Columbus Fire and Rescue V1N2

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FIREFIGHTER TRAINEE MATT JONES ENGINEER LAMARCUS PHILLIPS PHOTO BY FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM

CONTENTS U

FEATURES

EDITORIAL

COMMUNICATIONS: THE CHIEF’S CHAIR: More Than Just Pushing Buttons... PAGE 6 GIVING UNSELFISHLY.... PAGE 8 EDITOR’S NOTE: WEATHERING THE STORM: STAY PREPARED.... PAGE 10 The Severe Storm Season.... PAGE 20

DEPARTMENTS FIRE & LIFE SAFETY Fire Safety For Older Adults ..... PAGE 5 DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: READY OR NOT ?..... PAGE 16 THE TRAINING SECTION TRAINING PHOTOS..... PAGE 11-14

AROUND THE STATION PHOTOS OF STAFF & FIREFIGHTERS.... PAGE 15 & 23

EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE I Called For An Ambulance. Why Is That Fire Truck Here ?..... PAGE 26

IN THE COMMUNITY Columbus Cowboys: Firefighter/Coaches.. PAGE 19 Photos ......PAGE 28 & 33

SPECIAL MAYOR SMITH’S UNITY PICNIC ..... PAGE 9 NEW FIREFIGHTERS & ENGINEERS .... PAGE 17 FIREFIGHTER DREAM BECOMES REALITY .... PAGE 18 COLUMBUS FIRE & RESCUE SEEKS NATIONAL ACCREDITATION ..... PAGE 22 UNEVENTFUL EVENTS ..... PAGE 24 NEAL AUSTIN: SPECIAL OPERATIONS ..... PAGE 30 NIGHT LIFE FUN vs FIRE AND LIFE SAFETY .... PAGE 31 CHARITY STARTS AT HOME ..... PAGE 32

EXTRA CROSSWORD PUZZLE..... PAGE 25 WORD SEARCH..... PAGE 27 25+ YEARS OF SERVICE: ENGINEER FRANK UPTON’S RETIREMENT PARTY PHOTOS ..... PAGE 29 EMERGENCY HAVE-READY KIT .....PAGE 34 72-HOUR SURVIVAL KIT ..... PAGE 35


PUBLISHER COLUMBUS, MISSISSIPPI FIRE and RESCUE DEPARTMENT EDITOR-IN-CHIEF FIRE CHIEF KENNETH MOORE EDITOR FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM DESIGN & LAYOUT FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM PHOTOGRAPHY FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM ENGINEER WES MIMS CONTRIBUTING WRITERS BATTALION CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS CAPTAIN MIKE CHANDLER BATTALION CHIEF CHRIS HANSEN CHIEF of TRAINING DUANE HUGHES FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO CAROLE SUMMERALL BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD FIRE MARSHAL TODD WEATHERS STAFF KENNETH MOORE - FIRE CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS: A-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF CHRIS HANSEN: B-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD: C-SHIFT BATTALION CHIEF NEAL AUSTIN: SPECIAL OPERATIONS CHIEF DUANE HUGHES: CHIEF OF TRAINING TODD WEATHERS: FIRE MARSHAL CAROLE SUMMERALL: FIRE & LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO LINDA HANSON: ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Columbus Fire and Rescue Department 205 7th Street S. Columbus, MS 39701 (662) 329-5121 This publication may not be reproduced in whole nor in part without the written permission of the publisher. Copyright © 2012, Columbus, Mississippi Fire and Rescue Department.


FIRE SAFETY FOR OLDER ADULTS

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FIRE & LIFE SAFETY

The facts speak for themselves: the relative risk of Americans over the age of 65 dying in a fire is 2.6 times greater than that of the general population. The risk worsens as age increases. People age 85 and older die in fires at a rate 4.4 times higher than the rest of the population. The leading cause of fire deaths in older adults is smoking and the leading cause of fire injuries in older adults is cooking.

There are a number of precautionary steps older Americans can take to dramatically reduce their chances of becoming a fire casualty, including: •Don’t leave smoking materials unattended and never smoke in bed. •Never leave cooking unattended. Use a timer to remind you that you are cooking. •Keep anything that can burn at least three feet away from heat sources, like portable space heaters, wood burning stoves, and fireplaces. •Place a smoke alarm on every level of your home, including the basement, and both inside and outside bedrooms. •Know at least two exits from every room. Make sure all doors and windows that lead outside open easily. SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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M O C MUNI S N O I T A C

AN JU H T E R O M

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INTERVIEW BY FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM acolom@columbusms.org Could you tell us a little bit about the department’s communications vehicle that you operate? It’s mainly to give support when we get deployed with homeland security. when can also support towns when their infrastructure is gone. We can take a repeater to them. We have two different repeaters: a VHF and a UHF. we can provide internet and phone service. We can provide at least one working channel; like when we went to Smithville after the tornado there. We can provide satellite communications anywhere in the United States. What other areas has the department helped with this vehicle? We’ve been to Vicksburg; Tunica; the gulf coast; Jackson; Meridian, and Demopolis, Alabama. Our first response area covers 10 counties. We’re responsible for going there first. We pre-program those coun06

ties information into our system so that when we go to them, we can just merge right into their system. Was this vehicle deployed to the gulf coast after Hurricane Katrina ? No. We moved as a group, and were always within 5 miles of each other while we were there; so we just used regular talk-around channels. What kind of special training did you have to have in order to operate this vehicle, and where were you trained ? A lot of the training is just self-motivation. I’ve been to Raleigh, North Carolina; Las Vegas, and Tunica. Every year we go to the FBI in Jackson. They put on a 3-day class for all of us, and we all have input into it. A lot of the training is just reading and understanding. Teletec, our local radio shop here in Columbus, they’ve taught me a lot. Anything that I need to

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know, they help me with it. I’m a HAM radio operator. I’ve gone to those classes with Captain Bobby Barksdale and Engineer Ray Whitson. It’s actually more than just pushing buttons. We have to understand how radio operates: the signals and sound waves. Are you the only person in the department who’s qualified to operate the vehicle ? The way the vehicle is set up, you or anyone in the department can take it to a place, I’m out of town, and you ask me, ‘what do I need to do?’ The first thing I’ll tell you to do is set up the outside and stabilize the vehicle. I’ll tell you to set up the repeater. Once I get you to pull up internet on the truck - which involves pushing one button - I’ll pull out my laptop from anywhere in the world, and I can control some of the stuff on the truck. Our 911 has the

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FEATURE

S same capability. We can remotein from our laptops to the truck using a unit called the AC-1000, and using our laptops, we can talk into the radio system here from anywhere in the world. We have 3 satellite units on our truck, and they’re all transportable. We can talk from anyplace in the U.S. using them, and some places in Puerto Rico. What types of emergency situations have to happen in order for this vehicle to be deployed ? Anything. Lightening could hit someone’s repeater, and they need a spare repeater; but we could load that up in the car and wouldn’t need the truck. Usually when we go out, there’s a larger communications truck there. Our truck is out where the worker bees are is how I kind of see it. We have a real

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close working relationship with the Fire Chief from the Columbus Air Force Base. A couple of years ago a T6 went down in Webster County and he called me and said that he needed our truck out there. We prov i d e d them with p h o n e service and radio communications. his main concern was that he had to have communication by with the air base. At that time, they had no communication once they left that base. Once it was over, he called me and said he needed to have a

meeting with me. We went out there and totally overhauled his communications to where he now has satellite units and an AC-1000. He can do what he needs to now. I guess that’s one of my proudest moments: that little old me was able to help the Columbus Air Force Base. About a month after that, I got a call from an air force base in Texas. They wanted to know..... how are you doing this? How are you doing that? I make up a lot of my own cables; even after being told that they wouldn’t work. I received a small award from the FBI last year. It was called “A Job Well Done Award.” It’s an award given to civilians for work done inside the state. If Chief Moore wasn’t as open minded as he is, we probably wouldn’t be able to go and do a lot of the things that we get to do.

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Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

THE CHIEF’S CHAIR

G N I V I G LY H S I F UNSEL BY FIRE CHIEF KENNETH MOORE kmoore@columbusms.org

Welcome to the second edition of Columbus Fire & Rescue Magazine. The first edition was really good, but with much great input we are making improvements with each edition. I want to personally thank all businesses that allowed us to share our magazine with their customers. Our goal from the beginning has been to educate the citizens of Columbus about the wide range of services we offer and to show appreciation to all who support our mission externally and internally.

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I have recently given talks to various community organizations. The theme of these talks has been to recognize the hard-working men and women of Columbus Fire & Rescue. They do so much to unselfishly give back to the community with little or no recognition wanted or expected. Some personnel donate their time to Habitat for Humanity, coach little league football, mentor students, and do so much more. I commend them for all they do, both on and off the job, to serve our citizens. This edition is focused on severe weather. As we enter this tornado season, I ask all citizens to read the articles and take necessary precautions to make you and your family safe. Over the years, this time of year has proved to be dangerous and deadly. Most recently, we have responded to Yazoo City and Smithville to assist in their responses. It is vital that we as citizens prepare ourselves as we cannot stop the weather from occurring, but we can prepare if it occurs. Also, personnel have written several articles that are a result of questions we have received from many citizens. Please take the time to read, and I know and am sure they will give you insight into just some of the services we provide here at Columbus Fire & Rescue and why they exist to better assist you in your time of need.

I sincerely hope you enjoy this and all future issues of Columbus Fire & Rescue Magazine. We are always open to suggestions to improve and hope you will share them with us.

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EXTRA

MAYOR ROBERT SMITH’S ANNUAL UNITY PICNIC March 31 20 12

Event photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom acolom@columbusms.org

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Recently Mayor Robert Smith held his 5th Annual Unity Picnic at the Columbus Riverwalk. The event was created by Mayor Smith and Greg Lewis, the Columbus-Lowndes Parks and Recreation Authority’s Programs Director, as a way of unifying the citizens of Columbus. Although the intent was to unify Columbus, some say it has actually worked to unify Lowndes County. Music,

CHECK YOUR SMOKE DETECTORS

free fish, hotdogs, and beverages were provided at the event, while kids had a day of playtime with the inflatable slides and jumpers. Columbus Fire and Police Departments, public works employees, and the many volunteers worked to help make the event an enjoyable one. We here at Columbus Fire and Rescue thank Mayor Smith for the work he has done to help make our city and department better.

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Y A sT ED R A P PRE

Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

EDITOR’S NOTE

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BY FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM acolom@columbusms.org

Our 1st quarter edition seems to have been a success, and we’d like to thank not only the citizens of Columbus and Lowndes County, but those around the state of Mississippi who’ve called and congratulated us on our new magazine. In this issue we hope to provide you with more of what you enjoyed in our first issue. We intend to give each issue a theme. Since our first issue was more of an introduction, we’ll start with this, our second issue. Our area generally exeperiences strong thunderstorms and tornadoes during this time of the year, so this issue will focus on providing tips and information on how to prepare in advance for severe weather. This issue also contains more news and articles written by Columbus Fire and Rescue staff and shift personnel. Columbus Fire and Rescue has so many things that we’re involved in, and we intend to capture and document them here in our publication. If for some reason you can’t find our publication, and would like a personal copy, please give us a call at our main fire station at (662) 329-5121. We’re working very hard at preparing a means for online viewing of our publication, with possibly some added training video inside. You, the viewer, will be able to view training exercises, and fire and life safety instructions from some of our personnel by simply clicking the play button inside of the online version of our magazine. Thank you for your continued support, and we hope that you enjoy this issue as much as our first one. And remember..... let’s stay prepared during this severe weather season. 10

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G N I N I A TR ECTION S Photo by Firefighter Anthony Colom

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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18. 1. Engineer Anthony Smith 2. Captain John Fancher 3. Engineer Darren Allbritton & Battalion Chief Chris Hansen 4. Engineer Billy Clark 5. Chief of Training Duane Hughes & Firefighter Kirk Gayle 6. Captain Chip Kain 7. Firefighter Trainee Matt Jones 8. Engineer Ron Musgrove & Captain Bud Egger 9. Firefighter James Avery 10. Captain Larry Webber, Captain Derrick Parnell, & Captain Kirk McKellar 11. Captain Scott Swain (back) & Engineer Brad Alexander 12. Firefighter Tyler Lofton, Captain Jr. Lancaster, Engineer Ray Whitson, Engineer Jeff Edmondson, & Firefigter Trainee Matt Jones 13. Captain Andy Perkins & Captain Kirk McKellar 14. Catain Derrick Parnell, Firefighter T.J. Brand, & Captain Larry Webber 15. Engineer Ray Whitson, Captain Jim Robbins, & Firefighter Brian Benson 16. Captain Todd Graham, Captain Mark Connors, & Captain Jim Robbins 17. Captain Andy Grant, Engineer Fred Hargrove, & Captain Brett Thompson 18. Captain Tommy Massey * All photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom except 3, 4, and 6 by Engineer Wes Mims 13


TRAINING SECTION CONTINUED

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1. Engineer Anthony Smith 2. Captain Bobby Barksdale 3. Engineer Kevin Brown 4. Firefighter Steve Loden 5. Firefighter Kirk Gayle 6. Firefighter Nathan Knepp 7. Firefighter Chris Carter & Captain Todd Graham 8. Engineer Shannon Murphy, Captain Todd Graham, & Engineer Kevin Brown 9. Captain Jim Robbins 10. Engineer Shannon Murphy 11. Firefighter Chris Carter, Captain Jim Robbins, & Captain Todd Graham 12. Captain Mark Connors Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom 14

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AROUND THE STATION 2.

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12. 1. Engineer Brooks Pope 2. Engineer Ray Whitson 3. Engineer Alan Walker 4. Battalion Chief Martin Andrews 5. Battalion Chief Chris Hansen 6. Battalion Chief Mark Ward 7. Firefighter Shane Darrell, Engineer Kevin Brown, & Captain Mark Connors 8. Engineer Kirk McKellar 9. Captain Brett Thompson & Firefighter Dale Ballard 10.Engineer Lance Godfrey 11. Firefighter Michael Miller & Special Operations Chief Neal Austin 12. Captain Jr. Lancaster & Firefighter Trainee Matt Jones Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom


Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

Fire and Life Safety

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BY FIRE and LIFE SAFETY EDUCATOR / PIO CAROLE SUMMERALL csummerall@columbusms.org

Planning is a daily part of our routine. We plan our summer vacations, weekend activities and grocery store visits. We plan our children's schedules and daily tasks. One particular plan that deserves to be reviewed is your emergency preparedness checklist and emergency preparedness plan for your family.

following questions: Have you spoken to your children's schools about their shelterin-place and/or evacuation plans? Do you know the evacuation plan at your work? If your cell phone was inoperable how would you get in touch with your family? Do you have a family meeting place and an out of town contact? These are just a few of the questions you should consider as you are Spring is a good reminder that we all have developing your emergency plan. a responsibility in protecting ourselves, families and our communities. Free preparedness resources, such as a Emergencies will happen, but taking action Family Emergency Plan template and an now can help us minimize the impact they Emergency Supply Kit Checklist are just a will have on our lives. click away at ready.gov or by calling 1-800BE-READY. The Ready Web site also has Columbus Fire & Rescue would like to a special sections for kids, ages 8-12, remind you to take important prepared- (Ready Kids) and small- to medium-sized ness steps such as: Get an Emergency businesses (Ready Business). Emergencies Supply Kit; Make a Family Emergency can happen anytime and to anyone - Ready Plan; Be Informed about the emergencies or not. and their appropriate responses; and Get Involved in community efforts, such as Red Cross, Salvation Army and your local Churches.

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Columbus Fire & Rescue encourages you to take a few extra minutes this month to plan in case of an emergency. Consider the

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NEWFIREFIGHTERS A-SHIFT

B-SHIFT

Battalion Chief Martin Andrews, Shane Darrell, T.J. Brand, Will McReynolds, Matt Jones, & Chief Kenneth Moore (Photo by Firefighter Anthony Colom)

Chief Kenneth Moore, Eric Minga, Chris Carter, Steve Loden, Nathan Knepp, Chase Taylor, Battalion Chief Chris Hansen (Photo by Firefighter Anthony Colom)

C-SHIFT Chief Kenneth Moore, Terrance Collister, Damon Estes, Jason Pool, and Battalion Chief Mark Ward (Photo by Engineer Wes Mims)

NEW ENGINEERS Jeff Edmondson, LaMarcus Phillips, Shannon Murphy, Josh Westbrook, and Darren Allbritton (Photo by Engineer Wes Mims)


SPECIAL Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

TER H G I F ES FIRE M O C BE M A E R D TY REALI BY BATTALION CHIEF MARTIN ANDREWS mandrews@columbusms.org

Firefighting - it's tedious, draining and vigorous, but can be very rewarding. After more than two decades in the field, I have come to truly appreciate the profession for which I have chosen for a career. As a young lad, I was fascinated and intrigued by the red fire truck that traveled throughout Columbus, protecting lives and property. When it traveled in my neighborhood on the south side of town, I said to myself, "I want to drive that truck someday." As I grew older, I would walk by City Hall and see the vintage fire steam engine, and wondered what it was like to fight fires in the olden days. Little did I know that my dear mother recognized the enthusiasm and the sparkle in my eyes as a young boy. When I reached age twenty-two, she encouraged me to try out for the position of firefighter. She said it was befitting of me, because I enjoyed helping others. I took her advice and tried out. I passed the physical agility phase, but failed the written exam. I refused to be defeated and tried out the next time the test was given and successfully passed all phases. I was employed with the City of Columbus Fire Department on September 30, 1987. I made my mother very proud, but more importantly, I held in my hands the opportunity to fulfill a life-long goal-being a firefighter and helping others. I knew at that point that I would not stop, that I would get the chance to drive that red fire truck that I often dreamed about.

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The Columbus Fire Department afforded me many opportunities to advance by providing training and education. I attended the Mississippi Fire Academy in Pearl, MS for two weeks and completed the 1001-I & II course. Then, I took every advantage of internal and external training. This effort required hours of sacrificial time away from home and family, but the end results were worth every minute of it. At night, I often went to my room and studied, knowing that someday, the knowledge would be beneficial. I was promoted to the position of Fire Engineer in 1991. This position entails knowledge of operating the apparatus, identification of every fire hydrant within the response area, and familiarity with city streets. My next advancement was promotion to the position of Fire Captain. This was a demanding position that required people skills, job knowledge skills, management skills and versatility. During my tenure as Captain, I took many management courses, at East Mississippi Community College, Mississippi Fire Academy, and the National Fire Academy in 18

Emmitsburg, MD. I then saw the need to further my education in Fire Science. I attended EMCC and the University of Memphis to attain a Bachelor's Degree in Fire Science. I was fortunate to take advantage of the City's Educational Reimbursement Program and reached the milestone that was set by receiving a Bachelor of Science Degree in 2006. The education and training achieved was a vital tool in the management-level position. After being out of school for two years, I felt the time was right to continue my education to the next level. In 2008, I enrolled at Grand Canyon University, to matriculate a Master's Degree in Executive Fire Science Leadership. The promotion to the position of Battalion Chief and graduating from the Masters program in May 2010 were the highlights of my career. I am ultimately grateful to God, my family, and all who encouraged me to reach my goals; it hasn't always been easy, but it was worth the challenges presented. I am also grateful to my leader, Chief Kenneth Moore, for recommending me for an Instructor position at Mississippi University for Women. After interviewing with Dr. William Mayfield, I was hired as Adjunct Instructor for a Pilot program at MUW. I have successfully taught two terms: Fall 2011 - FRD-410 (Fire Prevention Organization and Management) and Spring 2012 - FRD 420 (Community Risk Reduction), FRD-430 (Application for Fire Research) and FRD 499 (Internship). I often reflect on those secret aspirations of being a firefighter when I was a child. More than four decades have passed since that time. Many goals have been set. Some reached and others still in sight. I hope this article inspires other firefighters to set and achieve personal goals and to be successful in their endeavors.

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IN THE COMMUNITY

Firefighter Trainee Terrance Colister, Firefighter Anthony Colom, Firefighter Michael Miller, Engineer Frederick Hargrove, and Firefighter T.J. Brand (not pictured is James Lewis)

COLUMBUS COWBOYS COLUMBUS FIREFIGHTERS TEACH LOCAL YOUTH WHILE COACHING PEE - WEE FOOTBALL IN THEIR SPARE TIME Since 2004, a group of Columbus firefighters: Anthony Colom, Frederick Hargrove, and Michael Miller have given many hours of their free time to teach the youth of Columbus and Lowndes County the game of football: tackle football. These men have coached their sons, nephews, children of family friends, and those with whom they are of no relation. For Firefighter Michael Miller, an 18year veteran of the department; Firefighter Anthony Colom, a 17-year veteran of the department, and Engineer Frederick Hargrove, a 13year veteran of the department, this will be their 9th season coaching youth football in the community; while new firefighters T.J Brand and Trainee Terrance Colister will begin their first year of coaching. James Lewis, the only one of the coaches who’s not in the

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

fire service, has not only coached football locally, but basketball and baseball as well. Miller, Colom, Hargrove, and Lewis, after having coached with a another local travel team in 2011, decided to start their own team in 2012, the Columbus Cowboys, and enlisted the help of Brand and Colister. The team is comprised of 3 age groups: 7-8, 910, and 11-12. The Cowboys will play teams from Starkville, Aberdeen, Okolona, Verona, Shannon, Tupelo, Baldwyn, Booneville, and Columbus. “I love coaching these kids; because whether they win or lose they’re still doing something positive and constructive with their time,” says Miller. “It actually feels good to see a kid in junior high or high school that I’ve coached when he was 8 or 9 years old

still referring to me as ‘Coach’ after so many years,” states Colom. “You know that you’ve played a meaningful role in that childs life.” Engineer Hargrove says, “We get to see these young boys grow into young men. Life can be hard sometimes, and we hope that some of the things that we’ve taught them, they can carry with them as they grow into adults.” Many of the men and women (of equal rank) in the department have swapped time with coaches in the department to allow them to coach games that they would have otherwise missed. When requested, Chief Moore has even allowed the department’s EMTs to attend games in case of injuries. Our coaches coach, but Columbus Fire and Rescue is still a part of the team that helps make it all work.

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FEATURE ARTICLE

WEATHERING THE STORM: A E S M R O T S E R E THE SEV

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INTERVIEW BY FIREFIGHTER ANTHONY COLOM acolom@columbusms.org Hello Ms. Lawrence. Would you please give us your job title and a description of your duties? Hello ! Well, my name is Cindy Lawrence, and I’m the emergency management director of Columbus and Lowndes County. I’m the director and coordinator of the agency. Our agency serves many purposes. We coordinate with a lot of our industry with what types of chemicals they have and where the chemicals are stored, and what to do in the event that something is released in the county. We’re notified by MEMA when a truck comes through Lowndes county carrying hazardous material. We even deal with gasoline spills at our local stations; that could be a hazardous situation.

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With this being the severe storm season, Director what should our citizens being doing now to prepare for severe weather? Tornado season use to be between the months of March and June; now it’s considered to be every month. Our office tries to prepare the community for tornadoes. One of the things that we try to stress most is knowing where to go immediately in the event of a tornado in our area. We ask everyone to take our phamplets and brochures to read up on this information. We also ask everyone to purchase a Noaa Weather Radio. If a tornado is spotted in our area, the tornado sirens will be activat20

ed, letting the citizens know to go to their safe place. Even though we’re about 300 miles from the gulf coast, should we be prepared for hurricanes as well?

CINDY LAWRENCE

one prepare a disaster supply kit, and keep one in your home and your car. You need things like a battery-operated radio; like a Noaa Weather Radio, and a flashlight. A lot times citizens in the city and county are alarmed when they hear the sirens and the weather looks really nice outside. What’s going on? We have 25 sirens throughout Columbus and Lowndes County. We activate our tornado sirens at 10a.m. the first Wednesday of every month, and test them to make sure they’re working properly. The only other times that we activate our sirens is if an actual tornado has been spotted in our area, or if the wind speed is greater than 75 miles per hour.

If someone in our - Lowndes County Emergency Management area wanted a personal storm shelter, do you or can you We activate our assist in any way ? There are several tornado sirens at companies here in Lowndes county 10 a.m. the first who can install a below ground, inground, or in home saferoom shelter Wednesday of every for you. We can assist in helping you month, and test them to find someone. If FEMA had a grant right now, a person would only have to make sure they’re pay 25% of the cost for the shelter. We working properly. do recommend that those who can

Hurricanes affect the the coast worse, but the winds can affect us as well. Here in our county, we open up shelters for those coming up here from the coast. We also like to stress that every-

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afford a shelter have one installed. April and May are usually the worst months for storms in our area. The weather is warmer than usual right now. Please be prepared.

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Before a Tornado To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan. Listen to NOAA Weather Radio or to commercial radio or television newscasts for the latest information. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials. Be alert to changing weather conditions. Look for approaching storms. Look for the following danger signs: Dark, often greenish sky Large hail A large, dark, low-lying cloud (particularly if rotating) Loud roar, similar to a freight train. If you see approaching storms or any of the danger signs, be prepared to take shelter immediately.

Tornado Facts Quick facts you should know about tornadoes: They may strike quickly, with little or no warning. They may appear nearly transparent until dust and debris are picked up or a cloud forms in the funnel. The average tornado moves Southwest to Northeast, but tornadoes have been known to move in any direc tion. The average forward speed of a tornado is 30 mph, but may vary from stationary to 70 mph. Tornadoes can accompany tropical storms and hurricanes as they move onto land. Waterspouts are tornadoes that form over water. Tornadoes are most frequently reported east of the Rocky Mountains during spring and summer months. Peak tornado season in the southern states is March through May; in the northern states, it is late spring through early summer. Tornadoes are most likely to occur between 3 pm and 9 pm, but can occur at any time.

If you are in: A structure (e.g. residence, small building, school, nursing home, hospital, factory, shopping center, highrise building) Then: Go to a pre-designated shelter area such as a safe room, basement, storm cellar, or the lowest building level. If there is no basement, go to the center of an interior room on the lowest level (closet, interior hallway) away from corners, windows, doors, and outside walls. Put as many walls as possible between you and the outside. Get under a sturdy table and use your arms to protect your head and neck. In a high-rise building, go to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor possible. Do not open windows.

If you are in: A vehicle, trailer, or mobile home Get out immediately and go to the lowest floor of a sturdy, nearby building or a storm shelter. Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes. The outside with no shelter Then: Lie flat in a nearby ditch or depression and cover your head with your hands. Be aware of the potential for flooding. Do not get under an overpass or bridge. You are safer in a low, flat location. Never try to outrun a tornado in urban or congested areas in a car or truck. Instead, leave the vehicle immediately for safe shelter. Watch out for flying debris. Flying debris from tornadoes causes most fatalities and injuries.

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Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

SPECIAL

e u c s e &R e r i F us b al n m o u i l t o C Na s k e e on S i t a t i d Accre BY CAPTAIN MICHAEL CHANDLER mchandler@columbusms.org

The goal of any public agency should be to provide their community with the best services possible. While this goal may sound simple, many organizations have often found it much more difficult to accomplish. As the old adage goes, "Saying and doing are two different things." At Columbus Fire & Rescue, not only do we intend to continue to provide quality services and programs but also seek ways in which we can improve as a department.

formance indicators which must be addressed. This extensive self-assessment will identify what we are doing compared to how it should be done and, if a deficiency exists, identify steps on how we will correct it. In the Standards of Cover phase, the department conducts a community risk analysis. This analysis identifies conditions within the city that impacts department operations such as population concentrations of at-risk age groups (elderly and young), the types and frequency of calls the department respond to, apparatus response times, fire suppression water supplies, and target hazards (businesses and special locations) that present challenges to department resources. By completing this analysis, the department is able to determine if we are providing the services and programs the community actually needs as well as determining if we are capable of providing these services in terms of personnel, training, and physical assets (apparatus and equipment).

T Columbus Fire & Rescue has begun the process of becoming a nationally accredited fire service organization. Accreditation is the process by which all aspects of department operation's are evaluated using nationally recognized peer standards and practices. Accreditation supports an integrated risk management approach by involving not only emergency response but also incorporating preventative programs such as code enforcement and public education. In order to meet accreditation requirements, the department must complete a self-assessment, develop a Standards of Cover, and publish a strategic plan. Once these three requirements are completed, the Commission on Fire Accreditation International (CFAI) will send an assessment team to conduct an on-site review to determine whether the department has meet accreditation standards. In the self-assessment phase, the department will be evaluated in 10 categories that include services and programs, physical and human resources, assessment and planning, and training to name just a few. Within these categories are 44 criterion and 250 per-

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for the department. How will accreditation benefit Columbus? First, you, the citizens of Columbus, know that we are providing services and programs that meet your needs. Second, accreditation promotes excellence within the organization by serving as a continuous self-improvement tool that ensures organizational effectiveness and efficiency. In other words, the department constantly monitors what we are doing and, if problems exist, develops a plan of action to address any issues noted. By doing this self assessment, you know that we are doing the best job possible and we are doing it in an efficient and cost effective manner. Nationally, there are approximately 150 departments that are recognized by the CFAI as having met accreditation standards. Once accredited, Columbus Fire & Rescue will become the first fire department in Mississippi to achieve this status. At Columbus Fire & Rescue, we intend to back up our words with our actions.

The last phase in the accreditation process is publishing a strategic plan. In developing the strategic plan, the department uses information gained during the self-assessment and community risk analysis phases to determine the department's strengths, weaknesses, and external relationships. The strategic plan provides a "road map" for the department to follow in addressing gaps in department operations and activities. The plan serves as a guidance tool that provides both short and long term direction, establishes goals and objectives, maximizes department resources, and builds a shared vision

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AROUND THE STATION 1.

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1. Firefighter T.J. Brand 2. Chief Kenneth Moore 3. Fire Marshal Todd Weathers & Firefighter Trainee Terrance Colister 4. Administrative Assistant Linda Hanson 5. Captain Larry Webber 6. Firefighter Nathan Knepp 7. Captain Mike Gibson 8. Captain Todd Graham 9. Firefighter Jason Pool (Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom)


Photo by Firefighter Anthony Colom

SPECIAL

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BY BATTALION CHIEF CHRIS HANSEN chansen@columbusms.org It's that time of year again, when warmer weather and longer days in the south bring local and distant people to enjoy each other's company at a variety of social outings that are happening in the Friendly City. There are festivals, picnics, fundraisers and many other events that allow for good food, great fun and even a helping hand or two. It takes a lot of detailed planning and hard work to ensure that these events not only start out on a good note but end up on an even better one. Having a great time is at the top of everyone's list; however, this would not be possible unless they felt safe and secure enough to do so.

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ly handled by our firefighters already positioned throughout these events to provide prompt service to patrons. Also, a self sustaining mobile command vehicle that host all participating emergency agencies at one location is usually positioned at events to have a quick response coordination in the event of an emergency situation. In order for these various agencies to coordinate with

Here at Columbus Fire and Rescue (CFR) along with other local agencies, safety is at the top of our list. I know it sounds strange but it's our goal to make sure these events are as "uneventful" as possible. CFR provides a variety of specialized functions during outings that range from boat operations/ water rescue during events that occur in or near our local waterways, to qualified EMT's on all terrain vehicles that provide medical attention to those in need. Cuts, scrapes, bruises and the occasional lost child are common occurrences when large crowds are gathered. These types of incidents are main-

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each other we use a system of organization that is called the ICS ( Incident Command System ) The ICS is used as a thinking tool to bridge government and professional emergency responders together to be able to work effectively and efficiently through an

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event. This system is used on a daily basis here at CFR as a command and control technique on our emergency scenes here within the City limits as well as on larger scale incidents such as Hurricane Katrina, Yazoo City and Smithville Tornado disasters, and many other mutual aid responses that have requested our technical assistance. Such responses would not be possible if it were not for an organized system of command and control between firefighters, police officers, ambulance personnel, public works, or any other agency helping to mitigate an emergency or yes, even a fun- filled family event. Well, I can already smell the great food and hear the music at our our next big outing: Market Street Festival 2012. I hope all who attend this or any of the other events happening this year in Columbus will know that Columbus Fire and Rescue and a host of many other dedicated professionals are planning and working hard to make your experience very "uneventful".

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COLUMBUS FIRE and RESCUE

Crossword Puzzle

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9 ACROSS 3 The 20th state. 5 The warming of a room or building by a furnace or another source of energy 7 Designed to assist in fighting fires by transporting firefighters to the scene. 9 Refers to a firefighter’s outer protective clothing. DOWN 1 A device that detects smoke, typically as an indicator of fire. 2 A source of water provided in most urban, suburban, and rural areas which allows firefighters to tap into the municipal water supply to assist in extinguishing a fire. 4 A collection of airborne solid and liquid particulates and gases emitted when a material undergoes combustion. 6 A situation that poses an immediate risk to health, life, property, or environment. 8 A Mississippi city founded in 1821. 3) Mississippi 5) heat 7) fire truck 9) turnouts 1) smoke detector 2) fire hydrant 4) smoke 6) emergency 8) Columbus


Emergency Medical Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

An r o F at ed I Call . Why Is Th ce n ? a l e r u e b H Am ck u r T e Fir BY BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD mward@columbusms.org

Emergency Medical Services (EMS), these three words have changed the face of many fire departments across the United States over the past 50 years. Most fire departments respond to some form of a medical emergency on a daily basis. Only a handful of departments that make no EMS runs exist today. According to the US Fire Administration data, fewer than 10 percent of incidents responded to by fire departments involve fire. More than 55 percent of incidents are categorized as EMS or rescue. That figure is more like 70 to 80 percent for Columbus Fire and Rescue. Don't overlook the fact that responding fire apparatus on EMS incidents provides a beneficial and valued service to the community. We provide time sensitive basic life support to the citizens and visitors of the City of Columbus during a medical emergency. After all, the primary objective of the fire department is to save lives and property. Providing emergency medical services to the community achieves one-half of this mission.

E Traditionally, ambulance services in the United States have been held to a goal of responding to medical emergencies within eight minutes for at least 90 percent of their calls. Fire department standards require fire stations to be located so as to provide a six minute response time for fires. This achieves excellent response time for all types of emergencies. According to data from the American Heart Association (AHA), patients suffering ventricular fibrillation, the most common survivable arrhythmia associated with cardiac arrest, should be defibrillated within five minutes. According to AHA, every minute that

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defibrillation is delayed reduces a patient's survival rate by up to ten percent! All Columbus Fire and Rescue vehicles carry Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs). If no treatment, such as CPR is started before the five minute mark, survival is 40 percent and declines rapidly. The key factor here is a quick response time, which can be achieved by the fire department because of the location of fire stations across the City of Columbus. Columbus Fire and Rescue began responding to emergency medical incidents in 1996. An incident that happened across the street from the "old station number three" on Military Road played a large part in establishing an EMS program for Columbus Fire and Rescue. There was a neighbor across the street in cardiac arrest, with firefighters trained in CPR in the station, but there was no response by the firefighters because they were not aware of the medical emergency right across the street! At that time fire department personnel were not dispatched to medical emergencies. I must say that 16 years ago this new mission or concept the fire department was adopting was not welcomed with "open arms" by all personnel within the fire department. Change is not always easy, but most personnel looked at this new mission as an opportunity to provide a much needed service to the community. Initially all firefighters were trained as Emergency Medical Responders (EMRs), but now it is a requirement in the department for personnel to become a Nationally Registered Emergency Medical Technician.

with medical emergencies. This means the fire department responds to the scene and renders aid until an ambulance arrives and then turns the primary patient care over to the ambulance crew, with the fire department assisting the ambulance crew if needed. Columbus Fire and Rescue only responds to life threatening medical emergencies; including chest pain, difficulty breathing, severe bleeding, an unresponsive patient, and motor vehicle accidents. When responding to motor vehicle accidents (MVAs), the fire department not only renders first aid to patients, but also provides extrication of trapped patients using the "jaws of life" and other extrication tools. There is sometimes the threat of fire at an MVA. Columbus Fire and Rescue responds to MVAs with two engines and a chief officer. If extrication is needed extra personnel are required to accomplish this in a safe manner. This is for the safety of the responders as well as the patient trapped inside the vehicle. Also in a MVA involving multiple vehicles, you never know how many people may be in need of medical care. Columbus Fire and Rescue has been providing emergency medical services to the citizens of Columbus for 16 years, and yes, we still respond to fires and many other emergency incidents, and we have been known to remove a cat out of a tree also, but to this day some people still ask “why is that fire truck here? I called for an ambulance.� Hopefully after reading this article that phrase will change to, “I called for an ambulance and I'm glad that fire truck is here"!

Columbus Fire and Rescue operates as a "first responder agency" when dealing

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EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS WORD SEARCH

WORDS TO FIND BACKPACK CALM FAMILY PLAN LISTEN MEETING PLACE PHONE RADIO SAFETY SUPPLY KIT SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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IN THE COMMUNITY Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom

Firefighter Chase Taylor, Enginee r Randall Beatt Captain Larry y, Webber, & BC Chris Hansen

Chief of Training Duane Hughes & son DJ at Mayor Smith’s Unity Picnic New firefighters recite oath for Chief Kenneth Moore & Mayor Robert Smith

Engineer Randall Beatty, Johnny Peters, Captain Larry Webber, Battalion Chief Chris Hansen, & Firefighter Chase Taylor with runners

umbu ntown Col un - dow 012 R n Fu s 2 Kid March 31,

Fire & Life Safety Educator Carole Sumerall at the Mayor’s Unity Picnic

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Kids Fun Run - downtown Columbus, March 31, 2012

Firefighter Eric Minga, Engineer Doug Wiggins, & Captain John Fancher

Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom

10K Run in downtown Columbus, March 31, 2012

Firefighters Chase Taylor & Nathan Knepp taking the oath before Chief Moore & Mayor Smith Engineer Randall Beatty, Gina Beatty, & Captain Larry Webber Engineer Randall Beatty & Firefighter Chase Taylor administering first aid at the Unity Picnic

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ENGINEER FRANK UPTON’S 1985 RETIREMENT PARTY 2012 3.

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Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom

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1.) Retired captain Bill Boddie & wife 2.) Engineer Darren Allbritton 3.) Retired battalion chief Earl Cunningham, Battalion Chief Chris Hansen, & retired battalion chief Ricky Graves 4.) Captain Mark Connors & Rebecca Palmer 5.) Retired engineer Frank Upton 6.) Engineer Brad Alexander & wife Jamie 7.) Keith and Margie Brown 8.) Frank Upton and daughter dancing 9.) Retired battalion chief Mike McReynolds CHECK YOUR SMOKE DETECTORS

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SPECIAL - PROFILE

NEAL AUSTIN: SPECIAL OPERATIONS Interview by Firefighter Anthony Colom acolom@columbusms.org You’re Columbus Fire and Rescue’s Special Operations Chief. What are your duties? Basically I’m dealing with everything other than fire; that includes haz-mat, rope rescue, confined space, trench, structural collapse, and the homeland security aspect also. My main fuction is as a liasion between coordinators and the money that’s need to operate. I answer directly to our fire chief, and work closely with our chief of training. Our Homeland Security office here in Columbus is the

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lead agency for Taskforce 2. All grant money comes through Columbus as well as any exercises and training. We’ve cut the numbers back in the taskforce because of budget cuts to homeland security. We now have a group of 62 from Columbus, Starkville, Westpoint, Philadelphia, Choctaw, Meridian, Jackson, Ridgeland, and Madison. In the event of natural disasters, and local governments are overwhelmed, they may call and request homeland security assis-

tance. If that happens, I’ll be going, or the team and I will go. Homeland Security is doing all hazards now. It’s not just an agency that deals with terrorist activity. Why are many departments around the country creating positions such as yours? Because there are so many things that you have to keep up with: the training and paperwork. If these departments didn’t have the position, a lot of things would get lost in the shuffle; kind of like what was happening here with us. So we’re just hoping to get ahead of it and have someone to spearhead the training side and paper work side, and keep it all flowing. What are some of the things that you’re working on right now? Well one of the biggest things we’ve done is switched from the specialized-team concept within the department to having everyone in the department trained to operations level so that everyone can perform at the same level. We still have our techs and specialist who will get into the minor details. We’ll still allow those who want to specialize in a certain area to do so. They’ll be the ones leading or guiding the others in the event that something happens, such as a dive rescue or rope rescue. The other personnel on scene will do things like going to get rope, helping the specialist and techs suit up, setting up equipment, and so on. naustin@columbusms.org

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NIGHT LIFE FUN

SPECIAL

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FIRE and LIFE SAFETY By FIRE MARSHAL TODD WEATHERS tweathers@columbusms.org Columbus Fire and Rescue regulates fire and life safety in 23 nightclubs or bars within the City of Columbus. The definition of a nightclub or bar is an establishment licensed to sell alcoholic beverages and/or beer on the premises and where dancing and entertainment may or may not be provided.

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A tragedy occurred at the Station Nightclub in West Warwick Rhode Island on Thursday, February 20, 2003 at 11:007 pm. The band had just begun to play when pyrotechnics were set off as part of the show. The pyrotechnics ignited insulation foam in the walls and ceiling surrounding the stage, in less than a minute the entire stage was engulfed in flames. 462 people were in attendance, 100 lost their lives and about half of the attendees were injured, either from burns, smoke inhalation, or trampling. The owners of the nightclub were charged with 200 counts of involuntary manslaughter. The fire from its inception was caught on video by a local news reporter; this frightening video can be viewed on the internet, just Google Station Nightclub Fire. In an attempt to keep such a tragedy from occurring within the City of Columbus, the Mayor and City Council have amended Chapter 12 of the City of Columbus Code of Ordinances. The ordinance requires nightclub and bar owners/ managers to attend a meeting with the Fire Marshal of the city prior to their business license. The purpose of this meeting is to share and explain the rules, regulations, codes, ordinances, enforcement procedures and penalties. Fire Marshal Todd Weathers has conducted these meeting with all owner/mangers operating nightclubs or bars with the city. In addition the code requires that all new and existing nightclubs and bars

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

AND

BATTALION CHIEF MARK WARD mward@columbusms.org

have a minimum of one fire and life safety manager on duty at all times that the business is open. Columbus Fire and Rescue provides the training for this position. Upon successful completion of this training, the participants will be registered with the fire marshal's office. These duties include: 1. Check all exit doors for proper operation. 2. Check all exit and emergency lighting for proper operation. 3. Check all portable fire extinguishers for proper operation. 4. Make sure the occupant load is posted and readily visible. 5. Check all fire alarm systems for proper operation. 6. Check for blocked or obstructed means of egress components (exits). 7. Maintain an accurate count of the number of occupants in the structure and make sure not to exceed the legal occupant load.

Columbus. We do not want the tragedy that occurred in Rhode Island to be repeated within our jurisdiction. We hope to achieve this goal by education, cooperation and participation by the owners, managers and employees of these establishments. We feel if they are educated in the dangers and have the skills and knowledge to correct these dangerous situations that the safety level in these establishments will increase as well. Please keep in mind that with all ordinances there is also enforcement. Columbus Fire and Rescue personnel, under the direction of the fire marshal, monitor the activities at nightclubs, bars and taverns on a routine basis so that all applicable ordinances are being followed. The next time you are "out on the town" please know that the fire marshal and other fire personnel are doing what we can to keep you safe!

A fire alarm system is also required under the ordinance. The fire alarm shall have a shunt device designed to disconnect the electrical power to the entertainment system upon alarm initiation. This allows the business patrons to hear the fire alarm and exit the building quickly. In the Station Nightclub fire the alarm did finally sound but was barely audible over the sound of the music. This shunt device helps to alleviate that problem by stopping the music or entertainment as soon as the fire alarm is initiated. Columbus Fire and Rescue's goal is to increase the safety level in all nightclubs, bars and taverns within the City of

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Photo by Engineer Wes Mims

SPECIAL

IT Y R A H C OMGEE DONATION H T A S RECEIVES L AR T R A T S CUE

ES AND R E R I F BUS BY CHIEF OF TRAINING DUANE HUGHES COLUM dhughes@columbusms.org Columbus Fire and Rescue constantly strives to meet the needs of the community we serve. After years of providing customer service to the wonderful citizens of Columbus, we sometimes forget that there are others working hard to meet the same goal. I was recently reminded of this fact after receiving a phone call from Mrs. Kathy Cadden. This simple phone call resulted in a well spring of equipment and goodwill benefiting the citizens of Columbus and Lowndes County.

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Mrs. Cadden introduced herself over the phone, saying that she worked for a relief agency called Operation Ukraine. Founded in 2001, Kathy Cadden along with Co-director Joe "Jody" Thompson collected donations at a warehouse in South Columbus. These donations were sent to support relief efforts in many different nations. Among these were Haiti, Ukraine, Somalia, Afghanistan, and many others. Mrs. Cadden said that she had come across some items in the warehouse that may be of some use to the fire department. She invited me down to take a look, and I accepted.

Arriving at the warehouse, I was greeted by Mrs. Cadden and a couple of volunteer workers. They were busy stacking boxes and crates. I was overwhelmed by the variety and quantity of goods before me. Rows of wheel chairs were flanked by stacks of folding cots. Mountains of pillows and sheets towered over neatly aligned boxes of shoes and boots. Guiding me forward, Mrs. Cadden navigated between the close aisles of stacked goods with practiced ease. After a series of twists and turns, we stopped before a stack of identical

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boxes. "Could Columbus Fire and Rescue use these?" Mrs. Cadden asked. I saw many Tyvex suits, the kind used by responders entering a hazardous environment. Thinking of all the situations in which the suits could be used, I accepted them. My smile widened when Mrs. Cadden also offered hard hats and various other pieces of equipment. Her only request was that the equipment be used locally. "Charity starts at home,�

Project Ukraine's co-director, Joe Thompson, works hard locally placing hospital beds in homes, and loaning wheelchairs to those in need. Mr. Thompson recently supplied one person with a donated electric mobility chair. Project Ukraine partners with local churches in supplying recovery houses and families with food. Mrs. Kathy was also proud that her organization ships supplies to orphanages around the world. Charity does start at home, but it doesn't have to end there. The incredible workers of Project Ukraine are a fine example of this fact. Their determined efforts ease suffering and spread love and caring. Project Ukraine helps not just those in Lowndes County, but all throughout our global community.

she said. So I promised to distribute the supplies throughout Columbus Fire and Rescue, EMA, and the five County Volunteer Fire Districts.

Kathy Cadden can be reached at kathy.cadden.ukraine@gmail.com

Mrs. Kathy told more of the charitable work of Operation Ukraine, and the many people worldwide that benefited from the collected donations. The donations arrive at the warehouse from churches and school groups nationwide. She told me stories ranging from an MSU Radio peanut butter drive, to the story of an individual who sends ten dollars every month. Mrs. Cadden said that monetary donations were used for shrink-wrap and tape to package supplies. Money also is used to purchase fuel to drive the packaged goods to Memphis, the first leg of their worldwide journey.

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IN THE COMMUNITY

City Planner Christina Berry, Fire Chief Kenneth Moore, Public Works Director Mike Pratt

Photos by Firefighter Anthony Colom

Honor Guard members

Ward 1 Community Meeting

Mayor Robert Smith

Engineer Brad Alexander & Captain Bud Egger at Columbus High School Engineer Brad Alexander, Firefighter Dale Ballard, & Captain Tommy Massey

Ward 1 councilman, Gene Taylor

Ward 1 Community Meeting

Offic ofessional ood, Chief Pr ub Joyce Ellenw iangle Boys & Girls Cl Golden Tr

er, Engineer LaMarcus Phillips, Engineer Ron Musgrove, Firefighter T.J. Brand, Captain Larry Webber, Firefighter Terrance Colister Ward 1 Community Meeting

Columbus Boys & Girls Club

Columbus Fire and Rescue’s CPAT orientation at Fire Station 3

Fire Chief Kenneth Moore speaking at CPAT orientation

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

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EMERGENCY HAVE-READY KIT It is important to have supplies ready if something happens. You should have the supplies you will need if you have to stay at home. You should also have the supplies you will need if you have to leave your home. You probably have a lot of these items already. Finding supplies in your home can be fun for everyone! Have a family scavenger hunt to gather items below and check them off. Some items are needed in both kits, but in different amounts. Keep Ready-to-Go items in a backpack or duffle bag. Ready-to-Go Kit: One gallon of water per person Food that doesn't have to be refrigerated a manual can opener Plastic/paper plates, cups and silverware Flashlight and extra batteries Battery-operated radio A change of clothes A card with your contact information and the number of someone out of state to call Pet food and supplies for one or more days Small first aid kit Personal identification card Personal hygiene items, soap and hand sanitizer Store medicine you usually take near your Ready-to-Go Kit The Ready-to-Stay Kit includes the items in the Ready-to-Go kit. You can keep all these supplies at home in a plastic tub or a special cabinet Ready-to-Stay Kit: Three gallons of water for each family member Canned food and snacks for at least three days Non-electric can opener First aid kit Medicine you usually take Toilet paper Clothes set aside for each family member Blankets Books and games to keep you busy Paper and pencils Pet food and supplies for three days Non-scented bleach

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t i K y c n e g r 72-Hour E m e Day 1 Breakfast: 2 granola bars 1 can juice

n o t r a C k l i in a M Menu

Lunch: 1 pkg soup mix 1 pkg soda crackers Dinner: 1 stick beef jerky 1 fruit roll Snack: 4 pieces candy 3 sticks gum

Day 2 Breakfast 1/2 of the trail mix hot chocolate Lunch: 1 stick beef jerky 1 apple cider mix Dinner: canned soup 1 pkg crackers Snack: 5 pieces candy 4 sticks gum

The 72-Hour Kit can be adapted to include things you want in yours.

Day 3

Breakfast 1/2 of the trail mix 1 apple cider mix

Materials Needed - 1 Clean Dried 1 gallon milk jug with lid - Scissors - Duct Tape - Paper Back Bible or other scriptures - Ball point pen Emergency Candle (made from soup can) - Clean empty vegetable can

Lunch: 1 pkg soup mix 1 pkg soda crackers Dinner: 2 granola bars 1 fruit roll 1 hot chocolate mix Snack: 4 pieces candy 3 sticks gum Water needed: 2 liters Label for outside of carton: contents: 2 pkgs chewing gum 2 pkgs hot chocolate mix 1-1/2 cups trail mix 2 sticks beef jerky 2 pkgs. apple cider mix 1 small can apple juice 4 granola bars 14 pieces hard candy 2 fruit rolls 3 pkgs soda crackers 1 can hearty soup 2 instant soup mix packets 1 two-liter pop containers filled with water

SMOKE ALARMS SAVE LIVES

With handle of milk jug facing you, cut on each side of opening -O-, down about 3 inches and around toward the opposite corner from handle leaving about 2" at that corner for the front of fold open. make sure inside of carton is clean and DRY! Place Scriptures in first, then insert emergency candle inside the vegetable can (this can be used for warming water and soup over the candle) add it to the jug next. Place the packages of hot chocolate around the edges of jug, then fill jug with remaining items. Add the first aid kit last as this needs to be easily accessible. Other items such as money, medications and emergency numbers should be added if necessary. We made an emergency card to place inside with our name, name of family members in our home, each person's ss#, blood type, medical needs, etc.

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TRAINING, PREVENTION, & BEST CUSTOMER SERVICE