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IT Consulting

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CommunityLink.com

TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 800-455-5600

production vp of production operations Amanda White managing editor Jay Nehrkorn copywriting Dana Hinders Amanda Knoles David Webb

lead design Josh Mueller website creation & support Josh Chandler director of media purchasing Diana Vaughn

4 6

photography Creative Photo Columbia Daily Tribune

business development director of business development George Prudhomme

business development manager Bonnie Ebers

director of outside sales Debbie Moss

customer service director Kathy Risley

regional director of publications Heidi Robson

ad design Mary Caldwell

account support Terri Ahner

human resources assistant Teresa Craig

publishing systems specialist Christopher Miller

executive leadership chairman and founder Craig Williams

ABOUT   This book is published by CommunityLink and distributed through the Columbia Chamber of Commerce. For advertising information or questions or comments about this book, contact CommunityLink at 800-4555600 or by e-mail at info@CommunityLink.com.

ABOUT THE CHAMBER

HOME SWEET C O MO COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE

BUSINESS 22 26 28

mailroom technician Melinda Bowlin

information technology

FAST FACTS IMPORTANT CONTACTS

REAL ESTATE

ad traffic Carol Smith

administrative support administrative support Kathy Hagene Carol Smith

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12 18

advertising ad research Mary Kopshever Mildred Walker

COLUMBIA PROFILE

COLUMBIA ON THE GROW OUR MAJOR EMPLOYERS THE DISTRICT

HEALTH CARE 32 34 36 38 40

BOONE HOSPITAL CENTER UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI HEALTH CARE HARRY S. TRUMAN MEMORIAL VETERANS’ HOSPITAL MISSOURI CANCER ASSOCIATES MORE OPTIONS FOR QUALITY CARE

EDUCATION 42 44 46 48

COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS MORE CHOICES FOR FAMILIES UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI: THERE’S ONLY ONE MIZZOU COLLEGE TOWN: HIGHER EDUCATION ABOUNDS

ARTS & CULTURE 51 52

VISUAL ARTS CURTAIN CALLS

RECREATION 53 54 FOR INFORMATION  Columbia Chamber of Commerce, 300 South Providence Road PO Box 1016 Columbia, MO 65205-1016 Phone: 573-874-1132 www.columbiamochamber.com

© 2014 Craig Williams Creative, Inc., 4742 Holts Prairie Road, Post Office Box 306, Pinckneyville, IL 62274-0306, 618-357-8653. All rights reserved. No portion of this book may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher.

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

58

PLAY LIKE YOU MEAN IT IN COLUMBIA CO LUMBIA PARKS & RECREATION: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE CELEBRATE LIFE COLUMBIA-STYLE

60

WORSHIP

61

PREFERRED BUSINESS LISTINGS

63

INDEX OF ADVERTISERS


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COLUMBIA PROFILE

SECTION TITLE

FAST FACTS AGE DISTRIBUTION (2010) Columbia Boone County 0-4 years..................................... 6,475 ........................... 10,155 5-9 years ..................................... 5,692 ............................. 9,513 10-14 years ................................. 5,130 ............................. 9,090 15-19 years ................................ 11,035 .......................... 14,681 20-24 years ................................ 21,656 .......................... 24,870 25-34 years ................................ 17,635 .......................... 24,715 35-44 years ................................ 11,370 .......................... 18,609 45-54 years ................................ 11,233 .......................... 19,824 55-59 years ................................. 5,039............................... 8,916 60-64 years ................................. 4,032 ............................. 7,197 65-74 years ................................. 4,565 ............................. 8,113 75-84 years ................................. 2,972 ............................. 4,666 >85 years .................................... 1,666 ............................. 2,293 Median age.................................... 26.8................................. 29.6 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

HOUSEHOLD INCOME (2010) Columbia Boone County Less than $10,000 .........................7,196 ........................... 8,240 $10,000-$14,999...........................3,260 ........................... 4,446 $15,000-$24,999...........................5,811 ........................... 8,168 $25,000-$34,999...........................5,318 ........................... 7,197 $35,000-$49,999...........................5,812 ........................... 9,247 $50,000-$74,999...........................7,023 ......................... 11,003 $75,000-$99,999...........................3,098 ........................... 6,099 $100,000-$149,999........................3,483 ........................... 6,246 $150,000-$199,999........................1,420 ........................... 1,961 $200,000 or more...........................1,140 ........................... 2,032 Median Household Income (2008-2012) Columbia: $43,084 Boone County: $47,786 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

POPULATION Columbia Boone County 2012................................... 113,225.................................168,535 2010................................... 108,500.................................162,642 Source: U.S. Census Bureau

EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT (Persons 25 years and older, 2008-2012) Columbia Boone County High School Grad or Higher................. 93.4%....................... 92.9% Bachelor’s Degree or Higher................ 54.1%....................... 47.3% Source: U.S. Census Bureau

CLIMATE Temperature, Monthly Averages (°F)

Average Precipitation (inches)

High Low January.................. 38............. 21 February................. 44............. 25 March.................... 55............. 34 April....................... 66............. 44 May....................... 75............. 54 June...................... 83............. 63 July........................ 88............. 67 August................... 87............. 65 September.............. 79............. 56 October.................. 67............. 45 November............... 54............. 35 December............... 41............. 24

January............... 1.92 February.............. 2.34 March................. 2.91 April.................... 4.49 May.................... 4.98 June................... 4.47 July..................... 4.37 August................ 4.36 September........... 3.87 October............... 3.31 November............ 3.25 December............ 2.44

Source: www.weather.com

POPULATION DENSITY Columbia Boone County Land area in square miles.................. 63.08......................685.41 Persons per square mile....................1,720.1...................... 237.3


COLUMBIA PROFILE

UNEMPLOYMENT (Columbia, MO Metropolitan Statistical Area)

Columbia MSA U.S. October 2008.............. 4.6%............. 6.5% October 2009.............. 6.6%............. 9.9% October 2010.............. 6.5%............. 9.5% October 2011.............. 5.5%............. 8.9% October 2012.............. 4.5%............. 7.9% October 2013.............. 4.4%............. 7.3% Source: U.S. Department of Labor via Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis

EMPLOYMENT BY SECTORS (2013) Agriculture......................................... 150 Mining.................................................. 43 Construction.................................... 3,111 Manufacturing................................. 3,824 Wholesale Trade.............................. 2,371 Retail Trade................................... 11,168 Transportation/Warehousing............. 1,377 Information...................................... 1,319 Finance & Insurance........................ 3,610 Real Estate & Rental/Leasing............ 1,131 Professional and Technical Services......................... 3,942 Management of Companies.............. 2,685 Administrative & Waste Services....... 3,544 Educational Services........................ 1,393 Health Care & Social Assistance....... 7,879 Arts, Entertainment and Recreation................................. 800 Accommodation and Food Services................................ 9,208 Other Services (exc. Public Admin) ....................... 2,107 Local Government............................ 6,505 State Government.......................... 16,977 Federal Government......................... 2,487

Partner with our seasoned team of professionals, to see you through all stages of your life, with individualized attention in the areas of:

• Retirement Strategies • Financial Planning

• Investments • Insurance Services

Source: Missouri Economic Research & Information Center

Let us be a “Beacon To Your Future” by contacting us TODAY!

COST OF LIVING INDEX (U.S. Average is 100) Composite............. 96.9 Grocery Items........ 89.6 Housing................. 89.5 Utilities............... 101.7

Transportation....... 93.6 Health Care......... 103.1 Miscellaneous...... 105.0

Source: Council for Community and Economic Research, 3Q2013

Securities & Investment Advisory Services offered through ING Financial Partners, MEMBER SIPC Fidelity Financial Servics, LLC is not a subsidiary of nor controlled by ING Financial Partners

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COLUMBIA PROFILE

IMPORTANT CONTACTS

CITY OF COLUMBIA, MO 701 E. BROADWAY P.O. BOX 6015 COLUMBIA, MO 65205 WWW.GOCOLUMBIAMO.COM

Emergency...................................................................................... 9-1-1 Non-Emergency Dispatch/Oper. Center......................................................573-442-6131 Airport............................................................................... 573-874-7508 Animal Control....................................................................573-449-1888 Activity Recreation Center...................................................573-874-7700 Birth & Death Records........................................................573-874-6396 Building Inspections & Site Development.............................................................573-874-7474 Bus Services......................................................................573-874-7282 Business License Office......................................................573-874-7378 TTY.................................................................................573-443-0633 City Clerk ..........................................................................573-874-7208 City Council........................................................................573-874-7222 City Hall Lobby...................................................................573-874-7111 City Manager......................................................................573-874-6338 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7215 Community Development....................................................573-874-7239 Convention & Visitors Bureau..............................................573-875-1231 Cultural Affairs...................................................................573-874-6386 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7488 Economic Development.......................................................573-442-8303 Emergency Management.....................................................573-874-7400 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7470 Environmental Health..........................................................573-874-7346 Finance............................................................................. 573-874-7111 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7625

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Fire Department..................................................................573-874-7391 Health and Human Services................................................573-874-7355 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7356 Human Resources...............................................................573-874-7235 TTY.................................................................................573-874-6395 Human Services / Rights Voice & TTY.....................................................................573-874-7488 Municipal Court..................................................................573-874-7230 Parks & Recreation.............................................................573-874-7460 Police Department..............................................................573-874-7404 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7652 Prosecutor..........................................................................573-874-7229 Public Communications.......................................................573-874-7316 or....................................................................................573-874-7240 Public Safety Joint Communications..............................................................573-874-7400 NON-emergency...............................................................573-442-6131 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7470 Public Works......................................................................573-874-7250 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7251 Recreation Hotline..............................................................573-874-7663 Sanitary Sewer Emergencies....................................................................573-445-9426 Street Maintenance.............................................................573-874-6289 Storm Water Problems........................................................573-874-7250 Office of Sustainability........................................................573-817-5025 Trash and Recycling............................................................573-874-6291


COLUMBIA PROFILE

Traffic and Parking Violations.........................................................................573-874-7230 Utility Account Information..................................................573-874-7380 TTY.................................................................................573-443-0633 Utility Payment System Automated.......................................................................573-874-7694 Utility Billing Office.............................................................573-874-7380 TTY.................................................................................573-443-0633 Volunteer Services..............................................................573-874-7499 Voter Registration (County)................................................. 573-886-4375 Water & Light.....................................................................573-874-7325 TTY.................................................................................573-874-7698 Water and Electric Emergencies - 24 hours...................................................573-875-2555 Engineering Services........................................................ 573-874 7532 Electric Distribution Office................................................573-874-6202 Water Distribution Office..................................................573-874-6229 Turn On & Off...................................................................573-874-7380

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COLUMBIA PROFILE

Photo by Creative Photo

BOONE COUNTY GOVERNMENT CENTER 801 EAST WALNUT COLUMBIA, MO 65201 WWW.SHOWMEBOONE.COM

UTILITIES (Other than City of Columbia) Alliance Water Resources, Inc. 573-874-8080 | www.alliancewater.com Ameren Missouri (Electric & Gas) 800-552-7583 | www.ameren.com Boone County Regional Sewer District 573-443-2774 Boone Electric Cooperative 573-449-4181 | www.booneelectric.coop Public Water Districts Consolidated Water Supply #1: 573-443-7494 Consolidated Water Supply #9: 573-474-9521

Assessor.................................. 573-886-4270 Auditor..................................... 573-886-4275 Circuit Clerk............................. 573-886-4000 Collector.................................. 573-886-4285 Commission............................. 573-886-4305 County Clerk............................ 573-886-4295 County Counselor.................... 573-886-4414 Court Administrator.................. 573-886-4060 GIS.......................................... 573-886-4325 Human Resources................... 573-886-4395 Information Technology............ 573-886-4315

CenturyLink 573-886-3380 | www.centurylink.com Charter Business 314-706-7572 | www.charterbusiness.com Lamm Tech 660-827-9944 | www.lammtech.com SOCKET 573-817-0000 | www.socket.net Towner Communications Systems 573-874-3339 | www.calltcs.com Mediacom (Cable TV) 573-489-1919 | mediacomcable.com

RECYCLING

TELECOMMUNICATIONS / INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

Advantage Metals Recycling 573-442-1771 | www.advantagerecycling.com

Bluebird Network, LLC 573-777-4200 | www.bluebirdnetwork.com

CoMo Recycling (electronics) 573-219-0012 | www.comorecycling.com

Boone Electric Satellite Systems, Inc. 573-876-1266 | www.booneelectric.com

Mid-Mo Recycling (electronics) 573-474-3997 | www.midmorecycling.com

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City of Columbia Public Works www.gocolumbiamo.com/PublicWorks

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Juvenile Justice Center............ 573-886-4450 Juvenile Office......................... 573-886-4200 Prosecuting Attorney................ 573-886-4100 Public Administrator................. 573-886-4190 Public Works............................ 573-886-8515 Purchasing.............................. 573-886-4392 Resource Management Planning............................... 573-886-4330 Inspections........................... 573-886-4480 Sheriff’s Department................ 573-875-1111 Treasurer................................. 573-886-4365

LIBRARY SYSTEM Columbia Public Library & Daniel Boone Regional Library 100 W. Broadway, Columbia 573-443-3161 | www.dbrl.org Southern Boone County Public Library 109 N. Main Street Ashland, MO 65010 573-657-7378 | www.dbrl.org Daniel Boone Regional Library Bookmobile & Outreach Department 800-324-4806 | www.dbrl.org/outreach

MEDIA Newspapers Columbia Business Times 573-499-1830 | www.columbiabusinesstimes.com Columbia Daily Tribune 573-815-1500 | www.columbiatribune.com The Columbia Missourian 573-882-5700 | www.columbiamissourian.com


COLUMBIA PROFILE

Radio Bott Radio Network (89.9 FM) 573-647-6285 | www.bottradionetwork.com

TRANSPORTATION Columbia Star Dinner Train 573-474-2223 | dinnertrain.com

Cumulus Broadcasting 573-449-4141 | www.cumulus.com/listen

MO-X/Doc & Norm Direct 573-256-1991 | moexpress.com/moxolrs

KBIA-FM 573.882.3431 | kbia.org

Taxi Terry’s 573-441-1414 | www.taxiterryscolumbia.com

KXEO & KWWR Radio (96 FM) 573-581-5500 | www.kwwr.com

Tiger Trolley Tours 573-567-0850 | www.tigertrolley.net

Zimmer Radio & Marketing Group 573-875-1099 | www.zimmercommunications.com

White Knight Limousine & Coach 573-814-5466 | www.gowhiteknight.com

Television Stations Columbia Access Television 573-442-4447 | columbiaaccess.tv KMOS-TV Missouri PBS 573-814-9208 | www.kmos.org KOMU 8 573-882-8888 | www.komu.com KRCG 573-443-1300 | www.connectmidmissouri.com The Networks of Mid-Missouri ABC17/FOX22/MeTV/MyZOUTV 573-449-0917 | www.abc17news.com

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ABOUT THE CHAMBER

CHAMBER PROGRAMS & SERVICES The Chamber hosts a variety of programs throughout the year to give our members the opportunity to build and solidify relationships. Four Quarterly Membership Breakfasts are held each year, as well as the annual Chamber Classic Golf Tournament, Economic Outlook Conference, Small Business Week, Business Showcase, Mayor’s Appreciation Breakfast, Agricultural Recognition Banquet, Legislative Reception, and Annual Meeting and Awards Banquet. Within the Chamber’s three divisions there are monthly luncheons, mixers, volunteer events and the ATHENA® International Awards Banquet. The Chamber strives to promote economic development in Columbia and Boone County. One way this is achieved is by working closely with Regional Economic Development, Inc. (REDI) to promote positive economic expansion in Columbia and Boone County while maintaining a high quality of life. In addition, the Chamber’s Centennial Investors Angel Investor Network was created to meet the early capital needs of university and private sector entrepreneurs. The organization assists with bringing to market exciting ideas generated in university labs and private businesses. The Columbia Chamber of Commerce takes their role of advocating for the business community seriously. The Chamber’s Government Affairs Committee provides leadership, information and advocacy that enhances the economic environment and represents the political interests of the Columbia business community. One of the key components of the Chamber’s advocacy efforts is to develop cooperative relationships with

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

SINCE 1905, THE COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE HAS BEEN A VOLUNTARY, MEMBERSUPPORTED ORGANIZATION OF BUSINESS, INDUSTRIAL AND PROFESSIONAL PEOPLE WHO ARE DEDICATED TO DEVELOPING, PROMOTING AND MAINTAINING A SOUND AND HEALTHY ECONOMIC CLIMATE FOR COLUMBIA.

organizations and to establish and nurture positive relationships with local, state and national elected officials. In addition, this Chamber has taken a proactive position of ensuring the business community is represented on the Columbia City Council by endorsing candidates they believe will best protect the free enterprise system. The endorsement process is member-driven and dependent on the business environment within the community and needs of the Chamber. Should the Council be grossly unsympathetic to reasonable business requests, endorsements can serve as a positive way to encourage change. The actual endorsement of a candidate is not arbitrarily decided. The endorsement of candidates is decided upon by a group referred to as the Endorsement Task Force and ultimately the Columbia Chamber of Commerce Board of Directors. The Chamber works to actively develop leaders within the community. The Leadership Columbia Program seeks to identify and nurture future leaders who can guide our community to achieve the economic vitality that will provide lasting benefit for the future. The Junior Leadership Columbia Program works to motivate high school students and develop their potential for community leadership. Print and digital communications provide exposure and keep members up-to-date on local businesses and Chamber and community activities. These publications include the weekly Chamber Activities Calendar, monthly Chamber Business Line Newsletter; the annual Chamber magazine, Columbia: Live. Learn. Work. Play. and Membership Directory; the annual State Legislative Agenda; and the Chamber’s website.


ABOUT THE CHAMBER

WHO IS THE CHAMBER?

CHAMBER DIVISIONS

What is our mission? AMBASSADORS

EMERGING ISSUES COMMITTEE

Purpose: To reinforce the Chamber’s mission in the hope of advancing economic development in Columbia and the surrounding trade area by “helping celebrate what’s important to you … Your Business!”

Purpose: To provide a forum to discuss critical issues that are affecting the business community.

EMERGING PROFESSIONALS IN COLUMBIA (EPIC)

GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

Purpose: To engage, develop and celebrate emerging leaders through professional growth opportunities and social interactions.

Purpose: To provide leadership, information and advocacy that enhances the economic environment and represents the political interests of the Columbia business community.

WOMEN’S NETWORK

MEMBERSHIP COMMITTEE

Purpose: To connect, empower and engage members through leadership development, educational opportunities and innovative outreach.

Purpose: To encourage, grow and educate our members on the importance of active involvement with Chamber activities. SMALL BUSINESS COMMITTEE

CHAMBER COMMITTEES AGRIBUSINESS & BIOSCIENCE COMMITTEE

Purpose: To support and stimulate growth of agribusiness and build awareness within the Chamber and surrounding community. BUDGET & FINANCE COMMITTEE

Purpose: To assure financial solvency of the Chamber.

Purpose: To promote the growth, profitability and recognition of business.

CHAMBER CLASSIC GOLF TOURNAMENT

Purpose: To provide a networking opportunity between business professionals, friends, clients or prospects while enjoying a day on the Links. The money raised goes to support and build Chamber programs. EDUCATION COMMITTEE

Purpose: To assist with and act as a liaison between the education and business communities.

What is our vision? Through persistent commitment to our mission, we see a future characterized by unprecedented achievements in both public policy and economic vitality. We are dedicated to nurturing and providing leadership to ensure community aspirations become realities.

What are our strategic issues?

TOTAL RESOURCE CAMPAIGN STEERING

• I ncrease employment opportunities in Columbia

Purpose: To plan and implement the Total Resource Campaign, the Chamber’s annual fund raising campaign.

• Improve the economic development opportunities for the Columbia area

TRANSPORTATION COMMITTEE

• B ecome more externally focused to increase Chamber impact

Purpose: To facilitate discussion and decision-making to improve highway and roadway transportation infrastructure in the Columbia area.

• Affect culture and attitudes • Identify and nurture future leaders

BUSINESS SHOWCASE COMMITTEE

Purpose: To provide a networking/ sales/marketing opportunity for business professionals.

The mission of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce is to lead our community, drive commerce in our region and advance community and regional collaborations, thereby enhancing the quality of where we live, learn, work and play.

CONTACT THE CHAMBER Columbia Chamber of Commerce 300 S. Providence Road P.O. Box 1016 Columbia, MO 65205

How is the Chamber funded? The Chamber is a nonprofit, 501(c)6 organization funded by membership dues, programming and events.

Phone: 573-874-1132 Fax: 573-443-3986

Who are our members?

Online: www.ColumbiaMOChamber.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/ COMOChamber Twitter: www.twitter.com/COMOChamber

Members include businesses of all sizes, from one-person shops to large corporations. Approximately 80% of the Columbia Chamber of Commerce membership is small businesses with fewer than 20 employees.

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REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

HOME SWEET COMO THE RESIDENTIAL REAL ESTATE MARKET IN COLUMBIA OFFERS VALUE, VARIETY AND GREAT NEIGHBORHOODS. BY DANA HINDERS

Photo by Creative Photo

M

oney magazine, MSN.com, Southern Living and Men’s Journal have all called Columbia one of the best places to live in the United States due to its state-of-the-art health care facilities, abundance of entertainment options, clean environment and low cost of living. U.S. News & World Report describes Columbia as “the quintessential college town.” With this in mind, it’s not surprising that Columbia’s real estate market fares well. “In general, the market in Columbia has been very strong this year,” said Alice Leeper of RE/MAX Boone Realty, the largest real estate brokerage serving the mid-Missouri area and the city’s oldest and largest family-owned real estate company.

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

GENERAL MARKET TRENDS RealEstate.com reports that the median listing price for a single-family home in Columbia in 2013 was $158,430. The Columbia Board of REALTORS® found that the median price for homes sold in Boone County was $162,500. Another positive sign suggesting a strong real estate market is that homes aren’t staying on the market for a significant period of time. For much of 2013, the market had a three- to six-month inventory of singlefamily homes in Boone County. This was the lowest inventory since 2008. Homes in Columbia sell fairly quickly, so interested buyers need to act fast. The Columbia Board of REALTORS® reports that single-family homes


R E A L E S TAT E

are listed for an average of 82 days. This is down from a high of 122 days on the market in 2011. Nationwide, the median time from listing to contract is 98 days.

SINGLE-FAMILY HOME TRENDS

POPULAR NEIGHBORHOODS

Home ownership rate, 2008-2012.....................48.4%

Real estate agents divide the city into quadrants to make it easier for buyers to search for homes. The north/south boundary for Columbia runs along Interstate 70. The east/ west boundary is Rangeline (north of I-70) and Providence (south of I-70.) Popular subdivisions on the north side of the city include Vanderveen, Forest Ridge, Auburn Hills, Parkade and Valley View Gardens. Notable southern subdivisions include Thornbrook, The Hamlet, Quail Creek, Stonecrest, Broadway Farms, Katy Lake Estates, Heritage Meadows and Old Hawthorne. The most popular zip code in Columbia is 65203. This area is west of Providence and south of I-70. It includes homes near the University of Missouri campus, Rock Bridge Memorial State Park and Eagle Bluffs Conservation Area.

SINGLE FAMILY HOME SALES IN BOONE COUNTY

NEW DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS New construction home sales for 2013 were up slightly, with several additional large scale development projects planned for 2014. St. Charles Road Development LLC is asking the city to annex 128 acres just west of Battle High for the Somerset Village subdivision. This proposed development would have more than 200 single-family home lots and about 16 acres each of commercial and office development. Homes in the subdivision would be priced in the upper $100,000 to lower $200,000 range. This development is seen as necessary for improving accessibility for Muriel Williams Battle High School as well a new elementary school,

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

2008 ..............................................................1,744 2009 ............................................................. 1,708 2010 .............................................................1,592 2011 .............................................................1,594 2012 .............................................................1,887 2013 (through October).....................................1,862

NEW CONSTRUCTION SINGLE FAMILY HOME SALES IN BOONE COUNTY 2008 .................................................................257 2009 .................................................................186 2010 .................................................................231 2011 .................................................................190 2012 .................................................................267 2013 (through October) .......................................236

scheduled to open in 2015, that will enroll 450 children. Parkside Estates subdivision is planned to back up to Rock Ridge Memorial Park. This subdivision will have 65 single-family homes and 11 duplexes. The land was formerly owned by Columbia Independent School. At the time of this writing, stakeholders in the project are addressing concerns about the impact of water runoff on the park and native wildlife. In September 2013, City Council members voted to limit the project to 15 percent impervious surface land instead of the 23 percent originally allowed by city ordinances, and the project’s developer will revise the proposal with the new limits approved before construction begins.

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES AVERAGE SOLD PRICE IN BOONE COUNTY 2008 ........................................................ $178,074 2009 ........................................................ $172,381 2010 ........................................................ $176,012 2011 ........................................................ $183,066 2012 ........................................................ $185,244 2013 (through October) .............................. $185,688

SINGLE FAMILY HOMES MEDIAN SOLD PRICE IN BOONE COUNTY 2008 ........................................................ $151,100 2009 ........................................................ $150,250 2010 ........................................................ $150,250 2011 ........................................................ $158,500 2012 ........................................................ $158,900 2013 (through October) .............................. $162,500

Source: Columbia Board of REALTORS®

U.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT DESCRIBES COLUMBIA AS “THE QUINTESSENTIAL COLLEGE TOWN.”

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R E A L E S TAT E

To meet the needs of lower-income residents, the Columbia Housing Authority (CHA) is in the midst of developing affordable hosing in the vicinity of Oak Towers, near the intersection of Garth Avenue and Sexton Road at Kinney Point and McQuitty Square. The northeast portion of the development will include 40 one-bedroom apartments, while the southwest portion will have up to six single-family homes for purchase and up to 19 rental homes.

RENTAL FACTS

Photo by Creative Photo

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The median monthly gross residential rent in the Columbia metro area is $774. Although this figure is slightly higher than the median monthly rent for Missouri as a whole, it’s well below the United States rental median of $884. Rental apartments tend to be most heavily concentrated near the University of Missouri campus to accommodate the city’s large student population. Campus View Apartments remains popular with local college students and is the closest apartment community to the campus. Amenities offered include a pool, hot tub, stand-up tanning bed, fitness center, basketball court, pool table, clubhouse with a flat-screen TV and shuttle


R E A L E S TAT E

service to MU. Both two- and four-bedroom apartments are available. Campus Lodge is also quite popular with the area’s student population. These fully furnished four-bedroom, four-bath apartments have an allinclusive rental rate. Cable, Internet, electricity and water are included. Students can provide their own roommate or use the company’s roommate matching service. Common areas include a 24-hour fitness center, 24-hour computer lab, basketball and sand volleyball courts, tanning beds, and a free DVD/Xbox library. RealEstate.com reports that Columbia’s percentage of rental properties is 30.92 percent above the national average. This is typical for most urban areas. However, the Columbia area’s rental vacancy rates are well below both the state and national averages. In 2012, Columbia had a 1.92 percent rental vacancy rate. The vacancy

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rate for Missouri was 6.74 percent, and the vacancy rate for the United States as a whole was 6.77 percent. Several new developments are being planned in order to provide additional rental housing options for the growing student population. The new developments will help ease the strain on the rental market, which should push vacancy rates back in line with state and national averages. In October 2013, it was announced that American Campus Communities is planning to build a 652-bed student housing development between Conley Avenue and Providence Road on the western edge of the University of Missouri campus. American Campus Communities already owns three rental properties in Columbia: Grindstone Canyon on Old 63, The Cottages of Columbia near the intersection of Nifong Boulevard and Bearfield Road, and Forest Village and Woodlake on South Providence Road. Another upcoming apartment complex will open in 2015 courtesy of Collegiate Housing Partners. Collegiate Housing Partners closed on a $25 million financing package for its West Campus student housing development in November 2013. They received city rezoning for a six-story student housing development on the south side of Conley Avenue, just west of Fifth Street.

721 W. Sexton Road Columbia, MO 65203

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


R E A L E S TAT E

COLUMBIA RENTAL RATES REAL GROSS MEDIAN RENT HISTORY FOR COLUMBIA 2007........................................................... $741 2008........................................................... $809 2009........................................................... $789 2010........................................................... $761 2011........................................................... $770 2012........................................................... $774

REAL GROSS MEDIAN RENT HISTORY FOR MISSOURI 2007........................................................... $676 2008........................................................... $718 2009........................................................... $710 2010........................................................... $715 2011........................................................... $720 2012........................................................... $706

REAL GROSS MEDIAN RENT HISTORY FOR THE UNITED STATES 2007........................................................... $862 2008........................................................... $901 2009........................................................... $895 2010........................................................... $896 2011........................................................... $886 2012........................................................... $884

Source: www.deptofnumbers.com

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COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE BY DANA HINDERS

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olumbia’s business community is thriving, thanks to its low cost of living, skilled workforce and high quality of life. Forbes recently ranked Columbia as one of the top 20 best small places for business and careers.

GENERAL MARKET TRENDS Whether buying property for an existing business or leasing space, Columbia has proven to be a desirable location. “Columbia is a great investment market,” Paul Land, owner of Plaza Commercial Realty, noted. “Our vacancy rates are in the 5 percent range, while national rates are in the double digits.” The median retail property sales price for the Columbia area was $74.37 in November 2013, an 11.2 percent increase from the previous year, while prices for industrial property were holding steady, with a median of $35.65 per square foot. For renters, the median rent for retail property was $12.02 per square foot, representing a 1.1 percent increase from the previous year. The median rent for industry space was $5.61 per square foot, which was a 6.6 percent increase over the previous year. “The commercial real estate outlook in Columbia for the next decade is solid,” said Jason Gavan, a commercial property specialist from House of Brokers Realty. “The primary local economic growth drivers of health care and technology utilize the human capital of our higher education institutions to continue expansion. The growing entrepreneurial community and the agriculture/biosciences graduates provide great possibility for Columbia to create a national and global imprint.”

DOWNTOWN DEVELOPMENTS New development in the downtown is limited by issues with electric and sewer capacity. The city has the infrastructure necessary to support current projects, but improvements will need to be made before additional projects can be approved. City Manager Mike Matthes, Mayor Bob McDavid

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and First Ward Councilman Fred Schmidt have all gone on record saying they support using tax increment financing (TIF) to obtain the funding necessary for electric and sewer system improvements. TIF freezes the property and sales taxes in a particular area and diverts the portion not needed by schools or local governments into a TIF fund to be used for the improvements. The alternative to TIF financing would be raising taxes or city service fees to help pay for the infrastructure upgrades required by new development proposals. Businesses looking for space in downtown Columbia do have several existing properties to choose from, however. Examples at the time of this writing include a freestanding office building for sale at 1001 E. Walnut, which is currently occupied by law offices and has three levels, each consisting of just over 3,000 square feet. There are also several newly renovated office spaces for lease at 910 East Broadway, conveniently located above a local eatery.

INDUSTRIAL PROPERTIES The Paris Road industrial corridor is a prime location for warehouses, factories and distribution centers. There are 81 acres for sale or ground lease at 5000 Paris Road, with an additional 25 acre site with rail available across Paris Road. The site offers excellent access to U.S. Highway 63 and Interstate 70. Neighboring facilities include PepsiCo, Honeywell, 3M and Schneider. This area also includes a freestanding warehouse/distribution center for sale at 6701 Stephens Station Road. This property contains eight docks and one overhead door, as well as small office space. There is the potential to add an outside storage/yard area, if desired. Those interested in commercial real estate and industrial properties can reference the Columbia Chamber of Commerce’s online membership directory to find Chamber member agents, and visit the REDI website at www.columbiaredi.com for a list of available properties.


BUSINESS

COLUMBIA ON THE GROW BY AMANDA KNOLES

Chamber members and REDI president Mike Brooks at the ribbon cutting for the Downtown Incubator.

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olumbia was named “Best Performing Small City” in the Milken Institute’s 2013 report on the best-performing cities in the United States. The Milken report noted that the city’s large student population drives consumer activity and that university-sponsored research creates opportunities for new business starts. With strong performance across all categories, the city’s growth in high-tech GDP and the number of hightech industries located in the city helped earn the No. 1 ranking. The report also stated that Columbia weathered the recession better than many other cities, with continuing job growth during tough economic times. High-tech industries continue to play a strong role in Columbia, with employment in that sector growing 60 percent over the last five years. Other growing economic sectors in Columbia include education, life sciences, human and animal health, information technology, and insurance. The city was also named a “Shining Example of Economic Development” by Southern Business and Development magazine. The recognition is based on job creation and wage growth. Veterans United was named the No. 1 job creator in Missouri and 29th in the nation, adding an impressive 1,300 employees since it began operations in 2002. IBM created over 800 wellpaying information technology jobs when it opened its Columbia location.

SUCCESS STORIES Toronto-based Bio Pharma Services (BPSI) has joined the city’s growing health care industry by opening a new 48-bed facility in Columbia. BPSI specializes in conducting Phase1/11A clinical trials for international pharmaceutical and biotech companies from the United States, Canada, Australia and Europe. The Phase 1 facility began operations in early 2014 at 300 Portland Street. The facility, located near the hospital and university facilities, spans 9,000 square feet and is expandable to 24,000 square feet and 140 beds. Nanova Biomaterials (NBI), an early-stage biotechnology company in Columbia, has embarked on a $1.5 million expansion project that is

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expected to create 50 new jobs in the next five years. NBI uses nanotechnology in the manufacture of orthopedic and dental products. The parent company, Nanova, Inc., was founded in 2007 by four researchers, two from the University of Missouri. By combining grants and venture capital funding, NBI was launched as a spinoff company in 2013 to focus on nanotechnology research and bring groundbreaking discoveries to the marketplace. The expansion is a good example of how Columbia benefits from the technology that is developed at the university and then commercialized in the community. “Mid Missouri has been a great place to launch a tech startup,” said Dr. Hao Li, president of NBI. “Missouri’s innovative economic toolkit has made the state a go-to place for startups, and being in close proximity to the University of Missouri, a prominent research institution, we’ve had access to extensive resources and world-class talent.” Savage River, Inc., manufacturer of Beyond Meat, is investing $2 million in its food production facility in Columbia and expects to add to its workforce over the next five years. Beyond Meat has collaborated with the University of Missouri for several years on plant protein research and development and launched its chicken-free strips, a soy-based meat alternative, nationally in 2013. CNN has ranked it one of the “Top 10 Startups to Watch.” “REDI is well aware of the importance of the University of Missouri in job generation and economic collaboration,” said Mike Brooks, president of REDI. “Beyond Meat demonstrates how intellectual property generated in a lab can be commercialized and, with support from the community, can result in a positive job announcement.”

BUSINESS RESOURCES CEO Magazine ranked Columbia second in the nation for small communities with CEOs under the age of 30. Innovative programs at the University of Missouri and assistance from resources like REDI are helping to fuel the


BUSINESS

entrepreneurial spirit among young professionals in the community. The University of Missouri Small Business and Technology Center assists entrepreneurs with pre-venture, startup and other business issues, including financial planning, marketing, technology, product development and commercialization. The center provides technical assistance to businesses and university faculty, assists with procuring research funds and winning government contracts, and provides counseling and seminars on a variety of topics from business plans to site selection and how to start a green business. Visit www.missouribusiness.net or call 573-884-8087. The Downtown Incubator, located at 500 East Walnut Street, offers affordable office space for entrepreneurs in a creative and collaborative environment. The mission of the incubator is to stimulate technology entrepreneurship while providing services and resources that include opportunity assessment and assistance with planning, financing, research and product development. By mentoring and physically accommodating startup businesses, the incubator provides an encouraging atmosphere that helps create more opportunities for local entrepreneurs to succeed. The Downtown Incubator is sponsored and managed through a partnership of REDI and the Small Business and Technology Development Center. For more information call 573-442-8303. The Life Science Business Incubator at Monsanto Place is owned by the University of Missouri and operated by the Missouri Innovation Center. Led by experienced business advisors, the program offers assistance with planning, financing, research and product development and helps incubate ventures through mentoring, office space and other resources. For more information call 573-884-0496 or visit muincubator.com. The Entrepreneurship Alliance (EA) is a program available to a select number of students at the University of Missouri-Columbia. Students pursuing the undergraduate minor in entrepreneurship engage in both classroom and practical exercises that go beyond what is typically taught in more structured business programs. Networking luncheons with local entrepreneurs, specialized internships and team-building activities are all designed to help students develop the confidence and passion they need to succeed with a business startup. For more information call 573-882-9026. A new Business Accelerator Program sponsored by REDI and the University of Missouri Small Business and Technology Center will provide counseling, funding and training for startups, beginning with a summer program in 2014. W W W. C O L U M B I A M O C H A M B E R . C O M

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Retail • Office • Industrial Leasing and Sales

Designed to promote entrepreneurship and build more companies from within the city, the program will accept applications from new entrepreneurs and members of the downtown business incubator, along with companies participating in REDI’s BOOM Bounce Competition. Museao (www.museao.com) and Innovatd (www.innovatd.com) are other helpful resources for startup companies. Museao offers a modern workspace that promotes creativity, collaboration and networking, while Innovatd provides mentoring, funding, marketing and management expertise to help entrepreneurs succeed.

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRIAL PARKS www.PlazaCommercialRealty.com

Columbia is home to three Missouri-certified business/industrial sites: • Ewing Industrial spans 325 acres and offers the convenience of multiple transmission lines, an electrical substation and gas peaking plant. The site offers electric and broadband and a water supply. • Sutter Industrial is a 110-acre tract located in northeast Columbia. The development-ready property offers road access and a full range of utility-supporting infrastructure, with geotechnical testing and environmental compliance inspections already completed. • Discovery Ridge Research Park is an ideal location for tenants who want to be near the intellectual and research resources of the University of Missouri.

INCENTIVES REDI offers assistance to businesses through a variety of incentive programs. Local opportunities include electric rate incentives for new loads available from two suppliers, no local earnings tax, sales-based local taxes, moderate property tax rates, and community development block grants, available outside the city limits for public infrastructure. State assistance includes industrial revenue bond financing for qualifying projects, reduced rate financing, low-interest loans and incentive financing for large development projects. Other items of interest to businesses include attractive tax credits, tax exemptions and assistance with training, recruiting and screening potential employees. For more information, visit REDI online at www.columbiaredi.com.

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BUSINESS

WHO’S REDI? BY AMANDA KNOLES

Organized in 1988 to promote economic expansion in Columbia and Boone County, Regional Economic Development, Inc. (REDI) is a nonprofit, membershipbased economic development organization that strives to provide increased economic opportunities in the region while maintaining a high quality of life. REDI has an impressive track record of attracting companies that will expand Columbia/Boone County’s economic base by providing great jobs and generating tax revenue. REDI recruited IBM and Linen King and worked with the University of Missouri on projects including Beyond Meat and Nanova. The economic agency is also committed to helping existing companies with retention and expansion support. Through programs like the Entrepreneurial Summit and #Boom Conference, REDI fosters entrepreneurship and promotes initiatives designed to help startup businesses thrive. REDI is the main point of contact for companies requesting information about Columbia and Boone County and serves as a liaison for local utilities, city government and the state to provide information on incentive programs, tax credits and other resources that can assist businesses relocating to Boone County. The agency also maintains a database of available sites and buildings and provides comprehensive area demographics and data from labor availability studies. Other services include organizing community tours and facilitating community

leader introductions when prospective companies visit the area. After companies relocate, REDI assists in groundbreaking and ribbon-cutting ceremonies and helps employers connect with employee recruiting and job training programs. Recently REDI released a video, Your Big Idea in Columbia, MO, which showcases the city as a premier startup location for entrepreneurs. During the five-minute video, successful entrepreneurs and Columbia business and university professionals provide testimonials describing the wide variety of support services available to startup businesses,

the encouraging environment entrepreneurs find in Columbia, and the high quality of the city’s well-educated workforce. Mike Brooks, president of REDI, emphasizes that Columbia is a very welcoming location for new businesses, particularly entrepreneurs. “We have a variety of resources to help new businesses with their startup plans and to help them succeed,” he noted. Brooks adds that the University of Missouri is a valuable partner for its programs designed to assist entrepreneurs.

AVAILABLE 24/7

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BUSINESS

OUR MAJOR EMPLOYERS Photo by Creative Photo

University of Missouri (MU)*.......................8,581 University Hospital & Clinics.......................4,438 Columbia Public Schools.............................2,141 Boone Hospital Center................................1,623 Harry S. Truman Veterans Hospital**...........1,374

Studio: 573.875.1841 Cell: 573.529.3366 2201 Old 63 S. | Columbia, MO 65201

email: carl@cpportraits.com | www.comophoto.com

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

City of Columbia.......................................1,354 Veterans United Home Loans.......................1,100 State Farm Insurance Companies.................1,168 Shelter Insurance Companies.......................1,078 MBS Textbook Exchange................................919 Hubbell Power Systems, Inc............................706 Columbia College.........................................686 Joe Machens Dealerships...............................653 State of Missouri (excludes MU)......................542 Kraft Foods Columbia....................................516 ABC Laboratories, Inc....................................398 Boone County Government............................376 MidwayUSA.................................................325 Boyce & Bynum Pathology Laboratories...........306 U.S. Postal Service........................................303 Schneider Electric: Square D..........................272


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Boone County National Bank........................... 264 ~ U.S. Department of Agriculture...................... 258 3M................................................................ 258 CenturyLink.................................................... 255 ~ Pepsico (Frito-Lay/Quaker Oats).................... 240 OTSCON....................................................... 240 Woodhaven................................................... 232 Missouri Employers Mutual Insurance................ 218 MFA, Inc........................................................ 203 Source: Unless noted, individual companies (Summer 2013) per REDI. ~ 2012 Figures *Includes MU, Extension and System employees ** Federal Office of Personnel ***Missouri Office of Personnel

Photo by Creative Photo

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BUSINESS

THE DISTRICT DOWNTOWN COLUMBIA IS A DESTINATION FOR SHOPPING, DINING, ATTRACTIONS, EVENTS AND HISTORIC CHARM. BY AMANDA KNOLES

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rojecting a unique fusion of urban energy and small-town friendliness, The District is a live/work/play environment that blends the city’s historic past with its innovative future. Situated near three colleges in the heart of Columbia’s central downtown, the 50-block area offers visitors and residents an exciting mix of shopping destinations, restaurants, attractions and historic architecture. Featuring over 110 unique shops, over 90 bars and restaurants, and easily accessible parking, The District has become a prime location for businesses and mixed-use development. Boasting a thriving arts district with galleries, artist studios, museums and performance venues, The District is a growing center for creative

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companies in fields like media, entertainment, architecture, advertising and film. More than 23,000 employees travel into the central city daily, and over 38,000 students and 13,000 faculty and staff are within walking distance of The District’s shops, restaurants and theaters. Downtown boasts an educated workforce, with 41 percent of those age 25 and older holding college degrees and 8 percent advanced degrees. The Downtown Community Improvement District (CID) is an independent organization dedicated to The District’s growth and success. A 15-member board of directors represents property owners, business owners and residents of The District. Through the efforts of the CID, downtown Columbia has been transformed into an environment that is clean, safe,


BUSINESS

attractive and fun to visit. Improvements over the last few years have included the installation of decorative streetlights and sidewalk amenities including benches, trash cans, newspaper corrals, street banners and helpful signage. Meanwhile, The District has also seen the completion of several projects that help fulfill the need for more residential and commercial space. A ribbon cutting and open house in December 2013 celebrated the announcement that all of the retail spaces at the 5th and Walnut garage have been completed and are 100 percent occupied. Young professionals, empty nesters and others who are drawn to the historic architecture, sidewalk cafés and street festivals are now taking up residence in new upscale lofts and apartments. The Short Street Garage added 423 parking spaces and combines commercial space on the ground level with modern apartments on the upper floors. The former Parker Furniture Store on North Tenth has also been converted to a mixed-use building, adding new residential/commercial space in the arts district. The Lofts at 308 Ninth has added several additional floors of one- and two-bedroom residences and expanded 20,000 square feet of ground floor commercial space that includes a campus-size Walmart offering groceries, toiletries and other essentials for the convenience of students and nearby residents. Visitors seeking a central location for their stay can now book a hotel room at the Broadway Hotel, completed in early 2014. Along with the recently renovated Tiger Hotel, the Broadway increases the availability of meeting space and expands the number of downtown hotel rooms to 177. Other completed projects include the restoration of the historic Missouri Theatre on Ninth Street and Phase II of Flat Branch Park and the MKT/KATY Trail, which includes walkways, sitting areas, an interactive water fountain, art

sculptures and the construction of a bridge over the creek, as well as routing of the MKT Trail under Locust and Elm streets. Bicyclists and hikers can now use the KATY Trail’s MKT Spur for easy access to shopping and dining in The District. Continued plans for the revitalization of the Avenue of the Columns area include multi-use developments and projects that help promote the arts, culture and historic importance of the area. Also under discussion are gateways that will provide a more welcoming entrance to neighborhoods in The District.

MORE THAN 23,000 EMPLOYEES TRAVEL INTO THE CENTRAL CITY DAILY, AND OVER 38,000 STUDENTS AND 13,000 FACULTY AND STAFF ARE WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF THE DISTRICT’S SHOPS, RESTAURANTS AND THEATERS. W W W. C O L U M B I A M O C H A M B E R . C O M

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BUSINESS

“Payroll Solutions That Make Sense” EXPERT•DEPENDABLE•PAYROLL

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The CID actively markets The District by hosting events, promoting festivals and increasing incentives for downtown development. The recently redesigned website (discoverthedistrict. com) offers visitors a chance to explore the various neighborhoods within the downtown area and view listings of shops, restaurants and services. The easy-to-navigate site includes links to hotels, attractions, parks and trails, and other points of interest as well as helpful maps that make it easy to find destinations within The District’s neighborhoods. The site provides links to available residential and commercial properties and offers helpful resources (including demographics, surveys and market profiles) for businesses interested in relocating downtown. A lengthy list of annual events has made The District an increasingly popular destination for locals and visitors. The True/False Film Festival, Ninth Street Summerfests, Living Windows Festival, Movies in the Park and Columbia Eve Fest are among the many popular events that bring people to the downtown area. In addition to a vibrant shopping, retail and restaurant scene, The District offers a mix of entertainment, featuring live performances each week in venues ranging from blues bars and coffee houses to renovated theaters and state-of-theart clubs. Attractions like the Missouri Theater


BUSINESS

Photo by Creative Photo

Center for the Arts, Blind Booth Home and the State Historical Society provide ongoing special events and exhibits that draw locals and visitors throughout the year. With Columbia ranked the best place in Missouri to open a restaurant, the best place in Missouri to start a business, and the best small city in the country for startups, it’s no wonder more companies are deciding The District is a smart place to be.

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HEALTH CARE

BOONE HOSPITAL CENTER STORMIN’ AGAINST CANCER: LEGENDARY BASKETBALL COACH JOINS BOONE HOSPITAL TO BUILD NEW CANCER CENTER BY BOONE HOSPITAL CENTER STAFF

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or many years, Boone Hospital Center has boasted a great team of physicians and caregivers in the fight against cancer. But recently, the hospital added two big recruits — Norm and Virginia Stewart. Boone Hospital and the Stewarts have collaborated to build the Stewart Cancer Center, which opened in 2014. “I was in tears when they asked us to join forces; it was just a huge honor,” Virginia said. Best known for a legendary career on Missouri’s sidelines, Norm was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1989. Since then, the Stewarts have been leaders in the fight against cancer. Norm helped found the Coaches vs. Cancer program, which has brought in close to $100 million for the American Cancer Society. “Now, we are looking forward to improving cancer care for the citizens of mid-Missouri,” Norm said. The first project to bear the Stewart Cancer Center name is a new $5.9 million inpatient treatment unit. The center opened in January and features 32 state-of-the-art private rooms. It is located on the sixth floor of Boone Hospital’s south tower. The new cancer rooms are beautiful and spacious, with an area for a family member to stay overnight with their loved one. It is a substantial upgrade from the hospital’s old 25-bed inpatient cancer unit. “Having a new floor for our cancer patients will do so much for them,” said Dr. Joe Muscato, Stewart Cancer Center medical director. “It will help reduce their anxiety and enable families to play a more active role in the care we provide.” The Stewart Cancer Center name extends well beyond the new unit. All of the hospital’s cancer-related services, from community outreach, to screening, to surgery and everything in between, all share the new moniker. Having one name across many disciplines reflects the teamwork at Boone Hospital between a diverse group of physicians and caregivers. “As a surgeon, that teamwork is critical to our success and the success of our patients,” said Dr. Walt Peters. “That’s why it’s so appropriate to have one name, one strong identity that we all share — the Virginia and Norman Stewart Cancer Center.” The name also covers the hospital’s impressive array of cancer-related technology, including 3D mammography, 4D ultrasound, da Vinci robotic surgery, 64-slice PET/CT and an advanced MRI suite. The Stewarts have a long relationship with Boone Hospital and the hospital’s physicians and caregivers. “For many years, Virginia and I have benefited from the services and care provided at Boone Hospital,” Norm said. “Having had the opportunity to travel, be in so many different areas and be under the care of a number of different physicians, we’re quite fortunate to have Boone Hospital Center. To me, it’s top flight.”

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In addition to lending their names to the cancer center, the Stewarts will work with Boone Hospital to help spread awareness. In particular, they are advocating for regular screenings, which can catch cancer early, when it’s treatable. “Screening doesn’t really take that long, and there’s such comfort in knowing that if you do have a polyp or if you do have a lump, if it’s diagnosed early, you can take care of it and go on with your life,” Virginia said. Today, Norm and Virginia can find a silver lining in Norm’s cancer battle. It’s helped them find an important new mission where they can make a difference in the health of their community. “It’s a moving experience, and we’re just happy to be part of it,” Norm said. “If having our names on the cancer center encourages people to be screened and do the procedure they should be doing, then all of this will be worth it.”


H E A LT H C A R E

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI HEALTH CARE BY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI HEALTH SYSTEMS STAFF

The Missouri Orthopaedic Institute is central Missouri’s largest freestanding orthopaedic hospital, as well as the region’s most comprehensive orthopaedic surger y center. The institute’s expert orthopaedic surgeons, nurses, rehabilitation staff and other health professionals offer patients a full range of care in a single location.

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s part of the state’s premier academic medical center, University of Missouri Health Care offers a full spectrum of care, ranging from primary care to highly specialized, multidisciplinary treatment for patients with the most severe illnesses and injuries. Patients from each of Missouri’s 114 counties are served by approximately 6,000 physicians, nurses and health care professionals at MU Health Care. The comprehensive health care network began when University Hospital opened in Columbia in 1956. Today, MU Health Care consists of University Hospital and Clinics, Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, Women’s and Children’s Hospital, the Missouri Orthopaedic Institute, and the Missouri Psychiatric Center, all based in Columbia, as well as 51 clinics. MU Health Care also includes a long-term acute care hospital, the Missouri Rehabilitation Center, in Mount Vernon. The system has a total of 545 beds. MU Health Care is a part of University of Missouri Health System, which also includes the MU School of Health Professions, the MU School of Medicine, the MU Sinclair School of Nursing and University Physicians practice plan. University Hospital and Clinics, a 346-bed acute care hospital, is home to the region’s only Level 1 trauma center, the Frank L. Mitchell Jr., M.D., Trauma Center. Patients make nearly 40,000 visits to University Hospital’s Emergency Department each year. The Missouri Psychiatric Center, located

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inside University Hospital, offers short-term, intensive inpatient treatment services for adults, adolescents and children. In March 2013, MU Health Care opened the doors to a $190 million addition to University Hospital. The eight-story patient care tower, located on the northeast side of University Hospital, includes a $50 million new home for Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, Missouri’s official state cancer center. Also included in the new 310,500-square-foot tower are 90 private patient rooms — all with “smart room” technology — six new operating rooms and shelled space for six more to be built in the future, a 7,000-square-foot inpatient pharmacy, 25 pre-procedure rooms and 18 post-procedure rooms, and the Ellis Fischel Gala and the Brown Family Healing Garden, which is a central focus of the building. MU Health Care’s 136-bed Women’s and Children’s Hospital provides the region’s most comprehensive health care services and technology to meet the special needs of women and children. More than 1,800 babies are delivered annually at the Family Birth Center. Children’s Hospital offers comprehensive, multidisciplinary care in more than 30 pediatric specialties. Inpatient and outpatient care at MU Health Care is provided by University Physicians. With more than 500 physicians trained in more than 75 specialties and subspecialties, University Physicians is the largest multi-specialty group practice in mid-Missouri. Outpatient care is provided at University Physicians clinics in Columbia, Fayette and Fulton. Visits to


H E A LT H C A R E

Ashish Nanda, M.D., a neurologist at University Hospital, reviews images of a skull. Nanda leads the hospital’s stroke program, along with Niranjan Singh, M.D.

Stephen Barnes, M.D., a trauma surgeon and chief of the Division of Acute Care Surgery, performs an abdominal surgery at University Hospital with Scott Matz, M.D., surgical resident physician (left), and Christopher Nelson, M.D., acute care surgeon (right).

Ian Montilla takes the temperature of pediatric oncologist Barbara Gruner, M.D., at a “Doctors-R-Us” event at MU Children’s Hospital. Events like these give patients a chance to express themselves through therapeutic play.

In March 2013, MU Health Care opened the doors to a $190 million addition to University Hospital. The eight-story patient care tower, located on the northeast side of University Hospital, includes a $50 million new home for Ellis Fischel Cancer Center, Missouri’s official state cancer center.

those clinics totaled 568,675 in fiscal year 2013. MU Health Care-affiliated organizations include Capital Region Medical Center in Jefferson City and Rusk Rehabilitation Center in Columbia. Through the Missouri Telehealth Network, which serves more than 60 Missouri counties, patients are able to stay in their own communities while being seen by a physician at a major medical center. As a safety-net provider, MU Health Care provides significant levels of care to low-income, uninsured and vulnerable populations. In fiscal year 2013, MU Health Care provided $31.6 million in charity and unreimbursed care. MU Health Care consistently receives recognition as a leader in providing high-quality, leading-edge health care services. In 2013, MU Health Care was ranked among the top hospitals in the state by U.S. News and

World Report, and six adult specialties were recognized as “high performing” — the most specialties recognized in central Missouri. In addition, MU Health Care was awarded HIMSS Analytics’ Stage 7 designation for advanced electronic medical records in outpatient clinics, a milestone in the transition from paper records to electronic records. And for the third consecutive year, MU Health Care was recognized in 2013 as one of the nation’s “Most Wired” health systems for its leading-edge health care information technology. For more information about the services at University of Missouri Health Care, please visit www.muhealth.org. You can also like us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/MUHealthCare or follow us on Twitter at www.twitter.com/MUHealth.

W W W. C O L U M B I A M O C H A M B E R . C O M

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HARRY S. TRUMAN

MEMORIAL VETERANS’ HOSPITAL BY HARRY S TRUMAN MEMORIAL VETERANS’ HOSPITAL STAFF

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he Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans’ Hospital is a general medical and surgical tertiary care teaching facility that is one of seven medical centers in the VA Heartland Network (VISN 15). In addition to outpatient clinics located at the facility, Truman VA currently operates eight community based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) located at: Fort Leonard Wood (Waynesville, MO) Jefferson City, MO Kirksville, MO Lake of the Ozarks (Osage Beach, MO) Marshfield, MO Mexico, MO Sedalia, MO Saint James, MO Truman VA provides a full continuum of care in both inpatient and outpatient settings and is

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committed to excellent patient care, education and research. The facility offers comprehensive care including primary care, medical and surgical specialties, behavioral health, rehabilitation medicine, and long-term care. Truman VA is a VA referral center for heart care services, including open heart surgery. Affiliated with the MU School of Medicine, the facility provides training opportunities for more than 900 medical students, resident physicians, nursing students and allied health students each year. The facility serves the health care needs of Veterans in 44 Missouri counties and one county in Illinois, with a Veteran population of approximately 97,000. With the exception of Boone County, the area is considered rural. The facility operates 123 beds (medical, surgical, acute psychiatry, long-term care and transitional residence). In FY 2013, Truman VA provided care for 35,000+ Veterans and

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

exceeded 404,000 outpatient visits. Staff members work with and support referring facilities and practitioners while taking care of the patient care demands from local area Veterans. In FY 2013, the facility performed 203 open-heart procedures. Two replacement cardiac catheterization laboratories have significantly enhanced the capabilities in this clinical area. A major construction project to replace/ renovate the facility’s operating room suite was approved in FY 2007, with the construction award made in June 2009. This project added approximately 25,000 square feet of new space and renovated 14,000 square feet of existing space for a new operatory suite with appropriate utilities and support space. The first of three phases was completed in May 2012, when the first surgical cases in the new OR suites were performed. The project was completed in November 2013. This completion date was delayed because


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an additional fully equipped, hybrid operating suite dedicated for endovascular procedures was approved in FY 2011. In 2013, the facility’s EEO Committee was the recipient of the VA secretary’s Third Annual Diversity & Inclusion Award after the EEO Program received the 2012 Columbia Values Diversity organization/group award at the 19th Annual Columbia Values Diversity Celebration. Truman VA was a recipient of the VA secretary’s 2012 Robert W. Carey Performance Excellence Awards as one of three Performance Excellence Winners. The Patient Safety Program received a Missouri Excellence in Safe Care Award from the Missouri Center for Patient Safety in the operations category in April 2012. The facility received a “Flag of Freedom” award in 2012 from the governor of Missouri for ongoing support and effort in hiring Veterans and members of the National Guard and Reserves. There are several core areas of work done by research investigators at Truman VA, ranging from cardiovascular medicine to radiopharmaceutical sciences. VA research investigators work in conjunction with numerous MU medical school departments as well as the School of Veterinary Medicine and the Research Nuclear Reactor.

Photo by Creative Photo

FREE testing referrals

care facilitation housing assistance

The mission of Rain-Central Missouri, Inc. is to provide comprehensive STD, HIV and Hepatitis education, early detection and care coordination for at-risk individuals, families and communities. Office Hours: 9am -12pm • 1 -4 pm Mon-Fri Testing Schedule: Call or check availability online

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H E A LT H C A R E

MISSOURI CANCER ASSOCIATES

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issouri Cancer Associates is a full-service medical and radiation oncology and hematology practice made up of 16 physicians. Started in Columbia over 25 years ago, MCA has grown and matured, now having practice locations in Kirksville and Columbia. Through stateof-the-art medical technology, highly experienced

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physicians and quality patient care, Missouri Cancer Associates has become the Premier Cancer Treatment Center in Mid-Missouri. At Missouri Cancer Associates, we are united in healing with The US Oncology Network. The US Oncology Network unites one of the nation’s largest community-based cancer treatment and

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

research networks to expand patient access to high-quality care and advance the science of cancer care. As a member of The US Oncology Network, our physicians and clinicians are united with more than 1,000 physicians and 10,000 cancer professionals from across the country.


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THROUGH STATE-OF-THE-ART MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY, HIGHLY EXPERIENCED PHYSICIANS AND QUALITY PATIENT CARE, MISSOURI CANCER ASSOCIATES HAS BECOME THE PREMIER CANCER TREATMENT CENTER IN MID-MISSOURI. As a patient or caregiver, you benefit from likeminded physicians who are united through The Network around a common vision of expanding patient access to high-quality, integrated cancer care in communities throughout the nation. Leveraging health care information technology, shared best practices, refined evidence-based medicine guidelines and quality measurements, physicians affiliated with The US Oncology Network are committed to advancing the quality, safety and science of cancer care to improve patient outcomes. The US Oncology Network is supported by McKesson Specialty Health, a division of McKesson Corporation focused on empowering a vibrant and sustainable community patient care delivery system to advance the science, technology and quality of care.

FIND OUT MORE: Contact MCA or go online to learn more: Missouri Cancer Associates 1705 E Broadway #100 Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 874-7800

missouricancer.com

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H E A LT H C A R E

MORE OPTIONS FOR QUALITY CARE COLUMBIA’S HEALTH CARE COMMUNITY FEATURES PROVIDERS WITH A WIDE VARIETY OF SPECIALTIES REPRESENTING A BROAD SPECTRUM OF SERVICES.

CLINICS AND SPECIALISTS

Nichols Mohs & Skin Surgery 303 N. Keene Street, Suite 201, Columbia 573-876-1000 • www.nicholssurgery.com

Peak Performance Physical Therapy 3301 Berrywood Drive, Suite 204, Columbia 573-449-8771 • www.peakperformpt.com

Columbia Allergy and Asthma Specialists 1601 E. Broadway, Suite 250, Columbia 573-777-4700 • breatheeasyandlivefree.com

Providence Urgent Care 202 E. Nifong Boulevard, Columbia 573-874-6824 www.providenceurgentcare.com

RecoverFast, LLC 2201 Chapel Plaza Court, Suite 101, Columbia 573-442-8292 • recoverfast.net

Columbia Facial Plastic Surgery 812 N. Keene Street, Columbia 573-882-8333 • face.missouri.edu

Urology Associates of Central Missouri 105 N. Keene Street, Suite 201, Columbia 573-499-4990 • www.mo-urology.com

Columbia Family Medical Group 303 Keene Street, Suite 301, Columbia 573-449-0808 • columbiafmg.com

WOMEN’S HEALTH

Advanced Radiology of Columbia 311 N. Keene Street, Columbia 573-442-1788 • www.aradiology.com

Cynergy Health 1100 Club Village Drive, Suite 102, Columbia 573-447-4400 • www.mycynergyhealth.com Family Health & Dental Centers 1001 W. Worley Street, Columbia 573-886-6713 • www.fhcmo.org Mid-Missouri Reproductive Medicine & Surgery 1506 E. Broadway, Suite 220, Columbia 573-443-4511 • www.missourifertility.com Midwest Sinus-Allergy Specialists 3401 Berrywood Drive, Suite 201, Columbia 573-815-0662 • www.missourisinusallergy.com Missouri Vein Care 4004 Peach Court, Suite E, Columbia 573-449-2273 • www.missouriveincare.com

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MU Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Women’s Health 500 N. Keene Street, Suite 405, Columbia 573-817-3256

Select Physical Therapy 200 N. Keene Street, Suite 102, Columbia 573-874-0001 www.selectphysicaltherapy.com

HOME HEALTH AND HOSPICE CARE Boone Hospital Home Care & Hospice 601 Business Loop 70 W, Suite 260, Columbia 573-875-0555 • www.boone.org

Women’s Health Associates 1601 E. Broadway, Suite 100, Columbia 573-443-8796 • www.wha-inc.com

Hospice Compassus 3050 I 70 Drive SE, Suite 100, Columbia 573-443-8360 • www.hospicecompassus.com

Women’s Wellness Center Broadway Medical Plaza 4 1705 E. Broadway, Suite 300 573-449-9355 ext. 300 www.womenswellnessnow.com

Oxford HealthCare 1400 Heriford Road, Suite 104, Columbia 417-883-7500 • www.oxfordhealthcare.net

PHYSICAL THERAPY Alternative Community Training (ACT) 2200 Burlington Street, Columbia 573-474-9446 • www.actservices.org

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Preferred Hospice of Missouri Central 1900 N. Providence Road, Suite 311, Columbia 573-499-4540 • www.preferredhospice.com


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RETIREMENT AND NURSING HOMES Bluff Creek Terrace Assisted Living 3104 Bluff Creek Drive, Columbia 573-815-9111 • www.americareusa.net The Bluffs 3105 Bluff Creek Drive, Columbia 573-442-6060 • www.thebluffscolumbia.org Boone Landing Retirement 109 N. Keene Street, Columbia 573-443-2007 • www.holidaytouch.com Candlelight Lodge 1406 Business Loop 70 W, Columbia 573-449-5287

Colony Pointe 1510 Chapel Hill Road, Columbia 573-234-1193 • www.americareusa.net Columbia HealthCare Center 1801 Towne Drive, Columbia 573-474-6111 www.columbiahealthcarecenter.com

PROVIDING PRIMARY MEDICAL, DENTAL AND MENTAL HEALTH CARE

Lutheran Senior Services Lenoir Woods 3710 Lenoir Street, Columbia 573-876-5800 • lssliving.org Terrace Retirement Community 1408 Business Loop 70 W, Columbia 573-875-2538 • terraceretirement.com

A member agency of the Heart of Missouri United Way.

1001 W. Worley

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EDUCATION

COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS BY COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS STAFF

Columbia’s newest school Muriel Williams Battle High School opened in 2013. The school, which took more than three years to construct, is Columbia’s third comprehensive high school.”

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olumbia Public Schools is the ninth-largest district in the state. It includes 19 elementary schools, six middle schools, four high schools and the Columbia Area Career Center, as well as an early childhood program with an enrollment of 17,905 students. The Columbia School District is Accredited with Distinction, for the ninth year in a row, by the Missouri Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, citing such educational advantages as:

• Comprehensive curriculum and services at all grade levels, including preschool and adult • Exceptional programs for at-risk students and students with disabilities • Extensive depth and breadth in junior high and high school course offerings • Award-winning career education programs designed for all students • Successful community partnerships and volunteer programs

Reaching out to Single Moms with unconditional love and acceptance through small groups, mentors and special events.

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

• Significant emphasis on staff development and school improvement efforts Columbia’s students excel in the classroom and in their post-secondary education careers. Eighty to 90 percent of Columbia students extend their education beyond high school. More than 30 percent of Columbia graduates earn the College Preparatory Studies Certificate, and more than 75 percent attend a college or university. The district’s teachers represent the primary reason Columbia’s schools and students are so successful. • The average Columbia teacher holds a master’s degree, has 15 years of professional experience, and stays in the district a good many years. • Approximately 33 percent of Missouri’s National Board Certified Teachers are employed in the Columbia School District. The community understands the importance of maintaining a high-quality educational program. Most recently, bond issues were passed in 1994, 1996, 1998, 2000, 2002, 2004, 2007, 2010 and 2012. A tax levy increase received voter approval in 1999, 2003 and 2012. The district’s focus, from preschool to adult career education, is excellence.


COLUMBIA PUBLIC SCHOOLS 1818 West Worley Columbia, Missouri 65203 573-214-3400 www.columbia.k12.mo.us

HBI

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Huebert Builders, Inc.

3407 Berrywood Dr. Suite 201 Columbia, MO 65201 hbi@huebertbuilders.com 573.449.4996

Accolades • Nationally ranked high schools by Newsweek magazine • Schools recognized by the state as being among the Highest Performing Schools on the MAP assessment • Nationally recognized by SchoolMatch with the “What Parents Want” award • ACT and SAT scores exceed state and national averages • Of the students taking advanced placement courses, 82 percent earn college credit • Nationally recognized teachers and students

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MORE CHOICES FOR FAMILIES

COLUMBIA INDEPENDENT SCHOOL cislions.org • 573-777-9257

Kirsten Craver has lived the majority of her life in Columbia. She attended public high school here, completed her post-secondary education at Mizzou, and after receiving her juris doctor degree in Virginia, moved back to The Show-Me State to practice law. After settling in Mid-Missouri with her husband and now three children, the family started looking at school options when two respected family friends transferred their children to Columbia Independent School (CIS). “I believed that you should just get through primary and secondary schools with the best grades possible in order to lead you to the ‘real’ education you would receive at the college and graduate school levels,” said Craver. “So, essentially my ‘philosophy’ translated to: the earlier the grade level, the less important it was to your overall education.” The Cravers visited CIS, and that was when Kirsten’s ‘philosophy’ on education began to change. “Just walking through the door and experiencing the environment sold us. For the first time, I encountered a place where they were teaching kids to love learning.” From small class sizes with dedicated, high-quality teachers, to a focus on individualized learning of the rich curriculum, to highlighting the importance of a JK-12 global perspective — all of this is part of everyday life at CIS. “CIS offers a foundation for learning that is equally as important on your first day of kindergarten as it is on the day you graduate from high school,”

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Craver explained. “At CIS, a child is free to be him or herself every single day. The student body is diverse, and there is an appreciation for the different perspectives each family brings to the school community. “Obviously, I am now a CIS parent and believe in the importance of strong primary and secondary education, so a definite shift in philosophy took place somewhere along the way.”

TOLTON CATHOLIC HIGH SCHOOL www.toltoncatholic.org | 573-445-7700

Fr. Tolton Catholic is committed to providing students with a challenging college-preparatory curriculum to ensure their success in higher education. A strong core curriculum, based on classical course sequences, is delivered to all students with options at the Academic, Honors and AP levels. Upon graduation, students will be faced with unique 21st century challenges, and the school’s mission is to ensure that they are well prepared to meet those challenges. A 1-to-1 laptop program enables students and teachers to integrate technology throughout the curriculum, preparing them for the education and workplaces they will encounter after graduation. Equipped with a strong moral compass, guided by their values, educated in both mind and spirit, graduates will not only meet the challenges of the 21st century, they will lead the way and “blaze a trail”! The real strength of Fr. Tolton Catholic High School is its faith-based mission. The entire school community is driven to empower stu­dents to


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become Christian leaders and citizens; to enable them to achieve spiritual, physical and academic excellence; and to encourage them to develop personal integrity and responsibil­ity. From the academic classrooms to athletic competitions and Christian service programs, students have the opportunity to strive for academic excellence in an atmosphere of love, discipline and honor.

CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP SCHOOL www.cfsknights.org | 573-445-8565

For more than 30 years, Christian Fellowship School has been partnering with families in the Columbia area to provide an academically challenging and Christ-centered education for students in PK-12th grade. CFS graduates are now serving in Columbia and other communities as nurses, lawyers, research scientists, university professors, small business owners and engineers. Several are also serving our country in the military. CFS is now looking forward to the next 30 years. With more families than ever seeking to enroll their children at CFS, the school desires to continue growing along with the community. Facts you may not know about CFS: • Current enrollment is 305 students in PK-12th grades, representing more than 185 families. • Sixteen percent of students are minorities, and 25 percent of students receive need-based tuition assistance. • CFS is accredited through the International Christian Academy Accreditation Association and the North Central Association. • Students come from more than 43 different congregations in the Columbia area. • CFS graduates have attended more than 66 different colleges and universities in 24 states, and 17 percent of them have qualified for Bright Flight Scholarships in Missouri. • The average ACT score over the past five graduating classes is 26, compared to the state average of 21.1. • CFS is a member of the Missouri Christian School Athletic Association and has competitive sports in soccer, volleyball, basketball, cheerleading, track and baseball. • AP courses are offered in biology and physics, and dual-credit classes are offered in college algebra, analytical trigonometry, statistics and calculus.

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E D U C AT I O N

UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI:

THERE’S ONLY ONE MIZZOU BY UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI STAFF

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he University of Missouri was founded in 1839 in Columbia as the first public university west of the Mississippi River. Today, with a record enrollment of more than 34,000 students, 13,000 full-time employees and 270,000 alumni worldwide, Missouri’s flagship university is a $2.1 billion enterprise and an important investment for the state and nation. Many states fund separate research and landgrant universities, but Missouri combines those roles at Mizzou. MU is both a land-grant university with a statewide mission of service to citizens and Missouri’s largest public research university. MU is one of only 34 public U.S. universities, and one of only two Missouri institutions, to be selected for membership in the Association of American Universities (AAU). Members award more than half of all U.S. doctoral degrees, with 55 percent of those in science and engineering. They are on the leading edge of innovation and

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scholarship, making important contributions to the nation’s economy, security and well-being. MU students represent every Missouri county, all 50 states and 120 countries. For more than a decade, the university has welcomed recordbreaking numbers of students, including large increases in high-ability, low-income and outof-state students. A favorite choice for the best and brightest, Mizzou has more valedictorians, Curators Scholars and more than twice as many Bright Flight Scholars than any other Missouri university. Twenty-six percent of freshmen come from the top 10 percent of their high school classes. The state’s largest and most comprehensive university, Mizzou has more than 300 degree programs through 19 colleges and schools and is one of only five universities nationwide with law, medicine, veterinary medicine and a nuclear research reactor on one campus. MU students earn 26 percent of all bachelor’s degrees,

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

24 percent of master’s degrees and 60 percent of doctoral degrees granted by Missouri public universities. Experiential learning is an essential part of an MU degree. Real-world media experience, or the Missouri Method, in journalism and the problem-based curriculum in medicine are two nationally recognized examples. Students also participate in Missouri’s largest study-abroad program, manage a bed and breakfast, operate a floral shop, prepare income taxes for families, represent domestic violence victims in court, provide health care, perform in national venues, contribute 190,000 hours of community service each year, and co-author articles in leading scientific journals. Mizzou students also hold patents and help create startup companies. MU spends about $240 million a year on scientific research, accounting for about 70 percent of the research dollars flowing to Missouri’s public universities. In addition, the university


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provides extensive end-market support of critical industries. For example, MU is the largest supplier to the nation’s pharmaceutical firms of radioisotopes for diagnosing and treating cancer. Mizzou also supports more than 400 drug-development trials and conducts 200,000 diagnostic tests annually to help determine the cause of death and disease in animals. MU’s nationally prominent faculty bring discoveries into the classroom, publish more than 1,400 books and scholarly articles each year, and attract multi-million-dollar grants. Recent awards include $14.8 million from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to reduce rehospitalizations among nursing home residents, $14 million from the USDA to study beef cattle genetics, $6.6 million from the National Science Foundation for improved corn crops, $5.5 million from the Kimmel Foundation to study alternative energy, and $3.8 million from the National Institutes of Health to develop a measurement tool for autism symptoms. Mizzou discoveries resulting from research are often the basis for new businesses. Since fiscal year 2008, MU has filed 465 U.S. patents, and licensing income from the commercialization of new technologies has reached more than $46 million. To date, companies have generated about $1 billion in sales revenues from licensed products invented by MU faculty and students.

Four interdisciplinary areas include top faculty, facilities and resources that set MU apart from other universities: Food for the Future, the culture, economics and production of healthy and affordable food; One Health/One Medicine, the convergence of human and animal health; Media of the Future, new ways to communicate, educate and market; and Sustainable Energy, developing and distributing renewable energy sources. As a land-grant institution, MU serves and unifies the state via extension programs throughout Missouri and by providing a comprehensive health system that includes six hospitals, numerous clinics and health care experts who conduct life-changing research and educate tomorrow’s physicians, nurses and allied health specialists. People also connect with the university through the Mizzou Alumni Association, two museums and athletic events. A member of the Southeastern Conference since July 2012, MU’s NCAA Division I athletic program has more than 520 student-athletes in 20 sports, many ranked in the top 25 nationally.

Photo by Bob Selsor

MIZZOU Columbia, Missouri 573-882-2121 (directory assistance) missouri.edu

Points of Pride • MU was founded in 1839 in Columbia, Mo., as the first public university west of the Mississippi River. • MU has the world’s first School of Journalism (founded in 1908), Missouri’s first and only College of Veterinary Medicine (founded in 1946), the first engineering program west of the Mississippi (founded in 1849), and the nation’s first College of Education at a public university (founded in 1868). • MU is designated an “Innovation and Economic Prosperity University” by the Association of Public Land-Grant Universities for exceptional entrepreneurship and workforce development efforts. • Mizzou’s main 1,262-acre campus has 350 buildings, including nine libraries and two museums. The university also has 18 agricultural research centers and more than 100 extension offices statewide. • Since 1911, Mizzou had hosted one of America’s oldest and grandest Homecoming celebrations, including the largest multi-day blood drive in the country. • Six Ionic columns on Francis Quadrangle are beloved vestiges from MU’s first building, Academic Hall. MU also is home to Thomas Jefferson’s original tombstone. • As a botanic garden, the historic Mizzou campus has 42,000 plants and trees in numerous thematic and special collection settings.

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COLLEGE TOWN -

HIGHER EDUCATION ABOUNDS

COLUMBIA COLLEGE www.ccis.edu 800-231-2391, ext. 7352

Columbia College saw exceptional advancements and developments in 2013, and now into 2014, it continues to thrive. The college announced its 17th president earlier this year, marking an exciting change for the years to come, while still celebrating accomplishments of the past. The Evening Campus, which offers hybrid and Saturday courses, is dedicated to accommodating changing student needs. The option of coming to campus at night and once a week meets the needs of some students better than a course that meets twice a week. In August 2013, the main campus opened the 53,000-square-foot Brouder Science Center, named after president emeritus Dr. Gerald Brouder and his wife Bonnie. The building gives students access to cutting-edge

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technology and education in forensic science, the physical sciences and nursing. Also in 2013, the college’s eight Missouri campuses celebrated 40 years of educating adult and military students. Plus, the Online Campus rolled out new online degree programs in education, political science, public administration and management information systems. For more than 160 years, Columbia College has helped students advance their lives through higher education. As a private, nonprofit, liberal arts and sciences institution accredited by the Higher Learning Commission, Columbia College offers small classes taught by experienced, innovative faculty. With 35 Nationwide Campuses across the country, 18 of which are on military installations, Columbia College educates more than 31,000 students each year and has more than 80,000 alumni. Students may enroll in day, evening or online classes. Visit GoForGreater.org to learn more.

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

STEPHENS COLLEGE www.stephens.edu • 573-442-2211

Stephens College has added several new programs, a reflection of the college’s ability to reflect current market trends. This coming school year, the college will offer a Bachelor of Health Sciences degree for students who want to enter the health industry. The demand for health generalists is growing, according to the U.S. Department of Labor, in response to global health concerns such as emerging diseases, aging populations and the need to promote healthier lifestyles. “This program is a response to student demand and to a workforce shortage,” said Dr. Tara Giblin, dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences. “It’s an interdisciplinary degree and is designed to prepare students who want to work in health but aren’t necessarily headed to medical or professional schools.”


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Stephens is assisting those who want to apply to medical school, as well, with an innovative new post-baccalaureate, pre-medical certificate. The 10-month program is designed for adults who have bachelor’s degrees but not the science courses needed for medical programs. Last year, Stephens launched the Event and Convention Management program, a three-year degree that gives students real event planning opportunities. Event planning is one of the fastest-growing industries this decade, according to the U.S. Labor Bureau of Statistics. “Stephens is always focused on careers, and we’re small and nimble enough to adapt to changing times,” said Kerri Yost, an associate professor who helped shape the 10-year-old digital filmmaking program. Established in 1833, Stephens is one of fewer than 50 women’s colleges and the second-oldest to remain a women’s college in the country.

BRYAN UNIVERSITY www.bryanu.edu • 573-777-5550

Bryan University (BU) was founded in 1982 to meet employers’ needs for quality, skilled employees. To date, Bryan University serves students and employers in Topeka, Kan.; Springfield, Mo.; Columbia, Mo.; and Rogers, Ark. Bryan University offers several programs in a fully online platform, helping students to pursue their education and meet the demands of their busy schedules. BU is committed to providing quality, relevant, career-based training to students in a variety of areas of study. Bryan University offers programs in the fields of allied health, business, information technology and criminal justice at the Columbia campus, which is located at 3215B Lemone Industrial Boulevard.

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In addition to offering programs at the diploma and academic associate degree level, BU also offers two bachelor’s-level degrees and an MBA program. All three of these higher level programs are offered exclusively through an online platform. For even more information, including Bryan University graduation rates, the median debt of students who completed their programs, and other important information, visit www.bryanu.edu/disclosure. You can also find them on Facebook at www.facebook.com/LearnAtBryan.

WILLIAM WOODS UNIVERSITY www.williamwoods.edu 573-642-2251

Founded in 1870, William Woods University in Fulton, Mo., offers a wide range of undergraduate degree courses in a variety of disciplines like business, art, writing, education, biology, veterinary, equestrian fields, communications and more. They also offer graduate degree courses in business and education, which are available through evening classes.

CENTRAL METHODIST UNIVERSITY ww w.centralmethodist.edu/cges/ columbia.php 660-248-6251

Established in 1854, Central Methodist University in Fayette, Mo., offers degree completion programs in business, child development and psychology. Their newest offering, an accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing, is intended for students who hold a bachelor’s degree in another discipline but want to move into nursing.

MOBERLY AREA COMMUNITY COLLEGE ww w.macc.edu/index.php/ locations/columbia 660-263-2408

Founded in 1927, Moberly Area Community College in Moberly, Mo., offers a variety of twoyear degree programs for disciplines in accounting, business, agriculture, criminal justice, music, nursing and more. These programs are designed to prepare students for transfer to a four-year university or for entry into the workforce.

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


ARTS & CULTURE

VISUAL ARTS BY DAVID WEBB

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here is no shortage of artistic vision in Columbia, Missouri. Around every corner there seems to be something fresh and inspiring. That spirit of creativity is exemplified by the city’s multitude of art galleries, which are a primary focus of the North Village Arts District. A longtime attraction for art lovers from around the United States, this district also appeals to a wide variety of artists who want to gain exposure from being featured in the expression-friendly galleries. Among these many creative spaces is a place called North Village Studios, which is situated on Walnut Street in Columbia’s old warehouse area. With its unique, industrial-style setting, it enhances the district and provides a creative atmosphere for resident artists. Artists located within North Village Studios at Artlandish Gallery frequently open their studios to the public during events. North Village Studios is the creative home to other businesses as well, such as The Root Cellar, Moon Shadow Studio, Liz Bryan and Maria Scudeir, Monarch Jewelry, House of Vansickle, and Shear Soul. North Village Art Studios isn’t alone in its endeavor to help local artists. Orr Street Studios is another artist-friendly location that offers artists a workspace as well as the ability to display and sell their work. Orr Studios regularly hosts exhibitions by guest artists and invites the public to attend its weekly lecture series, in which artists explain their works. Literary readings are also among the many community events that take place there. Other attractions for arts enthusiasts in the North Village Arts District include the Missouri Art Gallery, which features a growing collection of

original and limited edition prints, sculptures, carvings and collectibles by national and international award-winning artists. Poppy, another gallery within the district, features a wide range of folk art and fine art, including works in clay, glass, fiber, metal and wood. Poppy has even been recognized for three years in a row by Niche Magazine as one of the country’s top 25 galleries for contemporary craft. Art studios and galleries aren’t the only attractions that lure art lovers to Columbia. The Museum of Art and Archaeology is also a major draw for the community. The museum — which is located at, and operates under the auspices of, the University of Missouri — has gone to great lengths to acquire artifacts, paintings and sculptures to be appreciated by students, visitors and residents. One of the museum’s premier events is Art in Bloom. Held every spring, this festival combines the beauty of art with the wonders of the natural world. In early March, mid-Missouri florists create fresh floral arrangements inspired by artwork and artifacts that are found throughout the Museum of Art and Archaeology. The vast floral collection is enjoyed by attendees who come from near and far every year to see these unique creations. There is even a version of Art in Bloom that is geared toward children, enabling them to enjoy the festival’s artistic vision in a fun and creative way. Learn more about this event at maa.Missouri.edu/educ-programs/aib.html.

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ARTS & CULTURE

CURTAIN CALLS

BY DAVID WEBB

UNIVERSITY CONCERT SERIES www.concertseries.org • 573-882-3781

TRYPS CHILDREN’S THEATER www.trypskids.com • 543-449-4536

TRYPS Children’s Theater in Columbia was designed to create a place where children of all ages could participate in the performing arts. “I owe a lot to TRYPS for my success,” said reigning Miss Missouri Shelby Ringdhal about her many years with the theatre. “It is an incredible family to be a part of, and one that I will cherish forever.” Ringdhal also has many kind words to say about Jill Womack, the artistic director who helped her along her path as a child performer. “She has made the organization a successful one that provides amazing opportunities for kids to not only learn about performing, but about life,” she said. TRYPS programming includes after-school classes, classes for preschoolers, school break camps and productions open to actors in grades three through 12.

T ALKING HORSE PRODUCTIONS www.talkinghorseproductions.org • 573-268-1381

Talking Horse Productions was founded in 2012 by Artistic Director Ed Hanson, a retired teacher turned professional actor and producer. Hanson’s mission was to create a theatre that would produce intimate, high-quality live theatre in the North Village Arts District of downtown Columbia. After opening at a small venue known as the Berlin Theatre, Talking Horse Productions moved to their new home at 210 Saint James Street. Known as The Talking Horse Theatre, this new space offers more flexibility in staging and lighting than ever before. “As we complete our second season, we set our sights on the third,” said Hanson. “Columbia has discovered us and is loving what we do. We believe our 2014 season will solidify us as a major member of the theatre community.”

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

The University Concert Series in Columbia was never intended solely for the entertainment of its audience, but was designed with a greater purpose in mind: to pass on a legacy that has survived for over 100 years, proving its commitment to the arts. Educating the community is one of the Concert Series’ top priorities. “We use our position as promoters of entertainment to also give back to the community through educational outreach events for kids from preschool to college,” said Assistant Director Nathan Anderson. “We ask our incoming artists to spend time with the students to teach them about their craft, be it acting, classical music or something more contemporary. We typically do about five to eight of these events a year.”

MISSOURI THEATRE CENTER FOR THE ARTS / JESSE AUDITORIUM 573-884-9044

The Missouri Theatre Center for the Arts in Columbia has been a rich part of the city’s culture since its opening in 1928. Modeled after the Paris Opera House, it played host to vaudeville performances, silent films and talking pictures in its early days. The movie palace is just as important today as it was when it was first built, serving as a venue for modern cultural events such as the True/False Film Festival and University Concert Series. “We fill a lot of needs in the Columbia community,” said Missouri Theatre Manager John Murray. “The diversity of what we present now appeals to such a wide variety of people.” No matter what age, there is something for everyone. From infants to elders, there are programs specifically designed to educate students about theatre. Jesse Auditorium, located in Jesse Hall on the University of Missouri campus, is another historic venue. With more than 1,700 seats it is the largest performance venue in Columbia, and it has hosted many of the great orators and performers of the 20th century. The auditorium is available for use by university and non-university groups.


RECREATION

PLAY LIKE YOU MEAN IT IN COLUMBIA Photo by Dan Brenner

BY DAVID WEBB

C

olumbia is host to a number of popular annual sporting events, bringing thousands of athletes, volunteers and spectators from within the state and across the country together to enjoy competition and build friendships. Among these events are the Show-Me State Games and the Central Area Special Olympics of Missouri, which bring a great deal of revenue to the community of Columbia as well as bringing its members together in a very special way. The Show-Me State Games, an Olympic-style festival held in the summer, offers more than 40 different sports for all ages and ability levels. The main Show-Me State Games occur over three weekends during the summer. In 2014 the dates will be June 20–22, July 18–20 and July 25–27. In addition to the summer games, there are events held throughout the year that serve as fundraisers and help promote the overall mission of the games. The largest events are centered around team sports such as baseball, basketball and soccer. The largest of the fundraisers in terms of numbers are the 3v3 Soccerfest and the February “Hoopin’ It Up” basketball tournament. In its 29th year, the Show-Me State Games brought in 33,273 athletes to Columbia. The games have also managed to attract such celebrities as Olympic Gold Medalist Jordyn Wieber to the opening ceremonies. The 2014 games will mark the return of the running of the torch, which had been missing from the games for a decade. Another athletics organization important to Columbia is the Central Area Special Olympics of Missouri (SOMO), which has a mission to change the lives of individuals with intellectual disabilities through sports. “We feel that everyone deserves a chance to excel at life and grow both physically and mentally, regardless of the intellectual disability they may have,” said Brandon Schatsiek, a spokesman for the organization. The Special Olympics games offer 21 Olympic-style sports to athletes throughout the year and host more than 330 sporting competitions around the state. Currently there are two state-level competitions in 2014 (State Summer Games in Columbia and the State Outdoor Games in Jefferson City). In order to compete at that level, the athletes must first compete at the area, district and regional levels, depending on the sport in which they are participating. Then the competitors are allowed to move on to the state-level competitions depending upon their performance at the local events. So, the athletes who are chosen to attend the state-level events are the best of the best.

There are more than 17,000 participating athletes from throughout the state of Missouri. The athletes are the organization’s first priority, and the physical, social and emotional benefits of participation in the program are experienced both on and off the field. Not only does practicing and competing help the athletes’ physical fitness, but it also typically enhances their self-esteem and instills a sense of pride. In a survey developed by John M. Olin School of Business at Washington University in St. Louis, it was found that 87 percent of athletes noticed an increase in self confidence due to their participation in a Special Olympics program. Other SOMO programs and events include a program for children under the age of 8. Known as the Youth Athletes Program, it is designed to foster physical, cognitive and social development while teaching the basics to prepare children for transition to the main program once they reach the admission age. The Unified Sports program allows individuals who aren’t challenged to practice and compete with some current SOMO athletes. Athletes and partners compete alongside one another in an effort to create bonds. The program was inspired by the simple principle that training together is a quick path to friendship and understanding.

HOST IT HERE Need a place to host a tournament or sporting event? Columbia’s extensive parks system has hosted a wide variety of competitive events, including swim tournaments, the MO Grand Prix, half marathons, basketball tournaments and martial arts competitions. The Columbia CVB can help you book blocks of hotel rooms for teams and fans, match local facilities to events, and provide other important information about services in the community. Contact them at 573-875-1231.

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COLUMBIA PARKS & RECREATION -

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

Photo by Creative Photo

T

he city of Columbia has left no stone unturned when it comes to their Parks and Recreation Department, which is responsible for overseeing more than 3,000 acres of park land. The department maintains 78 parks and green space locations, as well as a multitude of recreation facilities. Designed to accommodate a broad spectrum of recreational activities, their facilities and programs provide enjoyment for citizens of all ages. Columbia’s golfers, for example, enjoy the convenience of L.A. Nickle Golf Course at the 533-acre Columbia Cosmopolitan Recreation Area (often referred to as Cosmo Park). The course has three sets of tees, is surrounded by

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mature trees and features beautiful fairways. There are 18 holes of play plus a driving range, and the facility is open year-round.

TRAILS Columbia parks range in size from large nature and wildlife areas to smaller neighborhood parks for those citizens who don’t want to venture too far from home when exercising. Either way, the parks system provides scenic spots for relaxation or exercise in the midst of the busy city. This is particularly true for those who enjoy walking, jogging and biking. Trails maintained by the Parks and Recreation Department

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

vary in length, with some extending for five miles or more, and are a great way to take in the beauty of the natural, preserved green spaces. Some of the more popular trails are Capen Nature Trail, Cosmo Fitness Trail, Cosmo Nature Trail, Fairview Nature Trail, Forum Wetland Trails, Grindstone Nature Trails and Indian Hills Trails. Many of the city’s trails are referred to as Destination Trails because of their connections to other trail systems and their accessibility from multiple locations. Among these trails are Bear Creek, County House, Hominy Creek, MKT Nature and Fitness Trail, and Scott’s Bench Trail. There are many connecting trails that primarily serve to link neighborhoods to the major destination trails; however, some of the larger connecting trails provide an enjoyable journey in and of themselves. Among these connecting paths is Blue Ridge Road Connector, which leads through to the Bear Creek Trail. Another is the Greenbriar Connector, which leads to the MKT trail.


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Photo by Creative Photo

Perhaps one of the most noticeable changes to the local trail systems is the most recent renovation of the Katy Trail. Thanks to funding from the Park Sales Tax, it is now able to be traveled without ever having to cross a street. The trail was routed under Stewart, Providence and Elm streets as part of a capital improvement project completed in 2007.

SWIMMING Columbia’s Albert-Oakland Family Aquatic Center has seen its fair share of renovations, including the addition of a variety of original artwork and designs. The more than $800,000 renovation project has added features such as a double-looped enclosed water slide, concession stand and children’s play areas with sprinklers. The facility also features a 50-meter pool, shade

umbrellas, two diving boards and a large deck with lounge chairs. Other popular municipal facilities for swimming and splashing around include Douglass Family Aquatic Center, Lake of the Woods Pool, Little Mates Cove at Twin Lakes Recreation Area and Little Mates Cove. Visit www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec to learn more about Parks and Recreation facilities, hours of operation, fees and private rentals.

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COLUMBIA PARKS & RECREATION SAMPLER

PARK

ADDRESS HIGHLIGHT

Albert-Oakland Park

1900 Blue Ridge Road

Outdoor pools, water play areas, basketball courts

Athens Park

5220 N. Oakland Gravel Road

Baseball parks, picnic shelters and much more

Capen Park

1600 Capen Drive

Beautiful scenic trails

Clay-Sky Park

1701 W. Ash Street

Elegant soccer fields and sporting facilities

Columbia Cosmopolitan Recreation Area 1

615 Business Loop 70 W

533 acres, Antimi Sports Complex, Cosmo Fitness Trail

FlatBranch Park

101 S. 4th Street

Beautiful greenspace spread across downtown area

Forum Nature Area

2701 Forum Boulevard

Majestic scenery, magnificient trees, trails for exercise

Grindstone Nature Area

2011 Old 63 S

Scenic trails and spaces to enjoy the sights of Columbia

Indian Hills Park

5009 Aztec Boulevard

Horse shoes; playgrounds; tennis, volleyball and basketball

Lake of Woods Recreation Area

6700 St. Charles Road

Outdoor pools, baseball and softball fields

Stephens Lake Park

2001 E. Broadway

Water play areas, playgrounds, sporting facilities

Twin Lakes Recreation Area

2500 Chapel Hill Road

Waterplay areas, playgrounds, volleyball and tennis courts

INDOOR FACILITIES

ADDRESS

HIGHLIGHTS

Activity and Rec Center

1701 W. Ash Street

Gymnasiums, leisure pool, cardio/strength training, track

Armory Sports Center

701 E. Ash Street

Gymnasiums, locker rooms

Hickman Pool

1400 N. Providence

Heated indoor pool

Reichman Pavilion

2300 E. Walnut Street

Reservable indoor pavilion with kitchen

Stephens Lake Activity Center

2311 E. Walnut Street

Recreation classes and programs

See the Parks & Rec Guide at www.gocolumbiamo.com/ParksandRec/Parks/documents/park_guide.pdf for more details about offerings at these and other Columbia parks.

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE


SECTION TITLE

www.HolidayColumbia.com

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CELEBRATE LIFE COLUMBIA-STYLE

Photo by Columbia Daily Tribune

BY DAVID WEBB

C

olumbia’s college-town energy and rich history have given the community many reasons to celebrate, and perhaps one of the most interesting things about the city is the vast offering of annual festivals that bring visitors from all across the country into this central Missouri town. Columbia prides itself on its extensive list of festive gatherings that highlight every walk of life, each one exhibiting a style that is uniquely its own. The festivals and events that are held in the city are as diverse as the town itself, covering everything from its patriotic and rural heritage to fine art and films. The True/False Film Festival was created to champion the best new nonfiction films and filmmakers. The goal of festival organizers is to promote art and dialogue, as well as to deepen the community’s understanding of itself and the world at large. The idea for the festival was brought about in the summer of 2003, a year that was known by some as “the year of the documentary.” In 2013, the festival hit several new milestones. Ticket sales, which surpassed $43,500,

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were 10 times the amount brought in when the festival first began. The True/False fest has now taken its place on the world’s nonfiction film stage and remains a huge community effort. Local restaurants and hotels reap the rewards of the influx of festival attendees and the more than 500 mid-Missourians who volunteer each year. A popular quarterly event in Columbia, Artrageous Fridays was inspired by the desire to unite and celebrate organizations that are focused on the prosperity of the arts. It is a chance to take in a variety of artistic works and to admire historic downtown Columbia throughout the North Village Art District. People are invited to explore the district’s unique streetscapes and view vast collections of sculptures and crafts that were created by artisans from around the country. One of Columbia’s most time-honored annual events is Columbia Art League’s Art in the Park. It takes place in June amid the beauty of Stephens Lake Park and has been a tradition in the community for more than 50 years. Art in the Park is not only the oldest fine arts festival in Mid-Missouri, but is also the largest. The festival features more

COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Photo by Columbia Daily Tribune

than 120 artists from Missouri and across the United States. The event includes fine arts in a variety of media and has something for every age. Amid the arts there are also other attractions, such as music and a Youth Roots Stage that is designed for the entertainment of children. Music is an integral part of life in Columbia, and that includes annual festivals and celebrations. In fact, music is often the center of attraction. One of the more notable annual events in town is the Blind Boone Ragtime Festival, which takes place in early June. This celebration of music and history honors former Columbia resident and music legend John William Boone. A contemporary of ragtime music standout Scott Joplin, J.W. “Blind” Boone was renowned for his contributions to the musical genre, and every year the event seeks to honor him through historical features and performances by current artists. Art and music aren’t the only things in Columbia that are celebrated regularly. One of the largest happenings in the city is the Salute to Veterans Memorial Day Weekend and Air Show, held each Memorial Day Weekend to

Photo by Columbia Daily Tribune

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livestock showings and competitions, which include cattle, horses, sheep, poultry, rabbits, swine, goats and mules. No matter what your tastes or interests may be, there is always something to celebrate in Columbia. Check out the events calendars at www.visitcolumbiamo.com and discoverthedistrict.com for more information about happenings and events.

Photo by Columbia Daily Tribune

honor the region’s veterans. This parade and air show is presented by the Salute to Veterans Corporation and includes a spectacular exhibition of planes from both world wars, as well as various other important aircraft from throughout history. More than 50 military aircraft participate in the event each year, and air stunts are performed by the United States Golden Knights Parachute Team. Patriotic music fills the air as the huge Memorial Day Parade winds through the streets of the District, featuring more than 100 floats, veterans reunion groups, bands, military vehicles and patriotic organizations — all in honor of soldiers past and present. One of the best-known events in Columbia and one of the longest traditions in Missouri is the Boone County Fair. Originally held in 1835, it was the first county fair to be held west of the Mississippi River. Attractions and events such as tractor and truck pulls, a car show, pageants, a dog show, art competitions, a petting zoo, live entertainment, and tasty food draw people from all around. Central to fair activities are the

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WORSHIP

CHAMBER MEMBER HOUSES OF WORSHIP BY DAVID WEBB

Alive In Christ Lutheran Church 201 Southampton Drive, Columbia www.aic.org | 573-499-0443 Christian Chapel Church 3300 S. Providence Road, Columbia www.c2church.com | 573-442-2258 The Crossing 3615 Southland Drive, Columbia thecrossingchurch.com | 573-256-4410 Family Worship Center 4925 E. Bonne Femme Church Road, Columbia www.familywc.org | 573-441-1140

C

olumbia is known for its art community, its higher education institutions and its enviable quality of life, yet the city is also unique in its diversity of faiths and beliefs. Those beliefs have led the religious community to engage in benevolence ministries that benefit many in the community. The community’s heritage of worship traces back to the 1800s, when colleges — Central Methodist College, for example — were heavily affiliated with churches. Today, Columbia is home to a multitude of houses of worship that represent many different denominations of the Christian tradition, such as Methodist, Baptist, Presbyterian and Catholic, as well as Jewish, Hindu and Muslim beliefs. “My own assessment of what is happening in the faith community is actually quite positive. During seasons of unsettledness, many people find themselves looking for a place they can find soul-strength,” said Pieter Van Waarde, senior pastor of Woodcrest Chapel. “So, ‘business’ is brisk in the sense that people are asking great questions — and hopeful that a faith community can help them discover soul-satisfying solutions. Additionally, relationships between these various faith communities, in my experience, is good. I have cordial relationships with area pastors and feel generally well-respected. Of course there is always more good work that can be done — but overall I am encouraged!” It isn’t surprising that there are so many different beliefs in a community that embraces so many different educational concepts and is home to people from so many cultures, and there is no exclusion when it comes to faith. Columbia welcomes people of different ideologies and upbringings.

First Baptist Church 1112 E. Broadway, Columbia fbc-columbia.org | 573-442-1149 First Presbyterian Church 16 Hitt Street, Columbia www.fpccolumbia.org | 573-442-1164 Forum Christian Church 3900 Forum Boulevard, Columbia www.forumchristian.org | 573-443-3900 Grace Bible Church 601 Blue Ridge Road, Columbia www.gracebiblecolumbia.org 573-449-6794 The Latter House Kingdom Ministries 4914 Prairieridge Street, Columbia www.latterhousekingdomministries.org 573-474-5885 Missouri United Methodist Church 204 S. 9th Street, Columbia www.moumc.org | 573-443-3111 Urban Empowerment P.O. Box 85, Columbia www.urbanempowerment.net 573-474-3163 Wilkes Boulevard United Methodist Church 702 Wilkes Boulevard, Columbia www.wilkesblvdumc.org | 573-449-4363 Woodcrest Chapel 2201 W. Nifong Boulevard, Columbia www.woodcrest.org | 573-445-1131

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PREFERRED BUSINESS LISTINGS AUTOMOTIVE - DEALERS

Bob McCosh Chevrolet Buick GMC Cadillac 1 Business Loop 70 E Columbia, MO 65203 (573) 442-6156.......................................................................... fax (573) 443-1821 jdement@bmcmail.com www.BobMcCosh.com

Full GM line dealership (Sales-Service-Parts), open 6 days a week for your convenience. Our Certified Service Department has World-Class technicians, servicing ALL makes and models. Come see our remodeled showroom!

CONCRETE - READY MIX Central Concrete Co, Inc.

Fr. Tolton Catholic High School 3351 E. Gans Road Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 445-7700 kwolfe@toltoncatholic.org

Tolton Catholic features rigorous academics, a faith-based focus, competitive athletics and a comprehensive array of extracurricular activities. Financial aid is available. Interested students can apply online: www.toltoncatholic.org

EQUIPMENT & SERVICE Farm Power - Lawn & Leisure

2000 Dogwood Lane Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 443-2426 csnyder@centralconcreteco.com

1702 Business Loop 70 E Columbia, MO 65201-4639 (573) 442-1139 xfarmpowerlawn@mchsi.com

DENTISTS Accent Dental Center 1401 Forum Boulevard, Suite 203 Columbia, MO 65203 (573) 446-7181 office@accent-dental.com www.accent-dental.com

You will enjoy better dental experiences at Accent Dental Center, due to highly trained staff and the most current technology. Appointments are typically fewer and less time consuming, and we can detect possible issues sooner. Call us today!

FINANCIAL ADVISORS & INVESTMENT COUNSELORS The Blankenship Wealth Management Group of Wells Fargo Advisors 2100 Forum Boulevard Columbia, MO 65203 (573) 445-7088.......................................................................... fax (573) 446-5134 Richard.Blankenship@wellsfargoadvisors.com home.wellsfargoadvisors.com/001_A32

We offer clients an opportunity to achieve their long-term goals by combining local, personal relationships with a dedicated wealth management team backed by one of the largest and most well-respected financial institutions.

EDUCATION GARAGE DOORS Eddie’s Garage Doors, Inc. 4109 Waco Road Columbia, MO 65202-2894 (573) 886-8442 eddiesdoors@centurytel.net

Columbia College 1001 Rogers Street Columbia, MO 65101 (573) 875-7352 admissions@ccis.edu www.ccis.edu

Columbia College, founded in 1851, serves more than 30,000 students nationwide every year. Its campus in Columbia, Mo., provides a traditional college experience and offers convenient options for the working adult.

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PREFERRED BUSINESS LISTINGS

HOTELS & MOTELS

PAINTING SERVICES EXTERIOR & INTERIOR FINISHING

Hampton Inn

Reichlin Rentals - S/B Painting Company

3410 Clark Lane Columbia, MO 65202-2411 (573) 886-9392 barth.burgin@hilton.com

601 W. Nifong Boulevard, Suite 1F Columbia, MO 65203-6054 (573) 442-4294 sbpainting@centurytel.net

REAL ESTATE - COMMERCIAL

Quality Inn Columbia 1612 N. Providence Road Columbia, MO 65202-1591 (573) 449-2491 qualityinncolumbia@hotmail.com

Conveniently located off Interstate 70, the Quality Inn is minutes from University of Missouri, Stephens College, Columbia College and Memorial Stadium. Free full breakfast, free wireless Internet access, indoor heated pool with whirlpool.

Starr Properties 3401 Broadway Business Park, Suite 101 Columbia, MO 65203 (573) 447-2414.......................................................................... fax (573) 447-2420 info@starrproperties.com www.starrproperties.com

Starr Properties specializes in the development and management of commercial, residential and investment properties in Central Missouri.

INSURANCE Cornerstone National Insurance Co. P.O. Box 6040 Columbia, MO 65205-6040 (573) 817-2481 rwalker@cornerstonenational.com

INTERIOR DECORATORS & DESIGNERS Studio Home

RESTAURANTS Ingredient 304 S. 9th Street, Suite 101 Columbia, MO 65201-5007 (573) 442-1502 ingredient.columbia@gmail.com

RETIREMENT & NURSING HOMES

1029 E. Walnut Street Columbia, MO 65201-4940 (573) 445-4122.......................................................................... fax (573) 446-8762 patrice@studiohomeinteriors.com

JEWELERS - CUSTOM & REPAIR Gary B Robinson Jewelers Inc. 1608 Chapel Hill Road Columbia, MO 65203-5464 (573) 445-8765 garyrobinson40@yahoo.com

NOT-FOR-PROFIT ORGANIZATION Central Missouri Humane Society 616 Big Bear Boulevard Columbia, MO 65202-3739 (573) 443-7387 director@cmhspets.org

Presbyterian Manor of Fulton 811 Center Street Fulton, MO 65251-1922 (573) 642-6646 dsmith2@pmma.org

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COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Candlelight Lodge 1406 Business Loop 70 W Columbia, MO 65202-1398 (573) 449-5287 talmond@candlelightlodge.com www.candlelightlodge.com

Our Assisted Senior Community provides 24-hour care, including nursing, dining, housekeeping and transportation services as well as social and recreational opportunities. Proudly serving Columbia seniors for more than 54 years.

THEATERS Talking Horse Productions 210 Saint James Street Columbia, MO 65201 (573) 268-1381 hanson_ed@hotmail.com


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS A&B Management Inc.......................................17

Great Circle.....................................................45

Andrew Stone Optometry..................................39

Hanson & Company CPA’s P.C.............................9

Beard Boehmer & Associates, PC, Certified Public Accountants and Consultants.....31

Harper, Evans, Wade & Netermeyer..................25

Boone County Family Resources.........................37

House of Brokers Realty.....................................19

Boone County Fire Protection District Headquarters.........................................7 Boone Electric Cooperative................................25 Boone Hospital Center – Stewart Cancer Center....................................33 Boone-Central Title Company.............................17 Camping World RV Sales..................................55 The Caring People......................................42; 60 Carpet One.....................................................13 CenturyLink........................................................9 Cevet Tree Care...............................................15 City of Columbia..............................................20 Columbia College.............................................49 Columbia Convention and Visitors Bureau...........59 Columbia Daily Tribune.....................................24 Columbia EDP..................................................30 Columbia Independent School...........................45 Columbia Public Schools...................................43 Columbia Welcome..........................................17 CoMO Cubs Pediatrics.....................................37 Creative Photo..................................................26 D&H Drugstore.................................................41 Dave Griggs’ Flooring America..........................15

Holiday Inn Executive Center.............................57 Huber & Associates....................Inside Front Cover Huebert Builders, Inc.........................................43 Interior Design Associates, Inc............................16 Jackie Bulgin & Associates – House of Brokers Realty...................................14 JobFinders Employment Services........................24 Missouri Cancer Associates.................................1 Nate’s Computer Repair....................................15 Plaza Commercial Realty...................................24 Privitt Auto Service Center.................................16 Quest Diagnostics.............................................37 Rain-Central Missouri, Inc..................................37 Randstad.........................................................29 Randy Adams Construction Inc...........................27 Raymond James Financial Services, Inc...............38 Regional Economic Development, Inc...................... Inside Back Cover ServiceMASTER Restore.....................................17 Shelter Insurance – Nancy Allison......................50 Tiger Scholarship Fund......................................23 Tim’s Automotive.................................................5 University of Missouri..........................................3

EcoWater Systems............................................41

University of Missouri Health System........................ Outside Back Cover

Family Health Center........................................41

Walmart..........................................................31

Fidelity Financial Services, LLC.............................5

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W E ’ R E P U B L I S H I N G T H E S T O R I E S O F A M E R I C A’ S B E S T C O M M U N I T I E S

T han k you

for allowing us t h e privil eg e o f publi s h i n g

your c ommunity ’ s st ory. — Craig Williams CEO COMMUNITYLINK PUBLICATIONS

When community leaders across the United States partner with CommunityLink for a city magazine, membership directory, relocation guide or street map, they’re dealing with a highly capable, broad-shouldered publishing company that understands custom community publishing — a company worthy of your loyalty and your trust. MAGAZINES :: STREET MAPS :: DIRECTORIES We’re proud to have published this volume and to be

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yours — and take seriously the commitment we’ve made to each and every advertiser in this volume to deliver a quality reflection of your community. Thank you for your support of this publication and the community it serves. We’re thrilled

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to be a part of both.

THE LEADER IN COMMUNITY PUBLISHING


Columbia, MO 2014 Community Profile and Resource Guide