Page 1

C SINCE 1967 VOL. 48, NO. 15

ourier

UPDATE!

JANUARY 25, 2013 • WWW.CODCOURIER.ORG

WANT NEWS COVERAGE EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK? FOLLOW US ON TWITTER AND FACEBOOK! @CODCOURIER

COLLEGE OF DUPAGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER

New statue pictures up! • CODCOURIER.ORG

Do you feel safe around campus? “i’d feel a lot safer if there was better lighting outside in the parking lots,” CONCETTA VITALE

Second year student

“Yeah, but i don’t agree with all of the weapon bans because they’re trying to take weapons away from citizens who need them for protection,” CORY CACIOPPO

Former student

“i feel pretty safe because nothing has happened to me but i study here late and i don’t usually see cops,” DAVID ABEGAZ

Second year student

“Here’s what i think... People’s safety is a matter of taking the responsibility to be safe,” TREVER HILL

Second year student

Photo by Nathan Camp

TIPS, TRICKS TO STAY WARM THIS WINTER

The Courier asks students what to do when the snow starts to fall Page 9 POLICE REPORT:

SLC searches for new student leaders for fallen positions JORDIN GIGNAC NEWS EDITOR

Student Leadership Council will hold elections for two positions for the spring semester due to fallen positions on January 29. Former Vice President of SLC Tim Ziman and former Outreach coordinator of SLC Jenna Holakovsky will not hold their positions this spring semester due to clear and unclear reasons. Holakovsky was said to have had a lot of schoolwork that got in the way of her position responsibilities and Ziman was very unclear as to why he left. “She needed to focus

1032 E Ogden Ave. Naperville, IL. 60653 (630) 470 6602 metrofamilyclinic.com

back on school but we really relied on her for advertising,” SLC member and student trustee Olivia Martin said. According Martin, no one in SLC knows the reason why Ziman left and all they do know is that their advisor Chuck Steele received an email from him saying that he was no longer enrolled as a student at the college and will be resigning from his Vice president position. Martin said she is excited to see how the elections go next Tuesday and expects at least four to positions. “As long as they can

Walk Ins Welcome! Yearly Physical Exams for Men & Women Sports Physical

Thief steals “The Mind Sculptor” worth $600 JORDIN GIGNAC NEWS EDITOR

Photo by Jordin Gignac

SLC member and student trustee Olivia Martin sits continue wanting to get involved then it will be good,” Martin said. Martin will spend her last semester at the col-

lege as a student trustee and will be attending a four year college next See SLC, Page 2

We Help Manage Acute Asthma, Hypertension, Diabetes, etc.

A student became a victim of theft in the SSC lounge on January 15. The victim was said to be in the lounge playing a card game with a few other students at 11 a.m. The victim said he was playing cards with people he didn’t know and could only recognize them by their face. The victim said he left the SSC around 2:30 p.m. to go to his friend’s house. See POLICE, Page 3


2

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Islamic Faith: EATING ON CAMPUS The Courier goes in-depth with the Islamic culture and how the college effects what food they can and can not eat JORDIN GIGNAC NEWS EDITOR

For many students on campus, eating is not a problem but for Muslims or other students with dietary restrictions, the food choices are often limited. Last November, SLC provided an open meeting between the students and Sodexo¹s managerial staff. Most of the students who attended had issues with Sodexo not providing enough meal options for students who wanted to eat healthy or in this case according to their religion. Sodexo listened to what the students had to say and provided more vegetarian choices like veggie burgers on the grill and pre packaged vegetarian sandwiches in the fridges. Although, the vegetarians are happy with their change, Muslims still have very limited options due to not enough food being bought. Sodexo added Halal burgers and prepackaged Halal turkey sandwiches, but they soon discontinued the sandwiches since they weren¹t as popular. Now, Muslims have to either bring their lunches from home or buy the same burger everyday for

Photo by Jordin Gignac

Two MSA members listening to the co advisor about their faith and taking notes on their phones. the rest of the semester. According to Muslim Student Association (MSA) Brother Representative Ali Mohsin, he liked both of the food that was provided but he would rather bring his own food. “It is harder for me to get home and have home cooked food,” Mohsin said. Mohsin lives half an hour away from the campus and that is his main reason for trying to eat on campus. According to MSA Co Advisor Abdulaziz Syed, he was uncertain when or what Halal food is being served in the cafeteria and said that it seems to be dying down. Since November, the only Halal food choice has been the burgers and a Sodexo manager said that they should have them available everyday. Syed said that although there is nothing of his religion to eat on campus,

Photo by Jordin Gignac

Co advisor Abdulaziz Syed discussing the Islamic Faith with the Muslim Student Association.

Photo by Jordin Gignac

Co advisor Abdulaziz Syed demonstrating what it is like when you are struggling with obstacles and trying to overcome them. the food is not a big problem for him. “It depends because I eat to live, not live to eat,” Syed said. “I am trying to cut down on eating out-

side anyway.” In the Islamic culture, eating is a big part of the religion and that is why having the proper food choices on campus is

SERVICE LEARNING AND VOLUNTEER FAIR

important. According to Syed, he does not know how strict some Muslims are with their eating habits on campus, but he does know that it would be nice to let them keep more choices in the cafeteria for their beliefs. The Muslim Student Association meets weekly on Tuesdays for lessons on their religion from 12 to 1 p.m. in the SRC room 3245. SLC, from Page 1

Wednesday, Jan. 30, 2013 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Student Services Center (SSC) Atrium next to Campus Central and Starbucks

All students are invited to attend! Local community partners will be available to talk to College of DuPage students about Service Learning and volunteer opportunities. Questions? Contact the Career Services Center, (630) 942-2230, servicelearning@cod.edu. For Americans with Disabilities Act accommodations, call (630) 942-2141 (voice) or (630) 858-9692 (TDD).

year which she said she wanted to try to get involved there as well. “You just have to stay involved and you can make a difference,” Martin said. According to Martin, she said she wanted the next student trustee to know that she will answer any questions and help out they need it next year. As for the spring semester, the elections will be held at the general meeting next Tuesday in SRC room 3245. According to Martin, anyone is welcome to get involved and make a difference and SLC could be the right place for a student.


COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Police

RepoRts POLICE, from Page 1

Around 5 p.m. the victim noticed his playing card box set was missing from his backpack. The victim left his friend’s house and arrived on campus around 5:45 p.m. to look for the card set. A student walked up to

the victim and said that a student gave him the box card set to give back to him. The victim said he did not know either of the students that returned his card set. When the victim looked inside the deck of cards, his $600 playing card called “The Mind Sculptor” was missing. “If you don’t play this game, you wouldn’t know that this card is worth $600,” The victim said.

The victim reported to police that he wanted to sign a complaint if the thief was caught. There have been no further suspects in the report.

MONDAY, JAN. 14

ACCIDENT A student was driving down College lot 2 when another student drove into her while turning left.

The two students both had damage on their vehicles. damage on their left fender and the second student had damage on their right corner fender. There were no injuries and no citations.

COMPLAINT A student was driving east down college lot 1A when another student drove into them.

3

The student was backing up into the aisle that the other student was driving in from. The student hit the students car in the rear left corner and both cars had damage. The student who hit the other student said they were distracted by a pedestrian and did not see the student’s car until they crashed. There were no injuries and no further information.

NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE NAPERVILLE, IL

JOIN US FOR OUR

Transfer Visit Day

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 9, 2013, 9 A.M. - 1 P.M.

HERE’S WHAT WE HAVE PLANNED FOR YOU Presentation topics include » Academic Highlights » Introduction to Student Services » Transfer Admission & Financial Aid Overview » Student Panel You will also have the opportunity to meet our faculty and take a walking tour of our beautiful 63.5-acre campus in Naperville’s Historic District. NORTH CENTRAL COLLEGE WILL ALSO BE AT COLLEGE OF DUPAGE ON: January 31, 9:30-12:30 February 6, 9:30-12:30 February 13, 9:30-12:30 February 21, 9:30-12:30 These visits are located on the second floor of the SRC near Campus Central.

To learn more about North Central College’s visit day program and to register visit northcentralcollege.edu/transfer or call 630-637-5800.


4

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

EDITORIAL COURIER POLICY The Courier is published every Friday when classes are in session during the Fall and Spring Semesand last Friday of each Semester and the week of and the week after Spring Break as a public forum with content chosen by student editors. One copy free, additional copies available on request. Views expressed in editorials represent opinions of the majority of the Editorial Board, made up of all the Courier editors. The Courier does not knowingly accept advertisement that discriminate on the basis of sex, creed, religion, color, handicapped status, veteran or sexual orientation, nor does it knowingly print ads that violate any local, state or federal laws. The Courier encourages all students, faculty, staff, administrators and community members to voice their opinions on all the topics concerning them both in and out of school. Writers can express their views in a letter to Letters to the Editor. All correspondence and letters for publication must be typed and signed with the author’s daytime phone number. The editor-in-chief may withhold the author’s name on request. Deliver all correspondence to BIC 3401 between regular

CODTIP text message feature to launch Furthering their embrace of current technologies and trends, the college police department has released the Rave Eyewitness CODTIP text message program. The new program will allow students to anonymously alert the police of potential threats or if something seems out of place. The service can be utilized by sending a text message to 67283 with the message ‘CODTIP’ followed by whatever information is possible. According to an article on the college’s website, the sender will receive a message stating that

Courier, College of DuPage, 425 Fawell Blvd., Glen Ellyn, IL. 60137. Letters also may be sent by e-mail. The subject heading to the message must read “Letter to the and last names, street address, city, state and complete phone number with area code must be included for identity verDeadline for letters meant for publication is noon Tuesday. E-mails can be sent to editor@cod.edu Letters are subject to editing for grammar, style, language, length and libel. All letters represent the views of their author.

the department received the information. Police Chief Joe Mullin said that the sender might be contacted for further information regarding the incident if they feel it might help

weekly police report feature in this newspaper. Whether it’s the theft of a book or an attempted break-in to a vehicle, the students and patrons of

“We believe that as a community, we all play a role in creating the environment we want to live and participate in,” said Mullin. “This system allows everyone access to report suspicious activity, increasing the safety of us all.” While the campus boasts high safety ratings, there are still issues as evident through the

line of defense against crime as eyewitnesses. In many cases, it wouldn’t be in the best interest of the eyewitness to confront a criminal, but if you see something, say something. With the large, spanning campus and thousands of students, the police department can’t cover everything all the time. Opening up to the student body shows trust and willingness to work

between the two parties. While the anonymity of the program might entice some to abuse the system, we at the Courier hope that doesn’t occur. The program should be used for its intended purpose, to prevent crimes and make the campus a safer place for everyone. Who doesn’t want that? As the semester continues, keep an eye open for anything that could be out of place and inform the department. If used properly, this could prove to be a great boon to the college. In such an uncertain world that we live in, the more information available, the better.

CourierStaff 942-2660 arts@cod.edu

Graphics Courtney Clark 942-3113 graphics@cod.edu

News

Jordin Gignac 942-2153 news@cod.edu

Sports Austin Slott 942-3066 sports@cod.edu

Advertising Christina Payton 942-3379 paytonc359@cod.edu

Features Rosalie DeAstis 942-2713 features@cod.edu

Photography London Summers 942-2531 photo@cod.edu

Adviser Eric Hahn 942-4269 hahne148@cod.edu

Editor in Chief Nathan Camp 942-2683 editor@cod.edu

A&E


OPINION

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

How to get involved in aiding campus safety and preparedness The College of DuPage stands ready to protect you. Our professionals include faculty, staff and students that have been trained to respond in emergencies. Do you know what to do in an emergency whether The college ties together public safety both on and off campus in three ways: 1- Campus Police stands ready for Emergency Response 24/7 to protect the College of DuPage by handling daily emergencies: car accidents, CPR assistance, ambulance calls, lock outs, noise control, lock and security issues at (630) 942-2000. Did you know they also provide emergency information in all campus rooms for out shelter facilities for surrounding communities coordinated by Campus Police. Their website provides Safety Tips and Emergency Response information at http:// 2- Did you know the College of DuPage has an faculty and staff throughout the college. In the event of a real emergency they stand ready to assist Campus Police in their efforts and provide information such as by their Orange Vests. You can become a member of this group by contacting Rick Spiers, COD Patrolman. 3- COD is located in Milton Township. Milton Township has formed a Citizens Corps Council under the guidance of FEMA and the Department of groups and individuals that could assist not only themselves, but others in the township during ma-

jor disasters. These groups after 21 hours of training become CERT Teams in Milton Township. There are already 704 volunteers trained since inception. There is no cost to individuals (must be at least 18 years old) residing or working in the Township for this training or for the purchase of supplies to equip members or teams. That cost is borne by donations, the federal, and local government programs. We are reaching out to you, the Milton Township nights 2/7/13 to 3/21/2013 (7 nights 6:30pm to 9:30pm). There are on-going volunteer training events after initial training fort CERT members to enhance their trainees stand ready to insure that our community is capable of helping themselves in almost any situation for a period of time until professional help can arrive. Find out more information at: http://www.twp.milton.il.us/citizencorp.html Homeland Security is front and center in our minds after various catastrophic events over the years and the college is at the forefront of this important initiative with construction of the NEW Homeland Security Building. You can become a part of this movement toward a safer community by helping others through College of DuPage or through Milton Township, Citizens Corps Council training or by checking out the “Are you Ready” guide located on the FEMA website: http://www.ready.gov/are-you-ready-guide Bonny Belfanz

5

Important Emails Board of Trustees

Chairman: David Carlin carlind@cod.edu Vice Chairman: Erin Birt birte@cod.edu Secretary: Allison O’Donnell bot-odonnella@cod.edu Dianne McGuire bot-mcguire@cod.edu Nancy Svoboda bot-svobodan@cod.edu Joseph Wozniak wozniakj@cod.edu Student Trustee: Olivia Martin bot-martino@cod.edu

Student Leadership Council President: Hank Gordon SLC.Hank@cod.edu Vice-President:

Coordinator of Outreach: Adviser: Chuck Steele steelec@cod.edu

Public Safety

Chief of Police: Joe Mullin mullin@cod.edu Deputy Chief: Ray Snisko snisko@cod.edu

Admissions Coordinator

Julie Marlatt marlattj@cod.edu

Counseling and Advising

counseling@cod.edu

McAninch Arts Center

Director: Stephen Cummins cummins@cod.edu

Athletics

Director: Paul Zakowski zakows@cod.edu

Facilities Master Plan Director: John Wandolowski wandol@cod.edu

Alter Ego Productions

Adviser: Steph Quirk quirks@cod.edu

Prairie Light Review

Adviser: Linda Elaine elaine@cod.edu


6

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

FEATURES

Balancing it all out

A look at the different work loads and priorities of community college students ROSALIE DEASTIS FEATURES EDITOR

21-year-old Elissa Jezl, second year student at the college, works 30-40 hours a week at Meijer Superstore and is a part time student. She pays tuition completely on her own. PHOTOS BY LONDON SUMMERS

Kevin Maher, 18, is

a full time student and maintains a full time job in Naperville. “Coffee is how I survive,” he commented.

As community college students, many students are juggling classes, jobs, and families. Many are trying to make ends meet while working to support to their education and maintain good grades at the same time. Some are working two part time jobs while attending the college. Many might have children or live alone. Whatever the scenario, all of these priorities can become very stressful and overwhelming. Is it right that community college students may have to deal with a heavier load than those who are away at universities without jobs? “It is certainly possible to manage good grades and a job, but someTelevision shows, blogs, social media, and texts are temporary; our fu-

ture through education is permanent,” commented English professor Trina Sotirakopulos, who has seen how extreme stress levels have affected some students she has taught. “I’ve seen sleep-deprived students nearly fail because they are trying to work two or three jobs while taking college courses. Financially, they may not have a choice, but I wish they had more options,” she added. Second year student, 19 year old Jordan Adler works full time at a car dealership and is a part time student at the college. “My job is really important to me, so I just had to learn how to make time for homework when I’m not working or on my breaks,” he commented. It’s unfortunate that students may have to choose between their college degree and their jobs at some point.

Many students may have to deal with employers who do not understand the demands of college courses. “I wish employers would honor the commitment of students by respecting their needs as modern learners and rewarding their successes; this requires open communication between the employee and the employer,” explained Sotirakopulos. When it comes down to it, balancing a handful of tasks and priorities is a matter of the own ways to successfully manage their time. “You are in college to improve your life, which is extremely admirable. In order to receive the best return on your academic investment you need to invest your time, money, heart, and soul. Jobs may come and go, but knowledge will stay with you forever.”

Are you a student who has found a balance between work, class and your social life? Let us know what works for you!

Club Spotlight: Environmental Club

ROSALIE DEASTIS FEATURES EDITOR

This spring semester, students David Wilcox and Steph Steinhaus kicked off their new Environmental Club. They

The massage therapy program has opened up a massage clinic in SRC 1110. The clinic offers a variety of massages such as Swedish Wellness, Deep Tissue, and many others. It is $54.00 for a full hour and everyone gets $10.00 off

FEATURES EDITOR

The club’s main focus is to build awareness of a sustainable lifestyle and by providing opportunities to preserve the Earth. For more information contact the club sponsor, Diana Strode.

PHOTO BY LONDON SUMMERS

Abraham Mellish is studying early childhood development at the college and is looking forward to being a part of Environmental Club. He was president of Eco Club in high school and is a self-taught guitarist.

Starbucks. “Working better and saves a ton of gas money.”

Fernanda Rodriguez

is currently unemployed, but is looking for a job. The 22 year-old medical student is focusing on her studies and agrees it is easier to maintain good grades without a job to worry about.

GET A MASSAGE, BETWEEN CLASSES

ROSALIE DEASTIS

where Wilcox was named president and Steinhaus was named vice president. Their next meeting will be this Wednesday where they will brainstorm events for the semester and meet with new members. “We are open to new ideas,” commented Steinhaus, who is a vegetarian for environmental reasons and health purposes. Wilcox and Steinhaus have always been involved with making the Earth more “green” with volunteer work and by making adjustments to their

Full time student Matt Dunn, 20, works 20-30

“The massage therapy program hopes to raise awareness about health and wellness with this new addition to the college,” commented Patricia O’Shaughnessy, program coordinator and licensed massage therapist. It is open to the general public and there are six

therapists on staff. Each specializes in a certain kind of massage. The clinic is open Mondays through Thursdays 9 a.m. to 8 p.m.; Fridays from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m; and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon. Appointments are required 12 hours in advance. “Sessions are scheduled an hour and everyone is guaranteed a full hour of a massage,” added O’Shaugnessy.

PHOTO COURTESY OF FLICKR.COM


COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Food Around the World: Sushi Monday, January 28, 2013 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM COD Cafeteria North SRC – lower level. Stop by the Cyclone Salad station for made-to-order sushi in the COD cafeteria. Brown Bag Lecture: Burkina Faso Monday, January 28, 2013 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM Free lecture about West Africa’s Burkino Faso. LifeSource Blood Drive Tuesday, January 29, 2013 9:00 AM - 3:00 PM SRC Room 2000. See URL below and enter code G504 to register. lifesource.org

Food Around the World: Pasta Tuesday, January 29, 2013 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM COD Cafeteria North SRC lower level. Stop by the Cyclone Salad station for made-to-order pasta in the COD cafeteria. Free Workshop: Interviewing Tuesday, January 29, 2013 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM SSC 2200. Register: www.cod.edu/careerfair. Food Around the World: Buenos Nachos Wednesday, January 30, 2013 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM COD Cafeteria North SRC - lower level

Spring 2013 Session Start Date (12-week classes). Thursday, January 31, 2013 (all day)

Food Around the World: Chicken Satay with Peanut Sauce Thursday, January 31, 2013 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM COD Cafeteria North SRC lower level. Alpha Beta Gamma Open House. Thursday, January 31, 2013 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM. BIC 1407

Food Around the World Friday, February 1, 2013 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM COD Cafeteria North SRC lower level. Stop by the Cyclone Salad station for a “We are the World” combo special in the COD cafeteria.

A partnership between College of DuPage and GSU

Earn Your Bachelor’s Degree

FYI

Paying for College Presentation in Spanish. Wednesday, January 30, 2013 6:30 PM - 8:00 PM SSC 2201

7

DDP provides on campus specialists at COD to help you: Earn your associate and bachelor’s degrees in four years, at a fraction of the cost of many universities Guarantee your acceptance to GSU Lock in your GSU tuition rate for four years in your second semester at COD Compete for one of 50 GSU Promise and 13 DDP Honors Scholarships Compete your bachelor’s degree in nursing through the 3+1 BSN program for COD nursing students Complete your bachelor’s degree at GSU in University Park or the Naperville Education Center Contact Jan Ulner, your Transfer Specialist at COD, at 630.428.3375 or julner@govst.edu.


8

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

TAKE YOUR HIGHER EDUCATION

even higher

Articulation Agreement Did you know that College of DuPage and DeVry University have an articulation agreement? If you’ve earned your associate degree, this agreement offers you an ideal opportunity to transfer qualifying credits and earn your bachelor’s degree in as few as 1 1/2 years.

The DeVry University Advantage: t'MFYJCMFMFBSOJOHPQUJPOT On campus & online t"DDFMFSBUFEDPVSTFTDIFEVMF Classes start every 8 weeks

t'JOBODJBMBJEBOETDIPMBSTIJQT available for those who qualify t1SPGFTTPSTXJUISFBMXPSME experience

Addison Campus 1221 N. Swift Road | Addison

DeVry.edu/Chicagoland | 630-952-2000 AC0050 Program availability varies by location. Š2012 DeVry Educational Development Corp. All rights reserved.


PHOTO

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Tips for surviving Winter on campus Alexia Vergara the weather.

“You have to put on three pairs of everything”-Alexia Vergara,19

“I Don’t like the cold as is, carrying around a heavy coat through COD just adds to it”- Emma Wielert, 19

“As long as you’re dressed warmly the weather isn’t that bad” Paola Speziale, 18

ALL PHOTOS BY LONDON SUMMERS

Lyssete Zepeda sports 0 before snow fall.

“Everything just takes longer in the cold” - Lyssete Zepeda, 18

9


10

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Arts&EntErtainmEnt

Music recording program Students receive hands-on experience applicable to real studio production CAROLINE KOCH

STAFF CORRESPONDENT

This semester, over 70 students make up the music program’s recording technique classes. This lucky bunch is allowed access to both the computer lab and the recording studio, plus all the hands-on recording equipment experience you can soak up in one semester. Though you must be registered for the class to take advantage of the opportunity, students can bring friends, colleagues and fellow artists into the studio with them during their slated time. You could be laying down some sweet beats or recording a soulful vocal free of charge because you’re a student. Students in both recording technique classes (2211 & 2212) are welcome to sign up weekly for free studio time during the duration of either 16 week course. That’s a music-lover’s perk you just can’t pass up.

The facility is open from 9 a.m. until 9 p.m. Monday through Friday, with available help from student aids to adjust microphones, troubleshoot issues and answer any questions that might arise during a session. Not only do students get hands on with physical equipment in the studio, but recording software as well. Familiarity with programs like Pro Tools, Adobe Audition, Ableton Live and Finale are not just course curriculum, but necessary for industry success. Work with these programs can be done in the computer lab, making more time available for students that are ready for a go in the studio. For example, someone might be downloading samples in the lab while another is overdubbing individual tracks in a recording session. But don’t worry too much about the time; students have the potential to utilize the space for up to 48 hours during the course of the semester.

In even more exciting news, music professor Ken Paoli tells us the college has been putting together plans for 2 new programs: an Audio an AS for Music Business. “We recognize that there’s a lot of the music business that’s not research or performance or teaching,” said Paoli. The degree in music business will be perfect for students looking to enter the music industry on a corporate level or The two-year program, when in place, will include and marketing classes. All of which will be transferable to schools with bachelor programs for music business such as Western Illinois University and Elmhurst College. For more information on taking recording techniques classes for the fall semester, consult the 2013 course catalog for MUSIC 2211 or 2212.

PHOTO COURTESY OF TRI-L-COMUSIC.COM

Music professor Ken Paoli splits time between the classroom entertaining and engaging students and the stage, where he still regularly performs for a crowd.

McAninch Arts Center Construction

PHOTO BY NATHAN CAMP

The amphitheatre outside the Arts Center receives a covering to provide protection for the outdoor performance area. Construction for the Arts


COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

11


12

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

COMICS


SPORTS

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

13

Who ya got? with Slott Sports editor reveals his Super Bowl prediction, keys to victory

AUSTIN SLOTT

SPORTS EDITOR

Sibling rivalry provides for some of the most intense competition humankind has witnessed. On Feb. 3 it will take place where it never has before: the Super Bowl.

The Baltimore Ravens vs. the San Francisco 49ers will pit John Harbaugh against Jim Harbaugh in a must-see matchup. This is the game that people were hoping for last year until the Patriots and Giants came and crushed those dreams. By the time the brother vs. brother bowl idea came back again this year, it seemed a little played out thanks to ESPN’s 24/7 overuse of the term “HarBowl.” But it is sure better than having another Patriots Super Bowl. Since John Harbaugh took over the reigns as head coach from longtime coach Brian Billick, he has never once missed the

playoffs. Super Bowl a Harbaugh-coached Ravens team has gone to but they have proven they have postseason experience. seasons the Ravens have reached either the divisional round or the conference championship of the playoffs and you can bet they will be determined to win one more for linebacker Ray Lewis. The team has been inspired this playoff season by Lewis’ announcement that he will be retiring at the end of the season. Naturally, they will be looking to send him out with another championship ring. If they are to do so, it

ROAD BLOCK Chaps fall to Triton Trojans in a tough away game

will be essential for the Ravens’ offense to get their running game going. They will be facing a tough defense in the 49ers and will be receiving nonstop pressure from vicious pass rushers like Aldon Smith. Getting the running attack going will take some pressure off of quarterback Joe Flacco, not to mention they have a superstar in halfback Ray Rice. If they keep feeding him the ball he will make plays. Additionally, Flacco may not be best quarterback in the NFL, even if he claims to be so, but is a proven winner. A game of solid, turnover-less play by Flacco will be enough to pull out a win for Bal-

What can the college do to make you go to more sports games? “If the school had more pep rallies that would make me want to attend.”

AUSTIN SLOTT

SPORTS EDITOR

The road woes continued for the Chaparral men’s basketball team Wednesday night as they were defeated by the Triton Trojans. The game, which was originally supposed to be held at the Chaps’ new home court the Walker Sports Complex, was already out of hand by the

Photos by Nathan Camp

The Chaps drive the lane at a recent game.

with Triton leading 48-29. Power forward Denzel Washington once again led the way for the Chaps in scoring with 15 points coming off the bench. Forward Jake Martin also had a solid game with 14 points on six of eight shooting, as well as grabbing eight rebounds. With this loss, the Chaps are now 9-12 on the season and just 2-8 on the road. They will next travel to Madison College to face the WolfPack Saturday Jan. 26.

timore. On the other side of the ball, 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick is an explosive player and has played well in big games this year. But he is still young and is essentially a rookie quarterback playing one of the most daunting defenses in the league. Jim Harbaugh has found early success in his career with the niners, just like older brother John had. But, in the battle of the brothers, look for the older Harbaugh to come out on top. Final Prediction: Ravens beat the 49ers 24-13.

TAHA ABUMAYE

Second year student

“Maybe they could put up more flyers about the games.” KATIE GIUSTI

Second year student

“They just need to have more announcements about the games.” JUSTIN HARRINGTON First year student

“The college should post signs or posters around to promote the events.” SYMPHONY SIPRIAN First year student


14

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Upcoming Sports Schedule NOVEMBER Tue., 6 at McHenry L 62-66 Thu., 8 ELGIN W 65-50 Sat., 10 OAKTON W 65-51 Thu., 15 at Kishwaukee L 52-75 Sat., 17 OLIVE HARVEY W 78-73 Tue., 20 WAUBONSEE L 52-54 Wed., 28 at Benedictine JV W 58-48 Fri., 30 DUPAGE TOURNEY (Sauk Valley, Daley, St. Francis JV) L 66-80 DECEMBER Sat., 1 DuPAGE TOURNEY Consolation W 74-53 Championship Tue., 4 at Morton L 61-71 Sat., 8 at Prairie State L 51-69 Tue., 11 ROBERT MORRIS JV W 82-56 Fri., 14 William R Bear Classic at Highland Community College vs. Ellsworth L 60-64 Sat., 15 William R Bear Classic at Highland Community College vs. Harper L 62-70 vs. Sauk Valley L 53-70 JANUARY Sat., 5 at Lake County W 56-44 Sat., 9 at Milwaukee Tech L 60-68 Sat., 12 WRIGHT W 64-51

Wed., 16 ROCK VALLEY L 52-69 Sat., 19 HARPER W 75-66 Wed., 23 at Triton L 60-75 Sat., 26 at Madison 7:00pm Wed., 30 at Joliet 7:00pm FEBRUARY Sat., 2 MILWAUKEE TECH 7:00pm Wed., 6 at Wright 7:00pm Sat., 9 at Rock Valley 7:00pm Wed., 13 at Harper 7:00pm Sat., 16 at Triton 7:00pm Wed., 20 MADISON 7:00pm Sat., 23 JOLIET 7:00pm Wed., 27 Region IV Tournament at Harper tba MARCH Sat., 2 Region IV Tournament Semi-final at Harper tba Sun., 3 Region IV Tournament Championship at Harper tba Thu., 14- NJCAA Division III Sat., 16 National Tournament at Sullivan Community College Loch Sheldrake, NY tba

NOVEMBER Tue., 6 at McHenry W 66-47 Thu., 8 ELGIN L 55-49 Sat., 10 OAKTON W 72-35 Tue., 13 at Malcolm X W 58-54 Thu., 15 at Kishwaukee L 57-66 Sat., 17 OLIVE HARVEY W 96- 45 Tue., 20 WAUBONSEE W 61-52 Tue., 27 MORAINE VALLEY L 55-57 Fri., 30 at Kennedy-King W 80-46 DECEMBER Tue., 4 at Morton W 54-48 Sat., 8 at Prairie State L 63-66 Fri., 14 DuPAGE HOLIDAY TOURNAMENT DuPage Elmhurst JV 3:00pm Malcolm X Robert Morris JV Sat., 15 HOLIDAY TOURNAMENT Consolation Championship vs. Malcolm X L 56-67 JANUARY Sat., 5 at Lake County W 49-47 Wed., 9 at Milwaukee Tech W 51-35 Sat., 12 WRIGHT W 84-43 Wed., 16 ROCK VALLEY L 46-78 Sat., 19 HARPER 5:00pm Wed., 23 TRITON 5:00pm Sat., 26 at Madison 5:00pm Wed., 30 at Joliet 5:00pm

FEBRUARY Sat., 2 MILWAUKEE TECH 5:00pm Wed., 6 at Wright 5:00pm Sat., 9 at Rock Valley 5:00pm Wed., 13 at Harper 5:00pm Sat., 16 at Triton 5:00pm Wed., 20 MADISON 5:00pm Sat., 23 JOLIET 5:00pm Tue., 28 Region IV Tournament at Harper tba MARCH Sat., 2 Region IV Tournament Semi-final at Harper tba Sun., 3 Region IV Tournament Championship at Harper 12:00pm Thu., 14- NJCAA Division III Sat., 16 National Tournament at Rochester Community College Rochester, MN tba

LEARNING COMMONS ONE-STOP ACADEMIC SUPPORT CENTER TUTORING SERVICES tutoring@cod.edu, (630) 942-3686

Transfer to Lewis University We offer more than 80 undergraduate majors and programs of study, adult accelerated degree completion programs and 25 graduate programs. We seek to develop strong, capable graduates who build successful careers. We have more than 6,500 total students including international students from more than 20 countries. Our most popular transfer majors include aviation, criminal/social justice, education, nursing, healthcare leadership, and business.

www.lewisu.edu (815) 836-5250

6 Convenient Locations: Romeoville, Chicago, Hickory Hills, Oak Brook, Shorewood, Tinley Park

COLLEGE OF DUPAGE STUDENTS Transfer credit is pre-approved through existing agreements between Lewis University and the College of DuPage Learn more about our programs on-site:

s 4UTORING AVAILABLE FOR A VARIETY OF SUBJECTS BY APPOINTMENT DROP IN OR ONLINE s $ROP IN TUTORING FOR !CCOUNTING !NATOMY  0HYSIOLOGY #HEMISTRY %3, -ICROBIOLOGY

0HYSICS 3PANISH AND -ATH  

 AND  s 3UPPLEMENTAL INSTRUCTION FOR SELECTED COURSES s /NLINE TUTORING AT BBCODEDU THEN SELECT h!SK A 0EER 4UTORv s !SSISTANCE FROM OTHER #/$ STUDENTS PEER TUTORS

t  $SJNJOBM4PDJBM +VTUJDFBOE'JSF͇4FSWJDF "ENJOJTUSBUJPOEFHSFFT

s 5NIQUE PROCESS TO SERVE STUDENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES

t &OIBODFE 5FBDIFS &EVDBUJPOEFHSFFT &MFNFOUBSZ 4QFDJBM BOE $PNCJOFE&MFNFOUBSZ 4QFDJBM&EVDBUJPO

College of DuPage Learning Commons 3TUDENT 2ESOURCE #ENTER 32# 2OOM  www.cod.edu/learningcommons SELECT @4UTORING 3ERVICES


COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

Schedule cont. FEBRUARY Mon., 11 Sat., 16 Sun., 17 MARCH Fri., 1 Sat., 2 Sun., 3 Wed., 6 Sat., 9 Sun., 10 Wed., 13 Sun., 17 Wed., 20 Thu., 21 Fri., 22 Sat., 23 Sun., 24 Tue., 26 Wed., 27 Thu., 28 Sat., 30 APRIL Thu., 4

BASEBALL

Kirkwood (IA) at Minneapolis, MN at Johnson County (KS) at Johnson County (KS) John A. Logan at Marion, IL Illinois Central at Marion, IL South Suburban at Marion, IL at Heartland at Spoon River at Spoon River at Robert Morris at Lincoln Land JUDSON ROBERT MORRIS at Aurora MORAINE VALLEY at Milwaukee Tech at North Central at McHenry AURORA TRITON ELGIN

7:00pm 1:00pm 12:00pm 11:00am 2:00pm 11:00am 3:00pm 1:00pm 12:00pm 5:00pm 12:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 4:00pm 12:00pm 12:00pm 3:00pm 3:00pm 1:00pm 12:00pm 2:00pm

Lady Chaps win consecutive blowouts AUSTIN SLOTT

SPORTS EDITOR

The Chaparral women’s basketball team posted back-to-back blowout victories this week against Harper and Triton College. The Lady Chaps defeated Harper Saturday night 77-43 and followed that

up with a 71-41 victory on Wednesday. The big wins are signs that the Lady Chaps are starting to feel more insync offensively and were just what the team needed after a 32 point loss to 2nd ranked Rock Valley. The team is now 13-6 and will hit the road to face Madison College Saturday Jan. 26.

The time is now. The future is yours. » » » »

Complete your bachelor’s degree Experience a smooth transfer of credit Receive one-on-one academic advising Weekday, evening and online classes available

Adult Degree Completion majors offered in: Accounting | Business Administration* Communication* | Criminal Justice* Marketing | Psychology RN to BSN* | Social Work *Also offered online Adult Degree Completion Programs Open House Tuesday, January 29, 2013 5:00–7:00 p.m. University Banquet Hall in Alumni Hall 1410 Marseillaise Pl. | Aurora, IL Bring your transcripts for an immediate evaluation of prior college credit.

Learn more at aurora.edu/adultopenhouse

The Center for Adult and Graduate Studies 347 S. Gladstone Ave. | Aurora, IL 60506 630-844-5294 | AUadmission@aurora.edu Photo by Nathan Camp

Guard Tashiana Walton takes a three at a recent game.

15


16

COURIER • JANUARY 25, 2013

MY COURIER CONNECTIONS 630.942.3379 paytonc359@cod.edu

$30 PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCT SERVICE, OR EVENT *ONE WEEK PLACEMENT

TUTORING SERVICES NEED HELP WITH A COURSE? Online tutors are available. Visit bb.cod.edu, then select “Ask a Peer Tutor.”

GET PUBLISHED IN THE VALENTINES ISSUE! FEBRUARY 8TH CUTE CLASSMATE? BF? GF? BFF? FWB? FRENEMY? MISSED CONNECTION? OLD FLAME? NEW CRUSH? Candy ads $1, $5

$25 PROMOTE YOUR PRODUCT SERVICE, OR EVENT

SIGN UP FOR 6 WEEKS ATA REDUCED RATE PER WEEK

LEARNING COMMONS s s s s s

-ATH !SSISTANCE 4UTORING #OURSE #ONNECTIONS &LEXIBLE ,EARNING 7RITING 2EADING AND 3PEECH !SSISTANCE 32#     www.cod.edu/learningcommons

SAY WHAT YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED $30 TO SAY TO THAT SPECIAL SOMEONE WITH AN AD IN THE FEB. 8 COURIER. PUBLISH YOUR PRODUCT SERVICE, OR EVENT

*ONE WEEK PLACEMENT

(PSSST ... THESE ADS CAN BE ANONYMOUS)

Come by our office at BIC 3401 or stop by our table on the 2nd floor of the SRC next week to create your Candy Ad! DEADLINE TO ENTER: TUESDAY FEBRUARY 5TH

January 25, 2013  

Archive Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you