Page 1

2013/2014

R E SO U R CE G U I D E THE SOUTHERN REGION OF ALABAMA

GREAT FOOD • GREAT PEOPLE • GREAT PLACES TO VISIT IN T HI S IS S UE

Her Blueberry Business Andalusia...Judged Alabama’s Top Small Town


it V is

A Proud Heritage - A Progressive Future

Judged Alabama’s Top Town Beautiful City Great Climate

Springdale

and Unsurpassed Quality of Life

Drugstore Mural

Win $1,000 Montly

Courthouse Mural

3Notch Museum

Robert Horry Park


THE SOUT HERN REGION OF ALABAMA P E R F E C T F O R A B AC K YA R D B R E A K - C AT I O N Not so long ago, we never would have thought that driving to places that are close to where we live would amount to much of a vacation. We felt that if it wasn’t several states or countries away to the beaches in the Carribean Islands or mountains in Montana or wine country in California, it just wasn’t a real break from the everyday grind. But now the cost of travel makes us think twice about jumping on an airplane to get to a destination. Airline ticket prices ar sky high and airline companies are charging for everything from baggage to peanuts. Driving is not much better with gas prices close to $4.00 per gallon. So, its time to take a different approach. We don’t have to give up the pleasure of a great vacation. We just have to cut back on the number of miles we travel. Here in the Southern Region of Alabama, we have something for everyone, making this a perfect place for a break-cation right outside your backyard. We have history, culture, beaches, mountains, caves, hiking, hunting, bird watching, festivals, museums, parks, rivers, lakes, wineries, historic homes, food, shopping, national forests and many other tourism assets for enjoyment and enlightenment.

A list of the Southern Region’s tourism assets includes: • Bartram Trail: Tuskegee National Forest • BPA Labor Day Fly-In (September- Moton Field) • Burial Site of Booker T. Washington • Burial Site of Dr. George Washington Carver • George Washington Carver Arts & Crafts Festival (May) • George Washington Carver Museum • Harris Barrett School • Robert Horry Park (Andalusia, AL) • Hillbilly Mall (Little Texas) • 150 Historic Homes (Union Springs, AL) • Lionel Richie Birthplace (Grammy Award Winner) • Little Texas Tabernacle and Campground • Moton Field Airport (Home of the Tuskegee Airmen) • Red Door Theatre (Union Springs, AL) • Miracle League Playground (Andalusia, AL) • Octagon House (Clayton, AL)

• Possum Day (May, Franklin, AL) • Shiloh Missionary Baptist Church (Notasulga, AL) • SuCaro Ridge (The Farm at Milstead, Horse Training) • Taska Recreation Area: Tuskegee National Forest • Tsinia Wildlife Viewing Area: Tuskegee National Forest • Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site (Tuskegee) • Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center • Tuskegee National Forest • Tuskegee University • Octagon House (Clayton, AL) • The Josephine (circa 1880, Union Springs, AL) • The Oaks (Booker T. Washington Family Home) • Whippoorwill Vineyards (Notasulga, AL) • Zora Neale Hurston birthplace (Notasulga, AL) • Tallassee NOW (Tallassee, AL) • 3Notch Museum (Andalusia, AL)

All of this can be had on ONE TANK OF GAS. Lets break-cation in our own backyard!

1


ALABAMA

Miles Robinson District 1

Andrew Thompson, Jr. District 3

Louis Maxwell

Robert “Mike” Berry District 4

Edward “Coach” Huffman District 2

A County Rich in History, Heritage and Hospitality 101 East Rosa Parks Avenue • Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 • 334-727-5120 • www.maconcounty-al.org Macon County Agencies Working Hard To Serve All Citizens: Macon County Sheriff’s Department • East Central Mental Health Services • Macon County Library • Macon County Water Authority • Macon County Health Department • Macon County Elderly Nutrition Program • Macon County Rural Transportation • Emergency Management Agency • Macon County Juvenile Services • Macon County Extension Service • Macon County Community Action • Macon County Emergency Medical Service • Retired Senior Volunteer Program • Senior Aid Services to the Elderly • County-Wide Water System • County-Wide Solid Waste System • Macon County Council For Retardation and Rehabilitation


Contents

R ES O U R C E G U I D E

2013/2014

THE SOUTHERN REGION OF ALABAMA

G R E AT F O O D • G R E AT P E O P L E • G R E AT P L A C E S T O V IS IT I N T H IS IS S UE

Her Blueberry Business Andalusia...Judged Alabama’s Top Small Town

The Cover

his edition of the Tourism Resource Guide T opened my eyes to the history, beauty, charm and hospitality throughout Southern Alabama

and boosted my appreciation for the great tourism assets in this region. As the publisher and chief photographer for this magazine, visiting the many destinations featured in these pages was welcome work. In every county I met many wonderful people and enjoyed many interesting experiences. Plus, a road trip is also a perfect excuse to sample the food in these Alabama locales. If you are driving from place to place you must at some time stop to eat. Hence the concept for the cover design, which represents both travel and food. Each square shows the various types of food you will find in many restaurants throughout Alabama especially the small mom and pop establishments where I like to eat. From ribs, collard greens, pulled pork, fried chicken to sweet potato pies, I love it all. Each place you stop to eat, also has lots of places to visit and enjoy such as, historic homes, museums, culture, beaches, wineries, parks, lakes, rivers, caves, hiking, national forests and many other tourism attractions. Also, several small towns now have farmer’s markets where you buy fresh fruits and vegetables if you are not a meat and potatoes person. So throw your bags in the car and use this issue of Tourism Resource Guide to go and explore Alabama.

Noah Anthony Hopkins Publisher

1

TOURISM ASSETS SOUTHERN REGION

5-6

ANDALUSIA...ALABAMA’S TOP TOWN

7

TALLASSEE CDC

9

KID’S ADVENTURE LABOR DAY FLY-IN

11-12

HER BLUEBERRY BUSINESS

15-16

THE LEGACY PARKS OF ALABAMA

17

HOME OF BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

23

COMMUNITY TOURISM NETWORK

24

MACON COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

PUBLISHER

Noah Anthony Hopkins

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Karin Grant Hopkins

GRAPHIC DESIGN/PHOTOGRAPHY Noah Anthony Hopkins

COMMUNITY TOURISM NETWORK, INC.

608 Dibble Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334.725.8496 tourismresource@gmail.com www.tourismresource.org

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

City of Andalusia Mayor Earl V. Johnson Andy Wiggins Andalusia Chamber of Commerce Tallassee CDC Dionne Y. Inman All Advertisers


Realty Property Management

Margaret Fraser Broker

IF YOU ARE MOVING INTO THE AREA, WE WOULD LOVE TO HELP YOU FIND THE PROPERTY YOU NEED

C A L L T O D AY ! For information on these properties or commercial properties or any other Sales or Rentals

608 Dibble Street Tuskegee, AL 36083 cloudrealtors.com mfraser@cloudrealtors.com

334.742.3306 ofc 334.444.1528 cell 334.727.9995 fax


“Today, the Andalusia City Hall houses city government and hosts meetings and special events. Our City Hall serves as a beacon to those interested in doing business in Andalusia. It is the cornerstone of an era of restoration and progress in Andalusia and Covington County.” (www.cityofandalusia.com)

Judged Alabama’s Top Small Town

I

f you live in Andalusia, you love your city. And the same qualities that have locals smitten are also impressive to outsiders. This is why Andalusia outranked every small town in the State of Alabama in a national survey. “Andalusia is special for several reasons,” says one of the city’s most vocal cheerleaders. Earl V. Johnson is a native of Andalusia, proud product of the Andalusia public school system and the current Mayor. He says geographical proximity is an advantage. “Andalusia is 90 miles from Montgomery, Dothan and Pensacola. It’s also close to Florida beaches.” But officials work hard at making Andalusia the first choice for local citizens especially for retail shopping. The city recently introduced a program called “ANDY BUCKS,” to encoura g e p e o p l e t o p a t r o n i z e downtown businesses. Shopping puts customers in line for a possible reward of $1,000 in “ANDY BUCKS.” The make-believe money can be redeemed for merchandise at any participating store. Pretty and progressive, Anadalusia works hard at preserving the best of small town living while also welcoming growth. The beautifully manicured square is pedestrianfriendly. Meandering may trigger an irresistible urge to venture inside the quaint and sometimes quirky

businesses that populate the downtown district. Walker’s, a specialty retail store with furniture and accessories for the home and office also sells gifts, jewelry, school and work related supplies. It rivals and even surpasses many big city stores with its down-home country warmth and common sense prices. Nearby is Brooks True Value Hardware, which stocks everything for do-it-yourself home improvement projects and also doubles as a toy emporium and children’s playroom. It is historically significant as well with five generations of ownership in the same family. The current proprietor, Emily Brooks Crowson sa y s , “ 1 91 3 wa s t h e y e a r m y great-great grandfather opened a hardware store in Andalusia.”

Downtown Andalusia

5


With an abundance of charming ambience, Andalusia also has many natural resources, including a spirit of cooperation that permeates the community. Mayor Johnson credits the Tourism and Relocation Committee for enterprising efforts related to events and activities. He also praises the Rotary Club for founding and consistently hosting the World Championship Domino Tournament annually since 1976. Plans are in the works to establish a Domino University in Andalusia to teach the skills to a new generation. Unemployment is lower than the national average and job growth is increasing. Andalusia reeled in a whale when Shaw Industries set up a manufacturing plant in this town, employing as many as 1,800 workers at peak times. While growth is a concern so is smart planning and infrastructure improvements. In 2013, Andalusia received an $8.6 million grant, the largest in the city’s history. The funds are for work on a heavily traveled street where many medical facilities are located. Children and education are also priorities. Hence, classrooms average 15.2 students per teacher. There are excellent parks and recreational programs including the Dream Park and the Miracle League Playground, both sensitive to physically challenged users and also great fun for able-bodied children.

Miracle League Playground

Moderately priced housing and a gentle Southern climate are bonuses. The cost of living is more than 15 per cent lower than the national average. “Snowbirds looking for a pretty town with mild winters, nestled in a pleasing, gently rolling countryside, should consider Alabama’s best kept secret… Andalusia,” said Charles Anderson who spent 50 years traveling, researching and exploring small towns throughout the country to compile a “best of the best” list. The Church Street Cultural Arts Centre is another asset. A former school building, it was renovated through a joint partnership involving the Andalusia Ballet Association and the City of Andalusia. Cultural Arts Centre

Another former school building was also given a new life. Constructed in 1914, it served as a school for 87 years. After it closed, the building deteriorated. In 2004 it was reborn as Andalusia City Hall. This commitment to preservation and restoration is a major source of civic pride.

ANDY BUCKS Launched in October 2013, public response can be measured by the tremendous number of tickets piled up in a storage bin at City Hall. Drawings are held the first Tuesday of each month during the Andalusia City Council meeting. The winning ticket number is published in the newspaper and on the city’s Web site. Locals and tourists are encouraged to support the ANDY BUCKS program. It starts with a trip to a participating business in Andalusia.

A couple weeks after the program's launch, Mayor Johnson showed off the growing pile of tickets. When customers visit participating stores, they can get half of a ticket. The other half comes to City Hall for monthly drawings.

Dream Park Alabama Governor Robert Bentley praised Andalusia when he visited the city in August 2013 and commended local stakeholders for their business development attitude and efforts. The governor threw out the first pitch at the Babe Ruth World Series Tournament, held for the third time in recent years in Andalusia. The city scores high marks with organizers, teams and parents. No wonder Andalusia evokes love and loyalty from its residents and admiration from observers. It’s ideal for quick turnaround visits if you live within driving distance. It hosts wholesome, family-friendly experiences. It has a naturally scenic topography and well-maintained public facilities, operations and systems. There are great public schools and access to hospital services at Andalusia Regional Hospital. Andalusia is business friendly and a superior location for companies that value innovative, proactive, can-do energy. Andalusia — come for a day, an event or a lifetime. See for yourself why Andalusia was judged Alabama’s Top Small Town. 6


TALLASSEE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

The Tallassee Community Development Corporation is an Alabama non-profit corporation. It has received approval from the IRS as a public charity. Its goals generally are to build the community and to improve the quality of life for Tallassee. Its interests extend beyond the City limits to the entire 12,000-member community. It works with other public-interest entities throughout the community in projects for community development. It works closely with the Chamber of Commerce, the Tallassee Redevelopment Authority, and the City's Planning Commission in planning and promoting the community. It has been assigned the task of working with the Riverwalk Extension project and the revitalization plans for the business districts. An innovative project sponsored by the Community Development Corporation is the Tailgate Partnering Project in which it works with other non-profit organizations and entities as fund-raisers, especially during the fall football season, selling Boston butts, brisket, ribs, camp stew, and sandwiches in the downtown business district on Saturdays. For more information, contact us at 334-252-0036.

Tallassee CDC’s Signature Events Tallassee NOW BBQ Cookoff Tallassee NOW Music

5K Color Run Tecumseh at Tuckabatchee

Vintage Guitars

Boston Butts for Tailgate Project

“Community Working Together” P.O. Box 780791 • Tallassee, AL 36078 • 334-252-0036

7


1 Booker T. Washington Blvd. Tuskegee, AL 36088 800.949.6161 334.727.3000 ph 334.727.5119 fax

www.tuskegeekelloggcenter.com

Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center at Tuskegee University Kellogg Hotel and Conference Center at Tuskegee University nestled amidst a national historic site. With centuries of distinct heritage, 17,000 square feet of flexible meeting space, a lavishly decorated grand ballroom, 287 seat amphitheater and 102 finely appointed guest rooms and suites, the stage is set for an unforgettable event. Ask about our special BRIDAL PACKAGE with complementary bridal suite when you book your rehearsal dinner, wedding and reception with us. So whether it’s a convention, business meeting, family reunion or a weekend getaway our accommodations are perfect.

For Reservations and Information Call 1-800-949-6161

Support and Help Preserve the Legacy of the Heroic TUSKEGEE AIRMEN

Proudly Display This Commemorative Plate On your vehicle! ORDER TODAY! See details at: www.friendsoftuskegeeairmennhs.com or Call: 251.494.8382 (Alabama residents only) Proceeds to support the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site and Museum A Tuskegee Airmen Front Tag Available Online For Non-residents of Alabama From the Website Store 8


BPA LABOR DAY FLY-IN

A

s the parachutists land with the giant American Flags waving in the wind and the National Anthem is being sung, children of all ages are mesmerized and know it’s the kickoff of the Annual Kids Adventure Labor Day Fly-in hosted each year by Black Pilots of America (BPA). This event, which is free and open to the public, is sponsored by the Golden Hawks of Tuskegee, a chapter of the Black Pilots of America (BPA) which is comprised of pilots or airplane owners who know firsthand the joys of flying. BPA members also feel an obligation to the pioneers who made their passion possible — the Tuskegee Airmen. The primary mission of BPA and the Golden Hawks is to introduce children and adults to the wonders of aviation. “Our goal is to get kids at a young age interested in not just flying or being a pilot but considering aviation as a whole as a future career choice” said John Hicks, Jr., President of the National Black Pilots of American and also President of the organization’s local chapter Golden Hawks of Tuskegee. Each year pilots fly in from all over the country to participate in a day of safety briefings by FAA, maintenance inspections and most of all flying children. There are many types of aircraft on static display at historic Moton Field including vintage and experimental planes.

This year there were seven airplanes that practically stayed airborne flying children. At the end of the day, 173 children had taken what may have been their first plane ride and an additional number of adults also took flight. The children received a certificate making them an honorary member of the Golden Hawks of Tuskegee. The Golden Hawks organization sends a special thanks to the National Park Service and the many men and women who gave time and energy to make this year’s fly-in an unforgettable experience. For more information call 334.727.6485 or e-mail dhawkjwh@aol.com. Supporting sponsors: The City of Tuskegee and Golden Eagle Aviation at Moton Field. 9


Deborah Hill Biggers Attorney at Law

*My

Practice:

• Civil Law • Criminal Law • Administrative Law • Domestic relations • Wills • Serious Bodily Injuries • Real Estate • Education Law Deborah Biggers is the legal counsel for the Macon County Alabama Board of Education and the Macon County Racing Commission of Macon County Alabama

113 East Rosa Parks Avenue Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334.727.0092 ofc 334.727.7117 fax deborah.biggers@gmail.com * No representation is made that the quality of legal services to be performed is greater than the quality of legal services performed by other lawyers.

Southern Christian Leadership Foundation, Inc. To promote and impact sustainable and healthy communities' through development and implementation of wellness, and educational initiatives. "Improving Today for a Better Tomorrow - Promise - Purpose - Progress!"

SCL Foundation philosophy is to value our families and teach them the tenants of QUANTUM RESPONSIBILITY.

Board of Directors and President

“Silence Is Sinful HIV/AIDS Initiative” is the current signature health program of the Foundation. We are currently in a partnership with the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Act Against AIDS leadership Initiative (AAALI) since 2009. This partnership enables us to extend our reach directly into the communities we serve daily with important and relevant life-saving information. We are also seeking to refocus national attention on the HIV crisis in the U.S. and remind our communities that HIV is still deadly, difficult and costly.

For more Information Please Contact Us 608 Dibble Street • Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334.725.8496 ext. 312 • 334.727.9995 fax media@sclfoundation.org www.sclfoundation.org

The International Southern Christian Leadership Foundation, Inc. (SCL Foundation, Inc.) was founded in 1966. The Foundation is a nonprofit 501c3 tax-exempt organization. We have been providing services to the community for over 45 years. We remain committed to building a diverse society where the differences of individuals are respected and embraced rather than merely tolerated.

10


Joise Gbadamosi’s Blueberry Patch also produced the muscadines grapes she is holding in her hands.

A

Above left: A customer picking blueberries — Above right: A sample of the beautiful blueberries harvested at Josie’s farm Bottom: A family shows their blueberry bounty

BLUEBERRY

lmost everybody in Tuskegee calls her the “Blueberry Lady” and for good reason. Josie Gbadamosi grows chemical free blueberries on two and a half acres of her 46-acre farm. While it is primarily a U-pick operation, she also sells pre-picked berries on site, to farmers markets and to local grocery stores. A few years ago Josie herself was picking blueberries as a visitor to this farm. She noticed it needed a little TLC and sought the owner to offer her help in cleaning it up. When she discovered the farm was for sale — she bought it. A California native and retired white-collar professional, Josie is now a manual laborer who loves the land, lifestyle and legacy she is preserving. The farm was developed in the 1980’s as a demonstration site under the direction of Dr. Booker Whatley, Horticulture professor at Tuskegee University and champion of the small farmer. He planned to demonstrate that 25 acres of land with crop diversity, good planning, good management and direct sale to customer could yield $100,000 in annual income. Josie honors the original vision and thinks of her efforts as a restorative project. True to Dr. Whatley’s marketing model, selling directly to

the customer through–U-pick is my primary marketing strategy. “ To ensure the customer has an enjoyable safe experience, emphasis is put on safety and safe handling practices. Rows and bushes are kept cleaned, I supply customers with plastic bag lined picking buckets, make sure they use hand sanitizers before going into the field, have on closed-in shoes, and have on insect repellant. I also encourage use of sun-screen and remind customers not to eat or place berries in their buckets from the ground.” Josie says, “I use the old fashioned bartering concept to help whip the blueberry patch into shape and to maintain it. I am so grateful to family, friends, Tuskegee University staff and students and other volunteers for the help they provide. Without them I would not have been able to make such progress. And of course, for the fruits of their labor they all received lots of blueberries as well as blueberry plants.” Josie is an agrarian entrepreneur. Her goal is to grow her farm into a profitable business and she is steadily moving in that direction. She is also an educator and advocate for healthy eating. She wants to accelerate the organic food movement by persuading people to incorporate more fresh fruits and vegetables into their food regimen. (Continued on next page)

11


(Her Blueberry Business Continued)

Union Springs, Alabama Showcase of

Southern History Architecture and Charm

In the 1900’s a famous Tuskegee agronomist revolutionized the agriculture industry with his brilliant approach to crop rotation and land use. That man — the grandfather of the Green Movement and the patron saint of sustainability is Dr. George Washington Carver who continues to inspire people around the world and throughout the United States. It’s nice to see evidence of his principles on the small farm in Tuskegee where Josie Gbadamosi produces her nutritious and tasty blueberries. The blueberry farm is open from June through July, Tuesday-Saturday and is located at County Road 81 (Shady Grove Road) in Tuskegee, Alabama. For more information), call 334-727-1991 or 334-7032603 or E-mail Josie at: jgbadamo8@hotmail.com and also connect on facebookat:https://www.facebook.com/josie.gbadamosi. Bottom right photo: Blueberries ready for picking

www.unionspringsalabama.com

334-738-TOUR

• Kitchen

• Painting

Before Bath #1

• Bathrooms • Floor Tiling What's Behind the Red Door?

A TASTE OF THE SOUTH 2014 Schedule Mama Won't Fly - Feb. 20 -23 Cotton Patch Gospel - April 24-27 Rubycat Lawson's Roadhouse Lounge - June 6 & 7 Promises - July 31-Aug. 3 Always..Patsy Cline - Dec. 4-7,12,13

• Repairs

• and More...

FOR A FREE ESTIMATE Call TODAY!

After Bath #1

334.220.5180 cell 334.725.1324 office 113 N. Rosa Parks Avenue Tuskegee, Alabama 36083

Seated dinners and B&B accommodations are available.

R ED DO O R TH EATRE Union Springs, Alabama 334-738-8687

Before #2

After #2

www.reddoortheatre.org

12


PNC’s Community Development Banking

PNC Helps You Manage Your Money

Robert Davis

102 W. Rosa Parks Avenue Tuskegee, AL 36083 334-727-1730

Managing your money is not always an easy thing to do, but it’s very important, and PNC can help.

Checking Accounts - The best way to manage your household funds, PNC offers a variety of checking account solutions:

> Free Checking – For people who want to keep things simple, an account with no minimum balance requirement and no monthly service charge. > Performance Checking – For people who can maintain an account balance and want more from their checking. Includes interest checking, free ATM usage and CD interest rate bonuses. > Foundation Checking – For people who are starting a banking relationship, or trying to re-establish one.

PNC Visa® Check Card – Safer than carrying cash and quicker than writing a check, a PNC Bank Visa Check Card lets you access your money at the ATM or make purchases that are deducted from your checking account. And, your enrolled card can earn Visa Rewards points, just by making qualified1 everyday purchases, that you can redeem for free gifts.

Online Bill Pay – No more checks, envelopes, or stamps. Online Bill

1 A qualified purchase is any signature-based purchase, Internet purchase, phone or mail-order purchase or automatic bill payment made with an enrolled Visa card. PIN-based purchases not eligible. PNC Bank, MEMBER FDIC.

CDB Flyer 1210-03

Pay eliminates the paperwork and saves an average two hours a month. You can click and pay with confidence as your information is protected by advanced PNC security technology. And, Online Bill Pay helps you pay your bills on time.

Savings – Most financial experts agree it’s good to keep some of

your savings in an FDIC-insured account, such as a savings or money market account. Bank accounts such as these are easy to access and offer predictable interest rates.


NG GR I T L U S N O C E E T U S K EG

OUP

Doing More With Less

We Have 20 Plus Years of Experience • • • •

INSTITUTIONAL EFFECTIVENESS ACCREDITATION PREPARATION BOARD TRAINING PROCESS MANAGEMENT

• • • •

ORGANIZATIONAL DEVELOPMENT ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION STAFFING TRAINING STRATEGIC PLANNING

WE USE LEAN THINKING TO INCREASE OUTPUT/OUTCOME WHILE LOWERING COSTS Benjamin Newhouse, PH.D, CPA

T

CG

Managing Director

608 Dibble Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 919.599.9669 bnewhouse711@gmail.com

Dinning

Local Art Gallery, Museum & Vintage Ice Cream Parlor/Sandwich Shoppe located in the 1880's Historic Josephine Hotel; all within sight of the Bird Dog Field Trial Statue of the World , Our Renovated Carnegie Library (1 of 2 left in use as Library), Red Door Theatre and the only Empire II Courthouse in Alabama.

Art Gallery

For More Information & Dirctions Contact Us At:

126 Prairie St. North Union Springs, Alabama 36089 334.703.0098 www.artatjosephine.co

Museum

14


Prepare to Be Inspired – The Legacy Parks of Alabama T

here is no mistaking the majestic hues of blue skies upon arrival to the great state of Alabama. The winding roads and picturesque pastures make the journey part of the adventure. Beneath the sky and just beyond the main roads, the National Park Service legacy parks and trails of Alabama remind us that there is tangible evidence that small steps cultivate big change. Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site, Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site and the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail are connected through intrinsic events that remain relevant today. By: Patricia A. Butts, NPS Public Information Officer The Oaks

Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site was established by the Secretary of the Interior on November 13, 1977. Tuskegee Institute invites visitors to observe innovation and sustainability though the remarkable contributions of Booker T. Washington and George Washington Carver. These pioneers did not believe in “cannot be done”. Tuskegee is rooted in the soil of Alabama’s history and culture. “The Oaks”, home of Booker T. Washington was designed by Robert R. Taylor and built with the bricks made in Tuskegee by its students. This private residence was the first in Macon County to have electricity and interior bathrooms. The George Washington Carver museum represents the scientist’s research in and promotion of alternative crops to cotton. Peanuts, soybeans and sweet potatoes proved a great source of nutritional value to farm families as well as products to improve their quality of life. Carver developed over 300 useful products from peanuts, including cosmetics, dyes, paints and plastics. Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site emphasizes the power of visioning. In May 1940, the first class of students completed Tuskegee Institute’s Civilian Pilot Training Program and received pilot’s licenses. On July 19, 1941, thirteen pilot candidates reported to Tuskegee Institute to begin their training regimen at Moton Air Field. Only five would successfully complete the training and ultimately be commissioned as the first Negro pilots in the Army Corps. More pilots were trained and eventually combined to form the 332nd Fighter Group. In addition, both men and women were trained as ground crew and staff to support the operation. This historical site was established on November 6, 1998 to inspire present and future generations to strive for excellence by understanding and appreciating the heroic legacy of the Tuskegee Airmen, through interpretation, and the preservation of cultural resources. 15


Prepare to Be Inspired The historical core consists of framed replicas of the Cadet House, an Army supply building, and the physical plant/engineer's office. Other standing structures include two airplane hangars, the Skyway Club, an auxiliary storage shed, the bath and locker house, and a warehouse/vehicle storage building. Hangar No.1, completed in 1941, was the center of operations. Hangar No. 2, completed in 1944 in response to expanding operations, was designed to include the control tower and parachute drying area. This space will offer contemporary exhibits that focus on the broader story of the Tuskegee Airmen. The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail completes the trilogy of transformational history. On August 6, 1965, President Lyndon Johnson signed, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which extended equal voting rights for African-Americans. The Trail was established by Congress in 1996, to commemorate the events, people, and route of the 1965 Voting Rights March in Alabama. The shortest National Historic Trail in the National Trails System, the 54-miles follows the historic voting rights march route by beginning at Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma, and crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge. On March 7, 1965, as non-violent marchers crossed Lowndes Interpretive Centers the bridge, they were tear- gassed, beaten, and their processional stopped by law enforcement officers. This display of violence, heaped upon non-violent protesters was captured by the news media and broadcasted worldwide. This event came to be known as "Bloody Sunday�. Outraged protesters from across the country joined the marchers for a subsequent five-day march that began in Selma on March 21, 1965, this time with state and federal law enforcement protection. Come trace the march toward freedom and connect with their stories at the Lowndes and Selma Interpretive Centers. The civil rights movement and the concept of nonviolent protest have changed the fabric of this nation. The Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail is preparing for its 50th Anniversary in 2015. History provides tools to aid us in writing our own story. Every individual has the ability to aspire to great works through service. Youth and volunteer programs are available at each site. Get involved, visit the National Park Service legacy parks of Alabama, Tuskegee Institute NHS, Tuskegee Airmen NHS and Selma to Montgomery NHT to learn more. Be the Change!

For information about interpretive events, youth or volunteer programs: Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site

1212 West Montgomery Road, Tuskegee Institute, AL 36088 334-727-3200 www.nps.gov/tuin

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

1616 Chappie James Avenue, Tuskegee, AL 36083 334-724-0922 www.nps.gov/tuai

Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail Lowndes Interpretive Center

7002 US Highway 80, P.O. Box 595, Hayneville, AL 36040 334-877-1984 www.nps.gov/semo

Selma Interpretive Center

2 Broad Street, Selma, AL 36701 334-872-0509 www.nps.gov/semo

16


The Oaks THE HOME OF BOOKER T. WASHINGTON

The Oaks

The Oaks was Washington's command center and Tuskegee Institute's social center. It was a place of employment and an on-the-job training site for students. African-American educators, businessmen, and farmers were entertained there. Faculty members often called on Sunday afternoons but Washington often "cloistered himself in his office on Sunday afternoons, while his wife Margaret was entertaining young faculty members i n t h e p a r l o r. " Tuskegee's 25th anniversary in 1906 brought prominent people to the home, including Secretary o f Wa r W i l l i a m Howard Taft, Harvard The Study president Charles W. Eliot, and philanthropist Andre Carnegie. The Oaks housed a reception for President Theodore Roosevelt and another for the wedding of Washington's daughter, Portia. The Parlor The Oaks was designed by Robert Taylor who was the first African American to graduate from MIT and is credited with organizing the Institute’s architecture department. Construction of the home began in 1899 with the family moving into the house in 1900. The Queen Anne-style home was the first home in Macon County to have indoor plumbing and electricity. Booker T. Washington was on vacation in Europe the year construction began. The frieze murals in the parlor, library and dining room depict highlights of this trip.

Booker T. Washington in his office at Tuskegee

Bricklaying, a practical, productive skill, was taught at the school. The bricks at the home were made by students who were also responsible for the construction of the building, with the assistance of faculty members. The Tuskegee brickyard produced enough bricks to sell the surplus to the community and provide the school with an income. Brick making began in 1883, but was not an instant success. Only after ruining many bricks did the novice brick makers finally master the craft. Tuskegee students used brick fired from clay dug on the Tuskegee farm to erect many of the school's buildings. The wood used for the construction, as well as the many Oak trees planted near the home, was the inspiration for its name. The Oaks sat on three acres of gardens, orchards, and pastures and provided tangible evidence of Washington’s success. After a grueling speaking tour, Washington was hospitalized in New York City. Desperately ill with what some now believe to be kidney failure and with a short time to live, he said, "I was born in the South, I have lived and labored in the South, and I expect to be buried in the South." He insisted on going home. On November 14, 1915, Booker T. Washington died at his home in beloved Tuskegee.

The National Park Service manages Tuskegee Institute National Historic Site which includes the George Washington Carver Museum and The Oaks, Booker T. Washington’s home. Tours of the Oaks start at the George Washington Carver Museum–check at the front desk for tour times or call 334-727-3200. c 2013 Community Tourism Network, Inc.

17


117 Westside Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334.727.1007 COFFEE • TEA • SMOOTHIES • SANDWICHES • GREAT SERVICE BEER • WINE • OTHER SPIRITS

18


Our Wide Variety of Wines Will Satisfy any Palate

The Winery

Family Owned & Operated Whippoorwill Vineyards

4282 County Road 31 Notasulga, AL 36866 Phone: 334-257-2711 whippoorwillvineyards@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/whippoorwill.vineyards Our hours of operation are: Thursday - Saturday: 10am - 6pm

Award Winners

Our Expansive and Well-Nutured Vineyards

2858 County Road 53 Tuskegee, AL 36083 800-288-4291 334-724-9800 ph. 334-724-9300 fax www.becksturf.com

Our Products:

Geo Zoysia Meyer Zoysia Emerald Zoysia Centipede Tifway 419 Bermuda Discovery Bermuda Celebration Bermudagrass

Members of:

Our Wines Are Now Sold in ABC Stores “Every vine was once a seed and every company was once an idea."

Services: To insure the highest quality turf, we harvest by order only. Orders should be made in advance. Orders can be from one pallet to multiple truck loads. Please call for both wholesale and retail pricing.

The Wildlife Group is a nursery strictly dedicated to wildlife and the enhancement of its natural, productive beauty. We grow trees that not only intensify the beauty of your surroundings, but also improve the productiveness of your land. Visit Our Nursery Site: www.wildlifegroup.com The Wildlife Group 2858 County Road 53 Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 1-800-221-9703

Southern Seed Certification Association • Alabama Turf Grass Research Association • Alabama Turf Grass Association • Lee County Home Builders Association • Auburn Chamber of Commerce

Quality and Service Since 1938

19


Corporate Office 50 Hurt Plaza Atlanta, GA 30303 Suite 520 (888) 600-6548 Toll Free (404) 890-5682 Office (888) 635-0263 Fax

One recycled can saves the same amount of energy needed to power a TV for four hours

Tuskegee Offic & Plant 401 Fonville St. Tuskegee, Al 36083. (Opening Late Fall 2013) Alabama Plant 199 County Road Macon County

Our Fleet

About 80% of what Americans throw away is recyclable, yet the recycling rate is around 33%. We provide all the proper tools to easily separate your paper, plastic, cans, glass, food waste, yard waste and spent cooking grease.

TUSKEGEE-MACON COUNTY COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION

We Are Building A Better Tomorrow...Today • Entrepreneurship Training • Small Business Incubator & Tech Center • Home Ownership & Housing Rehabilitation • Individual Development Account (United Way) • Participates in the Affordable Housing Program Set-aside • Sustainable Contruction Training

608 Dibble Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083

334-725-8496 www.tuskmaccdc.org 20


Community leaders, business professionals, and citizens of the Tuskegee Macon County Area helped shape the vision of The Tuskegee Area Chamber of Commerce. The vision statement suggests that by using respect and teamwork, the community members, residents, leaders, business owners and property owners will make Tuskegee a quality place to live, work, shop, and play. In order to direct and prioritize efforts, a mission statement has also evolved in the midst of reorganizing and revitalizing the City of Tuskegee. The mission is to provide local jobs, good quality schools and a desirable community to live in.

• Business to Business • Workforce Education • Small Business Programs • Tourism Promotions • Networking Opportunities and Events • Small Business Awards • Eggs and Issues

Post Office Box 831034 • Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 • 334.727.6619 ofc • 334.725.1801 fax info@tuskegeeareachamber.org • www.tuskegeeareachamber.org


125 Westside St. Tuskegee, AL 36083 334-727-3233 phone 678-886-9315 cell

tuskegeecomputers@att.net www.tuskegeecomputerrepair.com

Computer Upgrades Sales • Service • Repair Password-Virus Removal Troubleshooting PC Cleaning

LAPTOP REPAIRS DC CONVERTERS DESKTOP REPAIRS MOTHER BOARDS SCREENS REPLACED iPAD SCREEN REPAIRS APPLE (MAC) REPAIRS

NEW • USED • REFURBISHED COMPUTERS • NEW PC SETUP Call or See Mitch TODAY: 334-727-3233 ON THE SQUARE IN TUSKEGEE

Fred’s Garage Professional, Reliable & Friendly Service

We Service Domestic and Foreign Cars Fred Passow Owner/Head Mechanic

Call Us Today!

Donald Whitlow Professor Colins Mechanics on Duty

(334) 727-2138

2307 Old Columbus Road • Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 22


Community Tourism Network, Inc Call Us orVisit Our Site

TODAY!

334.725.8496 ofc • 205.567.6397 cell • tourismresource@gmail.com • www.tourismresource.org Whippoorwill Vineyard, Notasulga, AL

If You Like Hunting

History Shorter Mansion in Eufaula, AL

Edmund Pettus Bridge, Selma, AL

Heritage

George Washington Carver Museum, Tuskegee, AL

Hospitality

Let Us Discover and

Tuskegee Airmen Museum, Tuskegee, AL

Publish the

Tourism Assets of your town or city

TUSKEGEE TREATS! you the

THE SOUTHERN REGION OF ALABAMA

RESummer/Fall SOU R CE GU IDE 2011 MACON COUNTY & THE BLACK BELT REGION

you theare SW

are

S in mWEET POTyA TO

R ES OUWinter R C2012 E GU IDE

2013/2014

youare the

in myEET POTA TO

This Issue

Cele-

RE S OUR C E GU IDE

RESOURCE GUIDE

August 2010

and Unincorporated areas

brating The Year of

T NU in my PE A te r but

Macon County Music Art &

Franklin • Notasulga • Shorter G R EAT FO O D • GR E AT PEO PL E • G R EAT IPNLTAHCI SESWhat TO is V Ithe SI TBlack Belt Community Based Tourism Network (BBCBTN)?

Order Yours TODAY!

I S SU E

I N T HI S I S S UE

Her Blueberry Business Andalusia...Judged Alabama’s Top Small Town

History of Gees Bend and Its HiddenWhere Assets to

Worship In Macon County

Maco n Co un ty, A labama

Hi sto ry HeriMacon tag e County, Ho spiAlabama tal ity

“Tourism Development is Our Business” N e t wor k , I nc .

C ommunity

Tourism

608 Dibble Street Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334.725.8496 office 205.567.6397 cell tourismresource@gmail.com www.tourismresource.org

History

Heritage

Hospitality


Macon County Economic Development Authority Macon County, Alabama

Macon County: The New Diamond of the Interstate 85 Corridor Location...Locaion...Location Macon County, Alabama is the New Diamond of the Interstate Corridor. Boasting five exits directly on the interstate, Macon County is situated in the hottest industrial belt of the South, halfway between the new automotive plants of Kia and Hyundai. In a mere 15 minutes, travelers can enter Macon County from the Auburn/Opelika area or Montgomery. Air travel is made easy by way of our own Moton Field or with proximity to the Atlanta and Montgomery Jetports. Universities, national forest, historic sites, industrial land of Macon County, all located in the center of a 40 mile radius of over 700,000 people! OTHER ASSETS: Airport Access • Railroad Access • Interstate Access • Tuskegee University • Tuskegee Airmen’s Museum Tuskegee National Forest • George Washington Carver Museum • Historic Landmarks...and much more

BECK’S TURF FARM #2 OFF I-85 AT EXIT 22 WIRE ROAD 750 acrea, ready for large development and industry. Near Auburn and Tuskegee AL

BECK’S TURF FARM #5 is a...

GREENWOOD PLAZA RETAIL CENTER 1609 W. Montgomery Road Tuskegee, Alabama 36083 334-279-8646 • 334-202-8880

WASHINGTON PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER

SHORTER TECHNOLOGY PARK Large industrial and retail tracts abailable near Halla Climate Systems and VictoryLand. Minutes from Montgomery, AL

MOTON FIELD Moton Field, home of the Tuskegee Airmen Museum, boasts a 5,000 pllus foot runway, FBO, fuel and direct access to I-85

ETZIONI ESTATES RETAIL WITH WAREHOUSE 908 Martin Luther King, Hwy. 80 Tuskegee, Alabama 36083

I-85 CORRIDOR COMMERCE PARK AT TUSKEGEE Park ready for commerce at Moton Field on I-85 with full utilities 5 to 30 acre sites

DISCOVER MACON COUNTY, ALABAMA TODAY! WE ARE OPEN FOR BUSINESS

FOR MORE INFORMATION Visit Our Web Site: www.madeinmacon.com or Call Joe Turnham at 334.725.8496 or 334.444.2672 608 Dibble Street • Tuskegee, Alabama 36083


F

OR MORE THAN A CENTURY,

TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY

HAS IMPACTED SOCIETY IN NEARLY EVERY

INDUSTRY BENEFICIAL TO MANKIND.

WASHINGTON’S

VISION IN

1881

FROM BOOKER T.

TO TODAY’S EVIDENT

REALIZATION OF ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE,

TUSKEGEE

CONTINUES TO SOAR TO GREATER HEIGHTS, MAKING ITS MARK ON A GLOBAL COMMUNITY.

FOR INFORMATION

VISIT WWW.TUSKEGEE.EDU OR CALL

(800) 622-6531

Tuskegee University is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award doctoral, professional, master’s and bachelor’s degrees. Contact the Commission on Colleges at 1866 Southern Lane, Decatur, Georgia 30033-4097 or call 404-679-4500 for questions about the accreditation of Tuskegee University.


2013 - 2014 Southeast Region of Alabama Tourism Resource Guide  

The southern region of Alabama is a food lover's paradise. This edition of the Tourism Resource Guide celebrates the food and culture of so...

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you