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THE

DALLIFltEY

DAZ ETTE



CONTENTS Tlt1E OUT ..•....•.........................••...........•••.••..........•...... ii

SUBMISSICJ/\I GUIDELINES

ONE ENCHANTED FANTASY ........•.

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EVENING ......•..........•.•..•.•••.......•..••••.........••.... I

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TO A FRI END FOREVER .......••.........•..•.•.•••.....•........•..•.......•...

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TRIVIA ...•••..............•.•................••••••.•.........•.•.•...•...•

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BENNU •....•........•...•......•.•..•..•.••....••••.....•...•.•....•.........

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PUZZLE •.•............•..................•....•••••.....•........•.

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ONCE UPON A TIME IN CAt1ELOT ..•.•.....•.•....•••••••••...•.......•.......•.•.

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TROUBLE WITH TEENAGERS ...•.••••••••••.••.•.••..•.•....•••••.•.•............. LETTERS •••......•.•.•.•......•..•.•.•..•....•.•.••..•...•.......... READERS" POLL ••••••••••.••••••••••••••••••.••••••••••.•••••••.•••••••.••••.•

30 36 38

ADDRESSES

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OF INTEREST .•......•.•..•.•..........••••.•.•••........•.•..•••...

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****************************************************************************** Contributors this issue: Heidi EcKroth, Carla Hemmingson, Lucia Johnson, Eileen Jones, MiKe Lucart

Rachel Hemmingson,

STAFF Senior

Editor

Assistant

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Editor/Business

Ei leen

Manager ....•••........•...•...•.....

Jones

Carla Hemmingson

****************************************************************************** The Gall ifrey Gazette is intended solely for the enjoyment of the fans of the BBC-TV series Doctor Who. TM All correspondence will be considered for pub 1 ication unless clearly noted otherwise. Address all submissions and correspondence to: The Gall ifrey Gazette 3226 Dupont Ave N, Minneapol is, MN 55412. Copyright 19B5 by The Gall ifrey Gazette. This copyright covers only original material and in no way is intended to infringe upon copyrights held by BBC-TV or any other holders of Doctor Who TM copyrights and/or trademarKs. All rights revert to contributors upon publication. TM Doctor Who is a trademarK

of the British Broadcasting

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1

Corporation.


TIME DlfT Here it is! Issue "4. I've decided to approach this column ali ttle differently this time. I won't say anything about the contents of The GallifreY Gazette this time -- I'll let them speaK for themselves. Instead, want to talK a little about the future of the fanzine. (And a bit about my own as well.) First of all, there's going to be a change in staff. I will no longer be senior editor after this issue. My role will be changed to that of COPy editor. What this means is that Carla will now be responsible for the content of each issue; my job will be merely to correct any spell ing or grammatical errors. (If I catch them, that is!) I'll still be doing some writing; I'm not leaving entirely, although that had been my original intention. Another change will be in frequency of publication. Issue "5 will be the last as a bimonthly. We're looKing at a quarterly format now. That will give us more time to get stories together -- and more time for more of you to send in submissions. (Hint, hint.) LooK for an even bigger and better version of The GallifreY Gazette in 1986. With less responsibility for The GallifreY Gazette being mine, I hope to be able to put more energy into some other projects. Dne project will be the beginning of Special Editions. These will be longer stories (one story per issue) that will come out twice a year -- tentatively, Easter and Christmas. The first one is scheduled for Easter, 1986 (in time for Minicon) and will feature the fourth Doctor and Sarah Jane. 8y the way, I'll be needing art for this story (of the Doctor and Sarah, of course). Send any art you want considered for this Special Edition to me at 3226 Dupont Ave N, Minneapol is, MN 55412. Please try to get them to me by March 1. The price for the first Special Edition will be (I hope) announced in the next issue. Even though Minicon is still five months away (at the time of this writing), I'm already looKing forward to it. Those of you who can maKe it to Minicon will get to see some more of my creative abil ity beyond writing. hope to have two needlepoint pictures displayed at our table (one of the fourth Doctor and one of Sarah Jane -- who else?). And I'll be doing an eleven minute dance routine using music from Doctor Who -- the theme music (both versions) and incidental music from 'Keeper of TraKen', 'Arc of Infinity', 'Warrior's Gate' and 'SnaKedance." I'll also be dressed as two different companions during the course of the weeKend -- Sarah Jane (the 'Andy Pandy' overalls) for the bulK of the con and Nyssa (the outfit she wore in 'Terminus') for my dance routine. Dutside of Doctor Who. I hope to finish a fantasy novel that I've been writing (and rewriting!) for a long time. I'm a long-time fan of both J.R.R. TolKien and C.S. Lewis, so I guess if (correction -- when) my novel sells, owe them a big thanKs. In closing, let me thanK all of you who have supported The Gall ifrey Gazette so far. I hope your support will continue. Live long and prosper and may the Force be with you!

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SUBMISSION

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GUIDELINES

1) Written material must be neatly typed on 8 1/2 x 11 white paper. Use one side only and number all pages. Please proofread your material before submitting it! 2) Art submissions should be in blacK and white only, no larger than 8 x 10. No bleeds. Art must be completely camera-ready. 3) Previously published submissions are acceptable as long as you tell us where and when it was previously published. Simultaneous submissions are not acceptable. 4) No one will be notified of receipt of any submission unless accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope or postcard. No submissions will be returned unless accompanied by a self-addressed envelope with adequate return postage. Once a submission is accepted and scheduled for pub 1 ication, the contributor will be notified. 5) ORIGINALS ARE SENT AT YOUR OWN RISK. 6) All editorial

decisions

are final.

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ONE ENCHANTED EVENING . Carla Hemmingson 'Doctor, are you sure it's safe? That's an awfully big forest out there," Tegan said, staring out at the deeply wooded area the TARDIS materialized in. The fair haired man smiled at her. "Nonsense. It's perfect for an evening stroll. Fresh air, plenty of light from the moon. I'll be all right.' Tegan sighed. She could understand the Doctor's needing some sol itude, and she could appreciate what a brisK evening walK could do. But this was a huge forest. And the Doctor just had a KnacK for finding trouble. 'Well, don't be too long at it, all right?' asKed Turlough, sharing in Tegan's unease. He had an almost instinctive disliKe for darK places, caves, forests ••. it didn't much matter. 'Well, do have a nice walK, then," Tegan said, fighting her anxiety as the Doctor strolled off. The Doctor strolled along, enjoying the night scents and sounds, the I ight breeze on his hair. He stopped now and again to study the brilliant stars. And then he heard it, a sound which did not fit in. Drums. Drums meant civilization of some type. The thicK foliage would hide him. Well, why not? He decided to satisfy his curiosity. The drums were increasing in their tempo and the Doctor paused. He'd have to be careful. Drums could signify several things, ceremonies such as marriage, or a funeral, a hunting party, a war party, even -- and the thought made him shudder -- sacrifices. He didn't want to end up walKing in on something liKe that and become the icing on the caKe, so to speaK. Then he froze. Through the foliage he caught sight of flames and dancing figures, although there were no lodges nearby. Well, that was a good sign. This ceremony was taKing place outside the village. But the figure tied to the tree, the figure too close to the flames, was small. A child? He paused. This could be one of two things, he decided. A rite of passage often involved a mocK death, where the one becoming the adult would have to 'die' and be reborn as an adult. The second possibilty was far less acceptable. A sacrifice, perhaps stolen from a neighboring tribe. The dancers looKed human. But there was something about that 1 ittle figure which did not looK right .. Dying. He had accepted the idea as did all his folK, as a part of the life cycle. But this was a far worse fate than mere death. He, the chief of his people, to die a victim of humans, and at a time when his own cubs were too young to lead well ••. The weight of it threatened to rob him of all dignity. The 1 icKing flame made him suddenly throw his head bacK in pain, and the hidden Doctor gasped. For the prisoner with the golden fine hair had del icate, long, pointed ears -- the ears of an elf. The Doctor's hands suddenly began to search his jacKet. He smiled and tooK a deep breath. The timing had to be right, now. The drums were reaching a frenzied beat. Not long now. The elf closed his 1 ight blue eyes, wondering why it had taKen so long. He remembered the day well ... fishing with his best friend, SKywise, and then the sudden breaKing of the tree I imb he'd been on, the fall into the swollen river and nearly drowning. He'd reached land, only to find himself right on top of a human band of hunters, who happily passed up the chance to bring home a deer for the chance to offer him, Cutter, chief of the wolfriders, to their Gods. Usually he'd have been taKen to the village to be tormented and then slain at sundown. But this night's worK had lasted well 4

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beyond sundown. Perhaps, he thought grimly, they Knew his importance to his folK and so were more incl ined to drag it out so. The drumming halted and Cutter stiffened, looKing wide-eyed into his captor's face. The human who had seized him first slowly drew the blade. And then stopped short, staring past the startled elf at an amazing sight. A very tall, fair haired man in clothes unl iKe any the human had seen before had stepped out of the forest with a large smile on his face. "Hello, I'm the Doctor. I don't quite 1 iKe what you're about here." Smiling, he threw a firecracKer at the feet of the startled warriors. His hopes for scaring them off succeeded, beyond his wildest dreams. Indeed, there was no need for a second firecracKer, for already the men had abandoned their quarry and fled, screaming, into the forest, presumably toward the village. The Doctor smiled, very satisfied with himself. 'Hey now, we'd better have a looK at yOU, yes?' he said, cutting Cutter's bonds. The Doctor was not quite prepared for Cutter's sudden move. And he was certainly not prepared to find a silver blade, New Moon, at his own throat! His anxiety for the 1 ittle creature changed abruptly to respect, and then alarm. Never taKing his eyes off the blade, the Doctor carefully raised his hands a bit from his sides. 'I'm the Doctor. I mean you no harm,' he said in his most gentle voice. And then, in a more hurt voice, 'Is this any way, really, to treat someone who was just trying to help?' Cutter hesitated, torn between his instincts and the Doctor's tone. He lowered New Moon. 'Dnly twice in my 1 ife have humans helped me,' he said at Ias t. The Doctor grinned. 'Ah, well, I am not human. Perhaps that explains it,

y@s?-

Cutter stared. Then he cocKed his head. And sniffed. His ears discerned two hearts. And the scent, while it carried that of humans, was not of itself human. So absorbed was he in this startling revelation that he scarcely saw the movement behind the Doctor, and even his sending was not timely enough to prevent what happened. :Strongbow, no!: he sent frantically, too late to stop his best archer from releasing the arrow. ' The Doctor sensed the telepathic activity, although not the message. He wheeled about, just in time to catch the arrow through his right shoulder, an arrow which he had no doubt had been meant for a far deadl ier target! Narrowed fierce eyes burned into his own eyes, and even as he watched the elf grimly tooK aim with a second arrow. But the archer's eyes shifted to those of his chief. 'Strongbow, he saved my life,' said Cutter softly. The archer stared. It tooK all his restraint to Keep himself from slaying the hated human. But even as he looKed, he, too, sensed what Cutter had noted. And the bow lowered as the elf tooK a half pace forward in shocK. :What is he?: the archer sent, bewildered. Cutter shooK his head. :1 do not Know. Not a human, though. I hear two hearts.: 'I have, in my ..• home, medicine. For your burns and my shoulder,' the Doctor said, aware quite suddenly of a flood of weaKness as pain hit him. Cutter gave him a half smile. 'No. My soulmate is a great healer. I will taKe you to her, if you can walK. Sit over here. I will taKe Strongbow's arrow from your shoulder." The Doctor nodded, wincing, and sl id to the ground by a stump Cutter indicated. While he wasn't exactly sure what a healer was capable of, he did Know that with his own technological devices he was in for a sore time of it. 5


Perhaps it was time to trust to -- magic? Was that the right word? Strongbow stood silently behind the Time lord as Cutter carefully pulled the arrow through the shoulder, noting with a grudging admiration the Doctor's stoic patience. Cutter glanced at his archer and a wry smi 10 sl ipped across his own pale, del icate features. 'Help me get him to the tribe. How close are we, Strongbow?' The archer glanced away, then back, and the Doctor froze as a large wolf slowly padded forward. 'I will send Briersting to them. They will meet us and it will be shorter than walking,' he said in his hoarse voice, the voice of one who hardly ever spoke. Cutter nodded. In just under an hour, the Doctor became aware of his two small companions halting, and from the forest appeared several elves, many on the backs of wolves. More than one gazed at him in open hostil itY"which deepened as they saw Cutter's wounds. 'Treestump, my mother's brother, I owe this one my life,' Cutter addressed the oldest-looking elf, whose grizzled features abruptly became quite pleasant. The Doctor managed a weak smile, seeing this obvious love. 'Then he is welcome to our tribe and our .help,' the older elf said. An elf with silver hair ran forward, his eyes filled with deep concern. Cutter glanced at his best friend, Skywise, and smiled again. 'Skywise, where is Leetah? And the cubs?' 'I am here, lifemate. But who is the man?' The Doctor stared at beauty so exquisite he wondered if he'd ever seen any like it in all his traveling. Deep fiery locks and leaf-green eyes, set in a gently tanned face, the impression of leetah was that of an Autumn phantom. 'Lifemale, I do not know if you can do what I ask. But if you can, heal him. Strongbow would've killed him, but the arrow only hurt his shoulder. Can you help him?' asked Cutter, seeing her startled look. To heal a human was unthinkable. Cutter smiled at her reaction. 'He is not human. He is called the Doctor, but what he is or where he is from I don't know.' The entire tribe started at that. A little voice, pure and sweet, filled the glen. 'Is he a high one of their Kind, then?' Suntop, Cutter's son, gifted with awesome magic himself, was staring hard at the Doctor. Cutter arched an eyebrow. A high human, eh? There was a thought! To be rescued by one of power in human form.. He smiled. The story would live as long as elves would roam the forests. The Doctor didn't liKe pretending to be what he wasn't, but, somehow, seeing the reactions the elves were having, he decided to let it go. For the time being. leetah slowly approached him, those lovely green eyes gazing deeply into his own. 'I do not Know if I can help, but you saved my lifemate, my soulmate. I would die if you asKed it of me, for his saKe,' she said. He shivered. Such devotion and depth of feel ing was not something one experienced often. Not that one experienced being among elves often, he told himself. Leetah laid a cool hand upon his cheeK. 'TaKe this garment off. We shall see what can be done,' she said. The Doctor shrugged off his coat and then removed the sweater. He eyed them wryly and then glanced at Cutter. 'Does she sew?' he asked, grinning. He dreaded trying to explain the condition of his clothes to Tegan or Turlough. Cutter looKed asKance at him and the Doctor sighed. Too much separated them for the elf to appreciate the attempted humor. leetah motioned for him to sit, and then laid the cool hands upon his 6

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should~r. H~ was awar~ sudd~nly of a t~l~pathic s~nsation, of h~r mind and pow~r touching his mind. And th~n sh~ was whisp~ring to Cutter. "H~ is old! H~ is as old as I am! And -- 10n~ly -- I sens~ so much." Th~ Doctor felt a pang of f~ar. Nothing would b~ unknown to h~r unless h~ shi~ld~d hims~lf. But did h~ want to, h~ wonder~d. Th~n th~ flowing forces she ?ummon~d w~r~ a wind within his mind and sh~ surr~nd~red h~r conscious s~lf to th~ pow~r. B~n~ath th~ lith~ hands, th~ skin and muscle and blood of th~ Time Lord b~gan to m~ld and knit, until not a trac~ of th~ wound r~main~d, and not a whisp~r of pain. Smi 1ing, sh~ g~ntly wi thdr~w, l~aving him to r~st for a moment, alone upon th~ soft moss. "Doctor, can you stay a whil~?" It was Skywis~, his ~y~s hopeful. Th~ Doctor sigh~d. To stay with the elv~s, ~v~n for a night, would've be~n som~thing to ch~rish. But h~ did not want to worry his companions more than n~~d b~. It had alr~ady b~~n hours sinc~ he had l~ft for a short, brisk wa

Ik•

"I would lik~ that, but it is not possibl~," he said, se~ing th~ silv~r hair~d ~lf's f~atur~s drop a bit. And th~n he smil~d. Around th~ ~lf's neck, on a l~ath~r thong, was a ston~, on~ which th~ Doctor r~cogniz~d. "Skywis~, hav~ to l~av~. But b~for~ I do, I would lik~ to thank L~~tah, thank all of yoU, actually. It has b~en a pleasur~ m~~ting all of you. I s~~ you have a magn~tiz~d ston~. B~for~ I leave, p~rhaps you'd lik~ to hav~ th~s~." Smiling, h~ pvll~d out a pair of cufflinks from his coatpock~t. Cutter and Sk)'Wise stared as th~ silv~ry, b~jew~l~d cuffl inks adh~r~d to Sk)'Wis~'s magic ston~. L~etah smiled in d~light as h~r lif~mat~ and his b~st fri~nd gazed at th~ n~w d~corations on th~ lod~ston~. "You hav~ mad~ us all v~ry happy. Cutt~r is mor~ than my 1ihmat~, mor~ than th~ chief. H~ dar~d to dr~am of uniting th~ ~lv~s of our world, and his wand~ring brought him first to my tribe, then to th~ mountain ~lv~s and on to th~ Goback trib~. You sav~d th~ most important of our p~opl~, Doctor. And now you giv~ us this gift as well. Can w~ do som~thing for you?" Th~ Doctor smil~d g~ntly, "L~~tah, you already hav~. As you saw wh~n you h~al~d m~, I am a bit unusual among my p~opl~, too, F~w can shar~ what f~~l, r~ally. For a mom~nt, I wasn't so alon~. And you did h~al m~. I'm quit~ all right now." H~ paused, thoughtfully studying th~ ~lv~s, som~ Shyly glancing away from his op~n gaz~. His ~y~s turn~d to L~~tah's onc~ mor~; "I rath~r think I'll b~ coming back sometim~. Next to humans I could quit~ easily think of elv~s as my n~xt favorit~ sp~ci~s." Le~tah frown~d. Who could lik~ humans, sh~ wond~r~d. But th~n, h~r walk within th~ Doctor's mind had shown h~r som~thing ~ls~, som~thing sh~ could not ~xpr~ss but und~rstood. He had s~~n humans in a way sh~ n~v~r would, as b~ings savag~ and civil iz~d, warring and p~ac~making. Sh~ smil~d. P~rhaps, of all h~r folk, sh~ had r~ceived th~ great~st gift this night. Th~ Doctor shook hands, r~ceiving many a h~artfelt thanks as h~ took his leav~ of th~ trib~. Cutt~r accompani~d him a ways, th~ blu~ ~y~s s~arching th~ Doctor's. "Ar~ you a high human?" h~ ask~d softly, almost r~v~r~ntly. Th~ Doctor grinned. "Not at all. Th~y ar~ my favori t~ speci~s, but I am from Gall ifrey -- you might say from th~ stars, actually. I'm a Tim~ Lord." Cutter star~d at him, th~n smiled wryly, "W~l1, what~v~r you ar~, thank you. W~ have changed a bit tonight. W~ onc~ did not hav~ any id~a how big our world was, until I had th~ crazy idea to look for oth~r ~lf trib~s. Now w~ know this isn't th~ only world ... w~ wer~ told that once a whil~ ago, by a high one of our p~ople. But you prov~d it. Good-bye, Doctor. If ~v~r you do r~turn, we will be happy to hav~ you with us again. Ev~n Strongbow!" Th~ Doctor car~fully nudg~d the TARDIS doors op~n, hoping rath~r 7


desperately that his companions were sleeping. But fate was against him. 'Where have you been?" demanded Tegan, her anger turning to alarm as she saw his stained jacket. Turlough looked anxiously at him. The Doctor hesitated, then sighed ruefully. 'Just this once, Tegan, don't ask. I am all right, really. I found it all most refreshing.' And ignoring their looks of outrage, he sl ipped quickly into his bedroom and closed the door. Outside he overheard Tegan's exasperated 'Well, I 1 ike that!' and smiled. It had been a most magical evening!

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BY THE

lIME LOf2,DS 01= GALLI FRE Y

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FANTASY Eileen Jones 'What am I doing?' Sarah Jane Smith asKed herself as she stared out of the window of the small aircraft. 'I really should Know better.' She sighed softly. It was too late now, she reasoned. The money had been spent; she had to go through with it. She emerged from the plane a short time later, still wondering if she would regret this decision. A very distinguished-looKing gentleman raised his wineglass. 'My dear guests, I am Mr. RoarKe, your host. Welcome to Fantasy Island.' Sarah tooK one sip of her drinK and found she had no taste for it. All she wanted at that moment was to forget all about her fantasy, board the plane and !eave. Perhaps, if she didn't go through with it, she might be able to get a refund. No. The decision had been made. She wouldn't bacK out. After settling into her bungalow, she went to Mr. RoarKe's office to talK about her fantasy. 'My best friend and I parted company rather abruptly about two years ago,' she began. 'One thing I regret is that I never told him that I loved him .•

'So you want to go bacK and tell him that,' Mr. RoarKe commented. "Please .•

'Very well. When you return to your bungalow, concentrate on the last time you saw your friend. Put everything out of your mind except the events of that time,' Mr. RoarKe instructed her. IIAnd?-

'Then your fantasy will begin.' 'ThanK yOU, Mr. RoarKe,' Sarah said. She left his office and went bacK to her bungalow. She tooK a deep breath, sat down on the sofa and closed her eyes.

She formed a picture in her mind of the cold, barren world of Kastria. She could see the beautiful Eldrad, felt the pain in the pit of her stomach as the tube of acid strucK the alien woman. A sense of urgency overwhelmed her as she and the Doctor rushed to get Eldrad to the regeneration chamber before it was too late. She felt again the horror of bel ieving Eldrad had been obI iterated, the shocK of learning the truth about him. She opened her eyes and bl inKed. It was impossible, but she was bacK on Kastria. The Doctor had removed his scarf and handed her one end of it. 'When I say, 'Pull,' you pull,' he ordered. She could hear the enraged Eldrad lumbering after them. 'Pull!' cried the Doctor. She pulled and then watched in reI ief as Eldrad tripped on the Doctor's scarf and tumbled into the abyss. It was a strange feeling, she noted, to be both a participant and an observer in the events. She wondered, though, if she'd really be able to do it differently this time. BacK inside the TARDIS, wrapped in the Doctor's long coat, she heard herself say, AI'11 never be warm again. Never, ever, ever .• The Doctor set the coo~dinates to taKe them away from Kastria. As they discussed Eldrad and his fate, the TARDIS lurched unexpectedly. They both grabbed the console to Keep from fall ing. The Doctor opened up a lower panel to fix whatever was wrong. Since Sarah was still wearing his coat, he asKed her for whatever tools he needed. When he asKed for the sonic screwdriver, it just became too much for her. 'Boy, am I sicK of that sonic screwdriver!' She then unleashed a flurry of angry words, which she didn't really mean. The Doctor, engrossed in fixing his beloved TARDIS, didn't hear her. 'I'm going to pacK my goodies and I'm going home,' she said. She hoped

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'1 he'd apologize for ignoring her, but she waited in vain for a response. said, I'm going to pack my goodies and I am going home,' she repeated hotly. Still no response. 'Excuse me!' she said as she stormed out of the control room. Even as she packed the few possessions she had in the TARDIS, she began to regret her words. She knew how moody the Doctor could be. He did need her, even if he didn't say so in so many words. On the other hand, he often didn't seem to take her feelings into account. At least she hoped to patch things up before she left. She didn't want to leave him with hard feelings. As she re-entered the control room, packed and ready to go, she had the feeling that there was something she needed to say. But she couldn't think of what it could be. 'You're a good girl, Sarah,' the Doctor told her. 'It's no good apologizing now,' she repl ied, sti 11 feel ing angry at him. 'I'm packed and ready to go.' Somehow things weren't going quite the way she'd hoped. 'How did you know?' 'What? Her heart sank. She felt something awful -- even more awful than facing an army of Daleks and Cybermen -- was about to happen. The Doctor explained that he had received the call from Gall ifrey. As a Time Lord, he had no choice but to obey. And he couldn't take her with him. 'You've got to go.' Fighting back tears, she practically begged him to let her stay. She hadn't meant what she said about leaving; all she wanted at that moment was to stay with the Doctor, to continue travelling with him through the cosmos. However, much as he didn't want to see her go, he had no choice. He had to take Sarah home. He had to answer the Time Lord summons -- alone. The TARDIS landed on a quiet street a short time later. 'We've landed,' the Doctor said. 'What? 'We've landed,' he repeated. IIWhere?'South Croydon. Hillview Road, to be exact,. He tried his best to smi 1e. 'That's my home.' In spite of the fact that she was heme at last, she found it d iff icu 1t not to cry. 'We 11, I'll be off then.' She s 1 ipped ou t of the Doctor's coat and handed it back to him. She still felt like there was something she needed to say. 'Don't forget me.' 'Oh, Sarah. Don't yoU forget me.' She shook her head. She'd never, ever be able to forget the Doctor. Her travels in the TARDIS would always have a special place in her heart. A special place in her heart -- oh, that was it! She had to say 'J love you' to the Doctor. She turned around as she got to the door. 'You know, travel does broaden the mind.' The Doctor smiled. "Till we meet again, Sarah." She had an empty She nodded and left, the 'J love yOU' still unsaid. feel ing inside as she watched the TARDJS dematerial ize. In spite of the Doctor's final words, she doubted that their paths would ever cross again, She looked around the street. 'This isn't Hillview Road. I'll bet it isn't even South Croydon. He blew it!. She laughed, but only because it was the only way to keep from crying. She'd left the Doctor with the words she'd wanted to say so desperately still left unsaid. 'J love yOU, Doctor,' she whispered as she went to catch a bus to take her home. Sarah opened her eyes and found herself sitting on the sofa in her 11


bungalow on Fantasy Island. She wiped away the tear that started to tricKle down her cheeK. She smiled. The next day, the car and driver provided by Fantasy Island dropped her off by the hydroplane docK. "Miss Smi th, I trust your fantasy went well." "Yes, Mr. RoarKe, it did. It didn't turn out quite the way I'd hoped.' She paused. "I should have Known it wouldn't. The Doctor told me that the past couldn't be changed." "What happened?" "I Kept waiting for just the right moment to tell him, but it never came. I wanted to tell him, but I couldn't and didn't. I didn't do it the first time and I didn't do it this time, either." Sarah smiled. "But I didn't need to. He Knew all along that I loved him -- just as I Knew that he loved me. We didn't need words. Mr, RoarKe, thanK you for a wonderful fantasy," Sarah walKed up the docK toward the waiting hydroplane. She turned at the door, gave Mr. RoarKe a cheery wave and then entered the plane. A smile crept across her face as she settled into her seat, She'd be home soon.

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TO A FRIENO FOREVER Sw~~t Sa~ah -You~s w~~~ th~ ca~ing ~y~s I saw wh~n fi~st I b~gan this fou~th lif~. F~~e of my ea~th-bound exile, you wande~ed the sta~s with m~. y~t,

when the call came f~om Gall if~ey, I left you behind, igno~ing you~ tea~s. chose to face my fate alone, with only you~ m~mo~y to giv~ me st~ength.

Looking back on that final time, I know that had you found a way to stay wi th me, W~ would still be wande~ing togeth~~. Sa~ah •.•

I miss you ••. The Docto~

(by Lucia Johnson)

13


I

1/

14


TRIVIA 1) Who is the only actress to have played two different Doctor?

companions

of the

2) What is the license plate number of Sarah Jane Smith's car? 3) On what date did Sarah Jane visit Thinktank? 4) Name all of the Doctor's companions who left 5) According

to get married.

to the fourth Doctor, what should no handyman be without?

6) In 'Inferno', what was the date on the calendar on the alternate Earth? 7) Name all of the Doctor's companions who died. 8) What did Romana once

receive as a birthday present?

9) What song was the Doctor singing at the beginning of 'Terror of the Autons.?

Answers

next

issue!

Answers

to questions from last issue

1) The Eye of Orion. 2) The Doctor is allergic to certain gases and if the gas is present, celery turns purple. 3) Sarah Jane Smith in 'The Pyramids of Mars'. 4) 'The Tenth Planet' and 'Seeds of Doom'. 5) The TAROIS's

secondary control room was used.

6) 'You are a very stupid machine."

15

the


BE!'I'IU Ei 1een Jones The cloudy day had been followed, fortunately, by an equally cloudy night. Under the cover of almost total darkness, two figures in dark clothing scaled a chain link fence. Once on the other side, they ran as if running for their very lives. "I think we've gone far enough, Sandy," the young man noted after several minutes of hard running. "Are you sure, Oave?" his wife asked. "Yes," he whispered. "When daylight comes, we'll have to try to get some help from Hinton." Worn out from their exertion, the young couple drifted off into an uneasy sleep. They hoped desperately that they'd get some help for their hometown of Greendale -- before it was too late. The still of the Minnesota morning was broken by a very loud, very strange noise. Along with the noise came a large blue box. The door opened, and two people stepped out: a tall man with dark, curly hair and br igh t b Iu e eyes and a young, attractive, dark-haired woman. "Well, Sarah?" the Ooctor asked. "It's very nice," Sarah repl ied. She closed her eyes and breathed deeply. "It's good to be back on Earth. Where do you think we are?" she asked, opening her eyes and looking around. "I'm not sure. Let's just have a look round, shall we?" There was a slight nip in the air. The clear blue sky held the promise of a beautiful early fall day. The leaves were just beginning to turn. Sarah didn't much care where they were; wherever it was, it seemed the perfect place for a relaxing hoI iday. "Sarah, look. Someone's coming this way. Perhaps he can tell us where we are."

Sarah watched as the other man approached. He was as tall as the Doctor and had blond hair. His most notable feature was his eyes. They were a beautiful blue, 1 ike the Doctor's, and had a haunting qual ity about them. The Ooctor smiled. "Greetings in the Golden Light," he said. The other man looked surprised. "How did you know?" "Your meda 11 ion. I'm the Doc tor, and th isis Sarah Jane Sm ith." "Hello. I'm Bennu. Are you from Elrad?" "Oh, no. I'm from Gall ifrey. Sarah's from Earth." "Gallifrey." Bennu frowned. "You're a Time Lord?" The Doctor smiled and nodded. Sarah watched the two men curiously. They seemed to have formed an instant bond. They were both al iens on Earth, men of peace, men with an honest affection for this planet and her people. She knew, somehow, that this was the beginning of a long friendship. "So," she heard the Doctor say, "do you know where we are?" 'We're in Minnesota, but I don't know exactly where," Bennu rep I ied. "I think the towns of Greendale and Hinton are near here.' "It's certainly a nice change from most of the places we usually visit,' Sarah commented. She'd been to some less than pleasant places during her travels with the Doctor • •Yes,. the Doctor agreed. "It's nice to be somewhere peaceful for a change. " "Have you been in Minnesota long, Bennu?" Sarah asked. "Not really. I don't stay in one place for very long," he rep1 ied. The look in his eyes told Sarah not to press him on the matter. Nearby, Dave a"d S.ndy Peters woke from their restless sleep. Muscles

16


stiff, joints aching, th~y ros~ and str~tch~d. Sandy notic~d th~ strang~rs first. 'Dav~, look,' sh~ whisp~r~d. H~r husband frown~d. "Who ar~ th~y? What ar~ th~y doing h~r~?' h~ muttered. Sarah had th~ fe~ling that they w~r~ being watched. Sh~ turn~d h~r h~ad sl ightly and could see a young couple out of the corner of her ey~. 'Doctor,' she whisper~d. The Doctor look~d over at th~ young couple. H~ smiled and waved. 'Hello!' he called cheerfully. Encourag~d by the Doctor's fri~ndly gr~eting, Dav~ and Sandy approach~d the newcomers. They seem~d harmless enough, although the dark-hair~d man with his long coat and a scarf close to twenty f~et long, did s~em to be on th~ eccentric sid~. Maybe these three might even be able to help, unl ik~ly as tha t seem~d. 'Hello,' the Doctor repeated as th~ couple approach~d. 'I'm the Doctor. This is Sarah and this is Bennu.' 'Hello. I'm Dave P~ters and this is my wif~, Sandy.' 'Isn't it kind of late in th~ season for camping?" Bennu asked. The question gav~ Dave the opening he ne~d~d. 'It is, but we're not camp~rs. We're trying to get help for Greendale." 'Help? What's wrong?' Sarah asked. Dave nervously ran his hand through his auburn locks. 'A week ago, three vans pulled into town. Nobody thought anything of it; lots of vans pass through Greendale. But these vans weren't just passing through.' 'Th~y made that cl~ar right from the start,' Sandy added. 'Between the three vans, I'd say th~re were about forty of them -- all heavily armed. They knocked out all of our communication and pow~r syst~ms. Then they had the nerve to set up their headquarters in the Greendale pol ice station,' She bi t her lower lip. 'They've got control over the whol~ town,' Dave continu~d. 'Guards are on patrol twenty-four hours a day,' 'How did you manag~ to get away?' the Doctor wond~r~d. 'We timed the night patrols,' Dave repl ied. 'If we moved at just the right tim~ and speed, we figured we'd hav~ tw~nty minut~s to get out of our house and over the fence they'd put up around the town.' 'Everybody has I iv~d in constant t~rror for the past w~ek,' Sandy sighed. 'We thought if we could make it to Hinton, we might be abl~ to get some help.' 'Perhaps you don't ne~d to go to Hinton,' the Doctor told th~m. Sarah knew what the look in the Doctor's eyes and the tone of his voice meant. So much for stopping in a peac~ful place. It seemed as though troubl~ followed the Doctor like an obedient PUpPy following its master -- or perhaps it was vice versa. Not that it much mattor~d, of cours~; they'd soon be in the middle of it. 'Coming, Sarah?' the Doctor called. His question pulled h~r out of her thoughts. Everybody else was already heading for the TARDIS. She ran to catch up with them. If nothing els~, sh~ had to go along to keep an ey~ on the Doctor. She couldn't help but worry about him. Dave and Sandy star~d at th~ TARDIS in amazement. How could all five of them fi t inside something only ali ttle bigger than a phone booth? Well, he had r~f~rr~d to it as his ship, so maybe it was mor~ than it seemed. The Doctor was certainly more than he seemed. 'Incr~dibl~!' Sandy ~xclaim~d as they enter~d. 'Yes,' her husband agreed. Of the three newcomers, only Bennu wasn't surprised to find that th~ TARDIS was larger on the inside than on the outside. 'Fascinating. 17


Trans-dimensional engineering?" "Yes," the Doctor rep] ied, glad to have a Knowledgeable companion on board. "Now to taKe the TARDIS to the Peters' house. She's not really designed for such short trips, so this may be a bit bumpy." From what Dave and Sandy had said about far they had come, he was able to maKe what he hoped was an accurate guess of what the coordinates were for their house. "Cross your fingers, everybody!" A very short time later, the TARDIS landed with a thud. The Doctor opened the viewscreen. "We're in our 1 iving room," Sandy noted, a hint of awe in her voice. "Of course we're in your I iving room," the Doctor repl ied somewhat indignantly. "It is where we wanted to be, isn't it?" -Yes,.

Dave answered,

-but

i t"s

just

that

--

oh,

never .mind."

Sarah smiled sympathetically. "The TARDIS affects just about everyone this way the first time." "Now that we're here, we should decide what we're going to do next," Bennu suggested. 'Some way of returning control of Greendale to its residents.' "I thinK we'd be more comfortable having our discussion in the living room than in the TARDIS," Sandy commented. The group left the TARDIS and settled comfortably in the Peters' homey 1 iving room. "I don't Know about anybody else, but I could use a cup of coffee," Dave commented. He placed a pot on the wood-burning stove that occupied a corner of the room. "I never dreamed just how practical this stove would be,' he laughed. He suddenly turned serious. "Now what? If only the "We must find a way to interfere with their control. townspeople could be persuaded to resist the gang," Bennu mused. "Persuading them isn't the problem," Sandy repl ied. "It's finding an effective way to interfere." "How do they maintain control?" Sarah wondered. Dave tooK a sip of his coffee before answering. 'After they cut our power I ines, they posted a long list of rules. They also began demanding 'tribute'. Anybody who disobeyed the rules or refused to pay tribute suffered. " 'People were roughed up, pets Killed, property damaged," Sandy explained. "After a couple of days, nobody refused to give them whatever they wanted." "It looKs liKe they have all the cards," Sarah sighed. 'Not quite," Bennu corrected her. "We have three wildcards.' "I don't understand." "Of course," the Doctor said, smil ing. "Don't you see, Sarah? Bennu, you, me -- we can put a spanner in the worKs. BreaK all the rules they've establ ished. Ignore the curfew. Trespass wherever there's a 'No Trespassing' sign .•

"If the townspeople see we're not afraid to defy the gang, they might have the courage to do the same,' Bennu added. "We're with yOU, too," Dave said. "That gives us five wildcards, which sounds 1 iKe a winning hand to me. When do we start?" "No time 1 iKe the present, eh?" The Doctor grinned. Sandy, aware of how neat and fresh Sarah looKed, suddenly felt very self-conscious about her bedraggled appearance. "The rest of you can start now, but I really need to freshen up," she commented. "Won't taKe me long," she added as she headed for their bathroom. "Well," Bennu said after she left, 'why don't we go breaK some rules?' The Doctor, Sarah and Bennu left the house; Dave decided that he'd wait for Sandy. A large sign that boldly stated "AbsolutelY No Admittance" 18


becKoned the trio. They made a point of approaching the building noisily. The Doctor smiled as he saw a group of the town's residents watching them. 'What absolute rubbish!' the Doctor called loudly as he ripped the sign from the building and threw it to the ground. "Absolutely No Admittance" What cheeK!' Sarah did her best to suppress a giggle as they entered. A few thoughts about the seriousness of the situation quicKly Killed any potential laughter. The gang con troll ing Greenda 1e wou 1d not taKe K indl y to such obv ious f Iaun t ing of their rules. Bennu felt a hand on his shoulder and turned around. A big, burly man with an expression of pure evil on his face glared at the strangers. 'You lousy scum,' he growled through gritted teeth. He pull ed each member of the trio out of the building one by one. 'I beg your pardon?' the Doctor replied. 'You can read, can't you?' the man asKed sarcastically. The Doctor stared into the man's eyes. ') am not accustomed to being treated in this manner. Kindly show more respect.' 'More respect?' the man laughed. 'You're a barrel of laughs. )'11 give you your first and last warning. You'll be watched all the time from now on. One wrong move and -- well, you'll find out.' The man laughed again and walKed away. A crowd quicKly gathered around the newcomers. ') don't Know who you are or how on Earth you got here, but) wouldn't ignore that warning,' an old man told them. 'What? And let that lot taKe away our rights? No, thanK yOU,' the Doctor repl ied. 'Don't you see?' Bennu added. 'If you all worK together, you can breaK their hold on you.' The crowd began to breaK up and move away. Some left shaKing their heads; others left with thoughtful expressions on their faces. The battle for the control of Greendale was about to begin. 'looKs 1 iKe we're off to a good start,' Dave convnented as he and Sandy joined the others. 'I Know what can come next,' Sandy said, her eyes twinKling. 'We can breaK curfew tonight. Have a very big, very loud party right outside their headquarters. ' 'Will many people come?' Sarah wondered. 'We'll find out tonight,' Sandy replied. The five of them spent the rest of the day preparing for the party. They talKed to the residents of Greendale, explaining the importance of the event. Musicians were I ined up -- anything that wouldn't require electricity. Friends volunteered to provide food. The time for the party to begin was set for half an hour after curfew. The showdown was set. late that afternoon, Sarah paced bacK and forth nervously in the Peters' 1 iving room. What if, in spite of their earl ier agreement, nobody decided to show up after all? She really couldn't blame them if they didn't. 'Sarah, why don't'you have a cup of coffee?' Dave suggested. 'Don't worry, it'll all turn out all right.' 'Are you certain?' she asKed. 'Of course it will worK,' the Doctor agreed with Dave. Sarah sighed and accepted the cup of coffee. 'How much longer?' she wondered. Sandy 9lanced at her watch. 'Curfew is in two hours.' Two and a half hours later, nearly every resident of Greendale moved toward the gang's headquarters. The musicians set up and began to playa famil iar tune very loudly. The party goers began to sing along, also very

19


.loudly. The door of the building flew open. 'You're all breaking curfew,' the leader of the gang barked. 'You've got five minutes to clear out.' 'And if we don't?' Dave shouted back. 'Oh, a smart aleck,' the leader growled. He moved slowly out of the building, his face red with anger. Dave fought against his rising fear. But if he backed down now •. He stood his ground. Those with him hardly dared breathe. The gang leader was almost upon him. Dave didn't even flinch. Suddenly, the big, burly man found himself flat on his face. Bennu smiled innocently. It certainly wasn't his fault if the man hadn't noticed the sudden appearance of Bennu's foot. All the children present giggled at the sight. The adults, too, began to laugh. 'Get them! Get them all!' the leader yelled. He wasn't used to being humiliated. All but two of the gang members ran to the scene. The townspeople, encouraged by Dave's example, prepared to face the armed gang members. Shots rang through the evening air as the people of Greendale and the gang began. their final confrontation. The Doctor grabbed Sarah's hand. 'Come on,' he whispered, heading for the gang's headquarters. Bennu, knowing that the townspeople could handle the gang, followed the Doctor and Sarah. The trio entered the building, not sure of what they'd find inside. They moved slowly and cautiously toward the pol ice chief's office. Inside the office, they saw two gang members lounging, their feet propped up casually on the chief's desk. 'Follow my lead,' the Doctor whispered, removing his long scarf. He handed one end of it to Sarah. 'I say, come and take a look at this,' he cried. The two gang members left on guard sprang to their feet and ran out to see what was wrong. They tripped over the Doctor's scarf as they entered the hallway. 'So sorry about that,' the Doctor apologized, smiling. Bennu found a length of rope and soon had the two men tied up. 'I wonder how things are going outside,' he commented. 'Shall we go and see?' the Doctor replied. 'Better bring our new friends along. We wouldn't want them to miss anything now, would we?' he added, still smiling broadly. The group left the building to find a similar situation outside, The gang had been outnumbered, although they were armed and the townspeople weren't. But, according to Dave, it wasn't until one of the children had been hit by a stray bullet that the people began to fight in earnest. One young man even used his brand-new guitar as a weapon, demol ishing it in the process. 'Now what?' Sarah asked. 'Some of the guys have gone to get their vans, We'll load 'em up and drive 'em to Hinton,' Sandy repl ied. As the vans drove away, a short time later, teams began meeting to discuss the best way to repair the damage that had been done by the gang. Having disposed of the gang, it wouldn't take all that long for life in Greendale to return to normal. The next morning, the Doctor decided it was time to move on. 'Where will you go now?' Bennu asked. The Doctor smiled and patted the TARDIS affectionately, 'I've really no idea. The old girl often has a mind of her own.' He suddenly became serious. 'And what about yOU, Bennu?' 'I'm staying in Greendale for a while, I think. I'm sure they can use my

20

,

•


o

I

help for a I ittle while,' Sarah listened to the conversation in an almost amazed silence. For the first time in all her travels with the Doctor (in both regenerations), it seemed that he was almost reluctant to say good-bye, She remembered her thoughts at their first meeting. No, this wouldn't be 'good-bye'; it was .until we meet againu• 'Come along, Sarah,' the Doctor called, breaKing into her thoughts. 'Good-bye, Bennu!' she called as she popped into the TARDIS. She watched in silence as the Doctor entered the coordinates and set the TARDIS in motion. 'Do you thinK we'll see Bennu again?" she asKed several minutes later. The Doctor smiled. 'Only time will tell, Sarah.'

/ •

21


(/0 0 Q ()

o 0

Yes-II- d o-n

Ex+erh1ina+e-

0+- do -\..Vi n do

\N'S

I

22


2 ETA MIN 0 R A 0 Q I LEE U A R S B N E Q S LOW R C o RIC U I 0 C HEM M 0 K K V E S V K R F T E K T W M N A G V G H W P L T Y A L 2 A R IUS I X A J Y E H Y 0 0 RES K L U L 2 T 2 M K E E 0 G N 0 L N R K R 0 S R B Y C P P C T Q M S R T R A KEN S 0 0 T 0 C T L SOL 0 S N U A L V R R W L M I I R N X B SEN N T NAY 0 M 0 U b C 2 S Y U A L 0 B N 0 FEE A C M E X X I LON 0 BAN Y 0 E X SIT R 0 V F C U V L Y K GOO V E H 0 U E ETA I I MAR S I 0 L G A J T I GEL L A K I R R MEl P E F R ENS T 0 U E 0 E 0 L o 0 IMP J SEN W I 0 Q B MBA N S REO 0 L W E G E P V S PST A W S V R GIS U T S V LOX P A 0 I Y V U TOO A Y F I 2 G N C H LOR ISO E B NED PIC 0 0 0 0 0 H L E 2 N K FIE U G S N URI H E K TIN A E RID H S S A I J EEL L P L E S M L A R N W R 0 AWL 0 P N I I P C S A S Q H T U ROO S ASS T W G N H T S X 0 IA U S 0 v V N K Y E L R D E V A L 0 K A 2 Y G I TAO S R T B E 0 0 0 C SAD X P A E 0 Y R F ICY ENS R S G N KIP T E R MIN U SHE URI W S U J T G H N SOL I M N T N Y N N DEY M N TOW H G Q P U H R T H G 0 N S R L T 0 X E U 0 N A 0 0 IA R V A POW U A T Y N S I I 2 E 0 E A K DOL B L W 0 M A H I C H T L E J JAM F T M G N T R B H S M G W 0 IKE T T C A J S ElK W C F L L I Q 0 G 0 lEN TOW 0 0 S 0 M T U E P T R N S R Y T L S N S E F M D Y T T S N S EGA U G IBM V R S E E Y MOO AWE BIB E A E X E T Y N E R Y V T E H V T A o E 0 C E 2 E 0 SUN I RAM 2 E 0 T RAN D R N HAP E M E 0 B LOB 0 T F L T T C FAG I N 0 I E S lEO IM R B C IRE R F K S M D G NAG 0 STY L E B M E K H N N S M Y U M D D I INS T L I L R J RCA E D N 0 K A A Y WRY T N I T N L R 0 SUE REA A RID IUS M SPA W H W W E 0 0 L A N G K ARB Y D E V F R DOD 0 Y T Y 2 D S NOD ALE P AL2ARIUS ANDR02ANI MINOR ARGOLIS ARIDIUS ATRIOS CASTROVALVA CHLORIS DEVA LOKA DIDO DULKIS EXXILON KARN KASTRIA KEMBEL LOGOPOLIS MANUSSA MARINUS MARS MECHANUS METEBELIS THREE OSEIDON PELADON

PLUTO RIBOS SARN SKARO SKONNOS SOLOS SPIRIDON TARA TELOS TERMINUS TIGELLA T1GUS TITAN TRAKEN VORTI S VULCAN XEROS 2ANAK 2EOS 2ETA MINOR 20LFA THURA

23


ONCE UPON A TIME IN CAMELOT Carla Hemmingson It was a perfect day, if you happened to love snow, that was. Minnesota children were rejoicing in the del iciously cool weather which had produced a wonderful supply of very wet, very sticky, snow. James and his best friend, Kenny, were happi ly waging war on each other on the Nicollet t1all, ducking in and out of stores, dodging nervous pedestrians and looKing for strategic places to hide and throw from, such as waste barrels and bus shelters. One person who did not liKe snow was unhappily heading toward the two boys, in his wheelchair. He was one Stephen Kepple and he detested cold weather. He could not Keep warm and being a quadraplegic it was important to Keep warm. Usually his wife would have picKed him up right at the front door where he worKed, but this day she was eagerly shopping the ThanKsgiving sales, and he was supposed to meet her in half an hour, after he did a bit of shopping, too. Stephen sighed and the wheel chair shaKily moved forward. James laughed and dodged Kenny's wild toss, hurling his own with equal abandon. The missile missed Kenny by several feet, but it didn't exactly waste itself impacting on a wall, either. In fact, it almost led to a major disaster in rush hour traffic! Stephen was simply not prepared for the sudden icy cold snow in his face and down his neck. Waving his arms, he tried to dislodge the snow but only succeeded in hitting the control Knob of his wheelchair, sending both him and his chair out into the traffic on Seventh Street. The traffic cop who happened to be in charge suddenly tried to blow the whistle off his face, and the semi driver happily nodding in time to the Christmas music on his radio abruptly tired to put his size eleven shoe through his cab. The nifty I itt!e sports car behind him almost ran up his tailpipe. Amidst the screech of breaKs and honKing of horns, James and Kenny wisely vanished. Stephen paled as he saw the trucks and cars sl ipping all about him and slapped at his controls, performing a del ightfully executed wheel ie which would've drawn applause in another situation. The cop was beet red and frantically motioning for Stephen to get going, which he did, as fast as was possible. No longer in any mood for shopping, pale, shaKing and feel ing a bit more than sl ightly ill, Stephen tooK refuge in an alley between Hennepin and a 1 ittle shopping plaza on Seventh. No one was in the alley just now and it was fairly darK, and Stephen allowed his fear a moment of total control, submitting in the darK to the near tears he was fighting. And then he jerKed upright at a sound most unliKe anything he'd have expected to hear, It was a wheezing, echoing,sound, 1 ike an asthmatic elephant, perhaps, in a theatre. Stephen stared as a blue box slowly, fuzzily appeared VERY close by. And his heart sanK. 'Oh, Steve,' he muttered tn hi~self, 'this isn't going to looK good on your records .. ," He could see it all now, his wife, Terry, anxiously conferring with the shrinKs and wondering how on Earth a mere snowball could produce a major hallucination. If it was that. Because, somehow, he had a nasty suspicion that he might end up preferring it to be an hallucination because this looKed very, very sol id and very real and he was quite alone with this, .. thing. Inside the blue box, Known to its occupants as the TAROIS, one Sarah Jane Smith was staring at the white-faced young man in the wheelchair with growing concern. 'Doctor, hadn't we better let him in? He looKs positively faint!' said Sarah to the tall curly haired man near her who was staring in annoyance at the TAROIS controls. He looKed up rather vaguely at her note of concern, then glanced at the controls once more. 'Doctor, did you hear me?' she asKed impatiently, 24

•

•


He glanced up now, all attention. "Yes, what? Oh, well, yes, he does a bit at that. We can't ve~y well take him with us to see A~thu~, though. Be a bit out of place." Sa~ah scowled. "Couldn't he just wa~m up a bit? We'~e only going the~e fo~ a little while and you could always ~etu~n him befo~e he'd be missed, couldn't you?" she asked hopefully. It would be ~athe~ nice to have anothe~ human to chat with whilst the Docto~ was off having a business meeting with his acquaintance, King A~thu~. He had p~omised he~ a ~eal visit to Camelot one day, but this was not a social call. The Docto~ wanted to see Me~l in if at all possible, and he did not want to take any chances. It wasn't a place fo~ women o~ wheelchai~s. But the young man ce~tainly did look poo~ly. "Oh, ve~y well. I guess we can't have him f~eezing out the~e, nO'", can we? Why not put on some tea and we'll get on ou~ way," he added, opening the doo~s. He popped out his head and smiled at the stunned Stephen. "Hello, I'm the Docto~. Would you 1 ike a jelly baby?" he offe~ed. Stephen t~ied ha~d to pe~suade himself he was still out of it. But the wa~mth coming f~om the TARDIS and the sweet taste of the jelly baby he allowed the Docto~ to pop into his open mouth was too ~eal to igno~e. "Suga~ o~ c~eam?' Sa~ah asked, smil ing. Stephen ~an an app~eciative eye ove~ he~, then tu~ned his gaze to the TARDIS's inte~io~. Fitting, he thought. I d~eam up something so wei~d the inside is la~ge~ than the outside. Very fitting. Oh, God, I am ~eally, ~eally sick. Sa~ah pou~ed a cup of steaming tea, and Stephen decided to indulge himself. A sl ightly scalded tongue b~ought him to the acceptance of ~eal ity in a hu~~y. "Ca~eful, it's hot!" Sa~ah said as the young man splutte~ed. "Who a~e you? What a~e you?" he asked, deciding both we~e fai~ . She smiled. "Well, that's the Docto~ and I'm Sa~ah Jane Smith. Who a~e yoU?N

"Uh, Stephen Kepple. How did you get he~e?' he asked. Then anothe~ question a~ose, unbidden and unwelcome. 'Whe~e a~e we?" It wasn't exactly a flying sauce~, but close. Too close, he thought. That they we~e no 10nge~ in Minneapolis was appa~ent. The once familia~ conc~ete and alleyway had changed, becoming a fo~est, complete with sunshine and a 1ake . Sa~ah glanced b~iefly at the sc~een. qWe"re in Camelot," she said, as if such a thing happened eve~y day. "Camelot?" he whispe~ed. If he hadn't been st~apped in the wheelchai~, he decided, he would've fallen out in a dead faint. Sa~ah glanced at him and smiled again. Funny, she thought. He~ t~avels with the Docto~ we~e making he~ almost as impossible to ~elate to as he was. She'd have to watch that. The Docto~ flung his huge sca~f about him and smiled at the shaken man in the wheelchai~. 'Ca~e to come fo~ a st~oll?" he offe~ed, igno~ing Sa~ah's annoyed glance. 'I'm only going out fo~ a bit. I'll see A~thu~ late~." Stephen hesitated, then sh~ugged. Why not? Sometime late~, Sa~ah was ~ude1y inte~~upted f~om he~ book by f~antic pounding on the TARDIS doo~s. "What on Ea~th?' she thought, bewilde~ed. The Docto~ had a key! Hu~~ying to the cont~ol ~oom, she felt a sudden chill. Stephen, alone, was outside. The Docto~ was nowhe~e in sight. "Stephen! Whe~e's the Docto~?' she asked, letting him in. White-faced, Stephen looked at he~ in dist~ess. They had been nea~ the lake when the Docto~ had hea~d app~oaching ho~ses .

25


Not wanting to scare the riders, he had had Stephen hide in some dense foliage. Stephen had watched in silence as three knights rode up and halted before the Doctor. "Hello, I'm the Doctor. Who might you gentlemen be?" said the Doctor, smiling at them from beneath his hat. The three men sat still, then the tallest nodded to his companions and urged his mount forward. "Stay and del iver thou to me thy 1 ife, that I may save thy soul. For by thy looK, the Devil has hold upon thee.' Even as he spoKe, the other two Knights grimly drew their swords. The Doctor's eyes widened in alarm as he looKed at each Knight. "What?' he spluttered, trying to understand. But it was too late to flee. The Knight nearest to him rapped him smartly on the head with the flat of his blade, and in a moment he was stretched out unconscious on the ground. Stephen had watched helplessly as the Knights bore the Doctor away. 'What will they do, do you thinK?" asked Sarah, frantically trying to decide how to reSCUe the Doctor. Stephen looked unhapp ill' ather. "I th inK they will burn him. I'm sure they thinK he's a wizard or some such thing. Why else would they thinK they were doing his soul a favor?" Sarah froze. Burn the Doctor? Once before she'd seen him facing such a fate. Could she effect a reScue again? The Doctor wondered, rather wryly, if his fate was indeed in Sarah's hands onCe again. The three Knights had been joined by two more, and each was less friendly than the one before him. "Would you gentlemen mind if I had a last meal?' he asKed hopefully. "Ah, no? Well, too early in history, I suppose. It's a very civil ized

,

custom.-

A Knight turned toward him. 'Stay your tongue or we wi 11 sl ay you where you stand!' he hissed. Another cuffed him and he reluctantly obeyed. He Knew when he would die. We 11 , the knigh ts At sundown, now only about an hour away. As to how had not been lazy. A large mound of wood was heaped about his feet and the bonds were too tight for him to wriggle free of. Sarah and Stephen paced the control room trying to think of some plan. 'I rescued him once before from being burned and I can do it again" Sarah said. Stephen scowled. 'And if you got caught? They'd burn you as a witch! Sarah, We have to do it together or it won't worK! Please!' Sarah scowled. And then her eyes wandered to Stephen's wheelchair, and the bacKpacK under it on the bacK. 'What do you have in the pacK?' she asked, wondering if she dared hope. "Uh, my tapes. And player. MY PLAYER I' he yel ped in sudden del igh t . 'It's battery powered!" Sarah grinned in rei ief. There wasn't much time, but st i11, when there was hope, there might be a way 'Well, who is going to do it, then?" asKed the Doctor, watching as the sunset slowly gave way to rising fog. The Knights stirred. So far, none had so much as shown his face from behind his armor. One began to move toward him, but another stopped him. "Not so. He shall not die by thy hands, Sir Urias, for I, myself, shall slay him." The other Knight nodded. 'Thou hast done this deed before, Sir Morgan. Seeing he is in God's hands I do wish for my glory in the act, but do what thou wi 11 •." The Doctor looKed desperately from one to another. 'You are maKing a

26


,

terrible mistaKe! I am not possessed or bewitched!" he said. A Knight crossed himself, then offered the burning torch to the tall Knight who claimed the right to destroy the wizard. Then he dropped the torch, to stand, open-mouthed, staring at a most appalling sight. For, out of the fog, two I ights, glowing an eerie red, then gold, were approaching them. The horses stirred. And then, in a horrible, shocKing volume, drums and something no man would hear for centuries, electric guitars, the strains to Steppenwolf's song The Hippo Stomp roared out of the fog. And Elvis's You Ain't Nothing But A Hound Dog, and the whining sound of country, too loud and. •• It was more than enough. A stallion screamed and sent a Knight tumbling in a clatter of armor. "Sir Morgan! That which I see is horrible beyond_tell ing!' shrieKed Sir Urias. The others, crossing themselves, abandoned their noble goal of destroying the Doctor and fled, some on their nervous mounts and others on foot. "Well done, you two!" said the Doctor in rei ief as Sarah cut his bonds and Stephen circled in the chair, flashing his I ights and speeding the tapes on to Keep the sounds coming. The Doctor winced. BacK in the TARDIS, Stephen allowed himself to be congratulated, accepting the bag of jelly babies the Doctor offered. Sarah was laughing, remembering the Knights and their shame-faced retreat. 'Remember this, Doctor, the next time we decide to visit Camelot. can't say as I found the Knights very chivalrous!" The Doctor rolled his eyes, but didn't rise to the occasion. He had a few too many bruises to argue the point. And he had to get Stephe~ bacK, too. "Oh, my God, Terry will be frantic!' Stephen said, staring at his watch in dismay. The Doctor chucKled. "Nonsense, dear chap. I'll have you bacK before she has time to miss you. Hang on a bit. Here we are.' Stephen stared. The alley, still quietly abandoned in the early evening, had replaced the forest. And the snow had replaced the sun, too. He looKed sadly up at Sarah as she helped him bacK into his coat. "Stephen, I can't thanK you enough. You were very good, you Know." The Doctor clapped him on the shoulder and gave his hand a hearty squeezE".

IITake

care.

Don .. t get

into

trouble

now!

II

Stephen sat in the alley, trying to hang on to real ity as the blue box faded away. A few minutes later, settled in the safety and warmth of their modified car, with Terry's Kiss still lingering on his lips, he tried desperately to convince himself it had happened. Nothing. No pictures, and, silly thing, he'd even failed to tape any of their conversation. Nothing. 'Have you got the time? My watch stopped," Terry said. The watch' Stephen stared, and a smile slowly spread across his face. For while the clocK up on the banK said it was only 5:10, his watch said B:30. Three and a half hours. He'd been with them for three and a half wonderful, exciting, magical hours! 'Stephen, I asKed, do you have the time?" "Yes. I'ts 5:10," he said. And, smil ing, he stared bacK at the watch. 'Why, your watch is off, too!" Terry said, looKing at it. 'How did it gain so much time? Never mind, I'll reset it." "NO! Please, just let it be. It reminds me of something. I'll wear my other one, oKay?" Terry looKed at him in bewilderment, then shrugged. He could be weird sometimes, she thought, leaning over to Kiss him again. Stephen smiled and stared out the window at the darKening sKy. Wherever they were, he thought, he'd always Know they were real. The watch would 27


. Cam. I ot. . 0 f his adv.ntur.s In always r.mind him


• •

/

• 29


TROUBLE WITH TEENAGERS Part Four -- Anetta Eileen Jones

,

The Doctor Knew instinctively that whoever stepped out of the newly-arrived TARDIS would be the one responsible for changing Earth's history. A renegade Time Lord himself, he Knew how dangerous his opponent could be. He motioned for the girls to hide in the shrubbery by the lab. The trio waited expectantly. Trisha's palms felt sweaty and Kareen's heartbeat quicKened. They scarcely dared breathe as they watched one of the evergreens open. The Doctor was surprised -- almost shocKed -- to see a petite girl with flame-red hair step out of the TARDIS. She looKed to be about the same age as Kareen. "Stay here," he whispered to his young companions. He stepped out directly in front of the newcomer. "Hello!" he greeted her pleasantly. "I'm" "The Doctor!" the girl cried. "What?" "Oh, ah, you are the Doctor. aren't you?" she stammered. "Of course I'm the Doctor. But how did you" "Oh. this is too good to be true!" she exclaimed. "I'm actually meeting the Doctor! I can't believe it! This is a dream come true!" Trisha and Kareen, tired of hiding and certain that there was no danger, emerged from their hiding place. "What's she talKing about, Doctor?" Kareen whispered. "I've no idea," he repl ied. He turned to the red haired girl. "Excuse me, but could you please tell me who you are and how you Know who I am?" "Oh, I'm Anetta. I'm from GaJlifrey." "You're a Time Lord?" Trisha interrupted. "Yes," She looKed uncomfortable, "Well, sort of. Not officially. dropped out of the academy." "Why?" the Doctor wondered. "Life on Gall ifrey is so boring. And the academy is the most boring part. Anyway, after you saved Gall ifrey from the Master, I just had to leave. So I stole -- I mean borrowed -- a TARDIS, just I iKe you did." She smi led at him sweetly. The Doctor frowned. "How could you Know that saved Gall ifrey from the Master?" "Cardinal Borusa isn't perfect, you Know. In spite of his efforts to adjust the truth, I managed to find out what really happened when you came bacK home," She stared at him I iKe a star-strucK teenager. "You're my hero, Doc tor." "Next thing you Know, she'll be offering him a sacrifice," Kareen whispered to Trisha. Trisha did her best to suppress a giggle, While she respected the Doctor and was extremely fond of him, Anetta seemed to her to be carrying it just a bit too far. "That's very flattering," the Doctor said at last, "but what are you doing here?" "Following your example," she repl ied. "My example?" "Yes. After I left Gall ifrey, I decided to visit Earth first, since it is your favorite planet," Her eyes glowed. "I can hardly believe I'm really talKing to you! This is incredible!" The Doctor began to reconsider his thought that whoever stepped out of the TARDIS had changed Earth's history. This child couldn't have been responsible. On the other hand, appearances could be deceptive. She might

•

30

,


, •

• ,

have ~one so~ething, however well-intentioned, that changed history. Why this place and time?' he wondered. 'Oh, I've been watching Jennifer McPherson,' Anetta explained. 'She's about to make a terrible mistake.' 'A mistake?' Trisha asked . The other girl nodded. 'Edward Stewart is going to ask her to marry him and she's going to accept.' So, the Doctor real ized, the girl was responsible after all. 'How do you know it'll be a mistake?' Trisha countered. 'It's obvious,' Anetta replied, sounding offended that her opinion would be questioned. 'Edward is no good. Jennifer could do much better. She'll be very unhappy if she decides to marry him.' 'But she has to marry him!' Trisha blurted out. She wouldn't let this girl -- even if she was almost a Time Lord -- interfere with the future of her planet. Anetta looked at the Doctor. 'You really ought to choose your companions more carefully," she sniffed. 'There's no reason Jennifer has to marry Edward.' She fully expected him to agree with her. 'Trisha is right,' he repl ied quietly. 'If Jennifer doesn't marry Edward, the whole future of Earth will be altered. You can't interfere." 'You're a fine one to talk about interference!" she exploded. "That's all you ever do.' She put her hand over her mouth, suddenly ashamed to have spoken so disrespectfully to the man she idol ized. He put his arm around the girl's shoulders. 'Anetta, it's one thing to get involved with people. It's quite another to change the history of an entire planet.' He smiled at her, hoping she would understand. 'But you know how miserable she'll be,' Anetta replied. The Doctor knew she was right. Edward left Jennifer only a few months after their wedding. Neither of them even knew she was pregnant at the time. She threw herself completely into her work, passing on her love of science to her son, Denis. She never married again and died at a relatively young age. But if she hadn't been so miserable, if she hadn't devoted herself so completely to science, if Denis hadn't had that same love of science ... He closed his eyes as he remembered the nightmare he, Trisha and Kareen had just been through. "That doesn't matter," he sighed. He opened his blue eyes and stared into Anetta's emerald green ones. "Doesn't matter?' Anetta cried. 'Doctor, I thought you cared about people. You're totally heartless!' He was uncomfortably aware that passers-by were beginning to stare. 'Let's talk inside your TARDIS, shall we?' he suggested. Anetta opened her TARDIS and the trio followed her in. 'Doctor,' Trisha whispered. 'Provide a distraction at the right time,' he told her. The girl nodded. She hoped she'd be able to figure out when the right time came. 'Now, back to our original problem," he commented. 'Anetta, you simply cannot go around changing the history of an entire planet." 'But what about Jennifer? I can't let her life be ruined,' the girl countered. The Doctor sighed. "The future of Earth depends upon the existence of Denis Stewart. If you prevent Jennifer from marrying Edward, Denis will never exist.1I

"

'No, 'I'm 'The her, close

that can't be true,' afraid it is,' he repl ied quietly. future of Earth will be a nightmare if you interfere,' Trisha to tears. "I won't let you change the history of my world.'

31

told


"But it's not fair to Jennifer," Anetta protested. The Doctor looked at Trisha. "She can't imagine what we'ue just been through, can she?' The right time had come. In an emotion-laden voice, the girl began to tell Anetta everything that had happened to them in Chicago. The look of horror on the other girl's face -- especially when she learned that her interference had almost cost the Doctor his 1 ife -- told her that the diversion was working. With Anetta's attention focussed on Trisha, the Doctor made a few quick adjustments on the control console. Timing was crucial now if he didn't want the High Counc i1 to ask him a number of uncomf or tab 1e quest ions. "Anetta," the Doctor began gently, 'I Know you think you're doing the right thing. But interfering isn't always right -- and in this case, it's dead wrong. Denis Stewart is uital to Earth's history.' "You mean Jennifer's happiness has to be sacrificed to saue the whole planet?" thinK she'd be will ing to He nodded his head. 'And if Jennifer Knew, go through all the suffer ing." 'Why can't I at least tell her that her An idea suddenly struck Anetta. suffer ing wi 11 be worthwh i1e? Can't I tell her that her son will playa significant role in Earth's future? At least then she'd Know it was all for a good cause .•

"No," he repl ied quietly. 'Knowing her own future might somehow al ter it. Jennifer McPherson Stewart's 1 ife must happen exactly as it happened before." The girl opened her mouth to protest, but real i2ed it would be futile. The Doctor's face was grim, his mind set. Deep in her hearts, she Knew he was right. The looK in his eyes betrayed the sadness he felt at Jennifer's unhappiness. 'Doctor, you've taught me a very valuable lesson," Anetta admitted. "You'11 learn some more val uabl e 1essons by goi ng bacK to Gall ifrey and finishing up your time at the academy,' he suggested. 'I'll thinK about it -- but no promises,' she replied. 'I hope you decide to go back,' he said softly. His eyes locKed with hers and held them for a few seconds. He turned to his two companions. "Come along, Trisha, Kareen. It's time we were on our way.' He herded the two girls out before any of them had a chance to speaK. Mere seconds after they left, the other TARDIS vanished noisily. "I wonder where she's off to now,' Kareen commented. 'Gall ifrey,' the Doctor repl ied. "How can you be so sure?" Kareen asKed. 'While Trisha was distracting Anetta, I entered the coordinates for Gallifrey with a time delay taKe-off. If we had stayed a few seconds longer, we'd be on our way to Gall ifrey, too.' He smi led. 'Now let's see about getting you home, Trisha.' BacK inside his own TARDIS, the Doctor set the coordinates for Chicago, 2534. Nothing ought to go wrong this time, but he crossed his fingers just in case. While the Doctor was busy at the control console, Trisha watched Kareen out of the corner of her eye. It would be so hard to say good-bye. They'd become very close during the time they travelled with the Doctor. 'Kareen,' Trisha began at last, "I can't maKe any promises, but if my Aunt Beth is wi 11 ing, I'd 1 iKe it if you would stay wi th us." "Oh, I'd love to! I don't want to have to say good-bye.' Both girls glanced at the Doctor. They may not have to say good-bye to each other, but they'd still have to say good-bye to him. Neither of them

32

, •


found that particular thought very pleasant. "We've landed," the Doctor announced. "Chicago December 17, 2534." He opened the viewscreen. ' As promised, they were in Chicago, 2534. A layer of fresh snow covered th~ gr~und: Ch i1dren, be ing ch i1dren, engaged in snowba 11 f igh ts. Even in Trlsha s time, the first snow of the season had a magical effect on 1 ittle children. The Doctor smiled at the Christmas-card scene. "Shall we go?" he asked pleasantly. "Oh, yes!" Trisha cried, returning his smile. "We'll need to find my aunt, Beth Harper." She glanced up and down the street. "There's an information terminal over there." She ran to the terminal, punched in her aunt's name and returned seconds later with an address. By sheer luck, the TARDIS had landed only one block away from Beth Harper's house. The house was built in the style of the late twentieth century, which indicated that Beth Harper was a woman of means. Only those with money could afford such houses. Trisha knocked on the door nervously. After all, as far as her relatives knew, she was dead. What kind of reception could she expect? . After a few seconds, the door swung open to reveal a woman in about her mid-thirties with short blonde hair and sky-blue eyes. She looked at the unl ikely trio on her front steps. Her mouth dropped open as her gaze rested upon the youngest member of the group. "Trisha Gordon?" she whispered once she regained her composure. Trisha nodded. "May we come in, Aunt Beth?" Beth Harper opened the door wider to allow her unexpected visitors to enter. "Trisha, you look just 1 ike your mother did when she was your age. By the way" where are your parents?" "They died in a crash, Aunt Beth," Trisha repl ied sadly. "I'm so sorry, dear," her aunt said, stroking the girl's hair. "Forgive my manners! Who are your friends, Trisha?" "This is the Doctor and this is Kareen." "I'm pleased to meet you," Beth repl ied . "My pleasure," the Doctor told her, shaking her head. "Your niece is a quite remarkable young lady." "So, how did the three of you happen to meet?" The trio exchanged amused glances. Would Beth Harper ever believe all they'd been through? Trisha began the story, with the Doctor and Kareen taking their turns at story tel 1 ing also. Beth's eyes grew wider and wider as she I istened. It all seemed so incredible. Yet, she was quite certain it was all true. "You have had a time, haven't you?" she commented after they finished their tale. "Oh, well, it was nothing out of the ordinary for me," the Doctor repl ied. "Maybe not for yOU, but it certainly was for us!" Kareen told him. It seemed to Trisha the perfect time to make her request. "Aunt Beth, do you think Kareen could stay wi th us? She doesn't have any fami ly at all." Beth Harper had a heart big enough to love the whole world. "Of course! If she wants to, that is," she added. The Doctor knew that he was about to lose two more companions. While he 1 iked nothing better than to travel the cosmos, his companions often didn't share that love. Trisha and Kareen, 1 ike the others who had travelled with him in the course of his many I ives, needed to 1 ive their own lives. He stole silently out of the house. Perhaps he'd try to make the Great Exhibition at Hyde Park • Kareen smi led. "Dh, yes! I didn't want to have to say good-bye to

33


Trisha. It's too bad we have to say good-bye to the Doctor, though." Trisha nodded her agreement and turned to the Doctor -- or, rather, to where the Doctor had been. He had slipped away while they were talking. The girls rushed out the front door. Very faintly, they heard a now-familiar noise, sounding 1 ike the farewell cry of some al ien animal. It began to snow again.

". ..

:..!-

• 34


• •

35


LETTERS Dear Eileen: ThanKs for sending GALLIFREY GAZETTE so promptly! 1 just finished reading it and enjoyed it very much. I thought the Return of the Nada was one of the most original OW/ST crossovers I've read; everybody has him land on the Enterprise, and 1 thought the Devisor was a terrific choice! Dne thing that wasn't really explained was just what a Nada was -- evidently that was explained in the first story, but not everybody has that available. I did I iKe the use of Turlough in his BlacK Guardian stage, though. 1 1 iKed the other stories, too. One criticism 1 would maKe that seemed to apply to most of the stories is that they tend to mention scenes that ought to be told; for example, 1 was dying to read just what happened to Leela and Alan-a-dale in Amidst the Merry Men, but it happened 'off-stage', so to speaK. (The archaic language was better done than usual, but please! It's -st endings for thou verbs, regular endings for 3rd person singular! Sorry, it's the classics major showing.) All these criticisms are fairly minor, though -- on the whole I found GALLIFREY GAZETTE a delightful read. Since one story was a sequel and another was part of a series, I would be very interested in getting issues 1 and 2. Are they still in print? How much do they cost? ThanK

you

very much for putting

out a delightful

and engrossing

Whozine.

Sincerely, Anne ColI ins Smi th Dear Ei leen: 'Return of the Nada': A good crossover. One question: Know it has something to do with the Doctor.) Puzzle: Good.

What

is the Nada?

(1

One thing, the Horta is from Star TreK.

'Trouble with Teenagers': 1 loved this' 1 have an idea about the other TARDIS. It's the Master! 1 believe that he was JacK (in disguise). My proof is on p.3B: 'I came for a very different reason.' He smiled at the Doctor. Well, until later MiKe Lucart (Excerpts

from a longer letter.)

Dear Eileen: ThanKs for ~2. My favorite story was 'The Stray' because it had my favorite Doctor and companions in it. Also I iKed the trivia and the word search. ThanK yOU, Gail Daltry

36


Hi Carla and Eileen: I had a brainstorm and sat down and wrote these two pieces. will accept these submissions for future Gazettes.

So I hope you

I have enjoyed the G.G. from the first issue and hope to continue to read future issues. I hope to be able to send contributions in the future. Eileen. whatever or wherever you are up to: good lucK and best wishes. introduced me to a nice zine and I thanK you.

You

Well, I must close for now. Lucia Johnson EDITOR'S

RESPONSE

What is a Nada? According to Alan Dean Foster (in Star TreK Log Seven ), "Nada" is the Kl ingon god-patron of medicine. Sorry not to have included that definition in the second meeting of the Doctor and Captain Koloth. For those of you who are interested, bacK issues ~ available. Issues "1 and "2 are $4.00 each. Issue "3 is $5.00. See last page of this issue for the address and who to maKe your checK or money order payable to. As to the error with the Horta in the puzzle -- boy, do I feel I iKe an idiot! I was thinKing Horda ("Face of Evil") and forgot that it wasn't spelled the same way as Horta in Star TreK. Was MiKe the only one to catch that mistaKe? Or the only one to mention it to me? ThanKs to everyone who's written. Keep those cards and letters coming!

•

37


READERS' POLL Hi! W~'d 1iK~ to Know mor~ about our r~ad~rs, so w~'r~ including a poll in th i s issu~. PI~as~ s~nd your r~spons~s to us by F~bruary I if poss ibl ~. Th~ r~sults of th~ poll will b~ publish~d in a futur~ issu~. So, h~r~ go~s .•. Nam~ Addr~ss Ag~ (optional) H~, long YOu'v~ b~~n watching Doctor Who Your favorit~ Doctor Your favorit~ companion (or companions, if you r~ally can't picK just on~) Your favorit~ villain Your favorit~ monst~r Your favorit~ story Your favorit~ gu~st star W~'r~ looKing forward to h~aring from all of you!

ThanKs!

****************************************************************************** WANTED Th~ d~finitiv~ answ~r to th~ qu~stion "How many Tim~ Lords do~s it taK~ to chang~ alight bulb?' S~nd your id~as to Th~ Gall ifr~y Gazott~. All answ~rs wi 11 b~ consi d~r~d for publ icat ion. Th~r~ may ~v~n b~ a pr iZ~ for th~ on~ w~ 1i K~ b~s t !

Do~s that sound fami Iiar? W~ asK~d that sam~ qu~stion in issu~ ~2. w~'v~ gott~n only two answ~rs:

So far,

'Non~ -- th~y go bacK in tim~ to wh~n th~ light bulb was still worKing!' (Gail Daltry) "Non~ th~y hav~ a hard ~nough tim~ changing on th~ir own!" (John F. Curran, Jr.) Anybody ~ls~ hav~ any oth~r id~as?

38

>.


R.EYENCtE e.

Of=" "'Tl1

MARA

39


ADDRESSES

OF INTEREST

Mary Tamm c/o St. James's Management 22 Groom Place London SWIX 7BA England Lalla Ward c/o Fraser & Dunlop 91 Regent Street London WIR BRU England John Leeson c/o Marjorie Abel Ltd. 50 Maddox St. London WI England

****************************************************************************** Issue 5 of The Gall ifrey Gazette wi II be avai lable in December. It's sti 11 only 15.00. It'll be an issue you definitely won't want to miss! Send all orders to: The Gall ifrey Gazette 3226 Dupont Ave N Minneapolis, MN 55412 (Please maKe checKs or money orders payable to Eileen Jones.) ****************************************************************************** BIRTHDAY CALENDAR January 20: March 25: Apr iI 7: June 17: July 7:

Tom BaKer PatricK Troughton Pe ter Dav ison Col in BaKer Jon Pertwee

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Doctor Who Gallifrey Gazette 4 Fanzine