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February 2021

FEATURES

Issue No. 238

26

18 26

Richard ‘Dick’ Nock by camille devaul

Local cattle rancher, beef industry advocate, livestock entrepreneur, and Army Veteran leaves behind a legacy as a good-natured man, a mentor and a friend to all.

Coach Kiah by camille devaul

From cattle rancher to life coach, ‘One bit, don’t quit!’ became the mantra adopted by Kiah Twissleman after losing over 125 pounds and dedicating herself to helping others.

22 28

History of Roblan of the Year by hayley mattson

Since 1977 the Paso Robes Chamber of Commerce has been honoring local heroes who embody the spirit of volunteerism.

Taste of Americana by barbie butz

It’s time to celebrate the “sweet” people in our lives who love us and support us this Valentine’s Day. Nothing says, “I love you” better than a homemade dessert.

On the Cover We celebrate our magazine’s history by recognizing the Roblans of the Year that have graced our covers since 2003. Read more about it on page 22. Cover design by Hayley Mattson and Michael Michaud 30,000 PRINTED | 26,700 DIRECT MAILED LOCALLY!

3,300 DROPPED AT HIGH TRAFFIC LOCATIONS IN SLO COUNTY

Paso Robles 93446 • Templeton 93465 • Shandon 93461 • Bradley 93426 • San Miguel 93451 Hotels • Wineries • B&Bs • Waiting Rooms • Restaurants • High-traffic Visitor Hotspots for advertising inquiries and rates email publisher @ pasomagazine.com, or contact one of our advertising representatives.


contents publisher, editor-in-chief

Hayley Mattson

publisher, editor-at-large

Nicholas Mattson

assistant editor

layout design

Melissa Mattson

17

ad design

Denise Mclean Jen Rodman

Michael Michaud

community writers

Connor Allen Camille DeVaul

ad consultants

Dana McGraw Jamie Self

office administrator

Cami Martin | office@13starsmedia.com

20

contributors

Barbie Butz

Mira Honeycutt

Gina Fitzpatrick

The General Store

James Brescia, Ed.D.

The Natural Alternative

Karyl Lammers

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29

OUR NEXT ISSUE: BEST OF 2021 HOME IMPROVEMENT, WEDDING ISSUE March 2021

10

Something Worth Reading Publisher’s Letter

Round Town

14

Paso Robles Chamber: ‘Advocacy’ is Not Just a Buzzword Submitted

16

The Natural Alternative: Cholesterol and Heart Health

16

The General Store: Local Ways to Show Love

17

San Miguel: Michelle Hido Receives the Key to the City

Paso People

12

20

Noel Ryan: Retiring After 43 of Service

Taste of Paso

Oak Leaf

30

Sip & Savor: For Valentine’s Day, Uncork the Other Red Wines

32

SLO County Office of Education: A Year Like No Other Directory of Local Houses of Worship

Last Word

34 34

ADVERTISING DEADLINE* February 10, 2021 * Ad reservation deadline is the 10th of each month preceding the publication. For more information about advertising, upcoming issues and editorial themes, contact our advertising representatives above, or see our media kit at pasoroblesmagazine.com/advertise

It’s Happening On Main Street: Moving Forward

29

PUBLICATION DELIVERY DATE March 4, 2021

Paso Robles Magazine Manifesto Directory to our Advertisers

PASOMAGAZINE.COM office@13starsmedia.com • (805) 466-2585 OFFICE 5860 El Camino Real Ste G, Atascadero, Ca 93422

MAIL P.O. Box 427 Paso Robles, CA 93447

SUBSCRIPTIONS

Annual subscriptions are available for $29.99 Subscribe online at pasoroblesmagazine.com

EDITORIAL POLICY

Commentary reflects the views of the writers and does not necessarily reflect those of Paso Robles Magazine. Paso Robles Magazine is delivered free to 26,700 addresses in North San Luis Obispo County. Our costs are paid entirely by advertising revenue. Our Local Business section spotlights select advertisers. All other stories are determined solely by our editors.

PROUD TO BE LOCAL!

Paso Robles Magazine ©2021 is a local business owned and published by local people — Nicholas & Hayley Mattson No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form by any means without written consent from Paso Robles Magazine.

Like and Follow us: FB/TW: @pasomag | IG: @thepasomagazine designed & printed in california

8 | pasoroblesmagazine.com

Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


Something Worth Reading “If we could change ourselves, the tendencies in the world would also change. As a man changes his own nature, so does the attitude of the world change towards him. This is the divine mystery supreme. A wonderful thing it is and the source of our happiness. We need not wait to see what others do.” ~ Mohandas Gandhi

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s we head into the second month of the new year and the sun starts to warm our souls once again, we take time to reflect on the darkness of the winter that we all endured. Remaining optimistic comes naturally to us, as does believing the best in others and allowing individuals to prove otherwise. 2020 was particularly challenging but enlightening; however, we remain optimistic, and for the most part, people have proven to be genuine, generous, and kind. Our goal will always be to look at the brighter side of life and celebrate the good, the progress, and the successes we are blessed with in the communities we love. We feel it is a great day to be an American and honor the resilient, the proud, the pioneers, our community leaders. It is an honor to remember our local history as we come upon the 20th anniversary of Paso Robles Magazine in May of this year. Every February, we proudly display the Roblan of the Year on the cover. This year is a little different, as we collectively tip-toe into 2021 with caution. Due to current gathering restrictions, the Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce has decided to postpone choosing the Roblan of the Year until a later date (you can read about this more on page 22). So in lieu of our usual honoring of the current Roblan, we celebrate our magazine’s past by recognizing the Roblans of the Year that have graced our covers in their honor. As you read through all the names on page 22, you might recognize quite a few; we hope it reminds you of the strength in our community. We support our local businesses with absolute loyalty. We did not see one local business in the past year that did not rise to the occasion to provide quality service with higher health and safety standards than were required. We commend our friends, neighbors, and local loved ones who battled the arbitrary regulations California is famous for to serve their communities and provide for their families. The idea that health and safety is somehow a partisan issue is deeply flawed. The Constitution of California has no party lines. The first item in the California bill of inalienable rights includes

the right to acquire, possess and protect property, which consists of a person’s livelihood. There is a stirring of the wild west spirit of personal responsibility and self-determination on the air. These values created the world around us and will guide us as we move ahead. In March of last year, we voluntarily abandoned our scheduled work to weather the unknown. We withstood virulent attacks on local businesses, innocent Americans, the rule of law, constitutional rights, sensibility, rationality, and absurd claims of the boogeyman sort that sought to dismantle the fabric of our nation. We withstood it because we are Americans. We will always be proud to be Americans, not because presidents commanded it, but because we are the first and only nation to establish that inalienable rights endowed to the People are greater than the edicts of authoritarian govern-

ment. Progressive thinkers established the ideals of inalienable rights nearly 250 years ago, and they remain true today. We acknowledge that sovereignty in Paso Robles Magazine by celebrating our Roblans of the Year each year — community leaders who voluntarily gave their time and energy to make Paso Robles a better place for future generations. Today, more than ever, local effort and community engagement are needed to challenge the threats to our community and family values that make Paso Robles a beacon of hope for the future pioneers that will lead us into the new era. Think globally, act locally. We hope you enjoy this month’s issue of Paso Robles Magazine.

if thou wouldest win immortality of name, either do things worth the writing, or write things worth the reading. — Thomas Fuller, 1727 This month’s edition of Paso Robles Magazine is brought to you by all the local advertisers that fill our pages. Thanks to them, we are able to bring you your local Hometown Magazine.

Nic & Hayley


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Round Town

• It’s Happening on Main Street

Karyl Lammers

MOVING FORWARD

Keep your face always towards the sunshine, and the shadows will fall behind you. WALT WHITMAN

12 | pasoroblesmagazine.com

J

ust sing “Hakuna Matata,” it means “No worries for the rest of your days.” It’s a problem-free philosophy in music from the movie “The Lion King.” If you haven’t seen the 1994 movie or forgot the tune, research it. It’s happy, upbeat, and positive, just what we need to feel as we enter the second month of 2021. We are still facing COVID restrictions and all the challenges that come with them. Paso Robles Downtown Main Street Association is and has been busy keeping downtown energized. In December, we launched our “Love Locals Now, Enjoy Local Later” Campaign with a successful Christmas gift Raffle. Local businesses donated over $3,000 worth of gifts that were on display at Kahuna’s Surf and Sport on 12th Street. The drawing was on December 23 at the store...the winner was Lauren Picard (one of our locals). The businesses who participated embraced the support of Main Street and were energized because of the extra foot traffic and sales. Currently, Main Street has a unique fundraiser. We are raffling a VW Bus - Wagon Cooler filled with local craft beer donated by Savage Spirits & Deli. Tickets are only $10

and are on sale at Savage (where it is displayed), at the Main Street Office, or Facebook@pasoroblesdowntown.org, through PayPal. These funds will help us promote and support our Downtown. These events do not happen without our Volunteers: “Volunteers don’t go unpaid because they are worthless, but because they are Priceless.”Thank you, everyone!! There are changes still happening in town. There are two new restaurants opening soon. One is “Ziggy’s” on Pine Street, across the street from The Pine Street Saloon, and another on the corner of 14th and Park (where Santa Maria Brew was located) “The Chicken Shack.” A couple of new choices for you to try. February is here with special occasions: Groundhog Day, then a fun-filled weekend of Valentine’s Day on Sunday the 14th and President’s Day on Monday the 15th. It’s the American Heart Month and Chocolate Lovers Month. Note: These are celebrations that won’t be canceled. If we’re lucky, we will have a super bowl, and Mardi Gras will happen. In these trying times, it is more important than ever to surround yourself with love and laughter. Stay positive and always move forward. “You’re off to great places; today is your day. Your mountain is waiting, so get on your way.” Our Friend, Dr. Seuss. 

Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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pasoroblesmagazine.com | 13


ADVOCACY ADVOCACY ADVOCACY ADVOCACY ADVOCACY ADVOCACY ADVOCACY

Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce

GINA FITZPATRICK

President/CEO Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce

IS NOT JUST A BUZZWORD advocacy noun

ad·vo·ca·cy | \ ‘ad-və-kə-sē \ the act or process of supporting a cause or proposal: the act or process of advocating something

14 | pasoroblesmagazine.com

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n the Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce website, you’ll read, “we are committed to serving as the voice of business, making sure that elected officials and their regulatory staff understand the need to create and maintain an environment in which business can thrive, thereby creating a healthy economy to support our families and communities. We actively monitor proposed legislation, regulatory rules, and government processes to ensure the interests of Paso Robles’ businesses are represented and protected.” But what exactly does that mean, and how does it affect YOU? Whether you own a business or work at one; shop at a business or dine at one; every resident of Paso Robles benefits from the prosperity of our business community. Our advocacy efforts are always solution-oriented, designed to ensure the continued success of all Paso Roblans. With that constantly in mind, Chamber staff works closely with our community partners within the City and with our counterparts throughout the region. We maintain contact with our elected officials on both the local and state levels in order to provide the best possible voice in support of one another. We’ve held multiple roundtable discussions

with local business leaders to gain feedback on what is and is not working for them and how we can strive to work more efficiently together. This means we get to engage and brainstorm with our friends and hear what matters in the lives of those around us. Those are the best parts: the connection and camaraderie that comes with loving where you live. We are inspired daily by the creativity shown despite the challenging year we’ve endured. As an example, we have collaborated with the restaurant industry throughout this pandemic. Through our work in economic development, we have learned that the restaurant and retail industries are an essential part of the ecosystem in our beautiful town. Many of the employees that work in these industries have children in our school system. If they fail to be gainfully employed and have to move out of our area, our school system would suffer. Housing markets could see a shift. And tourists, whether you personally love them or wish they would stay home, provide much-needed revenue that translates into paved streets, open parks, and strong public service departments. Advocacy is not just a buzzword; it matters. The heartbeat of Paso Robles is you; it’s me; it’s the feel of community. It’s Paso Strong, and it’s why we do what we do Every. Single. Day. 

Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


THE NATURAL ALTERNATIVE NUTRITION CENTER

Cholesterol & Heart Health

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mericans currently spend billions each year on cholesterol-lowering medication without addressing one of the main causes of an elevated lipid panel. Before I get into that discussion, let’s talk about cholesterol. Cholesterol is essential to rebuild cell membranes as well as make hormones such as estrogen, testosterone, and cortisol. Cholesterol is not the enemy! What most don’t realize is how critical diet and lifestyle are to maintaining a healthy balance. Let’s start with diet. If you are avoiding eggs or tossing the yolks, hear me out. When you remove eggs or egg yolk from your diet, you also remove an excellent form of protein which supports a healthy weight, as well as the nutrients lutein, zeaxanthin, choline, and Vitamin A. Lutein & zeaxanthin are important in reducing risk of cataracts & macular degeneration, Vitamin A important for vision health, and choline for brain function and fatty liver. Eat those organic eggs (unless you have an allergy or sensitivity to eggs). Though they contain cholesterol, they won’t necessarily raise your numbers! One cause of high cholesterol is eating sugars and refined carbs (cookies, bread, crackers, candy – anything

man-made, basically!). Excess sugar consumption leads to excess insulin production, which leads to an increase in cholesterol and triglycerides. Refined sugar also leads to increased inflammation, and the LDL (lousy cholesterol) number skyrockets! In addition to dietary changes (which are essential!), we have a very effective supplement, Bergamot, from a quality practitioner line that has proven itself as a leader in heart health!

Dr. Vincenzo Mollace at the Univ. of Catanzaro has championed several clinical trials that demonstrated specific fractions in Bergamot supported healthy levels of every blood lipid marker by targeting the source of cholesterol production. If you are looking for a safe and effective way to reduce cholesterol, inflammation, and improve cardiovascular wellness, Bergamot is a winner. Buy Bergamot from The Natural Alternative, proven to work with so many customers! If you need help with sugar cravings, insulin resistance, weight loss, or any other ongoing health issue, schedule an appointment with our clinical nutritionist today and start feeling better tomorrow! Bobbi & Team @ Natural Alternative

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February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

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Local Ways to Show Love

hether your Valentine’s Day is an hourly-chocolate-dipped-surprise kind of day or your idea of celebrating is ordering enough dumplings to share (a deep show of love in our house), this year will no doubt look a little different. For some, it’s a way to bring a rosy glow to the gray days of February, whether you’ve got a sweetie or not. And some of our smaller makers and restaurant pals could use some TLC right about now. We’ve got some ideas for local ways to show the love : ) INDOOR PICNIC We’ve got a pile of Mexican blankets just right for the beach, the park, or your living room. Grab some take-out (have you tried @ justsouppasorobles? It’s Hatch’s cold weather pop-up serving 3 soups a day with homemade focaccia, sure to get you through the rainy days with a warm belly), light a candle, done. “OF ALL THE PATHS YOU TAKE IN LIFE, MAKE SURE SOME OF THEM ARE DIRT.” JOHN MUIR Being stuck at home in a place with so much natural beauty is a huge gift. It was their love for the magnificent power of plants that moved the makers of Vana Tisane to create small-batch, loose leaf teas using organic ingredients. We are especially fond of the Creative blend, which encourages clarity and balance. Brew some up, fill that thermos, and hit the trail! SEND A NOTE TO SOMEONE WHO’S MORE ALONE THAN USUAL We have dozens of stationery artists whose work we’re proud to showcase. Grab a card (we have lots of non-traditional options) to send to grandma, to a hardworking teacher, or to your mail carrier, whose 7:30 p.m. deliveries during the holidays did not go unnoticed. Have we told you lately, Paso? We love you!

General Store Paso Robles

OPEN FOR BUSINESS! Curbside service available. Morro Bay 510 Quintana Road 805-772-1265

Paso Robles 1171 Creston Rd. # 109 805-369-2811 San Luis Obispo 1336 Madonna Road 805-544-5400

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


San Miguel

Michelle Hido Given the Keys to the City

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By Camille DeVaul

n December 19, Michelle Hido received the San Miguel Town Key during the 30th Annual San Miguel Christmas Lights Parade. Michelle is the current Secretary and Treasurer of the San Miguel Firefighters Association and now the second San Miguel resident to receive the Town Key, following Gib Buckman. Steve Kalar, a local San Miguel artist, made the key from wood upon the request of Mike Sanders a few years ago. Sanders, a long-time resident of San Miguel and owner of the San Miguel Mercantile, was on the Advisory Committee and a chairman of the Chamber of Commerce. He created the Town Key to honor various individuals who have made a significant contribution to the San Miguel community through their time and effort, not their money. Gib Buckman, a San Miguel local with over 60 years with the San Miguel Fire Department, was the first to receive the key a few years ago, and now he has passed it on to Michelle. “It’s a real honor, especially coming from the Buckmans and Mike Sanders. They are a huge part of the community, and for them to think that I deserve it is an honor,” Michelle shared. The key is only passed on when someone who meets its requirements stands out, so the key is only ever placed in the hands of someone who truly loves the town. And Michelle is the perfect example of someone the key should be given to. Michelle is as humble as they come, and anytime she is asked about

February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

herself, she turns the conversation towards San Miguel and her fellow community members’ efforts. I don’t think she does this intentionally, but rather because San Miguel is her life, and she wholeheartedly loves the town. Laverne Buckman, Gib Buckman’s wife, said the following before the start of the parade: “We have a couple of very important people who need to be mentioned during this parade-First, Mike Sanders, who has kept this Christmas Parade going for so many years, is now undergoing treatments in Texas to hopefully save his life. We have a great appreciation for him and his commitment to this community, and we pray for his recovery. Next, we have Michelle Hido, a special person in our community who, in this time of hardships all around us, has stepped forward to keep the traditions alive. The Christmas Parade, with the appearance of The Grinch, instead of Santa, and the amazing lights all over town-all of which are providing Christmas JOY to everyone. We are greatly impressed by the way you have pulled everything off. Thank you for the wonderful job you have done. May God bless you for your tremendous initiative! As Mike has honored others in the past, today we honor you, Michelle, with the “Key” to San Miguel in recognition for all you do to make San Miguel a better place. Thank you for your time, effort, and commitment to San Miguel!” Michelle came from Los Angeles 10 years ago. After her parents bought a property in San Miguel, she began visiting as often as she could. “It was an easy decision to move up here and start a life here. I’ve got some great neighbors, and I’ve made wonderful friends, and the quality of people here is just so different from LA. I really value getting to have this lifestyle,” Michelle explained. Through the fire department, Michelle began to get involved in the community with her neighbor Scott Young’s help. “The assistant chief Scott Young, he helped me find ways to help the town. He was a little bit of my mentor in how to help the town out. He’s done a lot; he’s been the president of the association for years,” Michelle said. Now, Michelle is currently the San Miguel Firefighters Association (SMFA) secretary and treasurer. With Michelle and her fellow community members’ help and effort, San Miguel will become a ghost town by no means. Some exciting things are happening for San Miguel. Mission Street and were starting our cleanups,” Michelle shared. Congratulations to Michelle on becoming the new owner of the San Miguel Town Key.  Publishers Note: Starting in March, Michelle Hido has offered to write our San Miguel Reflections section of Paso Robles Magazine. Welcome, Michelle!

pasoroblesmagazine.com | 17


• Remembering a Local Legend

Paso People September 3, 1931 -

RICHARD ‘DICK’ NOCK

- December 28, 2020

A LEGACY, MENTOR AND FRIEND TO ALL

O

By Camille DeVaul

n a chilly morning in Cayucos, some long time friends sat around a fire on their friend’s ranch. With polenta being stirred and stew warming in a pot, they laughed and shared memories of a man who will never be forgotten. On paper, Richard “Dick” Leo Nock was a cattle rancher, a beef industry advocate, livestock entrepreneur, and Army Veteran. For those who knew him personally, Dick was a lover of splitting eggs, having a horn, handing out nicknames, and most of all, cattle. There were also many things Dick wasn’t a fan of. For instance, half-empty soda cans or slamming the door on his Jeep Cherokee-because it wasn’t a ranch vehicle! But when it came down to it, Dick was a good-natured man. Jo-Ann Switzer shared, “Since Dick passed, there’s been lots of phone calls from people all over saying how much he did for them, and they would not be where they are today if it wasn’t for him helping-he really had a heart of gold underneath.” Dick was born and raised on the Phelan Ranch in Cambria, California, where his great-grandfather, Jeffrey Phelan, settled in 1858 after immigrating from Ireland. Growing up, Dick worked on the Fiscalini Ranch. And for a short time, when Dick was 14, he worked at Hearst Castle for the big man himself, William Randolph Hearst. However, his time at Hearst didn’t last, and long story short, it ended with a broken nose! After graduating with a B.S. in Economics from the University of Santa Clara in 1953, Dick served in the U.S. Army as an Army Aviator from 1953-1957. It was then that Dick served with the U.S. Armed Forces in Korea and next as a flight instructor in the U.S. Army Aviation School in Fort Rucker, Alabama. Dick then returned home and served as a Logistics Officer for the United States Property and Fiscal Office (USPFO) at Camp San Luis from 1959 to 1966. Under his father-in-law Henry Gilardi’s guidance, Dick started his cow/ calf operation in Cayucos in 1957 and created his T-Diamond Cattle brand. In 1966, Dick went headstrong into the livestock industry with the purchase of the Templeton Sales Yard, the epitome of livestock and everything he loved. “We’ve all had something to do with the sales yard at one time in the last 20 years-he’d find something for us to do,” said Dick’s long time ranch manager, Jessie Renteria. Then, Claude Loftus laughed, saying, “If you were involved with Dick, you were forced to work at the sales yard at least one weekend.” Dick could almost always be found at the sales yard, whether in the “crows nest” or splitting an egg in Hoover’s Beef Palace. Pete Clark said, “Dick’s other major passion was the Templeton Sales Yard. When they decided to tear that down, that next to killed him.” Ahead of his time, Dick established the SLOCO Fed Beef in 1974, a first of its kind cattlemen to consumer type operation. The operation was the first and only in California with a fully integrated beef production and marketing facility.

In 1989, Dick joined the Clark Company in Paso Robles, where he worked closely with Pete Clark. “When Dick was with me in the real estate deal, we would get a ranch sold, and somehow he was always the first in line to lease it,” Clark said with a laugh. While Dick worked for the Clark Company, his cow/calf operation continued to grow, consisting of 4,500 acres on three ranches in Cayucos, Morro Bay, and Cambria, CA with grow and feed cattle in Colorado and Nebraska. Dick’s passion for the beef industry led him to serve on many boards, including the California Cattlemen’s Association and the historic “Osos Club.” He even advocated for beef on a national level with good friend John Lacey. “He loved telling people why they needed to eat beef, and this is where it came from-that was his passion, convincing people that beef was the way to be,” said Loftus. In 1979, Dick was named Cattlemen of the Year by the San Luis Obispo Cattlemen’s Association, and the list of all his accomplishments is almost endless. But one of his proudest endeavors was organizing the Jr. Livestock Support Club in 1970, which served as a price balancing device for 4-H and FFA kids auctioning livestock at the California Mid-State Fair (CMSF). Along with the support club, Dick was instrumental in establishing the fair’s first Farmers’ and Ranchers’ Day and the replacement heifer project. “That was Dick’s passion, 4-H kids and cows. It kinda brought everything together for him,” said Loftus. Because of Dick, CMSF was the first to implement the replacement heifer project, which many fairs across the state followed in suit. Dick was a past President of the National Livestock Marketing Association. In 1980 he held the national convention on the Central Coast, and for the first time, the World Champion Auction was held on the West Coast at the Templeton Livestock Market. The event pulled in people from around the world, and 4500 head of cattle were auctioned on contest day! For many years, Dick was partners with John Lacey on the Santa Margarita Ranch and other ventures. He was fortunate enough to run cattle on some of the largest and most elite ranches in the area, including the Chimineas Ranch off Highway 166. Dick was a mentor to countless cattlemen and cattlewomen locally and across the nation. He impacted countless generations, and to the date of his passing, many of the SLO County Cattlemen’s Association kids flocked to Dick when they saw him. Dick Nock was a unique man and true to himself. With a cigar, he seldom smoked, in his mouth and scotch in his hand, Dick never failed to put a smile on friends and family’s faces. His bewildering nicknames and even more interesting euphemisms are only part of what Dick Nock leaves behind. Dick is survived by his wife of 65 years, Yvonne Gilardi Nock, his daughters, Brandelyn Tronstad (Tom) Marque’ Nock Molodanof ( Jack) and Bretta Nock, granddaughters, Nicole Tronstad (Adam), Olivia, Sofia, Yvonna; a great-grandson Julien, his sister, Patricia Marlo, nieces Kimber Collins, Kami Davis, Bridgit Karo, and nephew Jock Marlo. 

IN HONOR OF DICK’S MEMORY AND MANY CONTRIBUTIONS TO AGRICULTURE, A SPECIAL FUND WAS CREATED. FUNDS WILL BE USED TO SUPPORT 4-H AND FFA BEEF MEMBERS. SEND CONTRIBUTIONS TO: The Dick Nock Memorial Fund C / O San Luis Obispo County Cattlemen Association, P.O. Box 302, Paso Robles, CA 93447

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

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Paso People

Noel Ryan By Camille DeVaul

A

Retiring After 43 Years of Service

times, going from selling bulk fertilizer to now catering more to the retail sides of businesses. He witnesses Paso Robles evolve from grain farmland to vineyards. “He’s mentored me with his integrity the mostand his patience and his compassion towards other people has rubbed off on me,” Susan said with admiration. It is clear that Noel has made an impact on his employees. In many ways, he is the heart and soul of the company. Susan has been with Farm Supply for nearly 30 years, and Noel has been with her every step of the way. “He treats us like his family, and he has his own family. We’re a close-knit bunch here; he is such a special person in so many ways,” Susan shared. Noel says he will miss the people the most when he leaves, “My wife Nancy asked me the other day, ‘Who are you going to talk to?’” But with four grown children and four grandchildren, plus his cattle, Noel will be most likely stay entertained. Spending time at home and with his family is

what he is ready for. While sharing photos of his grandchildren, you could see the pure pride and joy he has for Ruby, Tatum, Willa, and of course, his little grandson Noel. Most of all, he can’t wait to spend time with his wife Nancy and keep adding to their 46 (he’s pretty sure) years of marriage! “It’s been fun. Such a great business to work for. They support us so much in so many ways. A very family-oriented company,” Noel said, “My first boss until a few years ago was Jim Brabeck; he was the one who hired me. Just a wonderful guy to work for almost 40 years.” Although Susan isn’t ready to let Noel go, she is overjoyed for him. “He is a true American. He is all about that stuff, American and the values and family and a very traditional person. And I am, too; we relate to each other that way. I think that’s why we get along so well,” Susan said with a smile. Noel made the transition from the manager and Farm Supply team member for over forty years to the role of a customer. But needless to say, Noel will always be a Farm Supply family member. 

fter 43 years, Noel Ryan, branch manager of Paso Robles Farm Supply, retired on December 31. It’s not a secret that Noel was an essential member of the Farm Supply family. He is known for his integrity, American values, compassion, and so much more. Noel is also too humble to admit to any of these flattering attributes. Susan Hayes, the assistant branch manager who stepped into Ryan’s place on January 1, said, “He leads by example. He’s not above doing anything; I can count on him. He has mentored me tremendously.” Noel felt it was time for him to retire and let a new generation begin at Farm Supply. “I tell people that I’ve been a part-time resident of Creston for 43 years, now I’m going to go home,” Noel shared. However, Noel’s story doesn’t begin in Creston or America, for that matter. Noel and his brother Mike were born in Ireland and adopted in 1952 when he was two years old. His parents brought the boys back to their hometown of Creston, where they eventually attended school in the two-room schoolhouse. Noel laughed, saying, “I’m one of the luckiest Irishman alive.” Later on, Noel graduated from Paso Robles High School and then attended Cuesta Community College and Cal Poly before being offered a job at Cal Tech Chemical. In 1977 Farm Supply purchased Cal Tech Chemical, and Noel went to work for them at the old 1108 Paso Robles Street location. And that is where Noel’s history with Farm Supply began. Noel Ryan (center) and his wife Nancy (left) with children Carin Ryan, Matt and Meagan with daughter Tatum, and Noel has seen Farm Supply adapt with the Sean and Sarah Ryan with daughters Ruby, Willa and son, Noel.

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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pasoroblesmagazine.com | 21


History of ROBLAN OF THE YEAR List of Roblans Past E

By Hayley Mattson

ach year we all wait in anticipation to find out which incredible community member will be awarded the honorary title of Roblan of the Year. We pull out our favorite formal attire and prepare for a magical evening full of celebration hosted by the Paso Robles Chamber of Commerce to celebrate the new prestigious member that will join the list of other inspiring leaders that share the same title. Since 1977 the Chamber of Commerce has been honoring local heroes who embody the spirit of volunteerism. “Our records show that Paso Robles has been selecting Roblans of the Year all the way back to 1977!” shared Shanay Brown, Events Coordinator for the Chamber. The Roblan of the Year traditionally is honored at the Chamber’s Annual Dinner Gala. However, this year due to the pandemic, they are not certain when the Gala will be able to take place. Until then, the Chamber has decided to postpone the 2020 Roblan of the Year’s selection process until they can determine what type of event they can have in 2021. “As our community begins to open up, our Board of Directors will be able to determine what kind of awards ceremony we can safely present,” Shanay explained. Over the years, the Board of Directors creates an Annual Awards Nominating Committee. The committee is made up of a Chairperson, one committee member from the Recognition Committee, a Past Chairman of the Board, a Membership Committee Chairperson, two past Roblans of the Year, and the CEO of the Chamber (who is a non-voting member of the committee). The nominating committee meets to review the applications that have been submitted to the Chamber. The committee selects up to four candidates to present to the Chamber Board of Directors, with recommendations as to why each candidate would be the best Roblan of the Year. The Board of Directors strives to choose applicants who embody the spirit of volunteerism, along with what the nominee has done over the years of living in the greater Paso Robles area and some instances, the nominees who have also made monetary contributions for the betterment of the community. The vote is done by ballot and tallied by the CEO of the Chamber. Nominees that are not selected can be carried over to the following year. Since 2003 Paso Robles Magazine has had the privilege to share the chosen honoree on the cover each year. This year we shared the past Roblans of the Year with hopes to have a 2020 Roblan selected at a later date. As you read through all the names over the last 44 years, you might recognize quite a few. They all give us hope and faith in the resilience we have when we come together. They show us the strength in numbers and strength in our community. Together we can overcome anything. 

1977. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mayor Barney Schwartz

1997. . . . . . . . . . Jim Classen & Dorothy Kleck

1978. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Virginia Peterson

1998. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Manford J. Vanderlip

1979. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mary Studer Schwartz

1999. . . . . . . Larry Moore & Nancee Johnson

1980. . Dr. Bob Bryant & Ella Mae Butterfield

2000 . . . . . . . . . Diane Hahn & Wallace Ohles

1981. . Dr. Charles Kennedy & Dolly B. Bader

2001. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gene Ernst

1982. . . . . . . . . . . Harlow Ford & Ada Dugger

2002. . . . . . . . . . Vicki Silva & Lester Rougeot

1983. . . . . . . . . . . . Betty Olden & Swift Jewell

2003. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John & June Bertoni

1984. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ole Viborg

2004 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Frank Mecham

1985. . . . . . . . . . . . . Pat Butler & Norma Moye

2005. . . . . . . . . Valerie Warnke & Stuart Ross

1986. . . . . Katharine Madden & Albert Davis

2006 . . . . . . . . . . . Leora Eide & Jim Toomer

1987. . . . . . . Lola Phillips Eide & Tom Moore

2007. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Harry Ovitt

1988. . . . . . . . Kermit King & Larry Eastwood

2008 . . . . . . Dale Gomer & Barbara Rowland

1989. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Lloyd Marty

2009. Gen. Glen Muggelberg & Sandy Viborg

1990. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tom Salisbury

2010. . . . . . . . . . . . . Dale Schwartz & Liz Koll

1991. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . R.C. Bynum

2011. . . . . . . . . . Carol Tucker & Wade Taylor

1992. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dee Lacey

2012. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Don & Gail Campbell

1993. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ben & Judy Holsted

2013. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Randy & Nancy Flamm

1994. . . . . . Thomas A. Flynn & Betty Cousins

2014. . . . . . . . . . . . . . John & Marjorie Hamon

1995. . . . . . Patti Hamilton & Daniel E. Lewis

2015. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sharon Ross

1996. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gil Asa

2016. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hugh Pitts

2017

Thomas J. Madden III

2018

2019

Matt Masia

Mark Perry

2020 (Selection on hold due to COVID-19)

2/28/2021

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

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A Different Look at

T

Health and Wellness

his year instead of New Year’s resolutions, I propose we do something a little different. I propose we break the cycle of failed diets and fitness goals, which almost always ends in disappointment and being much too hard on ourselves. Instead, let’s create healthy, long-lasting changes that will stick with us for years to come. Bobbi Conner, CNC, ACN, MH, and owner of The Natural Alternative Nutrition Center, shares, “As we start a new year, let’s consider “changing your diet” instead of “going on a diet” for long term results!” By implementing one habit change at a time, we are more likely to stick with that change for the long run. For example, add drinking more water to your daily routine. You can do this by setting a goal of ounces of water to drink in a day. Make the new change fun by getting a cheerful water bottle to drink from! After one or two weeks into this new habit of yours, try adding another habit change to your routine. Andy Sverchek, general manager and coach at Athlon Fitness and Performance

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in Paso Robles, says, “Really focus on your habits. Things that you can change so that you can have long term results.” If you want to add exercise to your life, Andy suggests, “getting into a program that fits into your lifestyle and is going to fundamentally change some habits.” There is a reason more exercise is one of the most popular resolutions. It is because exercise does wonders for our health! Bobbi says, “Exercise daily. Not only does the fresh air and sunshine boost Vitamin D naturally, which supports mood and the immune system, but it also helps slow down the aging process.” Jenna Baird, owner, and instructor at Dharma Yoga Loft in Paso Robles, offers some advice on letting go of the idea of obligations and putting the joy back into exercise and fitness. “Put the heart into exercise; pick a form of movement you love to do. The body doesn’t know the difference from the stress that comes from general pressures of life to the kind of stress of doing a form of exercise you feel obligated or pressured to do,” Jenna continues, “Your biology responds in a more optimal way by doing what you love. Give

yourself permission to try something until it truly lights you up, and you feel excited and look forward to it.” For your overall health, Bobbi suggests, “Practice disease prevention. Avoid processed and fast food, manage stress by scheduling in “fun” time and get more restful sleep!” By changing our approach to health and wellness from the traditional obligation style of diet and exercise to a self-caring approach, we can create healthy changes that stick. “Real change comes from mindset. According to yoga, an ancient science, the mindset is more than half of the exercise. Fuel your mind properly. For lasting benefits and results for health, mental fitness is a requirement. Upgrade your mindset cultivating empowering daily routines and beliefs,” Jenna explained. You don’t have to do cycling and keto because the blogger you follow does cycling and keto. Eat what makes you feel your best. Move the way that best serves you. Bobbi reminds us, “These are not “New Year’s Resolutions,” but lifestyle changes to achieve optimal health and a strong immune system!” 

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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O

ne bit, don’t quit! Those are the words that have become Kiah Twisselman’s catchphrase after losing over 125 pounds and becoming a full-time life and weight loss coach. Born and raised on her family’s cattle ranch in Carrisa Plains, Kiah has a deep love for the beef and agriculture industry. After graduating from UC Davis, Kiah worked on the Kentucky Beef Council in charge of their nutrition program. “I felt very conflicted in that role. Not because I didn’t believe in what we were sharing in terms of beef and protein’s role in a heart-healthy diet and lifestyle,” Kiah shared. She continued, “I grew up on a cattle ranch, I believe in the beef industry with all my heart and soul, but I felt like such a hypocrite standing up in front of the room telling-the general public, ‘yeah, beef is so great for By Camille DeVaul your health’ without being a vision of health myself.” Before boarding a plane to a conference for the beef council, Kiah picked up Rachel Hollis’s book ‘Girl, Wash Your Face.’ That’s when she had her ah-ha moment, if you will, after having to ask for a seatbelt extender on the plane for the first time. After that moment, Kiah decided she needed to make some changes, but this time things were going to be different, “I feel like I knew this time that something felt different, and I think that really started within me.” Kiah began to follow Rachel Hollis’s ‘Five to Thrive’ in October 2018. Hollis’s ‘Five to Thrive’ is a list of five things she does every day that has drastically changed her life, energy levels, and how she shows up for her family. It wasn’t her first time trying to make a change in her health, but this time she knew it was different and she was determined. “I think that I knew this time when I made the commitment; it was a real commitment to myself. It wasn’t a commitment to a diet;

From the Cattle Rancher to Life Coach,

COACH KIAH IS AN INSPIRATION

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it wasn’t a commitment to keto; it wasn’t a commitment to weight watchers. It was a commitment to myself, and that felt different,” Kiah explained. Early in her health journey, Kiah began documenting her experience. For the first few months, she kept those videos and photos to herself. But after she started to see changes happening and knew she would follow through, Kiah began to share her story with the world. “The way I was approaching it felt different this time it was more from a place of ‘I’m going to learn to love myself and show up and care for myself the way I deserve instead of starting a diet from I hate myself, so I’m going to fix the problem.” Soon, women from all over the country began contacting Kiah asking if she was coaching others on weight loss. In August 2019, she began coaching people one on one in life and weight loss, and in July 2020, she became a full-time life coach. “It was completely unexpected to me that I would be here, one day being an example to other people, being in a place where I can empower so many other women that are that are walking their own journey, and I am so grateful that I’m able to say I’m here to help you because I did it myself and I have all this proof of what it takes,” Kiah shared. Since October 2018, Kiah has lost over 125 pounds and has been featured on national television and magazines like Good Morning America, Access Hollywood, People Magazine, and Women’s Health. Kiah never went to the gym. She learned how to exercise from home and make small changes in her habits one bit at a time. When it comes to dieting, Kiah says, “The problem is I think our society and our culture feeds us this belief that diets are what are going to solve the “problem” and I think that’s why the diet culture perpetuates itself and its because we never get to the core of what the real issue is which in my opinion has to do more about our relationship with ourselves than it does the diet or foods that we eat or whether we do the exercise.” 

Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

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Taste of Paso

• Taste of Americana Dark Chocolate Cake with Raspberry-Orange Compote This recipe is sure to please chocolate lovers. It’s just one tall, super moist layer.

From the Kitchen of

Barbie Butz

F

ebruary is a special month. We celebrate the birthdays of Washington and Lincoln with President’s Day on the 15th. But, don’t forget that on the 14th, it’s time to celebrate the “sweet” people in our lives who love us and support us. Traditionally, we celebrate by sending Valentine greeting cards, bouquets of flowers, chocolates, and other sweets. Nothing says, “I love you” better than a homemade dessert. So here’s a recipe that is certain to please all of your “special” people.

Ingredients For the cake: • 2 cups fresh raspberries • ¾ cup plus 2 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided • 2 tablespoons water • 2 1/3 cups all-purpose flour • 1/3 cup cocoa powder • 1 teaspoon kosher salt • 1 teaspoon baking soda • 1 cup (2 sticks) unsalted butter, room temperature • 1 cup brown sugar

• • • • • • • • • • •

3 eggs, room temperature 4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, melted ¾ cup plain Greek yogurt or sour cream For the compote: 1 large orange 3 tablespoons brown sugar 2 tablespoons honey 1 teaspoon orange zest ¼ teaspoon kosher salt 4 cups fresh raspberries 2 tablespoons Grand Marnier or other orange liqueur

1. To make the cake, combine the raspberries, 2 tablespoons of the granulated sugar, and water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to a simmer, and cook the raspberries until they break down into a sauce. Push the raspberry pulp and juice through a fine-mesh strainer. Cool the puree to room temperature or chill before using. 2. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Lightly grease the bottom of a round 10-inch cake pan and line with a circle of parchment paper. Do not grease the sides of the pan. (this cake releases easily from the sides, and greasing the sides means the cake doesn’t have anything to hold on to while it rises during baking. 3. Sift the flour, cocoa powder, salt, and baking soda in a medium bowl. 4. In the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter, brown sugar, and ¾ cup of granulated sugar on medium speed until light and fluffy (about 5 minutes), scraping once. Add the eggs one at a time, scraping well after each addition. Mix in the melted chocolate. 5. Combine the yogurt and raspberry puree in a medium bowl and set aside. With the mixer on low speed, mix half the dry ingredients into the butter mixture until almost combined. With the mixer running, add the raspberry mixture. Then mix in the remaining dry ingredients until almost combined. Scrape the bowl again and mix an additional 30 seconds on low speed until the batter is smooth. 6. Spoon the batter into the prepared pan. Bake the cake for 40 to 45 minutes or until the top springs back when touched. Cool to barely warm before removing the cake from the pan. Cool the cake completely before serving. To make the compote: 1. Peel the orange and clean off the white pith and webbing. Cut the segments into 1/2-inch pieces (about 1 cup). Combine the orange pieces, brown sugar, honey, zest, and salt in a medium pot and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to medium-low and continue to simmer for about 5 minutes. Stir in the raspberries and the Grand Marnier. Cover and refrigerate the compote overnight. 2. If you’ve made the compote the day before, about 2 hours before serving, remove the compote from the refrigerator. Cut the cake into wedges, and serve the compote alongside the cake. Hold leftover cake covered at room temperature and put the compote in the refrigerator for up to 2 days.

Happy Valentine’s Day. and Enjoy!

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


Sip and Savor

FOR VALENTINE’S DAY:

UNCORK

THE OTHER RED WINES

V

alentine’s Day is fast approaching, and most of you may be ready to serenade your amour with a bottle of Rosè or sparkling wine. Hold that thought! This year why not venture into the world of The Other Red Wines and give traditional varieties such as cabernet sauvignon, syrah, merlot, and grenache a rest — if only for a day. How about sampling esoteric reds such as marselan, caladoc, carignan, négrette, or cabernet pfeffer? Or Italian and Spanish varietal wines. (Variety signifies a species of grape, whereas varietal is a wine made from a single variety, which could be 100 percent or up to 75 percent of that variety with the balance

blended with one or two other varieties). Take Dubost Winery’s dark and brooding négrette (native to Toulouse, France) and cabernet pfeffer (a hybrid of cabernet sauvignon and trousseau) produced by winemaker/vineyard manager Zachary Raines, who sources the grapes from San Benito County. The purple-hued négrette is a wine that is lush on the palate, laced with violet aromas and backed with supple tannins. and cabernet pfeffer, which jolts the palate with of pepperiness. Raines also poured a carménère, a medium body wine redolent of cherries and woven with soft tannins. “People now seek us out, and we are getting known for this,” commented Raines on these under the radar wines. The same could be said of Thacher Winery. “We’re enjoying making these wines that have been pushed aside,” remarked Sherman Thacher as I savored another deep-colored négrette, a 2019 vintage also sourced from San Benito County. We also tested Thacher’s 2018 valdiguié, expressive of pomegranate and a spicy 2019 cinsault. More obscure varietals can be found

February 2021 | Paso Robles Magazine

at Sextant in its X Series, the cherry-loaded marselan (a hybrid of cabernet sauvignon and grenache), and the medium-body caladoc (a hybrid of grenache and malbec). Brecon estate produces a good half dozen varietals such as cabernet franc from 40-year-old vines, an intense petit verdot, an approachable petite sirah, a smoky mourvedre, and a deep-hued structured tannat. Other local wineries producing tannat include Bushong Vintage Company, Vina Robles, Tablas Creek, and Barr Estate. At Jada Vineyard & Winery, I sampled two versions of the dark and brooding tannat: a gamey 2017 and the earthy 2018. Dirk Neumann, owner/winemaker of Absolution Cellars, sources his tannat fruit from Jada and crafts it in a bold rich style expressive of muscle-flexing tannins. Derby Wine Estates is another winery with a large portfolio of varietal wines under its black label. Wines ranges from a violet-laced graciano and a plum-loaded petit verdot to a perfumey cinsault and a counoise effu-

sive of strawberries. (More delicious counoise is produced at Sans Liege and Paix Sur Terre). Carignan was little known as a varietal until Amy Butler of Ranchero Cellars made it her signature, a wine that coats the palate with a rush of plum and berry fruit backed with hints of Paso garrigue (wild hillside shrubbery). At Circle B Vineyard & Cellars, I savored the cranberry-laced 2017 Cariñena Reserva, a carignane driven wine blended with cabernet sauvignon. For mourvèdre fans, check out this varietal at Paix sur Terre, J. Dusi, Thacher, and Seven Oxen. And for cabernet franc lovers, you can’t go wrong at LXV Wine, Four Lanterns, and Paris Valley Road Estate Winery. Among the Italian-focused wineries, Giornata, Caparone, Pelletiere and Clesi are producing exceptional varietal wines ranging from nebbiolo and montepulciano to aglianico, barbera and sangiovese. In the Spanish portfolio, Bodegas Paso Robles, Diablo Paso and Bodega de Edgar offer brilliant selections of tempranillo, graciano and monastrell. 

pasoroblesmagazine.com | 29


San Luis Obispo County Office of Education

2020 James Brescia, Ed.D.

A Year Like No Other COUNTY SUPERVISOR OF SCHOOLS

“Hope is being able to see there is light despite all the darkness.”

A

Desmond Tutu

ccording to Google, the three most highly searched words/phrases during 2020 were election results, Coronavirus, and Kobe Bryant. A quick review of the Google Trends for 2020 will inform historians that 2020 was a year like no other to this generation. COVID-19 enveloped all aspects of life and education in California. The pandemic uprooted families, forced the conversion of bedrooms into classrooms, restricted in-person social gatherings, and prevented the daily student interactions we traditionally embraced. Today we measure the daily rhythms of school in learning loss and screen time. Along with the distance learning challenges 2020 presented, we faced fires, public protests, election challenges, new California higher education leaders, and the repulsive violent actions against the United States Capitol. This month’s article is my review of how 2020 disrupted and transformed California schools, focusing on our dedicated public servants. On March 5, a day after Gov. Gavin Newsom issued a state of emergency, a few California schools stopped in-person instruction, which was the start of California schools transitioning to distance instruction. During the early hours of Sunday, March 8, our home phone rang, and all 58 county superintendents were summoned to Sacramento to meet with the Governor for a briefing on COVID-19 specific to schools. On Friday, March 13, while hosting our monthly superintendent’s council for the district, charter, college, and university leaders in our county, mobile phones began to vibrate throughout the room. Each school leader was being called back to emergency meetings with their governing boards, almost as if we were characters in a science fiction or thriller movie, all receiving the same message. “REPORT BACK TO HEADQUARTERS IMMEDIATELY.” What followed were disappointments and missed timelines as school leaders struggled to follow COVID-19 protocols, continue providing educational services, adapting to a shifting landscape, and preparing for mid-year budget reductions.

2020 began with Governor Newsom’s optimistic budget projections that drastically changed in June, with billions in budget cuts to higher education and state funding deferrals for K-12. This news was followed by larger than expected tax revenues and a strong stock market that lessened the education blow. Additionally, Congress passed COVID-19 relief legislation in March and again in December, helping education start 2021 on a more stable fiscal footing. Unfortunately, districts across California, including several in our county, face a future of growing austerity and have reduced program offerings because of prior budget shortfalls compounded by the pandemic. The savings from reduced travel and building operations have lessened the cuts, and many of our districts will adapt practices to maintain fiscal stewardship moving forward. 2020 presented the world of higher education with two new leaders taking charge of the state’s university systems. In July, the University of California regents named Michal V. Drake to succeed Janet Napolitano as president of the University of California. In September, the California State University trustees selected Fresno State President Joseph Castro to replace the retiring Chancellor Timothy White. Together with Eloy Ortiz Oakley, chancellor of the California Community Colleges, and California State Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Thurmond, for the first time, all four of California’s public education systems will be led by people of color. 2020 also impacted our childcare centers that operate on thin margins, with underpaid staff. Childcare has continued to provide services throughout the pandemic at reduced capacity with the support of donations and emergency funding. Childcare centers and all other educational agencies received Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) and assistance with ongoing COVID-19 testing practices. We are hopeful that with the additional funds Congress and our state budget have added, childcare may not only maintain services but implement long-term gains. Locally, First 5 SLO, CAPSLO, Cuesta College, Trust Automation, the Childcare Planning Council, several cities, county government, my office, and several other agencies are continuing the dialogue about childcare’s economic importance. During the first month of 2021, schools across San Luis Obispo County implemented additional in-person services and continued to plan to increase operations as conditions permit. One parent described in a detailed email the first month of distance education feeling like an “explosion at the kitchen table.” Understanding these sentiments, families, educators, support staff, and community members have all stepped in to assist during these difficult times. Our community manifests a “Can Do” spirit and is rising to meet the challenge. Everyone hopes that we can return to schools, friends, and normalcy as soon as possible. As our community vaccination continues, I am confident that we will move forward, continue to increase in-person services, and look back on 2020 as a year like no other. It is an honor to serve as your county superintendent of schools. Thank you, San Luis Obispo County, for doing your part.  Valentine’s Day Specials all Day

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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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DIRECTORY of LOCAL HOUSES of WORSHIP The following listing of area houses of worship is provided by the partnership between Adelaide Inn and PASO Magazine. We hope to include all houses of worship in the Paso Robles, Templeton, San Miguel, Shandon, and Bradley areas. Your congregation is welcomed to send us updates and information to make our list complete and accurate. If you have information, please send an email to publisher@pasomagazine.com or call 805-239-1533. Please include your name, address, phone, service times, and name of spiritual leader of your congregation. Thank you, and stay blessed.

ATASCADERO Awakening Ways Spiritual Community 9315 Pismo Ave. 10 a.m. at the Pavilion Rev’s Frank & Terry Zum Mallen Congregation Ohr Tzafon 2605 Traffic Way Service: Fridays, 7:30 p.m. Rabbi Janice Mehring (805) 466-0329

CRESTON Creston Community Church 5170 O’Donovan Road Service: 9:00 a.m. Pastor JD Megason

LOCKWOOD True Life Christian Fellowship Lockwood/Jolon Road, across from the school in Lockwood Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Erick Reinstedt (805) 472-9325

NACIMIENTO Heritage Village Church At The Don Everingham Center Heritage Ranch Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Brad Brown (805) 712-7265 Hill Top Christian Fellowship 2085 Gateway Drive Heritage Ranch Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Jack Little (805) 239-1716 Oak Shores Christian Fellowship 2727 Turkey Cove Rd., at the Oak Shores Community Clubhouse Service: 8:30 a.m. Pastor Jack Little (760) 304-2435

PASO ROBLES Apostolic Assembly of the Faith of Christ Jesus 2343 Park St Bilingual Services: Services: Thursday 7 p.m. Sunday 2 p.m. Pastor Miguel Alvarado (805) 610-2930 Bridge Christian Church Centennial Park Banquet Room 600 Nickerson Dr. Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Tim Mensing (805) 975-7178 Calvary Chapel Paso Robles 1615 Commerce Way Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Aaron Newman (805) 239-4295

Christian Life Center Assembly of God 1744 Oak St. Service Times: 10:30 a.m. Youth Ministries: Monday 7:00 Home Groups during the week Preschool: Christian Life Early Learning Ctr. Pastor Guy Drummond (805) 238-3366 Christian Science Services 17th & Chestnut Streets Service: 10 a.m. Sunday & 2nd and 4th Wednesdays 7 p.m. (805) 238-3833 Church of Christ 3545 Spring St. (Corner 36th & Spring) Service: Sunday, 11 a.m. Evangelist Bob Champion (805) 286-5875 Sam Hogan (310) 602-9516 Delbert Arthurs (805) 238-4412 Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 1020 Creston Rd. Service: 9 a.m. (805) 238-4216 Missionaries: (805) 366.2363 Covenant Presbyterian Church 1450 Golden Hill Rd. Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Dan Katches (805) 238-6927 Belong Central Coast 905 Vine St. meets @ NCCF Service: Sunday 3 p.m. Senior Leaders: Pep & Angie Robey (661) 205-7853 Family Worship Center 616 Creston Rd. Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Patrick Sheean (805) 239-4809 First Baptist Church 1645 Park St. Pastor Michael R. Garman Services: 8:30 a.m. & 11 a.m. Discipleship 10 a.m. (805) 238-4419 First Mennonite Church 2343 Park St. Service: 11 a.m. Pastor Romero (805) 238-2445 First United Methodist 915 Creston Rd. Service: 11 a.m. Pastor Josh Zulueta (805) 238-2006 Grace Baptist Church 535 Creston Rd. Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Gary Barker (805) 238-3549 Highlands Church Corner S. River and Niblick 215 Oak Hill Services: 8:30, 9:45 & 11 a.m. Pastor James Baird (805) 226-5800

Life Worth Living Church of God 620 17th St. Service: 11 a.m. Pastor Jim Wilde (805) 238-0978 Live Oak 1521 Oak St. Service: 10 a.m. Pastor John Kaiser (805) 238-0575 New Day 1228 11th St (east off Paso Robles St) Services: Sunday 10 a.m., Wednesday 7 p.m. Pastor Brad Alford (805) 239-9998 New Life Tabernacle 3850 So. Ramada Dr. Ste. D Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Efrain Cordero North County Christian Fellowship 421 9th St. Services: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Steve Calagna (805) 239-3325 Paso Robles Bible Church 2206 Golden Hill Rd. Service: Sunday, 10:30 a.m. Pastor Mark Wheeler Pastor Dave Rusco (805) 226-9670 Paso Robles Church of the Nazarene 530 12th St. Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Charles Reece (805) 238-4300 www.pasonaz.com Paso Robles Community Church 2706 Spring St. Service: 9:00 a.m. Pastor Shawn Penn (805) 239-4771 www.pasochurch.com Plymouth Congregational Church, UCC Thirteenth and Oak Streets Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Steven Mabry (805) 238-3321 Poder de Dios Centro Familiar 500 Linne Road, Suite D Services Sunday 4:30p.m. & Wed. 7p.m. Pastors: Frank and Isabel Diaz (805) 264-9322 / (805) 621-4199 Redeemer Baptist Church Kermit King Elementary School 700 Schoolhouse Circle Service: 10:30 a.m. Pastor Christopher Cole (805) 238-4614 Second Baptist Church 1937 Riverside Ave. Service: 11 a.m. Pastors: Gary Jordon (805) 238-2011

Adelaide Inn 1215 Ysabel Ave (Just off 24th near Hwy 101 and 46 East intersection) Paso Robles, 805-238-2770

St. James Episcopal Church 1335 Oak St. Services: 8 a.m. (Rite I) 10 a.m. (Rite II) Reverend Barbara Miller (805) 238-0819 St. Rose of Lima Catholic Church 820 Creston Rd. Weekday Mass: M-S, 7 a.m. Weekend Masses: Saturday - 5 p.m. (Vigil) Sunday - 8 a.m., 10 a.m. (Family Mass) 12:30 p.m. (Spanish) 5 p.m. (Teen) & 7 p.m. (Spanish) Father Rudolfo Contreras (805) 238-2218 The Revival Center 3850 Ramada Dr., Ste. A-3 Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Gabe Abdelaziz (805) 434-5170 The Light of the World Church 2055 Riverside Ave. Services: Everyday, 6 p.m. Sundays 10 a.m. & 5 p.m. Pastor Bonifacio Robles (612) 990-4701 Trinity Lutheran Church 940 Creston Rd. Worship Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Steve Willweber (805) 238-3702 Victory Baptist Church 3850 Ramada Dr. Ste D4 Sundays - 10 & 11 a.m. Wednesday - 6:30 p.m. Pastor Bruce Fore (805) 221-5251 vbcpaso.org Victory Outreach Paso Robles 3201 Spring Street, Paso Robles Ca Services: Sunday,10:30 a.m. Thursday, 6:30 p.m. Pastor Pete Torres (805) 536-0035

TEMPLETON Bethel Lutheran Church 295 Old County Rd. Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Amy Beveridge (805) 434-1329 Celebration Worship Center Pentecostal Church of God 988 Vineyard Drive Pastor Roy Spinks Services: 10:30 a.m. & 6 p.m. (805) 610-9819 Central Coast Center for Spiritual Living 689 Crocker St. Service: 10 a.m. Rev. Elizabeth Rowley (805) 242-3180 Cowboy Church Family Praise & Worship 206 5th st.

Service: 10 am Pastor Vern H. Haynes Jr. 805-975-8594 Templeton Presbyterian Church 610 S. Main St. Service: 10 a.m. Reverend Charlie Little (805) 434-1921 Higher Dimension Church 601 Main St. 1st Sunday: 1:30 p.m. 2nd - 5th Sundays 12:30 p.m. Pastor Charlie Reed, Jr. (805) 440-0996 Life Community Church 3770 Ruth Way Service: 9:30 a.m. Pastor Keith Newsome (805) 434-5040 Solid Rock Christian Fellowship Assembly of God 925 Bennett Way Service: 10 a.m. Pastor Jeff Saylor (805) 434-2616 Seventh-day Adventist Church Templeton Hills 930 Templeton Hills Rd. Services: Saturday 9:30 & 10:30 a.m. Pastor Zac Page (805) 434-1710 Vineyard Church of Christ 601 So. Main St. Service: 10 a.m. Evangelist: Steve Orduno (805) 610-4272 Vintage Community Church 692 Peterson Ranch Road Services: 9 & 11 a.m. Coaches: Aaron Porter, Dayn Mansfield (805) 296-1120

SAN MIGUEL Iglesia Fuente De Agua Viva 301 13th St. Services: 10 a.m. & 7 p.m. Pastor Mike Duran (805) 467-5500 Mission San Miguel Parish 775 Mission Street Weekday Mass: 8 a.m. Weekend Mass: Saturday: 5 p.m. English (Vigil) & 6:30 p.m. Spanish (Vigil) Sunday: 7 a.m., Noon & 6 p.m. (Spanish) Father Eleazar Diaz, OFM (805) 467-2131

SHANDON Shandon Assembly of God 420 Los Altos Ave. Pastor Jim Mei (805)226-9737 Spanish Service: Sunday 5 p.m. & Thurs 7 p.m. Pastor Mauro Jimenez

Paso Magazine P.O. Box 427 Paso Robles, CA 93447 Phone: 805-239-1533 or publisher@pasomagazine.com


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Last Word

Paso Robles Magazine Manifesto 13 Stars Media We believe in people. We believe in partnerships. We believe in organic food and a healthy planet. We believe in getting it right, the first time, every time. We believe in our history, and our future. We believe culture eats strategy for breakfast. We believe to change anything, create a new model that makes the old model obsolete. We believe that all ideas are big ideas when they matter to you. We believe in art, music, sports, education, and kids. We believe in being the most fun. We believe handshakes and hugs are better than likes and shares. We believe Main Street is more powerful than Wall Street. We believe in holding the door, smiling, waving, and greeting strangers’ new friends. We believe small business is a state of mind. We believe everything looks better on high-gloss pages. We believe in the magic of teamwork and high fives. We believe in homemade lemonade and local honey. We believe in family, friends, and sharing warm bread. We believe in lighting each other’s candles. We believe in the Story of Us.

13 Stars Digital........................................33 1800 El Pomar Weddings, Events, Vine..25 A Heavenly Home...................................31 AM Sun Solar...........................................21 American Riviera Bank............................19 Athlon Fitness & Performance................23 Blake’s True Value....................................23 bloke........................................................13 Bob Sprain’s Draperies............................23 Bridge Sportsman’s Center.....................23 CalSun Electric & Solar............................33 City of Paso Robles Rec & Library..............7

Coast Electronics......................................16 Connect Home Loans..............................11 Country Florist.........................................17 Dr. Maureeni Stanislaus..........................35 Farron Elizabeth.......................................13 Five Star Rain Gutters..............................33 Frontier Floors..........................................22 General Store Paso Robles......................16 Hamon Overhead Door...........................27 Harvest Senior Living, LLC.......................35 Hearing Aid Specialists of The Central Coast...................................3

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DIRECTORY TO OUR ADVERTISERS This issue of Paso Robles Magazine brought to you by Hearing Solutions...................................31 Humana.....................................................9 Kaitilin Riley, DDS....................................25 Kim Bankston..........................................11 Kuehl-Nicolay Funeral Home..................27 Lansford Dental.........................................5 Las Tablas Animal Hospital......................15 Main Street Small Animal Hospital........14

Megan’s CBD Market..............................35 Native Landscape....................................13 Nick’s Painting.........................................22 O’Conner Pest Control.............................33 Odyssey World Cafe................................30 Optometric Care Associates......................9 Orchard & Vineyard Supply.....................28 Paso PetCare............................................27

Thank you for being #pasostrong

Paso Robles District Cemetery................27 Paso Robles Handyman..........................30 Paso Robles Waste & Recycle..................12 Pegasus Senior Living Creston Villiage................................ 24, 33 Premier Valley Bank................................36 Red Scooter Deli......................................21 Robert Fry M.D.........................................21 Robert Hall Winery....................................2 SLO County Office of Education..............31 SLG Senior Care.......................................25 Solarponics..............................................25

Ted Hamm Ins.........................................35 Teresa Rhyne Law Group.........................19 The Floral Parlor.......................................29 The Natural Alternative............................15 The Oaks, Paso Robles/Westmont Living.19 Tooth and Nail Winery...............................4 Versaclimber............................................11 Visit SLO Coast/ Boutique Hotel Collection......................24 Writing Support Group...........................17 Wyatt Wicks Finish Carpentry, Inc...........21

Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


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Paso Robles Magazine | February 2021


Profile for 13 Stars Media

Paso Robles Magazine #238 • Month 2021  

A monthly look at the remarkable community of Paso Robles and surrounding areas — the Story of Us.

Paso Robles Magazine #238 • Month 2021  

A monthly look at the remarkable community of Paso Robles and surrounding areas — the Story of Us.