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Friday, September 27, 2013 An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 www.collegiatetimes.com

COLLEGIATETIMES 110th year, issue 23

News, page 2

Lifestyles, page 5

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 6

Study Break, page 4

Library fines, fees explained

Triumph in Atlanta

KYLE BARGER news staff writer

TREVOR WHITE / SPPS

Logan Thomas (3) lunges for a five-yard touchdown early in the second quarter to give the Hokies an early 14-0 lead.

VT: 17, GT: 10

CHECK ONLINE SEE FULL STORY ON COLLEGIATETIMES.COM

Students get free Fashionista: Punk goes software training chic for fall accessories DEAN SEAL news editor

Students looking to land jobs in fields like information technology or computer science can receive a serious leg up on the competition next week, in the form of a $2,500 training session that Rackspace is offering to Tech students — for free. Rackspace, the San Antonio-based IT hosting company with offices in Blacksburg, will have a series of free three hour seminars for registered students. The training sessions will immerse students in the environment of OpenStack, an open source cloud computing project that started in 2010 as a collaboration between Rackspace Hosting and NASA. Since its creation, over 200 companies have joined the project, including Cisco, Dell and Intel. Students participating in the training seminars will receive the “same training that we deliver commercially, but they’re getting it at a faster pace, and they’re getting it for free,” said Tony Campbell, Director of Training for Rackspace. The same instructors that usually teach the commercial seminars will conduct the student training. According to Cassandra Burnias, the Training Program Manager for Rackspace, the normal

NEWS Interested in recent arrests? We’ve got you covered. see page 2 Find out more about OpenStack and what this training can do for students. see page 2

info on the go The training seminar will be conducted:

You could realistically not get to sign up for classes...if you don’t pay your bill.” Charla Lancaster Dir. of Assessment and Library Access Services.

Sept 30.- Oct. 3 6 p.m. - 9 p.m. Register online: http://goo.gl/52FrH9

training program usually lasts 32 hours that lasted across four days for roughly seven hours. The training for students will be consolidated to only three hours across four days. With the shortened time frame, the fundamentals will be taught more quickly, allowing more hands-on time with the soft ware and less lecturing. They were hoping to cap the class size at 40, Burnias said, but as they already have 40 registered students, they plan to open up a few more spots as a buffer for cancellations. Campbell noted that if the training sessions are successful, Rackspace “will definitely come back, as they have close ties with Tech, in case some students don’t get in,” (to this training session).” see FREE / page two

KEVIN DICKEL/ SPPS

This Lucky Brand necklace has the bold metal dynamics seen on the runway’s hot accessories.

The rocker trend is warming up this season’s transition into fall style. PRIYA SINGH fashion columnist

Now that the chilly weather is approaching and the leaves are transforming from lush green to warmer hues, it is time to reconsider your wardrobe options. We all know with Blacksburg’s infamous bipolar weather, it can be to hard determine what to wear between your 8 a.m. and afternoon classes. How do you pick something that will keep you warm and cool at the same time? However, instead of focusing on the repetitive ‘how

LIFESTYLES

to’s’ for a multi-season functional wardrobe, let’s talk accessories — the pieces that tend to be overlooked but can say so much about an outfit, which is important for transitional weather. Style.com’s “Guide to Fall’s 2013 Accessories” exemplifies the recurring theme in fashion since the Met Gala this past spring — Rocker Chic. One designer duo that has sparked a lot of buzz is sisters Danielle and Jodi Snyder, founders of Dannijo, who have developed a fall collection that

can be worn for both day and night outfits. The variety in this collection offers glamour that can be worn for any event and adds an instantaneous rocker-chic look to any daytime outfit. Many of their fashion jewelry pieces incorporate Swarovski crystals and an assortment of metals. According to Style.com, the duo looked to Elizabeth Taylor for inspiration, who is known for her pairing of opulent jewelry and everyday wardrobe. see PUNK / page five

SPORTS

TECH SEX Check out why our sex columnist wants to pursue her career as a sex therapist. see page 5

They plague the forgetful and the lazy. Dishing out money to pay library fines is a humbling and painful burden. While the figure behind the dollar sign usually isn’t high, it is cash that financially struggling college students wish they didn’t have to spend. “We get a little bit under $20,000 each year (from library fees),” said Charla Lancaster, Director of Assessment and Library Access Services in Newman Library. According to Lancaster, late fees from materials like books have decreased in the last couple of years due to longer loan periods for graduate students, faculty and staff. However, with the recent addition of loanable equipment like laptops, digital recorders and cameras, those late fees have boosted the figures closer to the original $20,000. Tyler Walters, Dean of University Libraries, said that money from library fees is primarily used to replace lost items and purchase new ones — mostly books and other materials such as DVDs. Recommendations for fee costs begin with Lancaster. “It’s sort of a joint effort,” she said. “I’m the director, so I make suggestions to the Dean and he approves or disapproves the cost.” At Newman, books, CDs and audiocassettes accumulate fees of $0.25 per day while popular reading books, videos and DVDs figure in at $1.00. However, once patrons owe $20.00 of late fees, they are prohibited from checking out more materials until the fine is paid.

see page 6

A local comparison to the Blacksburg Library on Miller Street shows that some fees are cheaper than Newman’s, but there is a much tighter accumulation limit than the campus library. Most materials penalize $0.15 per day while DVDs and games ring in at $1.00 there as well. Checkout, however, is cut off at $10.00, half that of Newman’s. While the inability to borrow books and movies may only be burdensome for an assignment or two, there could be worse consequences for unpaid fines. Charges are eventually sent to the Bursar’s office, so “You could, realistically, not get to sign up for classes next semester if you didn’t pay your bill,” Lancaster said. see FINES / page two

ONLINE The women’s soccer team got a pair of big wins over ranked opponents, and now they’re readying to face Duke in Durham in a big road game.

Check online for constant updates throughout the day. www.collegiatetimes.com

CollegiateTimes @collegiatetimes


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newseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 27, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Free: Training yields employment advantage from page one

NEWS weather watch

JAMES MORROW

Many students signed up through advertising by the Association for Computing Machinery at Tech, though the club itself makes up close to 50 percent of the students in attendance, said Chip Senkbeil, senior computer engineering major and president of the ACM. The group chose to advertise for Rackspace because of the opportunity it posed for students. “Having an understanding of what it is, how to get it up and running and use it in your infrastructure is very important to employers nowadays,” Senkbeil said. According to Campbell, the free open source soft ware is “one of the fastest growing open source projects in history,” and the opportunity to learn it first-hand from Rackspace instructors for free poses a plethora of benefits. “This thing has taken off extremely rapidly, and there are very few other open source projects that have grown the way OpenStack has,” Campbell said. “It is being adopted rapidly by the enterprise, so if students are looking for jobs coming out of college… OpenStack is highly sought after in the business market. There are a ton of jobs out there that are looking for OpenStack experience.” Burnias agreed with Campbell, noting that the IT industry currently has a high demand but low supply for OpenStack experts. Moreover, Campbell said that students looking to develop their own companies or startups in the IT field after college will find three enormous advantages in the training. Firstly, the soft ware is open

weather reporter

FILE 2012

The OpenStack training is usually offered for $2500, but Rackspace is giving it for free in an effort to expand the open cloud community. source, meaning it is completely free to use, in contrast to the proprietary soft ware that is typically available for cloud computing. The abundance of costly closed source soft ware was one of the driving forces behind OpenStack’s development, said Campbell. Secondly, OpenStack has a huge community of contributing companies, so new companies “won’t have to spend a development cycle working on their infrastructure (when) they could be building their new businesses and leverage the community to help them build their infrastructure,” Campbell said.

And finally, Campbell says, OpenStack is “cutting edge.” “There are so many companies that are working on this. We get the latest and greatest features being donated from all sorts of high tech companies,” Campbell explained. Tech is one of four universities that will receive free training sessions, along with University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, the University of Texas in Austin and Oregon State University. According to Burnias, Tech was chosen because of Rackspace’s presence in the Blacksburg community. With open source cloud computing evolving into a new standard, Campbell

sees this free training as having long-term benefits for Rackspace.

(This is) one of the fastest growing open source projects in history...” Tony Campbell Director of Training Rackspace Hosting

“The most obvious benefit is we’re looking for employees. In Blacksburg, we have a huge office we’re building out, and we have other

offices all over the world that are looking for employees that have that knowledge,” Campbell said. Similarly, the training will help build the community around OpenStack, creating more consumer freedom apart from pricy closed source cloud computing, thus cultivating a larger base of employable students. “If we get a student that graduates with OpenStack knowledge, that’s a win for us,” Campbell said. “It’s a long term investment, but it’s definitely a win for us.”

A beautiful weather week will come to a close with very little changes expected into the weekend. Temperatures continue to top out in the low to mid-70s with mostly sunny skies. The next chance of precipitation will make its way into Blacksburg by early next week. Patchy fog will continue to be an issue for the early-risers today and into the weekend. Fog will burn off quickly once the sun rises, increasing temperatures to around 72 degrees this afternoon. Skies will remain mostly clear with overnight lows dipping to 47. The weekend will feature be much of the same. Temperatures will top out in the low70s each day. Skies remain sunny Saturday and Sunday before clouds begin to move in Sunday night ahead of the next weather system. A front looks to push through on Monday, bringing the chance of rain to the area. The front looks to be fairly weak, limiting the amount of rain that will fall. The front will push through before Tuesday, setting the stage for a warm and dry workweek next week.

@JDeanSeal

Fines: Bill payment now easier from page one

97 percent of fines are paid with cash, according to Lancaster. In the last six months, the library created an online method of payment where students can use money on their Hokie Passports to pay their fines. Other options include check and money order, but credit and debit cards are not allowed. The library has set up multiple

means of avoiding those pesky charges. Many students are familiar with the email notices that are sent out prior to the due date and with the ability to renew items to buy more time. Students can set up courtesy notifications via email or text message through their My Library Account online. However, as Lancaster pointed out, sometimes sites crash and text messages get lost. “We do have courtesy notices, but

as it’s technology, it does go down on occasion,” she said. “Bear that in mind and don’t make that your sole source of reminding yourself that you have a library book that’s due.” With technological and physical precautions available, there are many ways to avoid paying library fees.

@KyleB_VT

crimeblotter date

time

offense

location

status

July 17-18

3:30 PM - 7:00 AM

Follow up to Burglary/Breaking and Entering

Signature Engineering Bldg.

Inactive

July 25

11:50 AM - 12:50 PM

Follow up to Larceny

Performing Arts Building

Inactive

Aug. 20 - Sept. 25

2:36 PM

Harassment

Lee Hall

Active

Sept. 19 - 23

11:00 PM - 8:00 AM

Follow Up to Burglary / Breaking and Entering

Lee Hall

Active

Sept. 26

2:01 AM

Possession of Marijuana

Stadium Woods

Cleared by Arrest

Southern Cooking 8-12 pm, NO COVER!

@wxBONE


OPINIONS

opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 27, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

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The Collegiate Times is an independent studentrun newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903 Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor in Chief: Priscilla Alvarez Managing Editor: Danielle Buynak Art Director: Kevin Dickel Design Editors: Brad Klodowski, Andrea Ledesma Public Editor: Andrew Kulak Web Editor: James O’Hara Multimedia Editor: Nick Smirniotopoulos News Editors: Cameron Austin, Dean Seal News Reporters: Melissa Draudt, Leslie McCrea Lifestyles Editors: Chelsea Giles, Madeline Gordon Opinions Editors: David Levitt, Sharath Reddy Sports Editors: Jacob Emert, Alex Koma Sports Media Manager: Mike Platania Assistant Photo Editor: Ben Wiedlich Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: James Dean Seal Circulation Manager: Keith Bardsley

MCT CAMPUS

Attendance drop due to attention deficit If

Lane Stadium did not have cellular reception within its cavernous walls, would you still attend and stay for a full game? Apparently bad reception is one reason, among others, that student attendance is declining at college football games across the nation. According to the Wall Street Journal, the phenomenon is spreading to big SEC schools such as University of Georgia and Alabama. This may come as a relief for stalwart Tech football fans who have noticed a drop off in spirit and attendance at games over the last few years. But Virginia Tech is not the only school having these problems. We are just another victim of a strange apathetic cloud sweeping college stadiums throughout the country. The Journal article stated that on average 39 percent of UGA’s student section was left empty over the last four years, while Alabama had an average of 32 percent seats unused between 2009 and 2012. These numbers prompted the SEC to hire a market research firm to gather more data on fans and find a reason for the declining attendance. Until their findings are released, all we have is speculation as to why students are increasingly choosing to skip out on

games. The article stated that students’ attention spans were too limited for them to enjoy a full-length game. This sentiment is not breaking new ground, but it truly seems to account for many schools’ attendance woes.

If your stadium has bad reception, you may be even less inclined to attend a game at the cost of being away from your virtual network for the afternoon” While students’ attention spans these days may not be any shorter than those from years past, students now have too many ways of distracting themselves from the spectacle at hand. When faced with the option of attending the actual event or watching it from the comfort of their own home on a HD projector with their own household amenities, the latter is becoming more attractive to many students. If your stadium has bad reception, you may be even less inclined to attend a game at the cost of being away from your virtual network for half an afternoon. This may

sound like a silly reason to miss a home game, but it often factors into such decisions. Even if you do attend the game, the closer it gets to half time, the more likely you are to call it a day and head for the comforts of home. Of course I am just trying to get into the head of a typical student in today’s world; this does not apply equally to every school or every person. The collective decline in our ability to give undivided attention to a specific event is starting to show however. No matter what your circumstances may be, students are under a constant pressure from their devices. The pressure drives decisions, priorities and how you use your time. So in a way, the plethora of options is acting as a way of separating the true fans from those who are less committed. In the past, football games were a prime venue for socializing. Today they still are, but they now compete with Facebook, HD television and Twitter for your attention. SHARATH REREDDY - opinions editor - junior - economics

Syria solution may rest in game theory A mathematical solution in Syria? That’s not as crazy as it sounds. In fact, the working compromise is a classic case of the power of game theory, a branch of mathematics that analyzes the best possible outcomes in conflicts where neither side knows what the other will do. It’s not about winning as much as it is finding the least worst option, which is precisely what Presidents Obama, Vladimir Putin, Bashar Assad and company have done. No one gets exactly what he wants. But no one loses everything either. In its simplest form, the Syrian standoff was a classic game of “chicken,” the game played by James Dean in “Rebel Without a Cause” when he was challenged by a bully named Buzz to race stolen cars to the edge of a cliff. Whoever bails first becomes the “chickie” and loses face. Dean’s character, Jim, jumps at the last minute, but Buzz’s jacket gets snagged on the door and he plunges to his death. Game over. The least worst solution would have been for both players to swallow their pride and jump early. The winner gets

to gloat. But even the loser gets to play another day. Over the long term, a willingness to take less than everything is a winning strategy. One reason is that winner-take-all (a zero-sum game) results in unstable situations, dangerous even for the winner. The losing side has little reason to cooperate and every reason to retaliate in kind, or worse. (In “Rebel,” Buzz’s gang blames Jim for their buddy’s death and hound him until a predictably tragic ending is the only one possible.) Lasting solutions require coming to an equilibrium in which all players feel they did well enough, given the circumstances. And game theory is all about finding equilibriums. Such calculations apply to much more than Syria. We do the same sort of mental math when we stop at red lights instead of barreling through at our pleasure (road rage is the primitive brain’s business). Whether we’re paying taxes or tipping waiters, we often do things that are not, from a selfish point of view, ideal _ but that we know are necessary to keep society going. In other

words, the least worst option.

Lasting solutions require coming to an equilibrium in which all players feel they did well enough, given the circumstances.”

When we insist on winnertake-all, nobody wins in the end. If the big fish gobble up all the little fish, even the big guys starve. It’s the argument I most often hear from the business community for economic policies that promote an equitable distribution of wealth. It doesn’t take a lot of calculation to see that when most people don’t have enough money to buy products, profits eventually dry up. Stability requires not just a measure of fairness but also the perception of fairness. Even a monkey will turn down a treat if it sees its neighbor get something far more delicious. (In

fact, the monkey feeling cheated will throw the second-rate treat back in the experimenter’s face.) When people feel their society doesn’t distribute treats equally _ be they tax breaks, voting rights or political power the resulting instability threatens everyone. Attaining a least worst solution, in other words, requires that both sides be prepared to live with less than they ideally want; if one side feels it’s getting both the least and the worst, there’s no point in even playing. Any monkey could tell us that. The situation in Syria, of course, is horrendously complicated, with multiple players with unknown aims and abilities, and multiple options and possible outcomes. Whether or not turning over Syria’s chemical weapons to the United Nations works, the present pause in the stalemate gives everyone time to think things through. Losing some face is worth it if you can return to play another day perhaps at a game that plays more to your strengths. K.C. Cole - mcclatchy newspapers

College Media Solutions Ad Director: Michelle Sutherland Account Executives: Taylor Moran, Stephanie Morris, Danielle Pedra Inside Sales Manager: Amanda Gawne Assistant Account Executives: Catie Stockdale Jordan Williams, Emily Daugherty, Emily Reina, Becca Schwartz Creative Director: Diana Bayless Creative Staff: Mariah Jones, Samantha Keck, Kitty Schaffernoth, Seden Craig. Katherine Miller

Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2013. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


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September 27, 2013

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ACROSS 1 Organic fuel 5 Beggar’s returns 9 Out-and-out 14 Soprano Gluck 15 Tree nursery? 16 Winnebagos’ kin 17 *Vaudeville headliner 19 Actress Kelly 20 Anaheim team, to fans 21 Splotch 23 Fishing gear 24 *Count Basie’s theme song 28 Garment border 29 Michael of “Caddyshack”

You Oughta Know- Alanis Morissette Smile - Lily Allen Don’t Think You Wanna- Sleater-Kinney Run the World (Girls) - Beyonce Cherry Bomb - Bratmobile

9/27/13 32 Marbles competition 36 Get out in the open 38 Singsong syllables 39 *Too-small quantity 43 Open mic performer, often 44 Bruins legend 45 “My love __ a fever, longing still”: Shakespeare 46 Deeply rooted 48 Gandalf portrayer McKellen

50 *1959 Monroe classic 57 “Go team!” 59 Well out of range 60 It may be captioned 61 Hoover rival 63 What many sports cars lack, and, in a way, what the ends of the starred answers are 66 Bench clearer 67 Pitcher Pettitte with a record 19 post-season wins

DOWN 1 Logical start? 2 Online mortgage broker 3 More than enough 4 It’s not done 5 “State of Wonder” novelist Patchett 6 Country expanse 7 “A Fuller Spectrum of News” network 8 Bit of rhubarb 9 Middle of nowhere, metaphorically 10 Hugs, symbolically 11 Cult classic of 1990s TV 12 It passes between Swiss banks 13 Would-be One L’s hurdle 18 Author Sholem 22 Eye of el tigre 25 Tilt 26 Fail to mention 27 Overseas thanks 30 Lab coat speck? 31 Chow 32 Year Elizabeth I delivered her “Golden Speech” 33 Caddie’s suggestion 34 Jaw-dropping news 35 Veep before Gerald 37 Letter after pi

40 Motel convenience 41 “Gymnopédies” composer Satie 42 Scot’s bluff 47 Dict. offering 49 Small bites 51 NFLer until 1994 52 Castle with many steps? 53 Museum concern

54 White with age 55 Weasel-like swimmer 56 Where captains go 57 Frolic 58 Field of expertise 62 GPA reducer, usually 64 Put in 65 Deli choice

Thursday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2012 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

9/26/13

WORDSEARCH: Water Animals Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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Aries (March 21-April 19) Stick with your beliefs. Follow a visionary, but keep your own eyes open. Know what you’re talking about. Continue to increase delegation. Proceed with determination. Cut the luff. It’s not a good time to travel. Watch out.

Leo (July 23-Aug. 22) Write a ictional piece. To get out of the box, go over the wall. Others are giving you a boost. Don’t let them spend your money. Hold irm. Continue to increase attention to inances.

Taurus (April 20-May 20) Don’t try to get blood from a turnip. Finish an old project. Keep your money in your pocket, and avoid inancial risk. Your work impresses the judges. Go for substance over symbolism. Don’t talk about it.

Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) Upgrade communications technology. You’re doing better with less effort. A move may be required. Don’t depend on anyone else. You know you can prosper. Keep increasing inancial management. Start getting serious. Accepting a challenge.

Gemini (May 21-June 20) Use your imagination. Your view is visionary. Share your dreams. Listen to a loved one’s considerations or complaints without getting intimidated. Learn from somebody else’s mistakes. Get their partnership. Opposites attract.

Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Spin a wild yarn. Edit out the super luous. Hold yourself to high standards. Continue to search for better solutions to increase clarity. A con lict could arise between work and play or about priorities. You’re irresistible.

Cancer (June 21-July 22) Keep your inancial objectives in mind. Continue to decrease your obligations in the coming week. Consider a wide variety of options. Answer correspondence. Stash away something of great value. Walk carefully. Watch your step.

Scorpio (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Use something you’ve been saving. Continue to increase your authority this week. Only buy what you can’t get in trade. No need for new toys. The old ones are ine. Check out options to improve your home.

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Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The trickster is at work now. A neighbor has a possible solution. Renew a bond. Continue to increase your wealth this week. Be lexible without capitulating. It could get chaotic. Not everyone wants to hear about it. Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) Count your earnings, and stay optimistic. You’re about to ind out more than you wanted to know. The truth revealed is much less scary than the unknown. Don’t believe everything. Decrease outside activities. Adapt to new requirements. Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) An opportunity holds promise and is worth pursuing. Fictional characters speak to you. Decrease expenses, and don’t lend. Encourage, don’t force. Stop worrying. Relax and enjoy it. Run errands. Everybody wants you. You don’t have to do anything. Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20) Continue to decrease your stack of un inished tasks. Clean out the closets. Postpone expansion. Let ideas percolate, and reevaluate your position. Something you have stored away is useful (if you can ind it). Brighten every corner.

Contact us (540) 961-9860


LIFESTYLES

lifestyleseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 27, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

Punk: Bold accessories rock this fall’s trends

Why I want to be a sex therapist

from page one

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Besides making fashion jewelry, Dannijo also carries a variety of accessories such as iPhone 5 cases, bags with graphic designed images as well as jewelry and statement hair accessories. If you’re not about breaking the bank for a few luxe pieces, Baublebar.com is a great alternative for fashion jewelry. They even sell the coveted monogram necklaces that have been seen around campus recently and notably worn by the likes of Rihanna and Beyonce. If you prefer playing with trends, punk-rock inspired metals and matte black jewelry are big for the fall. Metals have been around for several seasons, but matte finished jewelry is on the rise. This is greatly due to Ted Rossi’s popular matte black pyramid icon cuff. The dark finish adds edge and boldness, along with the powerful and seductive garments for fall. However, when paired with chunky pearls or geometrically shaped jewels, you can create the perfect balance of feminine boldness. In addition to all the amazing options of jewelry, thigh high boots, as seen from Balmain, and practical handbags are the way to go. A statement piece, whether a simple monogram necklace or a daring pair of thigh-high boots, is elemental to the success of an outfit, regardless of the season. Finding that transitional piece for between the seasons involves careful consideration. Think timeless. PRIYA SINGH - lifestyles staff writer - junior - apparel product development and merchandising management

TECH SEX

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

hat do you want to do when you get older?” “Well, I’m actually studying to be a sex therapist.” Then comes the awkward silence, nervous laughing and the outright, “What the hell?” I am sure most of you have been wondering why I write this column, especially since I’m a business student. For those of you who don’t already know, I hope to study sex for the rest of my life. Essentially, I plan on going to graduate school to obtain a Ph.D. in human sexuality and hopefully will start practicing therapy with clients. Many websites define sex therapy as the treatment of sexual dysfunction, such as nonconsummation, premature ejaculation, erectile dysfunction, low libido, unwanted sexual fetishes, sexual addiction, painful sex or a lack of sexual confidence. With that being said, I actually hate the definition. The stigma that is associated with sexual “problems” comes from using words like “dysfunction.” Sex therapy should not be considered strange. When you have a headache, you go to the doctor. Similarly, when you have things holding you back from having sex, you should go to the doctor. Sex therapists work with individuals and couples to improve their sex lives and solve the problems they may be having between the sheets. While this sounds like a light topic, many of the clients sex therapists see have terrible emotional and physical pain from sex-related issues. Like many other people, I want to do something where I can help others. I want to do something where I have face-to-face interaction with people. I want to get paid well, grow in my career and work for myself. After realizing what I find most interesting (anatomy, human sexuality and human development), I realized that business just wasn’t going to cut it for me. I have spent the past few summers reading books about the sexual behavior of humans and have realized that there is room in the field for improvement and good sex therapists. Ideally, I would love to work in the field for a few years and get some experience under my belt. After that, I would ideally write for some sort of magazine where I can voice my opinion that sex should not be a taboo subject. I would love to write books, continue to see clients and talk about sex in a public forum. So then the question becomes, what do my parents have to say about this not-so-standard career choice? When I told them that I had decided to pursue a career in sex therapy, their initial reaction was hysterical laughter. But since that day, my dad, an avid entrepreneur, has been calling me with ideas on how to make money with sex therapy. My mom supported me from the beginning and reads every article I write. I am so excited to continue exploring my career path in sex therapy. I hope to further my knowledge of this field so I can continue sharing how to be safe and have fun.

meet the writer

KEVIN DICKEL / SPPS

Punk chic accessories are taking the spotlight this fall. Thigh-high boots and timeless punk pieces such as studded earrings, metal necklaces and bags with graphics on them will transform any daytime or night out outfit with a bold touch.

TECH SEX is a brand new, weekly column about sex on Virginia Tech’s campus, written by Abby Broughton. Broughton, a junior marketing major, will eventually be pursuing a Ph.D. in sex therapy in the hopes to make a career out of sex therapy. If you have any questions or comments, email her at ambrough@vt.edu

5


SPORTS

sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com

September 27, 2013

collegiatetimes.com

6

Women’s soccer ends ACC trek Tennis team rides

momentum to Tulsa JAMES MITCHELL sports staff writer

CARLOS WATERS / SPPS

The women’s soccer team just won a pair of tough road games against ranked opponents, and now they’ll head to Duke. BROOKS AKER sports staff writer

The Virginia Tech women’s soccer team will conclude its four-game ACC road trip with a visit to Durham to face the Duke Blue Devils. Even though the Hokies faced two ranked teams last week and came away with two wins, they expect this weekend’s contest to be just as tough. “Duke is a very good team. They still have three or four national team kids in their starting lineup,” said head coach Chugger Adair. “The results haven’t been falling for them so we’ve got to make sure we’re ready for both matches and can have the same results as last weekend.” The other match Adair alluded to for the Hokies was a win at North Carolina State on Thursday night. Tech was able to get a big 4-1 win against the Wolfpack on the road in Raleigh. But the focus going into the weekend is on the Blue Devils, a team that is talented but has had a rough stretch recently. “Duke is very good, but I think we’re just going to attack them and play like we have been playing,” said junior defender Jodie Zelenky. “I don’t think we really need to change anything much because we’ve been playing so well the past couple of games.” The defense has been terrific throughout the season and especially on the road. The unit has not allowed a goal since giving up two in a tight loss to

top-ranked North Carolina on Sept. 12. Specifically, for her performance, Zelenky was named to the Top Drawer Soccer Women’s Team of the Week for Sept. 24 after she played all 180 minutes in two shutout wins the previous week. With their strong play of late, the Hokies are ready to pick up where they left off. “I think we have a lot of confidence going into the next road games,” Zelenky said. “We were able to keep a shutout and get a lot of good opportunities in the past two road games and I think playing against two teams that are as good as Maryland and Boston College should give us a lot of confidence going into this weekend.” After losing three starting defenders a year ago, there may have been some questions about whether the Hokies’ back line would be up to the task. But new starters Zelenky, senior Taylor Antolino, and junior Danielle King have meshed well with returning starter sophomore Jordan Coburn. “We had such great defenders last year and we all looked up to them so much and I think they gave us a great example of how we should look to play,” Zelenky said. “I think we have really come together and we’ve had to bond to be able to play as well as we are playing.” And having senior Dayle Colpitts in the net doesn’t hurt. The career leader in shutouts at Virginia Tech, Colpitts has been consistent this year for the Hokies. “She’s been solid all year. She’s made saves when she needed to,” Adair said. “Against Maryland she saved a penalty

about 10 minutes after the second half started and we were very shaky at the start of both halves I would say. And she came out and saved that penalty and gained confidence for our team and we were able to start playing better and kind of rolled from there.” The offense hasn’t been explosive, but it has been consistent all season long, as the Hokies have scored in every match this season. Senior Jazmine Reeves leads the team in scoring with seven goals and is tied with freshman Murielle Tiernan for the team lead with four assists. And according to Adair, that’s no accident. “Jazzy really committed to her training and to her fitness over the summer and it’s showing,” Adair said. “She’s been terrific.” Duke comes into the match with a decent record, but has struggled against ACC competition. The Hokies will be the fourth ranked conference opponent in five matches that the Blue Devils have faced. Sophomore Cassie Pecht, ACC Rookie of the Year last season, and senior Natasha Anasi lead a talented Blue Devils team that hasn’t had success recently, but certainly can’t be overlooked. They have played a tough schedule and were ranked in the national poll until this week. The Hokies and the Blue Devils are set to square off at 2 p.m. on Sunday afternoon in Durham.

@BrooksAker

The Virginia Tech men’s tennis team took the court in the UVA Ranked+1 tournament at the Snyder Tennis Center in Charlottesville, Va. this past weekend and came away with some big wins. Tech’s 66th ranked Andreas Bjerrehus defeated both his first two opponents in two sets during the Orange Singles’ first day. Meanwhile, 43rd ranked Amerigo Contini advanced in the White Singles, winning his first match 4-6, 6-3, 6-1 and his second 6-1, 6-3. The Hokies added to their strong opening with Hunter Koontz defeating Louisville’s 47th ranked Sebastian Stiefelmeyer in three sets. Koontz was then downed by Virginia’s JC Aragone in his second match. Coach Jim Thompson was pleased with how his team played. “There were lots of positives that came out of the weekend, and hopefully we can take the momentum into next week,” Thompson said. “Personally, it was great beating a top player. Beating him brought out the best in me,” said Koontz. Even though he failed to advance in his next singles match, the junior had a positive outlook on the tournament. “It was a learning experience,” Koontz said. “I look to get better from there.” The team of Contini and Joao Monteiro won their match 8-4 while competing in the Green Doubles. But they would later lose in the next round. Bjerrehus and Koontz as a pair were seeded high enough to earn a bye in the first round of the Red Doubles. On the second day, Bjerrehus and Koontz joined forces to win their two matches. They then went on to defeat Albert Wagner and Alex Gornet of Louisville 8-2 to win in the finals. “The first matches were both a little tight, and in the finals we played pretty well. It’s good beating top-quality opponents. And playing quality tennis is always a good feeling,” Koontz said. Both Bjerrehus and Contini would go on to play in their respective flight finals. Awaiting Contini was Ronnie Schneider, a talented freshman from North Carolina. Schneider won the first set, but Contini battled back, winning the second 6-4. The Tar Heel responded and won the final set 6-3. On the other hand, Bjerrehus won the Orange flight final due to the injury of Virginia’s Luca Corinteli, which

info on the go Andreas Bjerrehus: Orange Singles Flight Champion Amerigo Contini: White Flight DSingles Runner Up forced him to retire. The Hokies took this week to prepare for the Intercollegiate Tennis Association All-American Championships. When asked about the preparation, Thompson said, “We wouldn’t prepare any different than any other tournament. The guys work really hard.” The team will head to the University of Tulsa’s Michael D. Case Tennis Center for pre-qualifying on Sept. 28 and 29, which will feature Joao Monteiro in singles. Andreas Bjerrehus and Hunter Koontz will participate in qualifying held on Sept. 30 through Oct. 2. “It’s a good opportunity to get tough match play and work on your game,” Koontz said. “I’m not expecting to go out and win, but I’m expecting to play my best. It’s a good experience because it’s the first time I’m doing the tournament, and I’m looking forward to it.” Finally, the Main Draw will be played Oct. 3-6. Here, Amerigo Contini will compete in singles and will also team up with Andreas Bjerrehus in doubles. The combination is currently ranked 17th by the ITA. “They’re both playing really well. They have high expectations,” Thompson said. The ITA All-American Championships will feature the top tennis players in the country. But it’s not all about winning and losing — the Hokies are focused on getting better. “This year we’re going into it with a different mindset. There’s a lot of opportunity in the tournament. There’s the opportunity to get better, to try to play their best, and to face great competition,” Thompson said. “I think all of our guys are capable of beating any of those players on a given day. To perform at the highest level, that’s the goal.”

@CTSportsTalk

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Friday, September 27, 2013 Print Edition