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“China Bound!”

COMMUNITY

La’Nethia Howard, age 13 (pictured at right, fourth from the left wearing yellow dress standing behind seated children) recently held a fundraising celebration to pay for her upcoming trip to Beijing, China.

VOL. XXXVI Number 35 March 28, 2012

The Milwaukee

DON’T FORGET! Get out and VOTE on April 3rd!

JOURNAL

The event was held at St. Martin dePorres Church. Howard attends the Chinese Language School. She is pictured with members of her family, relatives, friends. (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

www.communityjournal.net 25 Cents

BULK RATE U.S. POSTAGE PAID MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN PERMIT NO. 4668

Experience is the theme of April 3 election W I S C O N S I N ’ S L A R G E S T A F R I C A N A M E R I C A N N E W S PA P E R

Compiled by MCJ Staff

Civil Rights leader Al Sharpton’s radio show is called “Keepin’ It Real!” Anyone who listens to his radio show, watches his television show and follows his controversial career knows he does just that…keep it real! Well, in our endorsements for the April 3, 2012 elections, we had to do the same thing the Reverend Al does: Keep it real. Simply put, these elections for mayor, alderman, county supervisor, and judge present some challenges for us as it relates to endorsing candidates we feel represent the interests of their constituents. There are a plethora of new faces with fresh and innovative ideas they want to implement to solve the problems of joblessness, high taxes, dwindling city services, law and order.

ELECTION WATCH 2012: THE ENDORSEMENTS

Mayor Tom Barrett

Then there are the challenges posed by the state legislature in its recent budget that has negatively impacted—in some cases made worse—all the aforementioned. While there seems to be a surge

Ald. Milele Coggs

in younger candidates that are part of a new generation of individuals who want to do more than articulate the problems—they want to solve them—there is still a place for experience.

Ninth Aldermanic District Candidate Ray Harmon wants to make his vision for area a reality

Ray Harmon grew up in Milwauagain and the main catalyst for this kee and was raised by a single mom revitalization is the redevelopment of and very supportive extended family Northridge Mall. that taught him the values of hard Ray spoke with over 1000 resiwork and community service. dents regarding the redevelopment, Since college, Ray has worked as interviewed Milwaukee County Ofa legislative assistant for city and ficials, faith leaders, business owncounty governments, as well as noners, business organizations, investors, profit organizations before becoming financial institutions, developers and the Economic Development Director economic development practitioners, for the Milwaukee Urban League. and we all want a more dramatic In 2003, Ray was appointed by change to Northridge Mall that will Governor Jim Doyle to become New be a destination center with a sense Products and Economic Developof place and renewed identity. Ray Harmon ment Director for the Wisconsin It is in this spirit, Ray hopes to Housing and Economic Developstimulate discussion, bring together ment Authority where he led projects stakeholders and create a sense of urto increase loan guarantees for congency by offering my vision for the tractors, small and medium sized revitalization of Northridge Mall. businesses. Ray offers this vision to provoke Later Governor Doyle asked Ray thought, stimulate dialogue and to to lead the Milwaukee Governor’s serve as a catalyst in the formation of office. new partnerships throughout the In early 2007, Ray received a heart northwest region. transplant. That gift of life has profoundly shaped the Ray’s end goal is to advance the interest of 9th district way he approaches how he lives his own life. Each day residents and help promote the district by redeveloping Ray wants to find ways to give back to his community. Northridge Mall, creating jobs and improve the quality Now, Ray is running for Alderperson to continue that of life for taxpayers. effort to give back. He wants to boost our local economy Along with Ray’s plan for Northridge Mall, Jobs and by helping to create jobs, keep Milwaukee fiscally re- Economic Development are core aspects of his “Vision sponsible and improve our quality of life. for Change.” Foremost, we need to Re-brand Northwest A core element of Ray Harmon’s campaign is his ex- Milwaukee to create a sense of place and a renewed sense tensive “Vision for Change.” Northwest Milwaukee has of identity. the potential to become an economically vibrant region (continued on page 6)

ELECTION WATCH 2012

A Celebration of Holy Matrimony

Brentwood Church of Christ held its second annual National Black Marriage Day seminar on March 24th at the church, located at 6425 N. 60th St. With the theme "It Takes Two," the seminar emphasized the importance of marriage as a partnership. A capacity crowd attended the event. Most aspects of the program were facilitated jointly by couples. The highlight of the seminar was a fun filled Black marriage Jeopardy game which highlighted famous couples in civil rights, entertainment, and the Bible to name a few categories. Two couples were also recognized as the longest and most newly married couples. The keynote speaker was Brentwood's minister, Bro. Leslie Odoms. Pictured above are (left to right): The longest married couple at the seminar (Walter and Madeline Wheeler, married 48 years), Mrs. Annie Odoms and Bro. Odoms, Clarene and MCJ Editor Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr., the organizers of the event; Jene and Michael Johnson (the most newly married couple, married eight months) and Barbara E. White, a consultant and educator who facilitated a relationship workshop provided by the Center for Self-Sufficiency that the Mitchells participated in prior to their marriage in 2009. Entertainment was provided by saxophonist Olusegun Sijuwade. The Brentwood event coincided the national Black Marriage Day observance the next day Sunday, March 25. (Photo by Robert Bell)

Ald. Willie Hines

In determining our endorsements, we weighed, measured, proven experience against youth and untapped potential. In some of the races, we’ve determined that experience trumps

Sup. Willie Johnson

potential. The reality is there are political offices that are too important to supplant proven leadership that are in positions of power and influence.

These individuals have done good things for our community and must be retained in their current positions in order to do more. With that said, the Community Journal endorses… Mayoral race— For reasons of reality two races have us supporting established and tested incumbents over challengers who have energy and ideas, but not the experience necessary to be immediately effective servants of the people. One of the two races is the mayoral race between incumbent Mayor Tom Barrett and challenger Edward McDonald. During the campaign McDonald, a long-time community activist, presented fresh ideas on a number of city issues in the Community Journals series in which we asked candidates their posi-

Quarles & Brady, LLP

(continued on page 2)

Despite its national reputation and success, law firm still remembers its social responsibility to community

Quarles & Brady, LLP is one of Milwaukee’s largest and premiere corporate law firms. With more than 118 years of distinguished history in this community, Quarles & Brady has grown from a small, well-respected local Milwaukee law firm to a firm with offices in Chicago, Illinois; Madison and Milwaukee, Wisconsin; Naples and Tampa, Florida; Phoenix and Tucson, Arizona; Shanghai, China; and Washington, D.C. And, while the firm has achieved gargantuan success, it has never forgotten its humble beginnings, nor has it lost its commitment to the community in which it was founded. Under the capable leadership of Chairman John W. Daniels, Jr., Esq. Quarles & Brady embraces the notion of giving back to the communities it serves to help make them stronger. Quarles & Brady’s communityminded focus isn’t just window dressing; the firm has created a program called “Quarles Cares,” which is a company-wide initiative that encompasses the most important aspects of the firm’s corporate citizenship: community involvement, pro bono and diversity. One of the ways in which Quarles & Brady ‘gives back’ is through its commitment to provide pro bono legal services. For example, Quarles & Brady is signatory to the Law Firm Pro Bono Challenge®, which is administered by the Pro Bono Institute’s Law Firm Pro Bono Project. Quarles & Brady has “challenged” themselves to contribute, at a minimum, an amount of time equal to three percent of the Firm’s total billable hours, or 60 hours per attorney, to pro bono work. Among its projects, Quarles & Brady helps staff a legal clinic in partnership with Marquette University Law School and they have partnered with Children’s Hospital, the Medical College of Wisconsin and Marquette University to staff the Legal-Medical Partnership at the Downtown Health Center. Beyond its pro bono work, Quarles & Brady is also dedicated to corporate social responsibility. The law firm believes it is essential to connect directly with the community to fully understand and better address its needs. To that end, Quarles & Brady reg-

ularly provides opportunities for attorneys and staff to volunteer and support civic and charitable initiatives, focusing primarily on projects related to hunger and education. Among some of the initiatives Quarles & Brady supports and volunteers

with in Milwaukee are the Open Door Ministry Program at The Cathedral of Saint John the Evangelist, Hunger Task Force “Stamp Out Hunger” Food Drive, the Marine Corps Toys for Tots campaign and (continued on page 8}

PULSE OF THE COMMUNITY Photos and question by Yvonne Kemp

QUESTION OF THE WEEK:

“Do you support President Obama’s Affordable Care Act? Why or Why not?”

STEPHANIE FINDLEY: “Yes I do. It allows my daughter who is in college to stay on my health insurance plan until she is 26.”

LAWRENCE WOODEN: “Yes, because the way the economy is today, we need all the help we can get.”

KHANI SOLOCHEK: “Yes. I believe all people should receive affordable health care. Young men should also be able to have this benefit too. I have a 20-year-old son with no health care and he can’t renew his drivers licence because he can’t afford an eye exam.”

Curtiss Harris: “I definitely support the health plan championed by President Obama. Without exception, everyone--regardless of income-should have access to excellent healthcare.”


PERSPECTIVES

The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 Page 3

THE FOURTEENTH AMENDMENT (SECTION 1): All persons born or naturalized in the United States and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and the state wherein they reside. “No state shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any persons within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

Trayvon Martin’s death reminds us again that justice is not blind when it comes to our Black men and boys

Throughout the country the death of Trayvon Martin has sparked fury. His death parallels thousands of young Black boys throughout the country, weekly. In Milwaukee, the number of homicide deaths of Black males in 2011 was 170 for Black males between the ages of 15-24. For White males between those same ages, the number was 30 homicides. The fact that Trayvon’s death was at the hands of a self-appointed neighborhood watchman simply was the straw that broke the camel’s back. Many media commentators have stated there has been too much emotion before all of the facts are in; and, racing to judgement before a full investigation was very premature. But if the situation had been reversed with George Zimmerman dead and Trayvon alive, Martin would have been held in jail that night, we believe! In too many cases, that is the norm. There would be extensive reports about what happened as Martin would have been handcuffed, taken to the police department, interrogated thoroughly and probably held until all witnesses’ statements could be checked. This happens on a daily basis. While by law one is innocent until proven guilty, thousands of Black boys, Black men and elders are iconically guilty until proven innocent. Institutionalized racism....often subtle and subconscious, engrained for so long, is real! It is so engrained that it plays out in our own race. Look at Black on Black crime.

MCJ EDITORIAL

Hoodies have become a stereotype; a national, institutionalized image. For as the nightly news spews the happenings of the evening robberies, now videotaped for posterity, the robbers are often wearing hoodies. The assumption is that hoodies are worn to hide the face. Hoodies are most often worn for warmth. It’s a low-cost protection from the elements. They are not singularly a robber’s fashion statement. However, many a Black mother has said “no hoodies” because they fear the image and more significantly understand the bias. Yes, Black mothers have been having “the conversation” with their boys, for over 100 years. Regrettably, it remains salient yet in 2012. There needs to be “the conversation”... about keeping your pants up and not haning from your buttocks. Our boys must understand the message and imagery of that fashion statement. They must also learn not to run if a policeman approaches you. And, don’t reach for anything while talking to a policeman. We must teach them to ask: “May I call my mom or dad, they need to know about this?” They must also ask: “Am I being held for something? If so, what am I being questioned for?” And, if the patrolman states they are investi-

gating something, teach your kids to ask: “Can I have someone present with me who understands what these questions are about”. Our children must be taught the things that will save their lives. No, these precaustions do not free Zimmerman of whatever guilt the findings will prove; nor does it soothe the pain we all feel for the Martin family and the harsh reality that another Black child has died needlessly. Yes, we must continue to insist upon the truth associated with Trayvon Martin’s death. Zimmerman must be interrogated thoroughly as Trayvon would have been....he would have never been able to just walk away. The U.S. Justice Department is now involved and will want all of the records for Zimmerman and Martin, and the law enforcement officers who were involved that night. Justice cannot be “just us”! Speak with any a Black mother, father, or man or teen and they can tell you stories that belie what the laws are supposed to represent. That is the fury of the Martin case. And new laws that permit people to carry their guns to “protect themselves” is a return to the insanity of the wild, wild West ! These new laws must be repelled. They serve no good purpose in any community....regardless of race. We are reminded of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and his non-violent campaigns. Protest for justice is necessary and non-violence is a virtue!

School psychologist speaks to realities of growing up Black and male in America

By Taki S. Raton

(Editor’s Note: This interview of psychologist Dr. Umar R. AbdullahJohnson by Taki S. Raton was supposed to be run the first week of February, almost three weeks before the February 26 killing of 17-yearold Trayvon Martin, who was shot to death by self-appointed neighborhood watch person George Zimmerman in Sandford, Florida. But due to space limitations, we had to hold the story until --ironically--now when the public’s attention is rivated on the shooting and the coverup by Sandford police, which has touched-off a fire-storm in relation to race, racial profiling of Black boys and men, what our boys and men wear, as well as the right of citizens to carry concealed weapons for “self-defense.”) The following interview of The Nationally certified school psychologist, kinsmen to abolitionist Frederick Douglas and a presenter in the renowned and widely acclaimed DVD “Hidden Colors,” Dr. Umar R. Abdullah-Johnson was jointly interviewed recently by this writer and First Work multimedia producer Warren Muhammad of the Final Call Newspaper. As part of a national tour, Dr. Johnson was on a three-day lecture schedule in Chicago speaking to educators and community audiences on the “Psycho-Academic War Against Black Boys.” The following comments were recorded on the third day of this engagement on January 26, following his presentation to Chicago Public School social workers at the South Loop Hotel. Questions were selected from a wide range of published articles by Dr. Johnson. Appreciation is extended to Chicago’s Black Star Project for arranging this interview. Raton: How have Black parents and adults become so desensitized to the pain of our children, particularly our boys? Dr. Johnson: One of the biggest reasons or ways that desensitization has taken place is by way of the massive indoctrination of Black parents with the belief that the system has the best interest of their children at heart. Many black parents especially mothers find it difficult to understand that there is a psycho-academic war against Black children in general and Black boys in particular. I think that the menticide of the Black parent is actually making them an active participant in the mis-education and extermination of their children because they are finding it difficult to believe that society would

be determined to marginalize and harm an entire generation of children. And unfortunately, until they come to the realization that that is exactly what is happening to their sons and daughters, it is going to be difficult to reverse the carnage because children generally cannot protect and fend for themselves. They need their communities and their families to do that for them. So without the community and the family as a protective safeguard for the youth, I think that it will become eminently conclusive that one day there will be no more Black youth. (“Mentacide” as labeled by Dr. Bobby Wright in 1985 is the deliberate and systematic destruction of a group’s mind and their unique way of life knowing, life thinking, and life being.) Raton: How does the five-stage cycle of “Institutional Repression” ultimately place Black males on the path of incarceration? Dr. Johnson: I have discovered in my work, in my research and particularly in my own experience as a psychologist and as an educator that the five stages that ever so increasingly large numbers of our Black boys are now moving through during their short life span takes them from birth to a premature extermination by the age of 25. The first stage in the psycho-academic holocaust against Black boys is mis-education. Mis-education has three goals. The first is to teach the Black male child to hate himself. That’s most important. The second is to teach the Black boy to love White culture. The third is to “special educate” the Black males and the fourth is to effeminize and homosexualize the Black male child. Now the effiminization and homosexualization is an over-arching goal of public education. It is the job of the White middle-class teacher to break the Black male’s spirit; to psychologically emasculate him so that he simply acquiesces into the oppression that the society has in store for him. And I always say that it is going to be difficult to rescue the effiminization of Black boys as long as their education is in the hands of White women. Now, if a White female teacher is not successful in breaking his spirit, we then go to stage two which is the psycho-tropic medicalization of Black boys. That is the deliberate usage of psychological chemicals to induce a submission to the American social order. And so the use of Risperdal, Adderall

The first stage in the psycho-academic holocaust against Black boys is miseducation. Mis-education has three goals. The first is to teach the Black male child to hate himself. That’s most important. The second is to teach the Black boy to love White culture. The third is to “special educate” the Black males and the fourth is to effeminize and homosexualize the Black male child.” and the list goes on. These chemicals are used to do to the brain what you could not do to the spirit. So if the White middle-class female is unsuccessful in breaking the spirit of the Black boy, she then turns to the psycho-tropic drug cartel to induce the submission psychologically. So first, you try to effeminize the Black male child. If that is not successful, you go to psycho-tropic medication. If the Black boy still is a “man child” and had not been broken through mis-education and schooling, you now go to juvenile incarceration. So juvenile incarceration is the full fledged physical containment of the Black male spirit and the Black male threat. You see, the whole purpose of miseducation is to make the Black boy psychosocially drop out of his own life. Mis-education is designed to engender in the Black male’s mind a desire to not want to achieve. Miseducation stamps out all interest in learning. Children by nature want to learn. Black boys want to learn like everyone else. But what they don’t want is the differential treatment that belittles them, that psychologically castrates them and makes them feel like they are less than human. To put it another way, the schools are doing exactly what slavery use to do, which is to dehumanize the Black man. And so when we look around our community and we see Black boys acting like animals, it is because they were treated in like fashion in the public school setting. A good example of how this works can be found in the “Standford Prison Experiment” conducted by a team of researchers led by psychology professor Philip Zimbardo at Standford University from August 14-20, 1971. It was funded by a grant from the US Office of Naval Research and was of interest to both the US Navy

and Marine Corps in order to determine the causes of conflict between military guards and prisoners. What this study revealed was that people will act the way they are treated. You become the surroundings that you are subjected to. Black children act out because they are being subjected to a hostile animalistic environment in today’s public educational system. And after they come out of juvenile incarceration, that’s when the reality sets in the Black male’s mind that “I’ve been lied to my whole life. My mother and my father told me; my pastor told me that if I go to school and do my work most of the time, study for my test and past them most of the time, listen to what the teacher has to say most of the time, I will graduate, get a diploma, go to college, graduate, find a good job, get married and live happily ever after.” They found out that that was all a hoax, a big lie. And now they are out on the street and not allowed to go back to school. They have psychological frustration and alienation. They become irritable and they feel disrespected. Our Black boys are not acting like this on purpose and it is really not a part of some kind of hyper-masculine personality. They are depressed. They are sad as hell, and they are in much pain. They are dealing silently with trauma. But they are too afraid to admit it because many of them have egos that have been torn to pieces by White women, by their own families, by their community, and by the media. So to admit that I am in pain, to admit that I need help to them means to admit that I am less than a man. And that they are not willing to do. Keep in mind that the minute slavery ended, they immediately began to build state-wide prison systems because they knew that they were going to engineer the education and eco-

nomic order to eventually over time lead the Black man to jail which means, in a sense, straight back to slavery. We still have slave ships. They now call it prisons. They just don’t sit on water, they now sit on land. Raton: You alluded to this point yesterday Wednesday in your presentation. Are we finding in today’s mainstream society, and even in some notable segments of Black culture, that effiminization and homosexuality are actually being fashioned and encouraged towards both our African American male youth and grown men? Dr. Johnson: The homosexualization of the Black man is the current Eugenics apparatus that is underway. Every 50 to 100 years, the American social order changes its primary strategy to bring about the annihilation of our race. For example, in the 1970’s until the year 2000, HIV Aids was the predominant strategy of population extermination for African people. Chemical dependence was also a weapon. Police brutality was a weapon. Mass incarceration was a weapon. And today, homosexuality is a weapon. Now, most people will ask, how can homosexuality ever be a weapon in the population control war? It is because homosexuality is a more effective strategy than mass incarceration. It is a more effective strategy than Black-on-Black crime. It is more effective than police brutality. Why? Because in order for police brutality to work; in order for

THE MILWAUKEE COMMUNITY JOURNAL

mass incarceration to be effective, you have to have a life that has already been born. But with homosexuality, you prevent the man’s semen from meeting the women’s egg. So you prevent life from being created in the first place. And even more importantly, the victims themselves actually carry out the genocide. And so it was actually going back to 1972 when the movement of homosexuality began to be developed and pushed. So what happens the next year? In 1973, the American Psychiatric Association holds its annual convention where they vote that homosexuality should no longer by considered a mental disorder. By April of 1974, homosexuality was deemed normal behavior. That was only 37 years ago. So sexual confusion amongst Black males is a very effective weapon in the population control war against us. Raton: Our children are born normal like everyone else and, in your own words, “can be successful like all other youth and will respond to love and proper treatment like everyone else.” Where does the process of Black male mistreatment, maltreatment, and mis-education begin and what form does it take? Dr. Johnson: Mis-education begins at birth. The first day of life for Black children is when they become subjected to self-hatred and self-hating messages about themselves. They are also receiving messages (continued on page 6)

Published twice weekly, Wednesday & Friday

3612 North Martin Luther King Drive, Milwaukee, WI 53212 MCJ STAFF: Patricia O’Flynn -Pattillo Publisher, CEO Robert J. Thomas Assoc. Publisher Todd Thomas, Vice Pres. Mikel Holt, Assoc. Publisher Thomas E. Mitchell, Jr., Editor Kia Marie Green, Mang. Editor Teretha Martin, Technical Consultant/Webmaster Josephine Joki, Billing

Dept./Publisher’s Admin. Assist. Colleen Newsom, Classified Advertising Jimmy V. Johnson, Sales Rep. Joan Hollingsworth, Sales Rep. CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Taki S. Raton, Rev. Roxanne Cardenas, Troy A. Sparks, Sports Editor PHOTOGRAPHER: Yvonne Kemp

Opinion and comments expressed on the Perspectives page do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher or management of the MCJ. Letters and “other perspectives” are accepted but may be edited for content and length.


The realities of growing up Black and male in America

(continued from page 3) about themselves that is directly or indirectly coming from the dominant culture. And so from the first day that they enter this world, the mis-education and the self-hatred training towards our babies begin. It intensifies in preschool because in preschool, for those that send their children to preschool, this is the first time that the Black boy comes face to face with the institutions of the American social order where he is expected to conform to the expectations from individuals who don’t care about him, who don’t know him, who don’t love him. In preschool and in kindergarten, for the first time, you are being given orders by people who care nothing about you. And on that note, last year, we had a record number of Black kindergarten boys – 4-, 5-, and 6-year-olds who were expelled from kindergarten. Now, what can a 5-year-old boy do, what can he do to earn him an expulsion from kindergarten? In the 90’s, a policy of “Zero Tolerance” began to be implemented in the public schools. Zero Tolerance says that we are going to have zero tolerance for anyone who threatens or actually commits harm to anyone. Every school district in America functions under this ruling where they expel Black boys by the dozens for doing what – for reacting to disrespectful behavior by White folks and other teachers in the classroom. Raton: Can you define for us please your conceptualization of “Mental Violence” and “Psychological Terrorism”? Dr. Johnson: Mental Violence is the violence that occurs in the mind of an individual when they are force fed negative information about themselves and are then forced to try to obtain some degree of sanity as a result of the psychological poison that has been put into their mind. You see, the mind is like a plant. Plans are rooted in soil. The brain is the soil. Every seed sowed must grow and

The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 Page 5

bear fruit. So whenever you teach a child to hate himself, when you teach him that he is nothing, but most importantly, when you teach him that he will never be nothing, then he is automatically wrestling with himself and second guessing his ability and possibilities. Psychological Terrorism is the deliberate external social engineering of the minds of Black boys to a point of self hatred and collective self extermination. What is interesting about Blackon-Black homicide is that whenever we talk about Black male violence, nobody puts it in a historical context. Mis-education is the mother of all violence. Economic castration is the father of all violence. If you don’t give me a decent education that would allow me the opportunity to go and get a job, and then even if I have a decent education, if you don’t give me an opportunity to earn a livable wage, how do I feed myself and my family? I am automatically forced by circumstance, not choice, to engage in illegal activity. Our sons are not out here stealing cars because they want to, selling drugs because they want to, robbing people because they want to. It is because they are forced by circumstance through a lack of resources and I think it if trifling that you have educated Negroes, preachers, Imams, politicians who got the nerve to blame Black men for the situation that they are in when they have done nothing to help correct the circumstance and have only by their inaction aided in maintaining it. In 1970, what did they start doing in Black communities? They started taking out the last remains of any factory based manual jobs that we used to work at and were able to earn a significant amount of money where we were a able to take care of our families and our neighborhoods. But now, when you go through Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, Baltimore, you see abandoned factories that have been converted into

luxury apartments that use to employ hundreds of Black people. So in 1970, a concerted effort was made to depopulate the Black community of any industries to eliminate the jobs. When Black men cannot provide for their families that creates Mental Violence. Mental Violence automatically begets some form of escape to cope with it. So in 1980, they dropped off crack deliberately to the Black community. No one can talk to me about a war on drugs. There is no war on drugs. There is only a war on Black men. Raton: Why is it difficult for Black people to take responsibility for our own actions? Dr. Johnson: Because we were taught not to. For 246 years of forced servitude, Black people were engineered to only care about the American social order and the slave master. You were taught not to have any selfregard for you or for your loved ones. Another Black person was not any of your concern. And so you fast forward to 2012, and another Black person still today is none of your concern. It is difficult for Black people to look after our own needs. That’s why we gross a trillion dollars in this American economic system and use little to none of this money for our own benefit. Black boys are catching hell everyday; being special educated, medicated, effiminized every day, and we have the economic potential to build schools just for our Black boys in America to fix this. And we don’t do it? Where does that come from? Where does that extreme sense of neglect for one’s own children and even one’s own future come from? It comes from our enslavement – the deliberate, the deliberate teaching of self denial. Black people are actually trained and conditioned not to come together and build something unique to us that would be of substantive healing benefit to our children, to our community, and to our future. No, you don’t see that happening. We come to-

gether for church. We come together for the Super Bowl. We come together to gossip. We come together to dance and to party. We come together for concerts. But we do not come together to build for our people. We don’t come together and put all of our vast knowledge together to save our people. So there is no wonder that our children are in pain, are failing, suffering and dying. Raton: Lastly, how did it feel to be a part of “Hidden Colors”? Dr. Johnson: It was an honor to be in “Hidden Colors.” When I got the phone call from co-producer brotha Ola, I guess that would have been towards the end of 2010, he gave me a call and said we were putting together a documentary and we absolutely have to have you involved. So we set up a time for director and executive producer brotha Tariq Nasheed to meet me in my office in

Philadelphia. That’s where my portion of the interview was filmed. He asked me some questions. I answered them. I had no idea that “Hidden Colors” would end up being the hit that it was. In fact, I had not guarantee that my interview would even be used in the documentary. And so I am sitting home one day and I get a phone call from one of my close friends who lives in New York City and he said I am at the movie theater watching you. And I said I have never been in any movies so you can’t possibly be watching me. And he said, “Well, the ‘Hidden Colors’ documentary released today at one of the movie houses in New York and we’re watching you and everybody in here is going crazy over who is this Umar Johnson. We never heard of him. We have never seen him.” So that documentary did a lot to bring me into the homes of Black people who don’t live in the northeastern corridor of

the United States. After “Hidden Colors” dropped, I was pretty much known everywhere. And so that DVD really helped raise the consciousness of Black folk, not just because of my participation, but because of every one in it – Tariq Nasheed, Shahrazad Ali, Dr. Booker T. Coleman, Sabir Bey, Dr. Phil Valentine, and Dr. Frances Cress Welsing. It was indeed an honor to be a part of this historical sharing. And in fact, it is interesting that you asked me about “Hidden Colors” because I just confirmed by interview for “Hidden Colors” – Part II. So the second week of February, we are going to be at it again. Brotha Nasheed is going to be coming to Philadelphia for the interview and hopefully with the grace and blessings of the ancestors and the will of the Almighty, we will be able to drop some more jewels for our people. Raton: Thank you!


OFFICE OF THE MILWAUKEE COUNTY ELECTION COMMISSION

NOTICE OF SPRING ELECTION AND SAMPLE BALLOTS APRIL 3, 2012

TO THE ELECTORS OF THE CITY OF MILWAUKEE, MILWAUKEE COUNTY:

Notice is hereby given of a spring election to be held in the City of Milwaukee on the 3rd day of April, 2012, at which the officers named below shall be chosen. The names of the candidates for each office to be voted for, whose nominations have been certified to or filed in this office, are given under the title of the office, each in its proper column, in the sample ballot shown.

The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 Page 7

Alderperson, District 5, appears in Wards 8, 33, 34, 35, 36, 75, 76, 77, 78, 79, 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, 87, 88, 89, 90. Alderperson, District 5 (Vote for One) Jim Bohl Write-In

Alderperson, District 6, appears in Wards 108, 109, 112, 113, 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 139, 140, 141, 142, 175, 176, 177. Alderperson, District 6 (Vote for One) Milele A. Coggs Ieshuh Griffin Write-In

INFORMATION TO ELECTORS

Upon entering the polling place, an elector shall state his or her name and address and sign the poll book before being permitted to vote. Where ballots are distributed to electors, the initials of two inspectors must appear on the ballot. Upon being permitted to vote, the elector shall retire alone to a voting booth and cast his or her ballot except that an elector who is a parent or guardian may be accompanied by the elector’s minor child or minor ward. An election official may inform the elector of the proper manner for casting a vote, but the official may not in any manner advise or indicate a particular voting choice.

Where optical scan voting systems are used, the elector shall connect the arrow next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall write in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided and connect the arrow on the write-in line.

Where touch screen voting systems are used, the elector shall touch the screen next to the name of the candidate of his or her choice for each office for which he or she intends to vote. To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, the elector shall type in the name of the person of his or her choice in the space provided for a write-in vote.

The vote should not be cast in any other manner. Not more than five minutes time shall be allowed inside a voting booth or machine. Sample ballots or other materials to assist the elector in casting his or her vote may be taken into the booth and copied. The sample ballot shall not be shown to anyone so as to reveal how the ballot is marked.

If the elector spoils an optical scan ballot, he or she shall return it to an election official who shall issue another ballot in its place, but not more than three ballots shall be issued to any one elector. If the ballot has not been initialed by two inspectors or is defective in any other way, the elector shall return it to the election official, who shall issue a proper ballot in its place. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the voting booth, properly deposit the ballot and promptly leave the polling place.

The elector may spoil a touch screen ballot at the voting station before the ballot is cast.

After an official optical scan ballot is marked, it shall be inserted in the security sleeve, if provided, so the marks do not show. After casting his or her vote, the elector shall leave the booth, insert the ballot in the voting device and discard the sleeve, or deliver the ballot to an inspector for deposit. The elector shall leave the polling place promptly.

Alderperson, District 7, appears in Wards 46, 64, 65, 66, 67, 68, 69, 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105, 106, 107, 110, 111, 160, 161. Alderperson, District 7 (Vote for One) Willie C. Wade Write-In

Alderperson, District 8, appears in Wards 215, 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 258, 259. Alderperson, District 8 (Vote for One) Benjamin Juarez Bob Donovan Write-In

Alderperson, District 9, appears in Wards 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 23, 24. Alderperson, District 9 (Vote for One) Robert W. Puente Ray Harmon Write-In

After an official touch screen ballot is cast, the elector shall leave the polling place promptly.

An elector may select an individual to assist in casting his or her vote if the elector declares to the presiding official that he or she is unable to read, has difficulty reading, writing or understanding English or that due to disability is unable to cast his or her ballot. The selected individual rendering assistance may not be the elector’s employer or an agent of that employer or an officer or agent of a labor organization which represents the elector.

A sample ballot is shown. Your ballot will be the same as the sample ballot if you reside in Wards 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11, 13. Following are contests that may appear on your ballot if you do not reside in the wards mentioned above: County Board Supervisor, District 1, appears in Wards 20, 21, 22, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56. County Board Supervisor District 1 (Vote for One) Andrew Cegielski Theodore A. Lipscomb, Sr. Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 2, appears in Wards 3, 4, 12, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 23, 24, 25, 26, 28, 29, 44, 45, 46, 47, 48, 49, 50, 66, 67, 68, 69, 70, 71, 98. County Board Supervisor District 2 (Vote for One) Nikiya Q. Harris Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 3, appears in Wards 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 179, 180, 181, 182. County Board Supervisor District 3 (Vote for One) Gerry Broderick Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 4, appears in Wards 216, 217, 218, 219, 220, 221, 222, 223, 241, 242, 243, 244, 247, 248, 249, 252, 257, 258, 259, 284, 285, 290, 291. County Board Supervisor District 4 (Vote for One) Marina Dimitrijevic Bill Buresh Write-In

Alderperson, District 10, appears in Wards 91, 92, 93, 94, 95, 96, 163, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214. Alderperson, District 10 (Vote for One) Richard L. Geldon Michael J. Murphy Write-In

Alderperson, District 11, appears in Wards 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 265, 266, 267, 268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281. Alderperson, District 11 (Vote for One) Joe Dudzik Daniel K. Plumb Write-In

Alderperson, District 12, appears in Wards 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 250, 253, 254, 255, 256, 257 Alderperson, District 12 (Vote for One) Jose G. Perez James N. Witkowiak Write-In

Alderperson, District 13, appears in Wards 282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 293, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, 316, 317. Alderperson, District 13 (Vote for One) Terry L. Witkowski Richard A. Pfeiffer Write-In

Alderperson, District 14, appears in Wards 241, 242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 251, 252, 289, 290, 291, 292, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302. Alderperson, District 14 (Vote for One) T. Anthony Zielinski Jan Pierce Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 5, appears in Wards 104, 105, 106, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 165, 169, 170, 171, 185, 186, 187, 190, 196, 197, 198, 200, 201, 202, 214.

Alderperson, District 15, appears in Wards 143, 144, 145, 146, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 162, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 201.

County Board Supervisor, District 6, appears in Wards 85, 86, 210, 211.

The polling places in the City of Milwaukee will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. City of Milwaukee residents contact the City of Milwaukee Election Commission, City Hall, at 286-3491 for location of your polling place and if you need further information regarding accessibility of polling places to elderly and disabled voters. The web address is www.Milwaukee.gov.

County Board Supervisor District 5 (Vote for One) Russell W. Stamper II Priscilla E. Coggs-Jones Write-In

County Board Supervisor District 6 (Vote for One) Barbara Schumacher Jim Luigi Schmitt Write-In

Alderperson, District 15 (Vote for One) Willie Hines Eyon Biddle, Sr. Write-In

GIVEN under our hands at the Courthouse, in the City of Milwaukee, this 22nd day of March, 2012. THE MILWAUKEE COUNTY BOARD OF ELECTION COMMISSIONERS

Judith A. Mount

County Board Supervisor, District 7, appears in Wards 27, 30, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 51, 61, 63, 64, 65, 72, 73, 74, 76, 91, 94, 95, 96, 97, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103, 107, 163. County Board Supervisor District 7 (Vote for One) Michael Mayo Jermaine A. Buckner Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 10, appears in Wards 60, 108, 109, 110, 111, 113, 114, 116, 117, 144, 147, 148, 149, 172, 173, 174, 178, 183, 184, 188, 189, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 199. County Board Supervisor District 10 (Vote for One) Radolph Matthews Jr. David Bowen Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 11, appears in Wards 268, 269, 270, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 313, 315. County Board Supervisor District 11 (Vote for One) Mark A. Borkowski Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 12, appears in Wards 215, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 235, 236, 237, 238, 239, 240, 250, 251, 253, 254, 255, 256. County Board Supervisor District 12 (Vote for One) Peggy Romo West Sylvia Ortiz Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 13, appears in Wards 57, 58, 59, 62, 112, 115, 118, 119, 120, 121, 122, 123, 124, 125, 126, 137, 138, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 145, 146, 175, 176, 177. County Board Supervisor District 13 (Vote for One) Bria Grant Willie Johnson, Jr. Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 14, appears in Wards 245, 246, 260, 281, 282, 283, 286, 287, 288, 289, 292, 293, 294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 308, 309, 310, 311, 312, 314, 316, 317. County Board Supervisor District 14 (Vote for One) Jason Haas Write-In

County Board Supervisor, District 15, appears in Wards 80, 81, 82, 83, 84, 87, 88, 89, 92, 93, 164, 166, 167, 168, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 212, 213, 263.

W. Scott Nelson

OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE & NON-PARTISAN OFFICE PAPELETA OFICIAL DE VOTACIÓN PARA VOTO PREFERENTE PRESIDENCIAL Y CARGOS NO PARTIDISTAS NOTICE TO ELECTORS: THIS BALLOT MAY BE INVALID UNLESS INITIALED BY 2 ELECTION INSPECTORS. IF CAST AS AN ABSENTEE BALLOT, THE BALLOT MUST BEAR THE INITIALS OF THE MUNICIPAL OR DEPUTY CLERK. AVISO A LOS ELECTORES: ESTE VOTO PODRÍA SER NULO A MENOS QUE CONTENGA LAS INICIALES DE 2 INSPECTORES ELECTORALES. SI EL VOTO ES POR CORREO, LA PAPELETA DEBE TENER LAS INICIALES DEL SECRETARIO MUNICIPAL O SECRETARIO SUPLENTE. IMPORTANT: USE ONLY A #2 PENCIL OR THE MARKING PEN PROVIDED. DO NOT USE RED INK! IMPORTANTE: USE UN LÁPIZ N° 2 O EL MARCADOR PROVISTO. ¡NO USE TINTA ROJA! to the RIGHT of the candidate’s name. To vote for a person whose To vote for the candidate of your choice, complete the arrow name does not appear on the ballot, write the person’s name on the line provided and complete the arrow to the right of the line. a la DERECHA del nombre del candidato. Para votar por una Para votar por el candidato de su preferencia, complete la flecha persona cuyo nombre no aparece en la papeleta, escriba el nombre de la persona en la línea provista y complete la flecha a la DERECHA de la línea.

PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE / VOTO DE PREFERENCIA PRESIDENCIAL In the Presidential Preference Election, if you vote more than once, your vote will not be counted. To vote for the candidate of your choice, or for the uninstructed delegation, complete the to the RIGHT of the candidate’s name or to the RIGHT of “Uninstructed Delegation.” To vote for a person whose name does not appear on the ballot, write the person’s name on the line provided and complete the arrow . Connect ONE arrow ONLY for this office ONLY within the party of your choice. YOU HAVE 1 OF 3 OPTIONS: Express your preference for one of the persons whose name is printed on this ballot; or Vote for an uninstructed delegation from Wisconsin to the national convention of the party of your choice; or Write in the name of another person to become the Presidential candidate of the party of your choice.

JUDICIAL (CONT.)

MAYOR ALCALDE

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

HANNAH C. DUGAN LINDSEY GRADY write-in / Por escrito

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

MARK A. SANDERS write-in / Por escrito

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

JEFFREY A. WAGNER write-in / Por escrito

JANE CARROLL write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 43 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 43

MARSHALL B. MURRAY write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 46 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 46 (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

County Board Supervisor District 16 (Vote for One) John F. Weishan Jr. Write-In

Uninstructed Delegation/Delegacion No Partidista

County Board Supervisor, District 18, appears in Wards 1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 75, 77, 78, 79, 90. County Board Supervisor District 18 (Vote for One) Tracey Corder Deanna Alexander Write-In

Alderperson, District 1, appears in Wards 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 47, 48, 49, 50, 51, 52, 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 59, 60, 61, 62, 63. Alderperson, District 1 (Vote for One) Ashanti Hamilton Write-In

Alderperson, District 2, appears in Wards 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 37, 38, 39, 40, 41, 42, 43, 44, 45, 70, 71, 72, 73, 74. Alderperson, District 2 (Vote for One) Joe Davis, Sr. Write-In

Alderperson, District 3, appears in Wards 125, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 131, 132, 133, 134, 135, 136, 137, 138, 178, 179, 180, 182, 183. Alderperson, District 3 (Vote for One) Nik Kovac Write-In

Alderperson, District 4, appears in Wards 181, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, 189, 190, 191, 192, 193, 194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200. Alderperson, District 4 (Vote for One) Bob Bauman Write-In

write-in / Por escrito

ALDERPERSON, DISTRICT 9 CONCEJAL, DISTRICT 9 (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

ROBERT W. PUENTE RAY HARMON write-in / Por escrito

CHRIS ABELE write-in / Por escrito

COUNTY COMPTROLLER CONTRALOR DEL CONDADO (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

SCOTT B. MANSKE KRISTIE BUNTING

OFFICIAL BALLOT FOR PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE VOTE & NONPARTISAN OFFICE PAPELETA OFICIANL PARA VOTO PREFERENTE PRESIDENCIAL Y CARGOS NO PARTIDISTAS

write-in / Por escrito

COUNTY SUPERVISOR, DIST. 18 SUPERVISOR DEL CONDADO, DIST. 18 (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

TRACEY CORDER DEANNA ALEXANDER

write-in / Por escrito

write-in / Por escrito

COURT OF APPEALS JUDGE, DISTRICT 1 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE APELACIONES, DIST. 1

SPENCER COGGS TIM CARPENTER

COUNTY EXECUTIVE EJECUTIVO DEL CONDADO

Uninstructed Delegation/Delegacion No Partidista

JUDICIAL

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

write-in / Por escrito

County Board Supervisor District 15 (Vote for One) David Cullen Dan Cody Write-In

BARACK OBAMA

write-in / Por escrito

CITY TREASURER TESORERO DE LA CIUDAD

BONNIE L. GORDON

REPUBLICAN PARTY PARTIDO REPUBLICANO

DEMOCRATIC PARTY PARTIDO DEMÓCRATA

MARTIN MATSON JOHNNY THOMAS

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

COUNTY / CONDADO

write-in / Por escrito

write-in / Por escrito

CITY COMPTROLLER CONTRALOR DE LA CIUDAD

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

NEWT GINGRICH JOHN HUNTSMAN MITT ROMNEY MICHELE BACHMANN RON PAUL RICK SANTORUM

GRANT F. LANGLEY

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 38 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 38

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 39 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 39

USTED TIENE 1 DE 3 OPCIONES: Expresar su preferencia por una de las personas cuyo nombre está impreso en esta papeleta, o Votar por una delegación no partidista de Wisconsin en la convención nacional del partido de su preferencia, o Escribir el nombre de otra persona para convertirse en candidato presidencial del partido de su preferencia.

write-in / Por escrito

CITY ATTORNEY ABOGADO DE LA CIUDAD

IN THE PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE ELECTION, YOU MAY ONLY VOTE ONCE.

Conecte UNA flecha SOLAMENTE para este cargo SÓLO dentro del partido de su preferencia.

TOM BARRETT EDWARD MC DONALD

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 28 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 28

En las Elecciones Presidenciales, si usted vota más de una vez, su voto no será tomado en cuenta. Para votar por el candidato de su preferencia o para la delegación no partidista, complete la flecha a la DERECHA del nombre del candidato o a la DERECHA de “Delegación No Partidista”. Para votar por una persona cuyo nombre no aparece en la papeleta de votación, escriba el nombre de la persona en la línea provista y complete la flecha .

MUNICIPAL

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 23 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 23

EN LAS ELECCIONES DE PREFERENCIA PRESIDENCIAL, USTED PUEDE VOTAR SÓLO UNA VEZ.

County Board Supervisor, District 16, appears in Wards 261, 262, 264, 265, 266, 267, 271, 272, 273, 274, 280.

David L. Sartori

APRIL 3, 2012 3 de abril de 2012 FOR / PARA

CITY OF MILWAUKEE la ciudad de milwaukee

A.D. 9 WARD 1 Ballot issued by/ Papeleta de votación emitida por

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

RALPH ADAM FINE write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 4 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 4

(initials of inspectors / iniciales de los inspectores)

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

MEL FLANAGAN write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 8 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 8 (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

Absentee Ballot issued by/ Papeleta de votación por correo emitida por

(initials of municipal or deputy clerk) (iniciales del secretario municipal o del secretario suplente)

WILLIAM SOSNAY write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 17 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 17 (Vote for one/Vote por uno)

CAROLINA MARIA STARK NELSON WESLEY PHILLIPS, III write-in / Por escrito

CIRCUIT COURT JUDGE, BRANCH 20 JUEZ DE TRIBUNAL DE CIRCUITO, RAMA 20

Certification of Elector Assistance I certify that the within ballot was marked by me for an elector who is authorized under the law to have assistance upon request and as directed by the elector.

Certificación de Asistencia al Votante Certifico que la papeleta de votación fue marcada por mi en nombre de un votante que está autorizado por la ley a recibir asistencia al solicitaria y conforme el votante lo ha pedido.

(Vote for one/Vote por uno)

DENNIS P. MORONEY write-in / Por escrito

(signature of assisting elector) (firma del votante que presta ayuda)


YOUTH & EDUCATION

The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 page 9

MPS year-to-year test results largely mirror state Significant gains seen in some key areas; proficiency exceeds voucher school’s rate

Angela Dye, a graduate of Alverno College, returned to her alma mater recently to trumpet her book, "Empowerment Starts Here: Seven Principles to Empowering Urban Youth." Dye also shared concepts from her book with the faculty, members of the human relations council, student education association members and student teachers (pictured above with Dye, who is holding a copy of her book) in Alverno's Alumnae Hall, 3400 S. 43rd St. The book provides insight on how educators can increase the efficacy and achievement of urban youth, a population Dye has proudly worked with throughout her teaching career. (Photo by Yvonne Kemp)

Alverno graduate returns to campus to share success with concept of empowerment Since its founding in 1887, Alverno College has promoted the importance of empowerment. Recently Angela Dye returned to her alma mater to share her professional successes with empowerment. Dye addressed all faculty, members of the human relations council, student education association members and student teachers, and share the concepts in her recently published book, “Empowerment Starts Here: Seven Principles to Empowering Urban Youth.” The book provides insight on how educators can increase the efficacy and achievement of urban youth, a population Dye has proudly worked with throughout her teaching career. “Empowerment Starts Here” covers an experimental approach to sochange within urban cial communities by way of seven distinct principles for student empowerment. They are Commitment, Innate Power, Personal Assets, Global Efficacy, Individual Responsibility, Sense of Self and Shared Accountability. Throughout the book, Dye explains each of the principles, and of-

Boys & Girls Clubs seeks top talent at career fair

On Friday, March 30, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee will host a walkin career fair to recruit for more than 50 positions. The career fair will take place at its Mardak Administration & Training Center, located at 1558 N. 6th St. All attendees should park in the building’s lower level lot and enter through its lower level doors. Top qualified candidates, who meet the skills and qualifications in youth development, will be interviewed at the career fair. For a full listing of the featured positions, candidates should visit the Clubs’ website at www.boysg i r l s c l u b s . o rg / c a r e e r f a i r. a s p x . www.boysgirlsclubs.org. Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Milwaukee is celebrating its 125th anniversary in 2012. Known as the oldest and largest youth-serving agency in Milwaukee, the Clubs offers high quality after-school and summer programming for children ages 5-18, focusing on those who have major life obstacles, most often poverty. The Clubs operates 38 sites, which include six primary locations, 30 school sites, Camp Whitcomb/Mason in Hartland and an extension site at St. Charles Youth and Family Services in Milwaukee. Membership to the Clubs is only $5 per year, per child, but no one is ever turned away based on inability to pay. For all the latest Club news, visit www.boysgirlsclubs.org, www.facebook.com/bgcmilwaukee or Twitter @bgcmilwaukee.

fers real-life examples of them at work in the classroom. “I think the world right now is concentrated on how to increase student achievement, especially among students who are disenfranchised in learning. Sharing power with students is a way to build motivation and efficacy,” said Dye. Desiree Pointer-Mace, the Associate Dean of Alverno College’s graduate program said the school was very much looking forward to the lecture with hopes that Dye would

“help our candidates and our faculty continue to refine our commitment to serving urban students. That is a shared commitment that she has both from her time as a student and as an educator and leader,” she said. “Empowerment Starts Here: Seven Principles to Empowering Urban Youth” was published by Rowman & Littlefield Education and is available direct from the publisher at www.rowmaneducation.com. It can also be purchased at Amazon.com. About Angela Dye Angela Dye prides herself on being a product of the urban environment and has a background that personally identifies with the at-risk learners she serves. As a teacher, administrator, and author, Angela has developed an Empowerment Model instructional framework that combats the psychosocial challenges that impedes academic success. Dye is a native of Milwaukee and graduated from Milwaukee Public Schools. She was a Milwaukee educator (teacher/director) for over 10 years.

Milwaukee Public Schools students largely mirrored the year-to-year change seen across Wisconsin in statewide test results released Tuesday. Students in Milwaukee Public Schools also posted higher proficiency rates than students using publiclyfunded vouchers to attend private schools, according to the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction, though the figures show much work remains for educators across the city of Milwaukee. MPS saw relatively stable year-to-year performance in both reading in math on the Wisconsin Knowledge and Concepts Examination, with math proficiency up by roughly one percentage point. That continues a trend of growing math proficiency in the district, which has risen by 10 percentage points over the last six years compared to five points statewide. In total, 40 MPS schools saw year-to-year increases in the percentage of students rated proficient or better in both math and reading between 2010-11 and 2011-12. Twenty-eight MPS schools are now roughly at or above the state average in reading and 26 are roughly at or above the state average in math. MPS 10th graders improved in reading and math at a faster rate than the state, with the most significant reading growth coming from African-American students. In addition, 48.4% of MPS 3rd graders who scored “minimal” in reading in 2010-11 moved up to “basic” or better as 4th graders in 2011-12. That growth would not be captured in proficiency figures because the students are not yet proficient as measured by the test. Those data show significant progress among some of the district’s lowest-performing students and at the most difficult grade-level transitions, despite the overall slight

This is our first test under the new comprehensive literacy and comprehensive math/science plans. National experts confirm that the plans are absolutely the right measures. Now we need the time to continue putting them in place and see their effects.

2400 W Burleigh St.

Diverse business relationships are an important part of an evolving community. That’s why we’re dedicated to the success and advancement of minority- and women-owned businesses. Diverse businesses not only contribute to our supply chain and business strategies, but also to the communities we serve. From architectural and construction services to financial and legal services, minority- and women-owned businesses provide the resources needed for us to evolve together.

Visit www.wisconsinenergy.com/supplier to learn more about participating in the We Energies Supplier Diversity Initiative.

2K11078-PC-MCJ

drop in reading proficiency in the district. The movement of students from minimal to basic in particular shows that time will be needed to improve the results of students who had been struggling for years, Superintendent Gregory Thornton said, noting that proficiency rates are still unacceptably low. “This is our first test under the new comprehensive literacy and comprehensive math/science plans. National experts confirm that the plans are absolutely the right measures. Now we need the time to continue putting them in place and see their effects. “As I’ve said before, I will be looking in future years to explore ways to extend the school day, extend the school year, expand teacher professional development and rely more heavily on summer programs to bring our students to where they need to be,” Dr. Thornton said. “We know the funding cuts that have increased class sizes, eliminated some teacher coaches and cut into professional development probably don’t help our situation, but we cannot and will not make that an excuse,” the Superintendent said. “We will work harder to improve education for our young people and we ask our parents to pledge to do the same.”


CLASSIFIEDS/LEGALS/PUBLIC NOTICES The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 page 11

SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COUNTY DIVORCE-40101 Case No. 12FA000748 In Re: The marriage of TOM E. RICHMOND, Petitioner and SHINITHA RICHMOND, Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN, TO THE PERSON NAMED ABOVE AS RESPONDENT: You are notified that the petitioner named above has filed a Petition for divorce or legal separation against you. You must respond with a written demand for a copy of the Petition within 45 days from the day after the first date of publication.

The demand must be sent or delivered to the court at: Clerk of Court 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to TOM E. RICHMOND, 3424 N 6th St. Milwaukee 53212 It is recommended, but not required, that you have attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the Petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the Petition and you may lose your right to object anything that is or may be incorrect in the Petition.

A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment or seizure of property.

You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of 948.31, Wis. Stats., (Interference with custody by parent or others) is punishable by fines and/or imprisonment.

If you and the petitioner have minor children, documents setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the department under 49.22(9), WIs. Stats., and the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under 767.511(1m), WIs. Stats. are available upon your request from the Clerk of Court.

You are notified of the availability of information from the Circuit Court Commissioner as set forth in 767.105, Wis Stats. 767.105 Information from Circuit Court Commissioner.

(2) Upon the request of a party to an action affecting the family, including a revision of judgment or order under sec. 767.59 or 767.451: (a) The Circuit Court Commissioner shall, with or without charge provide the party with written information on

the following, as appropriate to the action commenced: 1. The procedure for obtaining a judgment or order n the action. 2. The major issues usually addressed in such an action. 3. Community resources and family court counseling services available to assist the parties. 4. The procedure for setting modifying, and enforcing child support awards, or modifying and enforcing legal custody or physical placement judgments or orders. (b) The Circuit Court Commissioner shall provide a party, for inspection or purchase with a copy of the statutory provisions in this chapter generally pertinent to the action. Date: 3-6-2012 By: TOM E. RICHMOND, Petitioner 012-028/3-14-21-28-2012 . SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT MILWAUKEE COUNTY NOTICE and ORDER for NAME CHANGE HEARING Case No. 12CV002572 In the matter of the name change of: AIDAN FLORIAN GALLEGOS By petitioner VICTORIA POPA NOTICE IS GIVEN: A petition was filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: AIDAN FLORIAN GALLEGOS To: AIDAN FLORIAN POPA Birth Certificate: AIDAN FLORIAN GALLEGOS

IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin: By: HONORABLE TIMOTHY WITKOWIAK Branch 22 Place: Milwaukee County Courthouse 901 N. 9th St Room 412 Milwaukee, WI 53233 Date: April 20, 2012 Time: 10:00 AM IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin Date: 3-7-2012 BY THE COURT: HONORABLE TIMOTHY WITKOWIAK Circuit Court Judge 012-027/3-14-21-28-2012 SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN: CIRCUIT COURT: MILWAUKEE COUNTY FAMILY COURT BRANCH Case. No. 12FA000492 In re the Marriage of: HERMILA RAMIREZ DE GARCIA

5361 N. 83rd Street Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53218 Petitioner and JOSE RAMIRO GARCIA 4440 N. 26th St. Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53209 Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the person named above as respondent: You are hereby notified that the petitioner named above has filed a petition for divorce against you. Within 45 days after the 24th day of February, 2012 exclusive of the date just stated, you must respond within a written demand for a copy of the petition. The demand must be sent or delivered to this court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court Milwaukee County Courthouse 901 N. 9th St. Milwaukee, WI 53233 and to Centro Legal the petitioner’s attorney, whose address is: 614 W. National Ave., Flr 2 Milwaukee, WI 53204 You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy of the petition within 45 days, the court may grant judgment against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the petition, and you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the petition. A judgment may be enforced as provided by law. A judgment awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also be enforced by garnishment of wages or seizure of property. Your are further hereby notified that if you and the petitioner have minor children, violation of the following criminal statute is punishable by a fine or imprisonment, or both: 948.31 Interference with custody by parent or others. If you and the petitioner have minor children, a document setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the Department of Workforce Development under Wis. Stat. 49.22(9) and listing the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under Wis. Stat 767.511(1m) is available upon your request from the clerk of court. Your are further hereby notified of the availability of information set forth in Wis. Stat. 767.105 from the office of family court commissioner. Dated: February 24, 2012 Centro Legal Attorneys for the Petitioner By Samantha Kegley Levihn State Bar No. 1050410 614 W. National Ave., Flr 2, Milwaukee WI 53204 414-384-7900 012-023/3-21-28/4-4-2012 SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT:

FAMILY COURT BRANCH WASHINGTON COUNTY Case No. 2012FA001024C In re the marriage of: LISA SEXTON, 1908 W. Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI 53204 Petitioner, and JOSE ANTONIO MARQUEZ-MARIN, ADDRESS UNKNOWN, Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the person named above as respondent: You are hereby notified that the petitioner named above has filed a petitioner for divorce against you. Within forty (40) days after 20th day of March 2012, exclusive of the date just stated, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the petition. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court, Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St., Milwaukee Wisconsin, 53233, and to LISA SEXTON, whose address is: 1908 W. Burnham St., Milwaukee, WI 53204. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy within forty (40) days, the Court may grant a Judgement against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the petition, or you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the petition. A judgement may be enforced as provided by law. A judgement awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also been forced by garnishment of wages or seizure of property. You are hereby further notified that the parties to this action are entitled to notification of the availability of information set forth in sec. 767.081.Stats.The information is available from the family court commissioner. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of the following criminal statue is punishable by a fine not to exceed $10,000 or imprisonment not to exceed two years, or both: 948.31 Interference with custody by parent or others. If you and the petitioner have minor children, a document setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the Department under sec. 46.25(9)(a). Stats, and listing the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under sec. 767.25(1m), Stats., is available upon your request from the clerk of court. Dated this 20th day of March, 2012 By: LISA SEXTON 12-021/3-21-28/4-4- 2012 SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT: NOTICE AND ORDER FOR NAME CHANGE HEARING

MILWAUKEE COUNTY Case No. 12CV003177

In the matter of the name change of: ANTOINE DEVON HAMLER NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT: A petition has been filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: ANTOINE DEVON HAMLER To: ANTWNYUN TYSHINOKO Birth Certificate: ANTOINE DEVON HAMLER IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin: Judge’s Name: KEVIN E MARTENS, BRANCH 27 PLACE: ROOM 415, Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233 DATE: April 27, 2012, TIME: 10:30 A.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. BY THE COURT: KEVIN E MARTENS Circuit Court Judge Dated: 3/16/2012 12-022/3-21-28/4-4-2012 SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT: NOTICE AND ORDER FOR NAME CHANGE HEARING MILWAUKEE COUNTY Case No. 12CV002834 In the matter of the name change of: MARK ALLEN ZUVICH By (Petitioner) MARK ALLEN ZUVICH NOTICE IS GIVEN THAT: A petition has been filed asking to change the name of the person listed above: From: MARK ALLEN ZUVICH To: MARGO SIMONE ALLEN Birth Certificate: MARK ALLEN ZUVICH

IT IS ORDERED: This petition will be heard in the Circuit Court of Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin: Judge’s Name: TIMOTHY WITKOWIAK, PLACE: ROOM 412, Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th Street, Milwaukee, WI 53233 DATE: April 24, 2012, TIME: 8:45 A.M. IT IS FURTHER ORDERED: Notice of this hearing shall be given by publication as a Class 3 notice for three (3) weeks in a row prior to the date of the hearing in the Milwaukee Community Journal a newspaper published in Milwaukee County, State of Wisconsin. BY THE COURT: TIMOTHY WITKOWIAK Circuit Court Judge Dated: 3/8/2012

12-020/3-21-28/4-4-2012

SUMMONS (PUBLICATION) STATE OF WISCONSIN CIRCUIT COURT: FAMILY COURT BRANCH WASHINGTON COUNTY Case No. 2011FA008105D In re the marriage of: ROSA SALAZAR, 2835 S. 11th St., Milwaukee, WI 53215 Petitioner, and IGNACIO CHIQUITO-MONTOYA, ADDRESS UNKNOWN, Respondent THE STATE OF WISCONSIN To the person named above as respondent: You are hereby notified that the petitioner named above has filed a petitioner for divorce against you. Within forty (40) days after 13th day of March 2012, exclusive of the date just stated, you must respond with a written demand for a copy of the petition. The demand must be sent or delivered to the court, whose address is: Clerk of Circuit Court, Milwaukee County Courthouse, 901 N. 9th St., Milwaukee Wisconsin, 53233, and to ROSA SALAZAR, whose address is: 2835 S. 11th St., Milwaukee, WI 53215. You may have an attorney help or represent you. If you do not demand a copy within forty (40) days, the Court may grant a Judgement against you for the award of money or other legal action requested in the petition, or you may lose your right to object to anything that is or may be incorrect in the petition. A judgement may be enforced as provided by law. A judgement awarding money may become a lien against any real estate you own now or in the future, and may also been forced by garnishment of wages or seizure of property. You are hereby further notified that the parties to this action are entitled to notification of the availability of inforset forth in sec. mation 767.081.Stats.The information is available from the family court commissioner. You are further notified that if the parties to this action have minor children, violation of the following criminal statue is punishable by a fine not to exceed $10,000 or imprisonment not to exceed two years, or both: 948.31 Interference with custody by parent or others. If you and the petitioner have minor children, a document setting forth the percentage standard for child support established by the Department under sec. 46.25(9)(a). Stats, and listing the factors that a court may consider for modification of that standard under sec. 767.25(1m), Stats., is available upon your request from the clerk of court. Dated this 13th day of March, 2012 By: ROSA SALAZAR 12-025/3-28/4-4-11- 2012

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 21, 2012. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Wednesday, April 18, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid.

Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 21, 2012. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Tuesday, April 17, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid.

Office of the Milwaukee Public Schools, DIVISION OF FACILITIES AND MAINTENANCE SERVICES, 1124 N. 11th St., Milwaukee, Wisconsin, March 23, 2012. Sealed proposals will be received at 1124 N. 11th St., directed to the attention of Ms. Gina M. Spang, Director of the Division of Facilities and Maintenance Services, pursuant to Section 119.52(3) Wisconsin Statutes, until Thursday, April 19, 2012 at 1:30 P.M., in accordance with plans and specifications for the following work: All contractor(s) and subcontractor(s) are subject to the prevailing wage rates and hours of labor as prescribed by the Milwaukee Board of School Directors of the City of Milwaukee consistent with provisions of Section 66.0903 of the Wisconsin Statutes. BID GUARANTY TO ACCOMPANY BID: MPS Bid Bond, Certified or Cashier’s Check: 10% of Contractor’s Base Bid.

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY/BIO-MED LAB

PROJECT LEAD THE WAY/BIO-MED LAB

PARKING LOT RECONSTRUCTION

South Division High School 1515 W. Lapham Boulevard Milwaukee, WI 53204 MPS Property No. 032 MPS Project No. 1803

James Madison Academic Campus 8135 W. Florist Avenue Milwaukee, WI 53218 MPS Property No. 022 MPS Project No. 1817

Curtin School 3450 South 32nd Street Milwaukee, WI 53215 MPS Property No. 122 MPS Project No. 1573

This project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

This project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

This project is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009

The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 30% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 400 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours

The HUB requirements for this project are 10% The COIN requirements for this project are 30% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 400 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours

The HUB requirements for this project are 25% The COIN requirements for this project are 30% The minimum Student Participation requirements for this project are: Paid Employment: 400 Hours Educational Activities: 10 Hours

Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00

Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00

Deposit for Drawings and Specifications: $25.00 MAILING CHARGE: $35.00

The bidding documents may be obtained 7:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from AE Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call AE Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to AE Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at AE Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at AE Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. DR. GREGORY E. THORNTON, 10062265/3-21-28-4-4-11 Superintendent.

The bidding documents may be obtained 7:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from AE Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call AE Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to AE Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at AE Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at AE Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. DR. GREGORY E. THORNTON, 10062272/3-21-27-4-3-10 Superintendent.

The bidding documents may be obtained 7:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M. Monday through Friday from AE Graphics, Inc., 4075 North 124th Street, Brookfield, WI 53005; phone (262) 781-7744; fax (262) 781-4250. Call AE Graphics for availability of bid documents for pick up. Plans and specifications will be loaned to a prospective bidder upon receipt of the deposit listed, which deposit will be returned upon surrender of the plans and specifications in good condition. Bid documents must be returned only to AE Graphics, Inc. Plans and specifications may be examined at the Facilities and Maintenance Services’ office. Bid documents may not be examined at AE Graphics, Inc.. Plans and specifications may also be viewed online at AE Graphics, Inc. @ www.aegraphics.com. Each proposal shall be for a fixed lump sum. The right is reserved to reject any or all bids or to waive informalities. Upon reasonable notice, efforts will be made to accommodate the needs of disabled individuals at the bid opening through sign language interpreters or other auxiliary aids. The following TDD number is available for the hearing impaired for questions prior to bid opening, 283-4611. DR. GREGORY E. THORNTON, 10063403/3-23-29-4-5-12 Superintendent.


The Milwaukee Community Journal March 28, 2012 Page 12

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