Page 73

Houdini and the magic of the movies  The origins of cinema, a prize‐winning book reveals, are closely linked to the conjurors and  spiritualists of the early 20th century 

Magic touch ... escapologist Harry Houdini, Matthew Solomon's book argues, was central to   the development of early cinema. Photograph: Hulton Getty  

Over the past few months, I have been on a judging panel with Sir Christopher Frayling and  Hugh Hudson for a prize which is not as well known as it deserves to be. This is the Kraszna  Krausz best moving image book award, given to the year's most outstanding book on cinema,  video art and the moving image. The award was created in 1985 by the Hungarian publisher  Andor Kraszna‐Krausz, and the foundation also sponsors prizes for best photography book and  outstanding contribution to publishing. Our jury settled on what I think is a truly fascinating  book: Disappearing Tricks: Silent Film, Houdini and the New Magic of the Twentieth Century, by  Matthew Solomon, published by the University of Illinois Press.  In it, film historian Solomon re‐examines the cinema's occult roots in the early 20th century as  part of the magic theatre of conjurors and illusionists, and also the charlatan spiritualists who  would get people to gather in blacked‐out rooms to gasp at weird spectral images floating in  the darkness. It was a time when magicians were driving cinema innovation with their cheerful  little "trick films" screened as part of a live act: films with novel editing innovations such as  multiple exposures, cuts and dissolves, which made people appear to vanish, or suddenly  transform into something or someone else. 

Page 73 of 201

May 2011  
May 2011  

may_11_csi_in_the_news