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Wednesday, March 2, 2011

An independent, student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

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COLLEGIATETIMES 108th year, issue 26

News, page 2

Food & Drink, page 6

Opinions, page 3

Sports, page 5

Classifieds, page 4

Sudoku, page 4

Hokie hangover

JOSHUA MILLER / SPPS

Senior forward Terrell Bell (left) looks for a teammate to receive his pass in the first half. Coach Seth Greenberg (above) shows the beginnings of frustration that would later boil over into a technical foul.

HOKIES LOSE INTENSITY OF DUKE WIN, FALL HARD AT HOME TO DETERMINED BOSTON COLLEGE TEAM GARRETT RIPA sports editor The Hokies got off to a disastrous start on senior night and never recovered, losing to Boston College 76-61. Fresh off its euphoric win over thenNo. 1 Duke, Virginia Tech fell behind early, 19-6, with Eagles guard Reggie Jackson on fire, shooting four-of-four from the field for 13 points. The Hokies didn’t lead after the game’s opening moments, and the team’s frustration bubbled over in the second half as coach Seth Greenberg’s team once again played itself onto the NCAA tournament bubble. “This is disheartening. I wouldn’t say it was disappointing,” Greenberg JONATHAN ROBERTS / SPPS said. “But let’s be honest, I am proud

of this team and I am proud of where we are.” The Eagles lead eventually expanded to 32-14 with the Hokies being outshot 63 percent to 31 percent. “I thought we would come out and play hard for the seniors,” said sophomore guard Erick Green. “We got embarrassed and I feel bad for the way the seniors went out.” However, a 9-0 Tech run capped off by a Malcolm Delaney 3-pointer got the Hokies — and the crowd — right back in the game with a score of 32-23. Delaney’s final jumper of the first half landed him in third place on Tech’s all-time scoring list, as he passed Dale Solomon. Delaney finished with 17 on the night and now stands at

2,143 career points. But Tech’s letdown loss overshadowed his accomplishment. “This was not a good way to end our career at home,” Delaney said. Boston College entered the locker room with a 35-27 lead, yet only had two out of five timeouts remaining. The Eagles lack of second half timeouts proved to be irrelevant, as they didn’t need to call a single one the rest of the game. Delaney began the second period by nailing a 3-pointer to bring the Hokies within five, but the Eagles quickly countered with a three of their own. The Hokies were unable to close the gap and found themselves trailing 5541 with about 11 minutes remaining. A large part of the team’s struggles came from behind the arc, where Tech shot a dismal three-of-17, including air balls by Delaney and Erick Green. see LETDOWN / page five

Tech stands firm Campus burial space draws interest on firearms policy JAY SPEIDELL news reporter

MALLORY NOE-PAYNE news staff writer Virginia Tech is standing pat on its current firearms policy despite legal challenges to gun restrictions on college campuses nationwide. In Virginia, universities may prohibit or place restrictions on the carrying of firearms on their own campuses. Tech’s policy is outlined in its policies and procedures, saying that individuals on campus, in campus buildings or attending sports events are prohibited from “carrying, maintaining or storing a firearm or weapon.” The policies also apply to weapon owners with valid permits. “We do not believe that it is appropriate for guns to be in the classroom. Period,” said Tech spokesman Mark Owczarski. This policy was in place before the shootings of April 16, 2007, and has not changed since.

We do not believe that it is appropriate for guns to be in the classroom. Period. MARK OWCZARSKI SPOKESMAN, VIRGINIA TECH

Nicole Russell, a junior from northern Virginia, said she didn’t see a “need or necessity” for guns on campus. “I think it would serve to make the campus a more dangerous place,” Russell said. Many students nationally, however, do support the idea of allowing concealed weapons on campus. Students for Concealed Carry on Campus, a student organization formed after April 16, supports Texas legislation that would allow students and professors to carry licensed handguns on campus. Members say it would help make college campuses safer. The group’s website notes that 26 colleges in three states already allow licensed concealed weapons. “It’s definitely a touchy subject given our school, but I think looking at Virginia Tech, walking around campus versus around town, what makes it any different?” said

Matthew Hurt, the chairman of Tech’s College Republicans. Hurt is also a regular columnist for the Collegiate Times. “When you look at school shootings — there have been several instances when shootings have been put to a stop by students with a gun.” Around the country, 12 states are currently considering legislation that would allow the carriage of concealed weapons on college campuses. Many gun rights advocates believe that Texas has the best chance of passing the bill into law. Utah is the only state to already have similar legislation in the books. Like Virginia, many states allow individual schools to determine their own policies about concealed weapons. Colorado State University, for instance, has chosen to allow individuals with a permit to carry concealed weapons on their campus. The Virginia legislature has proposed legislation similar to the one now being debated in Texas. Del. Bob Marshall, a Republican from Prince William County, proposed a bill allowing professors to carry guns on campus shortly after April 16. “Parents trust teachers with the formal education of their children,” Marshall said. “If you have the confidence handling the gun, the parents will trust you to protect their children.” The legislation has died in committee two years in a row. The Virginia Supreme Court has joined the national conversation with a recent ruling on a case involving concealed carry at George Mason University. The constitutionality of allowing the university to make its own policy was challenged in January when a frequent visitor to GMU’s campus filed a suit against the school, complaining the school violated his Second Amendment right to bear arms. The court ruled in favor of the university, following precedent to say that firearms can be prohibited in sensitive locations. Virginia Attorney General Ken Cuccinelli wrote a brief supporting the university’s policy.

A new columbarium offers Virginia Tech alumni a final resting place bordering campus. The columbarium, an above ground burial place for ashes, is located on a terrace on the grounds of the Holtzman Alumni Center. It was built with Hokie stone and has maroon granite covering each of its 60 niches. Each niche has room for two urns. “It has a view toward the Duck Pond and to the campus,” said Tom Tillar, vice president of alumni relations. “It has a nice view from that rise and it has a nice tree beside it. “The height may surprise you when you’re actually standing on the niche side. It’s tall, above your head.” Tillar said many consider their experiences at college to be some of the most important of their lives, and that this columbarium gives them an opportunity to extend their connection to Tech. Spots in the columbarium cost $5,000. The columbarium, funded in part by donations from a group of alumni and class gifts from the 2008 and 2010 graduating classes, currently has only one set of ashes, which were interred in November 2010, in time for Veterans Day.

MARK UMANSKY / SPPS

The columbarium, seen above, has enough room for 60 spaces which can hold two urns a piece. Brent Blackwell, a member of Tech’s class of 1963 and the Corps of Cadets and Highty-Tighties, served in the U.S. Army Signal Corps. His ashes were interred in a ceremony that included a bugler from the corps and the presentation of his sabre to the corps.

Since the columbarium was finished, alumni response has been high. “We’ve had, I’d say upwards of 50 calls of interest,” Tillar said. “They understand it’s likely to be very popular, so most of them who call say ‘I’d like to do this while there are still available niches.’” Tillar explained that the site was

designed with expansion in mind. “When you stand behind it you can see that there could be additional walls constructed to hold more niches and border the terrace,” Tillar said. Tech is one of several area schools with columbariums, including Duke University and the University of Virginia.

Study abroad programs grow at Tech TORIE DEIBLE news staff writer Virginia Tech officials are seeing a marked increase in student participation in study abroad programs. When Jeremy Scott Billetdeaux, assistant program director of Education Abroad at Virginia Tech, started five-and-a-half years ago, there were only about 900 students studying abroad. The program now boasts nearly 1,200 students. Junior David Hopland studied abroad last semester at the University of the Sunshine Coast in Australia. “Being on your own in another culture allows you to learn how to deal with tough situations and exposure to different scenarios in a different culture,” Hopland said. “You learn a lot about yourself which was a big thing for me.” Senior Sarah Schneider, who has studied abroad in Chile and Spain,

said the experience helped her problem solving and language skills. “Not to mention resume building and career enhancement to set me apart,” Schneider said. Brendan Brink-Halloran, a Tech instructor who has a Ph.D. in planning, governance and globalization, is a huge supporter of studying abroad. “We can see a presentation for a professor on what’s going on in Egypt in the Middle East right now but it’s very different from actually being there, talking to people, seeing things with your own eyes, eating the food and immersing yourself in a different culture to teach you things that you could never learn in a classroom,” Brink-Halloran said. Terry Papillon, director of Tech’s Honors Program, leads study abroad programs in Greece every other year. Papillon said the value of the study program varies by student.

“If you go off on a study abroad program and you spend the whole time drinking and not paying attention, it’s not going to be worth it ultimately,” he said. Students obtain valuable knowledge and skills from studying abroad that they wouldn’t necessarily get in a classroom. “It makes students more aware that questions are broader than they thought they were, which helps in most any degree,” Papillon said. “It reminds students that the world is bigger and that questions are asked in different ways.” He said the four main reasons students may be hesitant to study abroad are money, scheduling, fear and ignorance. “Too many students burn their bridge before they cross it,” Papillon said. “Students don’t know that money doesn’t have to be a problem and they don’t know what’s out

there.” Billetdeaux said students in study abroad programs can enhance their employment opportunities after college. “Students make themselves much more marketable if they can demonstrate to employers that they’ve already been working in a different cultural context and they know how to interact with people with different backgrounds,” Billetdeaux said. “Almost all the time I hear from people who have studied abroad and they tell me that they have talked about it in their interviews and their potential employers were really impressed by that.” Billetdeaux said he has heard from several employers and graduate schools that the study abroad experience has made student applicants more desirable. “It gives you an edge,” Billetdeaux said.


2 news

news editors: philipp kotlaba, liana bayne, gordon block newseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865

march 2, 2011

COLLEGIATETIMES

what you’re saying //comments from online readers...

McDonnell calls for Social Security reform

On customers sickened at Souvlaki: Sven>> I commend Souvlaki for doing all they can to right the situation. Definitely my go to eatery in downtown Blacksburg. Chain restaurants just don’t compare.

Anonymous>> Ditto! They have been in Blacksburg for years and have some of the best food. This could happen to any restaurant, and just think, after this they are one of the cleanest restaurants in Blacksburg!

Guido>> Don’t let this destroy a VT landmark! Souvlaki’s didn’t do anything wrong and is too good to let it be replaced by a Subway or some other boring chain.

Anonymous>> Souvlaki’s will still have my business. This isn’t their fault. It’s not like it’s from bad food preperation.

Anonymous>> As someone who almost always argues against these articles I must say this is a very well done article. You advocated for your side while respecting differing opinions on the issue. Bravo for recognizing the validity in the opposing view points. Hopefully we can all find middle ground here.

Anonymous>>

CORRECTIONS

One part of your logic is flawed. You’re assuming that all Christians and Jews see gay marriage as a sin. There are many congregations in the Anglican tradition, Methodist, and Church of Christ that accept gay marriage. Church of Christ and the Metropolitan Community churces offically accept Gay Marriage. There continues to be a shift, albeit slow with theologians that see that the Bible says nothing “singularly” about homosexual behavior as being sinful. Any mention of it is in context of something sinful that is overarching same sex behavior. Jesus never spoke about it. There is more in the Bible that speaks of acceptance of polygomy than same sex marriage. So, it’s really a matter of time. The Earth isn’t flat, women can go out during and 10 days after their cycle and slavery while acceptable in the Bible is not considered Christian. A lot to sort out but I was married in a mainstream Christian Church, albeit in an urban city where a lot of elistist, intelligent people reside.

Betas from Christopher Newport University came to help get the Tech

Gov. Bob McDonnell is advocating an increase in the eligibility age for Social Security benefits and possible cuts in defense spending. McDonnell also calls for reforms to the Medicaid and Medicare programs to stop “tinkering around the edges” of spending cuts in the national budget. “About 40 percent of our federal spending resides in those three programs alone, and until we have the collective courage to reform these budget drivers, we aren’t serious about fixing our problems,” he writes in an opinion column for The Hill, a Washington publication.

“I’m the governor of a state with a significant military presence. But I also know that we have to take a reasonable look at efficiencies in defense spending as well, so long as we don’t sacrifice national security.” The opinion article was posted late Monday, after McDonnell attended a meeting of the state’s governors at the White House with President Barack Obama. He missed the first day of theNational Governors Association winter meeting because the General Assembly session ran over a day. McDonnell, vice chairman of the Republican Governors Association,

criticizes Obama’s proposed 2012 budget, saying it “relies on continued deficit spending with money we simply do not have to fund the basic operations of government.” He boasts about Virginia lawmakers making deep cuts instead of raising taxes to manage their budget and scolds Washington for spending beyond its means, but never mentions his plan to borrow $3 billion for state road improvements. -olympia meola, mcclatchy newspapers

world Writers barred from Chinese shopping area

On gay marriage:

In “New Tech sorority populates roster,” (CT—Mar. 1) Gamma Phi

virginia

JUSTIN GRAVES -public editor -junior -sociology major

chapter started. The Collegiate Times regrets this error.

BEIJING — The Chinese Foreign Ministry on Tuesday barred foreign news reporters from a major Beijing shopping district that’s been designated on the Internet as the gathering point for anti-government protests. The highly unusual move — such restrictions usually are applied only to sensitive regions such as Tibet — underscores the concern with which the Chinese government views the protest calls, which have been named the “Jasmine Revolution” after the demonstrations that started in Tunisia and have swept the Arab world. Public response to the announced gatherings has been tiny, but Chinese security officials have reacted with huge deployments of uniformed and plainclothes officers, both in the capital and in other cities across the country. On Sunday, journalists who attempted to cover the scheduled protest at the Wangfujing shopping district — where no protesters actually gathered — were detained, shoved around and, in at least one case, assaulted by men in civilian clothes who wore earpieces and were clearly in communication with uniformed police.

At a regularly scheduled news conference Tuesday afternoon, Foreign Ministry spokeswoman Jiang Yu endorsed the police actions: “As far as I know, over the weekend the Beijingpolice properly handled the incident at Wangfujing.” She said the police were forced to move in because the foreign journalists had disrupted the high-traffic shopping area. She also made it clear that Wangfujing now is considered off-limits without prior approval from local authorities, a departure from previous media guidelines, which required only that reporters have permission from the people or organizations they intend to interview. “If you don’t understand those regulations,” she said, referring to the rules that govern foreign reporters’ activities in China, “then the local authorities can offer help explaining them to you.” News about the calls for protests has been blocked from Chinese media and Internet portals, and Jiang stuck to that blackout Tuesday, refusing to say why she thought so many journalists had gathered in Wangfujing on Sunday. At first she said she didn’t know, and then she said the question was

inappropriate. The lack of explanation for what happened — and confusion about what guidelines the government expects reporters to follow — was typical in many ways of how China’s authoritarian regime operates. In the days before the announced gatherings, state or local security branchesdetaineddozensofChinese activists, often without any formal legal explanation. The U.S.-based Chineselanguage website that carried the announcements, boxun.com, has said that it no longer will do so because the online attacks that followed disabled its ability to function. While its editor, Watson Meng, said in a recent interview that he didn’t know who was behind the campaign to disable his site, he added that he’d concluded it was related to the “Jasmine” posts. On Monday, the U.S. Embassy released a statement from Ambassador Jon Huntsman saying he was “disappointed that the Chinese public security authorities could not protect the safety and property of foreign journalists doing their jobs.” -tom lasseter, mcclatchy newspapers

DIRECTIONS Career Fair WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16TH 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM INN AT VIRGINIA TECH

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opınıons 3

editors: scott masselli, gabi seltzer opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

march 2, 2011

The Collegiate Times is an independent student-run newspaper serving the Virginia Tech community since 1903

Change in clinic standards positive you participate in the abortion debate from time to If time, then you’ve probably heard that Virginia’s General Assembly recently passed a bill that requires clinics that perform abortions to meet standards similar to a hospital or an outpatient surgical center. This new law has been met with heavy opposition from pro-choice advocates. But since when is increasing health standards for anything a bad thing? For those of you that have read my past articles, it is no surprise that I’m a right-winger, so yes, I am anti-abortion as well. I believe that life begins at conception, and that abortion is the taking of an innocent life. Whoops, looks like I just made an anti-abortion statement. Forgive me for being “immoral and unethical,” which is what Joy Behar recently called members of the anti-abortion lobby. (Personally, I like Sean Hannity’s name for her a little better: Joyless Behar.) Getting back to the issue at hand, I repeat: Since when is increasing health standards for anything a bad thing? After all, that is what this new law does. Performing an abortion is performing an invasive procedure. Asking a doctor to perform a non-invasive abortion would be like asking the UVa football team to beat the Hokies. Talk about a difficult task. Since abortions go a little farther than general medical practices, it only makes sense to make abortion clinics meet the same standards that other centers performing surgeries have to meet. But if you ask some of the Democratic opposition about the bill, you would have thought Republicans were trying to outlaw all abortions, lock up abortion doctors and throw away the key. To be fair, when Republicans opposed “Obamacare,” the Democrats thought we were racist and were trying to bring back slav-

ery. Democrats have a history of overreacting. I support this bill because it raises health standards. Regardless of what procedure it is targeting, I consider that a good thing. Some will argue that this law may force many abortion clinics to shut down. Would they argue that we shouldn’t pass higher health standards for restaurants because it might force some restaurants to close? I sure hope not. I know I wouldn’t want to eat at an unsanitary restaurant, and I’m sure most women would prefer to seek the procedure at a clinic that is meeting the best standards possible. This bill better protects a woman’s health. Is the opposition more concerned with the health of the woman or the taking of the baby’s life? Seems to me opposing this bill supports the latter. Some will also argue that this bill will limit access to abortions. Personally, I don’t see a problem limiting access to a procedure in which nearly 95 percent of cases involve taking an innocent life simply as a form of birth control. However, last I checked, this bill does not outlaw abortion. If anything would limit access to abortions, it would be making them illegal, not making them occur in a healthier environment. If abortions are going to occur, we can at least make them take place in healthier environments to attempt to better protect one life while another is being taken. So for those of you that are prochoice, take your best shot at me for supporting this bill. Just consider this: If you’re going to continue to make the argument that allowing abortions protects women, this bill protects women as well.

MATTHEW HURT -regular columnist -sophomore -political science major

Intensity of UVa rivalry unnecessary hope I don’t make any enemies from this, but I almost went to the IUniversity of Virginia. After a long battle of never-ending pros and cons, of extensive soul searching and Internet browsing, I had that deposit signed, sealed and ready to go on May 1, anxiety raging. Was I a Cavalier or a Hokie? I looked at my pile of Virginia Tech paraphernalia that had accumulated over my 18 years of being a fan, assuming I had been forced into maroon and orange at birth and thought, well I guess I’m a Cavalier now. I was relieved to finally have made a real decision, after such a long agonizing month of uncertainty. On my way to school that morning, decked in my lone orange and blue T-shirt, I pulled into a parking lot, made a frantic call to my mother and changed my mind. The response was overwhelming. My changing Facebook status brought on a firestorm of hate, and although I had many fellow Tech supporters, the general consensus was “why?” My parents certainly didn’t jump on the bandwagon. They were overjoyed and made no attempt at trying to hide it like they had a day earlier when they thought their daughter was a traitor. They raised a Tech flag like the Fourth of July and notified all their family and friends as if I had just gotten engaged. The fact of the matter is I chose Tech because I just felt I fit in a little better. I’m not going to lie and say it wasn’t the food or the football games or specifically the dress code at said football games, but something about it just seemed a little more realistic, a little bit more fun. The fact that I made my decision and immediately felt a twinge of regret may have also had something to do with it. They say panic attacks aren’t necessarily good signs. My best friend gave me a really hard time about it, though I’d like to think it was because I had chosen a school further away from her. She printed out statistics and rankings and newspaper articles with comments from the mighty Princeton Review saying what I knew all along, and I could care less. Who cares if it’s the best value school, do you even know how much an apartment costs in Charlottesville?

As she rubbed the superiority of her school in my face, I began to hate the “friendly” rivalry that had become such a fixture in my life more and more. My boyfriend’s father’s reaction was even worse. He made me feel horrible about my decision, and I second-guessed myself repeatedly. I had never even thought about UVa until I applied on a whim, so why now was I suddenly supposed to hate it? Is it the snobbish stereotype that may only be true because a few spoiled brats referred to their school as “The University” and ruined it for the rest of them? Is it the “Cav Man” entrance that pales in comparison to our “Enter Sandman?” I don’t really get it. We went to all the same high schools, took all the same tests, and for the most part, did just as well (if not better). I’m sick of all the hate from both sides. We were all friends and neighbors, and now we turn our noses up as though one of us is a convicted felon, not a fellow student studying all the same things a little down the road. In a year or two when we are all competing for the same jobs and graduate school positions, it won’t really matter. At first, I was worried that there was a wrong decision, that choosing one over the other would somehow make it or break it for college and me. Now I know Virginia is lucky to have so many great schools. The two of them together, as well as all the other schools in the Commonwealth, make each other better. Yale wouldn’t be as great without Harvard. I am proud that I am a Hokie and will be even prouder when we win the Commonwealth Cup in November again (if only we could do the same with basketball), but I know that my Cavalier peers and I are really not much different. Who knows, if all goes as planned, I may even be in Charlottesville for med school in a few years.

JENNY SAMUELS -regular columnist -freshman -university studies

MCT CAMPUS

Prison reform needs more public, political attention our nation moves closer to the next presidential election, As debates on both the common and more particular areas of political interest are rising. In this current election cycle, the policies of the Obama administration are certainly at the forefront as the Republican party grooms its contenders in the form of not progressing their ideals so much as ensuring the defeat of Mr. Obama. Within the context of this growing debate, however, there is something that appears to be continually lost — prison reform. As it stands today, the United States claims 5 percent of the world’s population yet houses 25 percent of its inmates. Though this number is absurdly high for a nation that boasts itself as being the “land of the free,” China in comparison has a population four times higher than ours yet is able to boast a mere 14 percent of the world’s prison population. How is it that in the midst of electoral debate the simple question of why our “shining city on a hill” would claim an exponentially higher incarceration rate than one of the world’s leaders in inhuman oppression never brought up? Though the former statistics are cause for pause, it becomes far more startling when put in a different words. Currently one in 100 American adults are in prison opposed to one in 400 in 1970. When we include the number of adults on probation, that statistic turns into one in 31 American adults. To find the cause for this drastic increase one need not go far. The number of drug offenders in prison today is 13 times higher than what it was in 1980, meaning that half a million Americans are currently in prison for non-violent drug offenses (a 1,200 percent increase since 1980 and furthermore constituting 21.2 percent of the total prison population). In monetary terms, the United States

government spends approximately $40 billion on fighting its absurd “War on Drugs” and the overall spending in this country on prisons is nearly $60 billion. Considering that prison costs are the second highest costs for the states (first is Medicaid) it is difficult to understand how a bankrupt state like California can continue to spend nearly $50,000 a year per prisoner and yet still not have any serious debate over prison reform. The answer may be given that prisons are an effective means at rehabilitating drug users. When analyzing the numbers, however, it is quite obvious that prisons are neither an effective nor moral solution to this issue. Ex-convicts generally have a 50 percent chance of returning to prison after release (in contrast, two-thirds of released convicts return to prison within three years) yet drug rehabilitation centers witness an 80 percent success rate on their patients. One possible cause for the failure of prisons to rehabilitate drug offenders is the state of life prisoners are left with following their release. While the overall unemployment rate in the U.S. is currently floating around 9 percent, the unemployment rate for ex-convicts is nearly 50 percent. In addition to this, incarceration generally results in over 40 percent loss in financial earnings for inmates. This is made only worse by the fact that once released, inmates often face such high parole fees and child support that they are unable to support themselves and worse yet, have no hope of support because they have such a difficult time finding a job. For the callous of heart, recall that a person being incarcerated does not just affect their own lives but their families and especially children. This is made most horrifying by the fact that currently one in 28 children has a parent in prison.

Prisons are undoubtedly a remarkably complex and difficult issue to find a solution to, as they always have been. From the perspective of ensuring the health and security of society as a whole, there is no doubt that we must sequester the more dangerous elements of our populace from the remainder. The danger this mentality poses, however, is the loss of our overall humanity. We too often see the prisoner behind the bars when we should see the man or woman who witnessed a tragic circumstance. By approaching prison systems from the perspective of lowering crime rates or fighting an unethical war on drugs, perhaps we should consider that both inmates and drug offenders are not animals to be callously tossed about — they are our fellow men and deserve the basic respect of being seen as such. This is not political or economic issue so much as it is an ethical issue. While we are stripping the humanity off of those we deem too dangerous to keep in society as a whole, we in turn are stripping ourselves of our basic human decency. It is time for our politicians to stop cowering in fear of an issue that desperately needs our attention. Prison reform is something that we no longer have the luxury of ignoring and by ignoring it, we are threatening the destruction of thousands of more lives. The heartless gears of justice will continue its depraved consumption of humanity until we force the system to undergo a much needed alteration. How many more of our brethren will we allow to perish under our own apathy and barbaric vengeance until we finally exalt ourselves with our potential and bring about real change?

JASON CAMPBELL -regular columnist -sophomore -philosophy major

Army ‘psy-ops’ program has some dangerous consequences is times like these when I am glad my father has a lifetime subscripIt tion to Rolling Stone magazine. In addition to providing me with a chuckle when they call to make sure my dad is still “eligible” for his lifetime subscription, Rolling Stone also serves as a very unique source of information. So unique, in fact, that I find myself browsing its website now and then in the downtime between the monthly issues. Just a few days ago, the website had an article that caught my eye. Then, before reading it, I noticed who the author was — Michael Hastings. He is the same author who, in June 2010, published an article that exposed U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal’s harsh remarks against White House staff that ultimately led to President Barack Obama removing him from command. I knew this was going to be good. The hot topic is known as psychological operations, or the more foreboding shorthand “psy-ops.” According to the Department of Defense, psy-ops are psychological tactics used to influence emotions and behaviors. There exists a team of soldiers trained in this field, with the task of manipulating people, or, as Lt. Col. Michael Holmes says, “to get the enemy to behave the way we want them to behave.” This seems like a good thing to have — we want to try and get the upper hand on our “enemy” anyway we can. However, what if these skills were not used on enemies? What if they were used on American citizens in positions of power? Apparently, the U.S. Army, specifically Lt. Gen. William Caldwell, ordered a team of soldiers specializing in the aforementioned field to use

their skills on American congressmen visiting the front lines, with the goal of getting more troops and funding for the war. Targeted faces include senators John McCain and Joe Lieberman. If you are screaming out, “Wait! That’s illegal!” right now, you are correct. Many federal laws forbid the military from doing anything like this to the American people. Unfortunately, those who protested performing psyops on American citizens got seriously reprimanded instead of praised for their recognition of this fact. In fact, one person in cahoots with Caldwell, when brought face-to-face with the illegality of the situation, screamed out, “It’s not illegal if I say it isn’t!” Ah. The military at its finest. So did the psy-ops work? There is no way to know — how would anyone tell? We cannot simply look at the decisions made by our congressmen and see if they were “under the influence.” However, Hastings illustrates an interesting correlation. In January 2011, Caldwell asked the Obama administration for more money and more troops. He asked for so much, in fact, that U.S. taxpayers are paying more than $11 billion this year alone for the war. One of the biggest faces supporting Caldwell receiving all this money was Sen. Carl Levin, a target of the psy-ops initiatives. This whole mess is disgusting. Regardless of whether or not you support the war, no one should view this as okay. Consequentialism (for all your philosophers out there) does not stand strong here—the ends, with respect to American society, do not justify the means. Although I am trying my best to see how someone would rationalize their way through this, I simply can-

not make it feasible. Our military, no matter what reason, should not manipulate and take advantage of the citizens it was designed to protect. Not only is that a huge slap in the face to the American people, but also to those that serve (or have served), by tainting the name (once again) of the United States Army. It is times like this where I wonder who is pulling the strings. Although government classes will teach us about the separation of power in the government, the influence constituents can have, and so on, you have to wonder whether it really is true. I do not want to sound like too much of a conspiracist, but I wonder if American citizens are exposed to a sort of marionette show—much like the poor souls in Plato’s allegorical cave—who think what we are seeing is real. Will we ever see the puppeteer(s) controlling everything? I do not know the answer to that question. Ultimately, this whole ordeal was a scary wake-up call for me. I never would have placed something as ominous-sounding as “psy-ops” within the range of military initiatives, nor would I have even imagined the military using it on US citizens. I think we should all take a moment here to appreciate the power of the free press. This whole fiasco started out as a Rolling Stone article. I wonder where it will end.

JOSH TREBACH -regular columnist -junior -biolgical sciences major

Collegiate Times Editorial Staff Editor-in-Chief: Peter Velz Managing Editors: Zach Crizer, Katie Biondo, Josh Son Public Editor: Justin Graves Senior News Editor: Philipp Kotlaba Associate News Editors: Liana Bayne, Gordon Block News Reporters: Claire Sanderson, Jay Speidell, Michelle Sutherland, Sarah Watson News Staff Writers: Erin Chapman, Meighan Dober Features Editors: Lindsey Brookbank, Kim Walter Features Reporters: Chelsea Gunter, Majoni Harnal, Mia Perry Opinions Editors: Scott Masselli, Gabi Seltzer Sports Editors: Michael Bealey, Garrett Ripa Sports Reporters: Nick Cafferky, Matt Jones, Courtney Lofgren, Josh Parcell Sports Staff Writers: Alyssa Bedrosian, Alex Koma, Ashleigh Lanza, Zach Mariner Special Sections Editor: Bethany Buchanan Public Information Director: Dishu Maheshwari Training Director: Kelsey Heiter Copy Editors: Taylor Chakurda, Thandiwe Ogbonna, Spenser Snarr, Brittany Kelly Layout Designers: Danielle Buynak, Victoria Zigadlo, Wei Hann, Maya Shah Online Director: Jamie Chung Collegiate Times Business Staff Business Manager: David Harries Distribution Assistant: Ryan Francis Student Publications Photo Staff Director of Photography: Sara Mitchell Business Manager: Luke Mason Lab Manager: Mark Umansky College Media Solutions Ad Director: Nik Bando Asst Ad Director: Brandon Collins Account Executives: Emily Africa, Matt Freedman, David George, Melanie Knoth, Hunter Loving Inside Sales Manager: Wade Stephenson Assistant Inside Sales Manager: Diane Revalski Assistant Account Executives: Maddie Abram, Katie Berkel, Kaelynn Kurtz, Erin Shuba Creative Director: Chloé Skibba Asst Production Manager: Casey Stoneman Creative Services Staff: Tim Austin, Jennifer DiMarco, Colleen Hill, Jenn Le, Erin Weisiger Voice your opinion. Readers are encouraged to send letters to the Collegiate Times. 365 Squires Student Center Blacksburg, VA, 24061 Fax: (540) 231-9151 opinionseditor@collegiatetimes.com All letters to the editor must include a name and daytime phone number. Students must include year and major. Faculty and staff must include position and department. All other submissions must include city of residence, and if applicable, relationship to Virginia Tech (i.e., alumni, parent, etc.). All letters should be in MS Word (.doc) format, if possible. Letters, commentaries and editorial cartoons do not reflect the views of the Collegiate Times. Editorials are written by the Collegiate Times editorial board, which is composed of the opinions editors, editor-in-chief and the managing editors. Letters to the editor are submissions from Collegiate Times readers. We reserve the right to edit for any reason. Anonymous letters will not be printed. Have a news tip? Call or text 200-TIPS or e-mail newstips@collegiatetimes.com Student Media Phone Numbers Collegiate Times Newsroom 231-9865 Editor-in-Chief 231-9867 College Media Solutions Advertising 961-9860 The Collegiate Times, a division of the Educational Media Company at Virginia Tech, was established in 1903 by and for the students of Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. The Collegiate Times is published every Tuesday through Friday of the academic year except during exams and vacations. The Collegiate Times receives no direct funding from the university. The Collegiate Times can be found online at www.collegiatetimes.com. Except where noted, all photographs were taken by the Student Publications Photo Staff. To order a reprint of a photograph printed in the Collegiate Times, visit reprints.collegemedia.com. Subscription rates: $65 semester; $110 fall/spring. The first copy is free, any copy of the paper after that is 50 cents per issue. © Collegiate Times, 2011. All rights reserved. Material published in the Collegiate Times is the property thereof, and may not be reprinted without the express written consent of the Collegiate Times.


march 2, 2011

page 4

House approves plan to fund government for two weeks WASHINGTON — Tuesday’s vote in the House of Representatives to keep the federal government funded for two weeks is the first step toward averting a government shutdown starting Saturday, but it leaves the major differences between Republicans and Democrats over taxes and spending unresolved. It also leaves tremendous uncertainty about what may happen next — whether the government will shut down later this month, or next, for want of funds, and whether the opposing sides ever can devise a long-term plan for reducing the national debt. The House voted 335 to 91 to keep the government running until March 18, while cutting $4 billion. Voting yes were 231 Republicans and 104 Democrats; six Republicans and 85 Democrats voted no. The Democratic-run Senate plans to

vote Wednesday or Thursday on the two-week funding plan. Unless it passes, government funding runs out March 4. The House last month approved $61 billion in cuts through the rest of fiscal 2011, which ends Sept. 30, but the Democratic-run Senate is unlikely to concur, leading to the two-week temporary solution while they seek common ground on the rest of the fiscal year. Ultimately, the fight over short-term spending is the year’s first act in a more consequential drama — how to reduce federal debt over the long term. So far they’ve concentrated only on cutting non-military domestic discretionary programs that make up only 12 percent of the budget. They haven’t touched the big-money programs that drive up budget deficits — Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid and defense — not to mention possibly raising taxes to help end deficits. But lawmakers face two looming deadlines: The federal authority to borrow will run out later this spring, and fiscal 2012 begins Oct. 1. Both deadlines will force Congress to confront tax and spending choices again.

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Travel GETTING COLD TIME to Plan your Spring Break 2010 Get Away! Learn how to travel to beautiful locations like Jamaica, Acapulco and the Bahamas on a party cruise. Find out what other Virginia Tech Hokies are headed to your destination. -Adrian Email: Awhite@Studentcity.com for more information

Built-in budget busters Defense dominates discretionary spending

Aging population taxes entitlements

Mounting debt, mounting cost

Discretionary spending is where the annual congressional budget battles are focused; defense spending makes up the majority; including related spending in areas outside the Pentagon budget, so-called security spending makes up 62 percent of discretionary outlays; under President Barack Obama’s recent budget proposal, nonsecurity discretionary spending — ranging from food inspection costs to health programs, education and the Peace Corps — would shrink from $491 billion in fiscal 2010 to $449 billion in fiscal 2020, constituting only 8 percent of all spending and one-third of discretionary outlays

The main cause of the pressure on discretionary spending is the huge anticipated tab for so-called entitlement programs, such as Social Security and Medicare; Social Security spending is already $200 billion more than spending for all nonsecurity discretionary programs and, in a decade, the Social Security tab is projected to top $1.2 trillion, approaching the total for all discretionary spending, including defense

With the federal deficit topping $1 trillion in fiscal 2010 and forecast at a record $1.65 trillion in the current fiscal year, the cost of servicing the mounting debt continues to swell: Government interest payments were about $200 billion for fiscal 2010; even though annual deficits are projected to decline in the coming years, that figure is projected to soar to more than $840 billion by fiscal 2021 — even more than the estimated cost of Medicare that year

Breakdown by category For fiscal year 2010, in billions

U.S. residents 65 and older

Defense $689.0 (51.1%)

As a percentage of the population

National debt Amount at end of each fiscal year

Projections $25 trillion

Education $109.3 (8.1%) 100 million

25%

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Health $65.4 (4.9%) Justice $51.7 (3.8%)

Held by the public

Veterans services $50.9 (3.8%) NOTE: Discretionary spending totals on charts differ by $41 billion due to a difference in accounting methods; percentage total does not equal 100 due to rounding

Int’l programs $45.6 (3.4%) Natural resources/environment

$42.5 (3.2%)

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$9.02 trillion Held by government accounts

$4.51 trillion

Other $102.4 (7.6%)

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Source: White House Office of Management and Budget, U.S. Census Bureau Graphic: Andrew Countryman, Phil Geib and Adam Zoll, Chicago Tribune

© 2011 MCT

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WORDFIND • Theme: Words starting with CON Locate the list of words in the word bank in the letter grid.

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WORD BANK Conceal Concede Concept Concern Concert Conduct Confess Confine Confirm Confuse Congest Conquer Consent Consist Console Consult Contain Contest Context Contour Control

Today’s Radio Schedule ed Mix scs Di Art Day

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68 Boatload 69 Preminger et al. 70 Eyelid prob lem

By Don Gagliardo

ACROSS 1 17-Across in th e neck 5 Adv enturous 10 Domesticate d 14 Chase on stage 15 Cat-__-tails 16 Wicked 17 See 1-Across 18 Passé keyboard key 20 Bigger photo: Abbr. 21 Extremel y, in Essex 22 Horror ma ven Craven 23 Follower of Mar y 25 Sphere

3/2/11 27 Was beaten by 29 Midda y energi zer 34 K-6 35 Stroll 37 Vowel before omicron 38 Bounty rival 39 Angle irons graphically represented by four sets of black squares in this grid, and by letter formations star ting in th e four longes t answers 41 Pi cket lin e crosse r 42 Garden site

43 Actor Neeson 44 Finishes the road 45 Got sic k agai n 48 Li ke some quaint lamp s 50 Fair grade 51 Ger man GM subsidiar y 52 Workshop spr ite 55 Crete-bor n “View of Toledo” painter 59 Texas ranch initials 62 “I’m afraid this will sound funn y” 64 Dub lin’s land 65 Red Muppet 66 Trace 67 Future atty .’s hurdle

DOWN 1 Lounging ja cket wearer’s smok e, maybe 2 Verve 3 Video gam e difficulty settin g 4 Bronz e relativ e 5 Pasadena arena 6 Andean ancient 7 Letter addressees 8 Masseuse’ s challenge 9 Cowardly 10 Business car d abbr. 11 Speak bluntly 12 Cats’ quar ry 13 Bene volent lodgeful 19 Ancient st rings 21 NYC subw ay line named for two boroughs 24 Farmers’ publication? 26 Br ush component

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27 Hyped-up f eelin g 28 Sa y “bo’s’n,” say 29 Scottish patte rn 30 Gumbo pod 31 Names on it are off-limits to telema rketers 32 Big name in video games 33 Big name in beer 36 Up to the task 40 Wet ones , so to speak 46 Banana discar d 47 Ha ve as a customer 49 Stoc k mkt. debut 52 Mak eup accentuates them 53 Recline lazily 54 Do a slo w burn 56 Trot or canter 57 Litter’ s littlest 58 Kellogg’s toaster brand 60 Donk ey’s protest 61 Ballet leap 63 Sa d 64 Er nie of the PGA, to whom this puzzle could be dedicated Tuesday’s Puzzle Solved

(c)2011 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

3/1/11

ed Mix cs Dis


sports 5

editors: michael bealey, garrett ripa sportseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

march 2, 2011

Women’s basketball disappointed again

Letdown: Hokies fall flat, pump up bubble debate

JONATHAN ROBERTS / SPPS

Hokies defenders scramble to stop a BC lay up in the first half. The Eagles jumped to an early lead. from page one

AUSTEN MEREDITH / SPPS

Senior Brittany Gordon goes up for a shot during Sunday’s overtime loss at home against Virginia.

2011 SENIORS FAIL TO DEFEAT VIRGINIA OR MAKE POSTSEASON APPEARANCE DURING HOKIE CAREERS ALYSSA BEDROSIAN sports staff writer The Virginia Tech women’s basketball team ended the regular season with heartbreak, losing to in-state rival Virginia, 73-71 in overtime. It was a disappointing Senior Day for Tech’s seniors. Guard Nikki Davis, forward Brittany Gordon and forward Elizabeth Basham have failed to beat the Cavaliers during their four years as Hokies. In addition, Tech’s seniors are without any postseason appearances. The last time the Hokies made the National Invitation Tournament was in 2007, and the Hokies haven’t been to the Big Dance since 2006. “Last year we were eligible (for the NIT) but our administration opted not to put in a bid,” said head coach Beth Dunkenberger. “The year before they let us apply for it but they didn’t let us apply for our home seed. So teams with some higher RPIs than us actually got in because they agreed to host. So that’s frustrating and disappointing.” The Hokies ended the regular season with an overall record of 1118, tallying just one Atlantic Coast Conference win. “We struggled with being consistent. We had a few mental breaks mid-season,” Gordon said. Gordon, a three-year starter for the Hokies, averaged just 4.4 points per game this season, compared to the 6.4 points per game she scored a year ago. Davis, fellow senior and three-year starter, averaged 7.5 points per game as a sophomore. This season, Davis

averaged 6.1 points per game, her lowest average of her three seasons as a Hokie starter. According to Davis, the lack of consistency Tech faced this year may be due in part to the youth of the team. With just four upperclassmen, the Hokies are without the experience and maturity they have had in the past.

The year before they let us apply for it but they didn’t let us apply for our home seed. So teams with some higher RPIs than us actually got in because they agreed to host. So that’s frustrating and disappointing. BETH DUNKENBERGER HEAD COACH

However, the underclassmen have had success, specifically sophomore guard Alyssa Fenyn and freshman guard Monet Tellier. Fenyn averages 9.6 points per game, while Tellier averages 8.1 points per game and 4.2 rebounds per game. Additionally, Tellier was named ACC Rookie of the Week in December. According to both Davis and Gordon, the underclassmen have a bright future ahead. “It’s just a matter of time before they all mesh together,” Davis said. Despite difficulties, the seniors have continued to demonstrate perseverance throughout this season. “It’s been a tough year, we’ve lost a lost of games and sometimes when

you lose a lot of games teams will get discouraged,” Dunkenberger said. “There was not one hint of give-up in this team.” Even with Tech’s dismal ACC record (1-13), the Hokies have battled tremendously this season. Tech held No. 3 Duke to just 57 points at home, and last week gave No. 15 Maryland a scare at College Park. Tech’s overtime loss to Virginia on Sunday showed just how far the Hokies have come. Earlier this year in Charlottesville, Tech was pounded by its archrival, losing 72-37. “We’ve gotten better after each game that we’ve played,” Gordon said. Thursday the Hokies travel to Greensboro, N.C. for the ACC Tournament to take on Georgia Tech. The Yellow Jackets ranked fifth in the ACC, while the Hokies came in dead last. The winner of the ACC Tournament will receive an automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. Although unlikely, the Hokies have nothing to lose and have a chance at pulling off some upsets this weekend. Tech remains confident heading into Thursday’s game. For the seniors, it’s their last opportunity to make a name for themselves and establish credibility for Tech basketball. “I’m anxious to go to the ACC Tournament. I’m anxious to get some wins there,” Gordon said. “This could be my last game and my last tournament,” Davis said. “It’s just a matter of playing together, bringing intensity, playing with your heart and passion. “ The Hokies take on the Yellow Jackets this Thursday at the Greensboro Coliseum in the first round of the ACC Tournament. Tipoff is scheduled for 11 a.m., and the game will be broadcasted on Raycom Sports Network.

...... radio for everyone

Things got ugly when a technical foul was called on Greenberg for arguing a non-call on a play in which he thought Terrell Bell was fouled. Seven minutes later, forward Jeff Allen also got nailed with a technical for arguing. “I have no idea what he (Allen) got T’d for,” Greenberg said. “I didn’t use foul language. I had no conversation with the officials at

all.” The Hokies’ 15 second half fouls really hurt them as they attempted to full court press near the end of the game. Tech players got called for several non-shooting fouls that sent the Eagles to the line for oneand-ones and eventually two shots. Green led all scorers with 21 points, while Allen added 14. Center Victor Davila struggled on the night, playing just 23 minutes

and failing to convert numerous opportunities under the basket. An embarrassing home loss to the Eagles was about the worst thing that could happen for the Hokies after their Saturday triumph over Duke. Tech closes out the regular season on the road Saturday against fellow bubble team Clemson. The Hokies will then compete in the ACC Tournament.


6 food & drink march 2, 2011

editors: lindsey brookbank, kim walter featureseditor@collegiatetimes.com/ 540.231.9865 COLLEGIATETIMES

D.P. Dough offers tasty cuisine, modern atmosphere Waltzing through D.P. Dough’s large double doors, I was struck by the restaurant’s contemporary style, which was complemented by calming alternative music, a flat-screen TV broadcasting ESPN and its simple, yet exhaustive, menu that made my mouth water. As I approached the counter, I was at a loss for what to order — there were so many interesting combinations of ingredients that appealed to different aspects of my appetite. Maybe I should have thought a little more before I boldly approached the server. The clever item names prolonged my survey of the menu, with calzones like the Work Zone and the Drop Zone offering a creative flair to the restaurant’s image. Finally giving into the endless options, I asked the server what he recommended and proceeded to order the BBQ Chicken calzone. I prepared my taste buds for the tender chicken, complemented by crunchy bacon and melty cheddar cheese, all with the added sweet kick of barbecue sauce. Waiting anxiously for my food, I was comfortably at ease listening to the soothing music and watching SportsCenter. Soon enough, my server approached my table with the enormous calzone that put my stomach’s growling to rest. Dunking the warm calzone into marinara sauce, I took my first bite and crunched through the hard shell, allowing my taste buds to encounter the savory chicken. It was a very enjoyable meal because of the atmosphere and the great tasting food, and I was even able to bring home leftovers. While D.P. Dough’s atmosphere is not like that of a classy sit-down restaurant, the layout is simple, and the ambiance is comforting and inviting. D.P. Dough also offers free WiFi, which adds to its dining appeal for students who are always on their laptops, either finishing up last minute school work or surfing the Web. The restaurant is conveniently located downtown on Main Street, just off campus, nestled between stores and competing restaurants.

LUKE MASON / SPPS

The Spinner calzone, stuffed with spinach, mozzarella, ricotta and garlic, is just one of many offered at D.P. Dough. The joint has an extensive menu selection, with each calzone made with various ingredients.

Banana Peanut Butter Muffins LUKE MASON / SPPS D.P. Dough on North Main Street cooks up calzones with unique names. A typical, large-portioned meal at D.P. Dough costs about seven dollars — a price that competes with those of neighboring restaurants, such as Moe’s and Chipotle. D.P. Dough also has late-night hours and offers delivery to cater to the busy and warped schedules many students run on. Whether it is sitting down for a meal with friends, grabbing a bite to eat while studying or satisfying a late night craving, D.P. Dough offers an affordable, satisfying food option for students, while providing a nice alternative to ordering pizza.

extra info on D.P. Dough Location: 215 North Main St. Contact: (540) 951-9663 Website: www.dpdough.com Hours: Mon-Wed: 11 a.m. to 2 a.m. Thurs-Fri: 11 a.m. to 3 a.m. Sat: 9 a.m. to 3 a.m. Sun: 9 a.m. to 2 a.m.

NICK SMIRNIOTOPOULOS -features staff writer -freshman -university studies major

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Whip up these moist muffins for a quick grab-and-go breakfast — or save them for a late-night snack. Ingredients: -3 small to medium bananas, mashed (bananas with a lot of brown spotting on the peel are easiest to mash) -1 box yellow cake mix-3 eggs-1/4 cup vegetable oil-1/3 cup smooth peanut butter -1 cup water-chocolate chips (optional) Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. Spray two muffin tins with a nonstick cooking spray, such as Pam. 3. Mix all ingredients together (works best if you mix each time you add an ingredient). Make sure to thoroughly mix each ingredient, while scraping the bottom and sides of the bowl and eliminating chunks. 4. If you’d like, add a small handful of chocolate chips to the batter, and mix again. 5. Bake for 20 to 22 minutes. 6. Enjoy!

MIA PERRY / COLLEGIATE TIMES Banana peanut butter muffins are sweet and savory.

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Wednesday, March 2, 2011 Print Edition