The Coast News, Feb. 8, 2013

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VOL. 27, NO. 5

Dr. Eric Beam (at podium), OPA’s Director of Special Services, argues in favor of an OPA charter school, which was denied by the Carlsbad school district. The Charter has since made an appeal to the county. Photo by Rachel Stine

LOOK WHO’S HERE The Who brought their "Quadrophenia and More" tour to the Valley View Casino Center Tuesday. With a set list that included some of their greatest hits, including guitarist Pete Townsend’s 1973 opus “Quadrophenia” in its entirety. Townsend (pictured) also managed to break out his trademark “windmill” move. The band kept the more than 8,000 fans on their feet. More photos online at thecoastnews.com. Photo by Daniel Knighton

Del Mar addresses impacts of rail project By Bianca Kaplanek

DEL MAR — As SANDAG moves forward with plans to add a seasonal train platform at the Del Mar Fairgrounds, double track a 1.1-mile str etch of the railway and replace the San Dieguito Railway River Bridge, Del Mar officials have submitted a letter stating their concerns and formed a citiz ens committee to possibl y reduce any negative impacts, even though there is currently no requirement to do so. The engineering and environmental review

FEB. 8, 2013

process is under way. An informational meeting w as held Jan. 22 to garner public input on what should be studied under NEP A (National Environmental Policy Act.) Comments are being accepted through Feb. 21, but additional meetings will be held throughout the year. At their Feb. 4 meeting, City Council member s approved a letter outlining the city’s concerns. Plans to replace the 96-year-old San Dieguito Railway River Bridge They include increased include raising it between 7 and 10 feet to take it out of the flood zone. TURN TO TRAIN ON A23

Del Mar recently formed a citizens committee to address any negative impacts on the lagoon and nearby residents. Photo by Bianca Kaplanek

Two Sections, 48 pages

TIDAL EFFECTS The high tide events known as “King Tides” can be problematic for homes and infrastructure along the coast. It’s a reality scientists say we’ll have to deal with. B3

Arts & Entertainment . . A9 Food & Wine . . . . . . . . A12 Legals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A20 Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A4

HOW TO REACH US (760) 436-9737 Calendar: calendar@coastnewsgroup.com Community News: community@coastnewsgroup.com Letters to the Editor: letters@coastnewsgroup.com

Charter school appeals to county By Rachel Stine

CARLSBAD — Claiming that its petition was not given fair consideration, OPA (Oxford Preparatory Academy) is appealing to the San Diego County Board of Education over the Car lsbad Unified School District’s denial of their petition to run a charter school. OPA, which runs charter schools in Chino Valley and Orange County, will present its petition and appeal before the board at a public hearing Feb. 13 in hopes of opening a charter school in Carlsbad for the 2013-14 school year. “Despite what the district says, we (OPA) still have a very strong parental demand in Carlsbad,” said Dr. Eric Beam, OPA’s director of Special Services and primary spokesperson for the Carlsbad petition. “We know that we have a very sound charter petition in education that would benefit the community.” Citing doubts a bout OPA’s ability to meet half of

state Education Code requirements for charter schools, the district’s Board of Trustees denied their charter petition last December.. “We were very concerned about OPA’s ability to deliver on the instructional program and the fiduciary responsibilities that ar e required under the law,” said CUSD Superintendent Dr . Suzette Lovely. OPA’s proposed charter would establish a three-year charter school starting with the 2013-14 school year. The school would operate kindergarten through eighth grades for 800 to 1,000 students. OPA has requested to operate a facility near the Interstate 5 and state Route 78, and therefore would most likely reside on Buena Vista Elementary School’s campus. A team of district administration reviewed OPA’s charter petition, and TURN TO CHARTER ON A19

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FEB. 8, 2013

Celebrating 27 Years

Encinitas $3,295,000 Gated resort style estate, car collectors dream and more. MLS# 130001786

Cardiff $2,227,000 4.76 acres currently zoned for 1/2 acre lot. MLS# 120043856

Carlsbad $2,100-$2,250,000 Ocean close custom estate home w/ unbelievable amenities. MLS# 130002618

Cardiff $1,650-1,950,000 Tuscan designed home with stunning ocean views. MLS# 130002396

Cardiff $1,749,000 Private gem sits on almost 1/3 acre with ocean view. MLS# 120060011

Encinitas $1,195,000 Downtown Encinitas living at its finest, great end unit. MLS# 130001677

Solana Beach $1,195,000 Beautiful single level home with loft, walk in attic. MLS# 130002163

Carlsbad $1,150,000 Redevelopment opportunity approved with Carlsbad City. MLS# 130004485

Pacific Beach $1,099,000 Best ocean front penthouse, remodeled 2BR/2BA. MLS# 130002465

Solana Beach $879,000 Premier location in St Francis Ct, great views, private. MLS# 120060592

Encinitas $875,000 Nicest lot with great curb appeal in Wildflower Estate. MLS# 120046141

Carlsbad $859,000 Beautiful 4BD + optional office, view, pool and spa. MLS# 130004303

Solana Beach $845,000 Beach bungalow west of the 101 and 2 blocks from beach. MLS# 120055014

Pacific Beach $749,950-755,000 Beautifully furnished beach condo with whitewater view. MLS# 120032830

Cardiff $728,500 Tropical, west of I-5, a slice of paradise, close to all. MLS# 130004296

Encinitas $689,900 Beautifully remodeled home in Summerfield, quiet street. MLS# 130004659

-4 Y 1ve. A D i UR Dr AT rbor S EN Ha OP 050 4

Carlsbad $689,000 Beautiful move-in ready corner lot home, quiet location. MLS# 130000717

Carlsbad $655,000 Wonderfully remodeled home west of 5 fwy. MLS# 120051512

Solana Beach $609,900 Gorgeous beach town home in prime location. MLS# 120060564

Escondido $549,900-579,000 Immaculate 1 story, corner lot, 2.5BA 3 car garage, solar system. MLS# 130002425

Leucadia $535,000 Pacifica TH best location, upgraded 2BR. 2.5BA. MLS# 130002727

Encinitas $535,000 Views 2BR+loft 2.5BA lots of touches T/O open flpn. MLS# 130004700

Carlsbad $459,000 Beautifully renovated and remodeled, 3BR/2BA. MLS# 120056069

Oceanside $399,900-449,900 SW view 1 BR, 1BA condo, Harbor area MLS# 130003284

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THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

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Developers will present project this month Council addresses issues of weapons and waste

By Rachel Stine

CARLSBAD — The proposed Quarry Creek residential project could help Carlsbad meet impending state housing requirements, according to city planners and the project’s developer. “(Meeting Housing Element requirements) will contin ue to be a challenge either with Quarr y Creek or without,” said Carlsbad Principal Planner David de Cor dova. He added, “If (Quarry Creek) doesn’t go forward, it would be difficult. We’ll have to find we have sufficient sites elsewhere.” Corky McMillin Companies’ Quarry Creek residential plan proposes constructing 656 residential units on a 156-acre site located on the bor der of Carlsbad and Oceanside, south of state Route 78 and w est of College Boulevard. At least 500 of the pr oposed residential units are designated to meet the requirements of Car lsbad’s General Plan’s Housing Element per state guidelines.The plan allocates 300 units as residential, high-density units with a minimum of 20 d wellings per acre, and 200 units as residential, medium-high density units with a minimum of 20 dwellings per acre. “Under Housing Element la w, a city’s obligation is to plan for its regional share of estimated housing needs b y income group,” said de Cordova. “Cities accomplish this by designating enough residential land (thr ough zoning) at densities that can accommodate housing at all income le vels,” he added. “How many units are actually built will depend on the housing market.” California requires cities to meet

By Bianca Kaplanek

The proposed Quarry Creek residential project 156-acre site is located south of state Route 78 and west of College Boulevard. It includes reclaimed Hanson Aggregates quarry and borders the historic Marron Adobe home and El Salto Falls. Photos by Rachel Stine

these plans within set eight-y ear housing cycles. Carlsbad’s current housing c ycle ends April 30 this year. Whether Carlsbad meets its housing requirements, this cycle depends on City Council’s actions on tw o housing Element programs: Quarry Creek and the adoption of land use and z oning changes for the Barrio ar ea, according to de Cordova. If the city does not meet a c ycle’s Housing Element r equirements, the requirements will roll over to the subsequent cycle, according to Car lsbad Senior Planner Van Lynch. “The project provides a number of housing units critical to state housing requirements,” said Todd Galaraneau, McMillin senior vice president. Because of the site’ s proximity to public transportation, shopping, TURN TO DEVELOPERS ON A19

McMillin Senior Vice President Todd Galaraneau explains to Carlsbad’s Planning Commission on Feb. 6 about the need to delay the project’s public hearing to allow for further mitigation on the traffic effects on Oceanside streets.

O’side continues to evaluate landfill By Jared Whitlock

OCEANSIDE — The Gregory Canyon landfill has been a source of controversy in the county f or nearly two decades, and much of the debate has r aged in Oceanside. That’s why city staff in Oceanside is carefully examining a dr aft environmental impact report for the Gregory Canyon landfill with the help of several experts. Once they finish going through the impact report, city staff will submit their position and any other feedback, sometime before the April 15 deadline for public comments. “The document is several thousand pages long, ” said Cari Dale, Oceanside’s water utilities department dir ector. “We want to be thorough.” The Army Corps of Engineers will analyze public comments and decide whether to issue a permit f or the project at an undetermined point in the future. Gregory Canyon Limited, the company behind the project, also needs permits from other groups for the project to move forward. Oceanside’s vested interest in the landfill can be traced to the city’s large groundwater basin. The groundwater in the basin is tr eated through an ocean desalination plant and currently supplies 15 to 20 percent of the city’ s demand. In the future, new wells coming online could ad d another 20 percent. The city, however, worries that pollutants from the landfill near Pala could seep into the San Luis Rey River, which flows into the Oceanside groundwater basin. “They can say the landfill won’t have a leak,” Dale said.

A map of the proposed Gregory Canyon landfill. Rendering courtesy of Gregory Canyon Limited

“But it’s like the Super Bo wl, I’m sure they said the lights wouldn’t go off. We want to be absolutely sure it’s safe.” She added that even one leak, no matter if it’s five or 50 years from now, could threaten the city’s water supply and the costly infrastructure Oceanside is investing in. Jim Simmons, the project manager for Gregory Canyon Limited, said the landfill isn’ t close enough to w ater sources to pollute them. Regardless, he said the landfill would use a double composite lining to pr otect against any spills — state-ofthe-art technology, he maintains, that goes w ay beyond environmental regulations. “Critics have been proven wrong about the environmental impact,” Simmons said. “They’ve resorted to making things up.” The landfill was approved by voters in 1994 and in 2004, but still doesn’ t have all the required permits. Including legal fees,

Gregory Canyon Limited has invested $67 million to open a new landfill since it started its campaign 20 y ears ago. Over time, Simmons believes opponents in Oceanside ha ve softened their stance on the landfill. The Oceanside City Council has lar gely opposed the landfill in the past, though in 2011 it voted 3-2 not to support state legislation that would have prohibited the construction of a landfill within 1,000 feet of the San Luis Re y River, or land belie ved to be sacred by American Indians — a group that has also f ought against the landfill. Currently, there isn’t an agenda item scheduled to once again address the landfill issue. Oceanside Mayor Jim Wood has remained steadfast in his opposition to the landfill. Recently, he spoke out against it at a public meeting in Escondido that w as attended by more than 300 people. “We shouldn’t take a

chance on something that could result in us wasting millions in capital impr ovement projects,” Wood said, adding flooding or an earthquak e could send pollutants from the San Luis Re y River into Oceanside’s aquifer. Wood also said the landfill proposes to solve problems that only existed more than a decade ago. Chiefly, he said Gregory Canyon landfill isn’ t necessary in light of other landfills in the county expanding. But Gregory Canyon Limited maintains the landfill will provide a m uch-needed place for the county to store its trash. Stephen Grealy, deputy director of w aste reduction and disposal at the city of San Diego, said that under current plans the county’s landfills will reach capacity in 2037. The Gregory Canyon landfill would add an estimated five years to how much the county can hold, according to an analysis done in November. “If it’s approved, the region’s capacity date w ould be 2042,” Grealy said. Grealy noted that the year for when the county will reach landfill capacity has indeed been pushed bac k a few times. There are several reasons for this. First, the Sycamore Canyon landfill will expand. Second, recycling and trash diversion efforts have increased, partly due to ne w state laws and also because of more awareness. Finally,with the economic slowdown, businesses weren’t generating as m uch waste, causing trash levels to decline. Grealy noted it’s possible trash production will rise as the economy heats up again.

DEL MAR — City Council members were set to take a stand on guns, garbage and governance at the F eb. 4 meeting. But after discussing three separate resolutions to support an assault w eapons ban, oppose permits f or the Gregory Canyon landfill and recommend local authority over the Del Mar Fairgrounds, only one r esulted in what is traditionally a unanimous vote. Mayor Terry Sinnott, the dissenter in a 4-1 v ote to support the feder al Assault Weapons Ban of 2013, said he had four “mental blocks” while considering what action to take on the r esolution that would indicate the city’ s support of Senate Bill 150. “I first had a v ery strong emotional reaction that I wanted to support whate ver we could do to r educe gun violence,” he said. “I’m worried that the Senate bill … will not work.” Sinnott said in ad dition strengthening background checks, decreasing access to assault weapons and safel y storing guns; there needs to be a greater focus on how to treat and care for the mentally ill. He also said ther e is a need for reform in the media’s approach to these crimes. “I hope the individuals who commit these horrible crimes ar e not spotlighted,” he said, adding that he fears the attention may motivate others to act similarly. “I think there also needs to be e xtreme penalties f or people who do crimes with guns,” he said, and there needs to be incr eased security in public places. The bill bans the sale, transfer, manufacturing and importation of all semiautomatic rifles and pistols that use detachable magazines and have at least one militar y feature. It also bans all semiautomatic rifles and handguns that have a fixed magazine with the capacity to accept mor e than 10 rounds, semiautomatic shotguns with various capacities, ammunition feeding devices that can accept mor e than 10 rounds and 157 other specific firearms. Additionally, the proposed new law requires background checks on sales and transfers of a g randfathered assault weapon, prohibits the sale or transfer of large-capacity ammunition feeding devices and imposes a safe storage requirement for grandfathered firearms to k eep them away from those who aren’t allowed to own guns. “The level of gun violence in this countr y is at a totall y unacceptable level,” Councilman Don Mosier said. “There’s a lot more to do. “This resolution is just a start,” he said. “An assault weapon ban will not cur e everything that is associated with gun violence but I think it’s an important step… You’ve got to take whatever steps you can in this kind of situation to move forward.” A resolution urging the Army Corps of Engineer s to

deny Clean Water Act permits for the Gregory Canyon landfill was continued to a futur e meeting after ne w Council members Al Corti and Sherryl Parks said the y didn’t have enough information to mak e an informed decision on behalf of the residents. A resolution opposing the site was adopted in 2004.A letter restating the city’s position was submitting f or a public hearing in 2011 and another one was sent r ecently to the Army Corps reflecting the Council’s prior stance. Mosier said ther e was public input bef ore the 2011 letter was drafted. The main difference with the curr ent resolution is it is dir ected to the Army Corps of Engineers. “I’d like to ha ve some more information as to understanding the community input and the dir ection they would like us to take,” Corti said. Parks said she planned to abstain from voting, but was told by the city attorne y that municipal law precludes her from doing so unless there is a conflict of interest. Council voted 3-2 to continue the discussion, with Mosier and Council woman Lee Haydu opposed. A resolution to show the city’s commitment to a go vernance model for the Del Mar Fairgrounds passed unanimously. The San Diego County Board of Super visors in October agreed to e xplore potential partnerships with the 22nd District Agricultural Association, which operates the fairgrounds, to establish local control over the agency, free it from state interference and increase transparency. While most acti vities at fairgrounds take place within the boundaries of Del Mar, the resolution acknowledges those events, such as the San Diego County Fair and annual horse races, serve the entire region. The resolution states the city’s “desire to ensur e the continued successful oper ation” of those and other events “while taking into account the well-being of the surr ounding communities and the preservation of the en vironmentally sensitive San Dieguito Lagoon and River.” The resolution establishes the city’s support of the concept of r egional governance over fairgrounds’ operations so the mission of the state-owned facility can be maintained and a partnership can be de veloped to w ork on issues of mutual interest. The resolution recommends the governance model include representation from Del Mar, Solana Beach and the city and county of San Diego in partnership with the 22nd DAA “to achieve the best representation of impacted jurisdictions.” Corti asked why the resolution didn’t also indicate the city’s desire to r equire the 22nd DAA be compliant with the Del Mar community plan. “If we make this r esolution more like it’s for us they will not want to work with us,” Haydu said. “We’re trying to w ork together as a community.”


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O PINION &EDITORIAL LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Letters to the Editor and reader feedback are welcome. Unsigned letters and letters without city of residence will not be published. Letters should be no longer than 300 words and include a contact telephone number. Submission does not guarantee publication. Email letters to letters@coastnewsgroup.com. Views expressed in letters do not reflect the views of The Coast News Group. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Jackboot tactics not working in Oceanside

I had to laugh at a recent letter by Diane Fencl. (NC Times, 1/27/2013) She was frustrated with the “dis” by SANDAG on appointments to significant committees by representatives of the city of Oceanside. Even if she had not stated she w as a ne wer resident, I would have known. She obviously is not aware that the right-wing troika of Feller, Felien and Kern (FFK) decided to upend the pr ocess of appointments to SANDAG. Each City’s Mayor makes the appointments with concurrence of Council. However FFK decided the y’d take power that a way. Their bullyboy Kern lost big in the ma yor’s race by an embarr assing amount of v otes; Mayor Wood soundly slapped K ern by win-

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FEB. 8, 2013

Obamacare: Good for many Californians and state’s coffers? By Thomas D. Elias

ning 56 percent of the vote. So what did FFK do? They stripped Oceanside’s Mayor Wood of this po wer and gave it to themselv es. Did they really think the other Mayors in the region would support their jackboot, oppressive tactic and appoint any of their c hoices to significant SAND AG committees? I’m still laughing at this pitiful miscalculation by FKK but also gloom y because Oceanside has to tr y harder now to get an ything from SANDAG. How foolish to tr y to subvert the vote of the people who support Mayor Wood. Of course now we also ha ve hope that Melrose Extension will ne ver get SAND AG funding and we must ask FFK, why are they

THE COAST NEWS

Views expressed in Opinion & Editorial do not necessarily reflect the views of The Coast News

It’s hard to find any government program that helps both the ph ysical and financial health of many Californians and also f attens the state’s own coffers. But a new study from UC Berkeley indicates that’s how parts of the feder al Affordable Health Care Act may play out, in spite of all its vocal detractors. The controversial law, shunned by governors and legislators in most of the 23 states where Republicans enjoy full control, already has seen more than 450,000 y oung adults in California gain insurance coverage and state residents on Medicare save upwards of $600 million on pr escription drugs, compared to what they paid in 2009-10. But the really big benefits for California are yet to come,says the report,authored principally by policy analyst Laurel Lucia of Berkeley’s Center f or Labor Research and Education. The study does not consider Obamacare’s effects on businesses or on individuals who alr eady have health insur ance, nor does it include a $674 million feder al grant awarded in mid-January to help set up

the “Covered California” insurance exchange. “The state has the chance to improve the health of its r esidents by greatly expanding health care coverage at a r elatively minimal cost,” Lucia said. “This expansion would also translate into m uch-needed new jobs f or many Californians.” If forecasts in the Ber keley study (http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/healthcare/m edi-cal_expansion.shtml) prove correct, it will also provide a yet-unknown cash boost for hospitals and trauma care centers that have long had to eat at least some costs of “safety-net” coverage for the poor. That’s because at least 750,000 lo wincome, under 65 Calif ornians who lac ked health insurance before Affordable Health passed, but were able to get no-cost (to them) emergency treatment are expected to ha ve enrolled in Medi-Cal b y 2019, solely because of Obamacare’s expansion of Medicaid eligibility.About 500,000 have already signed onto county low-income health programs over the last two years, almost all of them lik ely to TURN TO OBAMACARE ON A18

COMMUNITY COMMENTARIES The Community Commentary section is open to everyone. Opinions expressed in the Community Commentary section are in no way representative of The Coast News Group. Send submissions, no longer than 700 words, to editor@coastnewsgroup.com with “Commentary” in the subject line. Submission does not guarantee publication. If published, please wait one month for next submission.

Streetscape plan highly praised By Patricia Bell

Having read Mr. Doug Fiske’s “community commentary” in The Coast News (dated Jan. 25), we had to w onder where this person is getting his f alse information and interpretation about the Leucadia Streetscape Plan. Let’s get the facts straight: The Streetscape’s purpose is not about “gentrifying” the North Coast Highw ay Corridor Highway 101. City Council and Main Street organizations don’t “gentrify” anything, anywhere and Leucadia is not a “redevelopment” district where gentrification is an objective typically. A “Streetscape” is about improving a “main street.” This is the case with the Leucadia Streetscape Plan. It’s about beautifying and impr oving upon our Highw ay 101 Leucadia “main street” and infrastructure: sidewalks, curbs, gutters, roads, medians, bike ways, trees (+900 planned), greenery, even parking facilities. It is also a bout making the “main street” safer and more usable by a variety of user types, that is, pedestrians, bicyclists, families, residents, visitors and even pets! It has nothing to do with private property.

Private property owners do what the y want with their properties. They can’t touch the street. The city can’t touch private property as a rule and b y law. An enhanced Leucadia “Streetscape” and “main street” will create the “facelift” you may be speaking about in y our commentary — w e can only hope — and provided the vocal minority, which seems to be on a letter writing crusade in an attempt to squelc h what the majority of Leucadians are in favor of, is not able to do away with this positive, fully vetted, Leucadia vision plan (Leucadia Streetscape Plan) alr eady in place and embraced by the comm unity majority at large. The Leucadia Main Str eet Association (L101) is not a g roup of commer cial real estate owners and de velopers from out of town and is not significantl y subsidized by the city of Encinitas. To the contrary, the L101 is comprised of an all-volunteer board of directors, consisting of local residents (also business owners) who graciously volunteer their time trying to help Leucadia become a better place. TURN TO STREETSCAPE ON A18

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THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

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O’side gives final approval on regulations for housing By Promise Yee

IN MAGGIE’S MEMORY City officials and others sit on a bench dedicated to the late Encinitas Councilwoman Maggie Houlihan. The bench was unveiled last Thursday at the opening of a new affordable housing unit in Leucadia called Iris. Houlihan, who passed away from cancer a year and a half ago, was among the project’s supporters. From left to right: Councilman Tony Kranz, Mayor Teresa Barth, Houlihan’s sister Michelle Bergman, and Supervisor Dave Roberts. Photo by Jared Whitlock

Encinitas supports ban on weapons By Jared Whitlock

ENCINITAS — During last week’s meeting, Council voted 5-0 to pass a resolution supporting federal legislation fr om U.S. Senator Dianne F einstein that would ban some assault weapons. Mayor Teresa Barth brought the item bef ore Council. The city’s staff report notes that Encinitas does not ha ve any licensed firearm dealers. But Barth said at the meeting it’ s important cities “speak up.” “While I r ealize that these actions ma y only be symbolic, I believe we must speak up,” Barth said at the meeting. “We can not accept that this type of violence visited our c hildren and innocent citiz ens time and time again is someho w the price we have to pay for freedom.” Three people spok e at the meeting. All were in favor of the r esolution, including Jacqueline Keavney-Lader a San Diego resident that sur vived the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colo. last year. “Later on w e realized the shooter w as carrying a AR-15 — a ci vilian version of the gun I carried in the Marine Corps,” KeavneyLader said. “This gun is solely made, not for sportsmanship, not for hunting, not for home defense, it is solely made for killing people.” After the meeting, Barth noted city staff had received one email against the resolution. When asked whether the resolution risks alienating some residents in Encinitas, Barth said that she introduced the r esoluTURN TO BAN ON A19

Garcia and Hernandez: Inez Martinez Garcia and her husband Marcial Garcia Hernandez sit in court on Dec. 18. Their next hearing will be Feb. 28. Photo by Rachel Stine

Preliminary court date set for Oceanside couple By Rachel Stine

VISTA — A preliminary hearing date has been set f or later this month to present evidence in court against an Oceanside couple charged with enslaving a 12-y earold Mexican girl for sex in the early 2000s. Inez Martinez Gar cia, 43, and her husband Marcial Garcia Hernandez, 45, both pled not guilty to 26 felon y counts of aggravated sexual assault on a child occurring between June 2001 and June 2002. If convicted of all charges, the defendants face up to 390 years to life each in prison. After allegedly working as a sla ve and being sold for sex by the couple for over two years, the victim was taken into protective custody and r eturned to her f amily in Me xico. Police were called when Garcia allegedly beat the victim severely. Members of the North County Human Trafficking Task Force arrested Garcia and Hernandez on Nov. 29 outside of their home in

Oceanside. The case has just been reopened because the victim, now an adult, has moved back to the U.S. and come f orward to la w enforcement. On Tuesday, attorneys and court officials set a preliminary hearing f or Feb. 28 at the Vista Courthouse, according to Garcia’s attorney Bill O’Connell. At the hearing, Deputy District Attorney Gretchen Means will pr esent witnesses bef ore the judge to esta blish reasonable belief that the crimes did occur and that Garcia and Hernandez w ere the perpetrators of those crimes, according to O’Connell. Means will decide whether or not the victim will testify at the preliminary hearing, said O’Connell. If the judge decides that there is reasonable belief of the crimes and that the defendants committed those crimes, the case will e ventually go to trial, where the victim will have to testify.

OCEANSIDE — In its ongoing effort to pr ovide sufficient affordable housing, City Council gave final approval to modifying inclusionary housing r egulations and allo wing lowincome housing to e xceed base density citywide J an 30. The hope is the incentives will prompt more lowincome housing to be built. “They’re thinking out of the box and trying something different,” John Seymour vice president of acquisitions of National Community Renaissance nonprofit developers, said. “The policy is the first ever in San Diego County , Orange County, or anywhere in Southern California.” New builder incentives include one ad ditional story of building height, reduced parking requirements, and waiver of a conditional use permit. Developer options to meet inclusionary housing standards are to either build low-income housing units on site, rehabilitate market-rate units, donate land, or pay a minimal $1.31 per squar e foot in lieu fee and higher $12,250 per unit in lieu fee for each unit built a bove base density. Mike McSweeny,

Building Industry Association senior public policy advisor, said the new rules are more “user friendly.” “It created incentives to help people move forward with projects that they otherwise w ouldn’t,” McSweeny said. “The city wins and the applicant wins.” Regulation changes may be just the kic k-start needed to spur building and increase low-income housing after Oceanside, like other cities, lost its redevelopment district and associated government funding. “There are a lot of moderate priced housing units in Oceanside for rent or purchase, but very little affordable low-income rental stock,” Seymour said. A low-income household is consider ed to be family of f our earning $20,000 to $40,000 a y ear. Low-income rental rates for a two-bedroom unit are between $460 and $950 a month.

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Seymour said a lack in low-income housing leads to multiple people living in units and o vercrowding issues impacting the surrounding neighborhood. City staff and developers are cautiously optimistic about the outcome of the r egulation changes. The success of the changes will be w eighed in the number of lo w-income houses built on site and amount of in lieu fees collected. “The BIA w as really pushing to get this accomplished,” Margery Pierce, neighborhood services director, said. “We will not know the outcomes f or a couple years. We’re hopeful it will be v ery successful and create a number of housing units un der this program.”


THE COAST NEWS

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FEB. 8, 2013

RSF Golf Club earns distinguished award By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Recognizing the Ranc ho Santa Fe Golf Club’s excellent experience for its members, the club w as awarded the Distinguished Emer ald Club award from BoardRoom magazine. “It was quite a surprise. I had no idea w e had been nominated,” said Al Castro, general manager of the club. “When I got the letter indicating we had been nominated, I did a little research and learned it was an award recognizing the member experience,” he said. Castro said tw o inspectors were sent to the club to observe the operation and to determine if the methods were in place to ensur e an outstanding member experience from every aspect, from golfing to dining to shopping. “They spent a bout six hours with us,” he said. “Then I got another letter that we had been a warded the Distinguished Emer ald Club award.” When he got the w ord Castro said he sought out his staff. “I announced it to the staff to let them kno w what a wonderful job the y had done and how their ha rd work was recognized,” he said. He then told the Association board. “They were quite surprised and happ y,” Castro said. “We are very proud to be one of only five California clubs and one of 18 clubs nationwide to be honor ed with such a pr estigious award,” Castro said. “Our board of governors, staff and department managers are truly a dedicated and outstanding team.” He said the club will be given a plaque that will be displayed “proudly” in the lobby of the golf club. Mike Irvin, the board president, was also r ecognized as an outstanding governor and for his leadership

according to Castro. “We’d like to cong ratulate Rancho Santa F e Golf Club for earning Distinguished Club status, ” said John Fornaro, publisher of BoardRoom magazine. “Special recognition also goes out to Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club Gener al Manger Al Castro, as well as the club’s board of directors, its department heads, and entire staff f or their eff orts in providing an e xcellent member experience.” Fornaro said in a ne ws release that “Member Experience” is that special combination of “qualities” that a private club provides its members. “Whatever you call it, it is that ‘X’ factor that separates two clubs that both provide superlative Member Experience, but where one is a g reat club, while the other is the most prestigious of memberships.” Castro was hired eight months ago and one of his tasks was bringing ne w life to the club. “I am amaz ed how quickly time passes. It’s already been eight months. Where does the time go?”he said. The next event at the club will be a Fat Tuesday event beginning at 6 p .m. Feb. 12. “We will celebrate with a traditional mardi gras party with masks and hats for those attending and a band named Ba you Brothers,” Castro said. “It’s going to be a fun party.” This will be the fir st of its kind and Castr o said he hopes it will become a tradition at the club. Then on Valentine’s Day, there will be a romantic dinner held in the dining room. “Our new chef has put together a w onderful meal paired with wine,” he said. Reservations are strongly suggested for both events. BoardRoom Magazine is the top tr ade publication covering all aspects of private clubs.

Tracey Kestler competing last year with a young horse she had been training. Kestler is a Rancho Santa Fe resident who trains racehorses and local people and their horses. Courtesy photo

RSF native spends time ‘horsing’ around By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Tracey Kestler said it w as her grandfather, Herbert Korholz, who got her interested in horses. “He said e veryone should learn to ride just like they should learn how to swim,” she said. “He said the reason was you never know when you will fall into someone’s pool or be invited on a fox hunt and y ou wouldn’t want to embarrass yourself,” Kestler said with a chuckle. Kestler, now in her early 40s, still treasures the memories of Sunda y trail rides with her grandfather who had “grand ideas about how life should be.” She took her g randfather’s advice, but went far beyond mere fox hunting skills. Over the y ears she has earned national titles with her riding and e ven helped train Grindstone, the 1995

Kentucky Derby winner. And believe it or not, a couple of years ago, she was invited to a fox hunt. These days she continues to tr ain racehorses and teaches riding skills to locals. Kestler is home grown. “I have been extremely fortunate to ha ve grown up in Rancho Santa Fe and it so happens, I started riding with Hap Hansen, such a wonderful man and an amazing trainer, one of the best in the w orld,” she said, “I started with him when I was 6 y ears old. He has an amazing gift with horses and the horses love him and perform for him.” She said one of Hansen’s best qualities as a teacher is making students feel they can do an ything and that the y are already successful. “That is what I tr y to impart to my students,” she said. “When I w as young I thought when I grew up, all I ever wanted to do is be a horse trainer,” she said. As a teenager, she and her mare placed first in the country in the J unior Hunter Division in 1986 and 1988. She was also the Grand Hunter Champion at the Washington D.C. International Horse Show in

1988 and was also a Reserve Champion at the National Horse Show that was held at the time in Madison Squar e Gardens. “I traveled to horse shows every weekend. I went to Rancho School and Torrey Pines. I would take off Thursday and go to the show and compete. I was always a good student too because my parents said I had to keep my grades up if I wanted to ride,” she said. At age 17 her parents sold her hor se because she had become so valuable. “I couldn’t imagine going into a sho w ring without her,” she said. “I went to college in Boston f or a couple of years. It was the only time in my life that I didn’ t ride,” she said. When she came home from Boston, she ran into a woman she knew at the post office who ask ed her what she was doing. She told the woman she had been a way for college, but that she was doing nothing at the moment. The woman told her of an opportunity to train racehorses near Santa Barbara. She went to w ork with renowned horse trainer D. Wayne Lukas and the e xperience changed her life. “It was fun and w as a really good tr aining experi-

ence working with young horses,” she said. She said she r ode Grindstone as a baby. She has continued on with the profession of training racehorses at Del Mar, Santa Anita and Hollywood Park. “If I knew what it w as going to be lik e, I would have never done it,” she said with a note of irony. “I’m not a morning person and this is a seven day a week job starting at 4:30 a.m. There are no benefits, no stock options or paid vacations, you don’t make much money and it’ s really dangerous.” But, she said, she would not trade her life for anyone else’s. “I am e xcited to go to work. I am the luc kiest person in the w orld,” she said. “I wouldn’t change a thing. I exercise racehorses in the morning. I absolutely love it. It is the most w onderful job in the world.” In addition to teac hing the art of sho w jumping to others, she admits she is getting the itc h to begin competing again. She is hoping to get more students and lo ves working with people at all different skill levels. To learn mor e call her at (858) 353-4539.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

A7

Sea gazers catching a ‘whale’ of a show COAST CITIES — 10, 15, 20 — the n umber just kept getting higher . With each gray whale counted off the coast of San Diego , the excitement rose another notch among a crowd of 100 tourists and locals on the boat. Spouts shot water into the air and lar ge fins bobbed above the surf ace. Experienced whale w atchers aboard had ne ver seen anything like it — or at least on that scale. “The experience was incredible, once-in-a-life time,� said Melissa Galety , a naturalist with San Diego Whale Watch. “It was hard to contain ourselves.� All told, crewmembers last week logged an estimated 23 g ray whales J an. 21, making it possibl y the largest pod e ver seen in Southern California. Prior to this, Galety said the tour’s highest whale count ever was 12 or so. Most pods aren’t bigger than tw o or

The experience was incredible, oncein-a-lifetime.� Melissa Galety Naturalist

three. The rare occurrence was the icing on the cak e for a whale-watching season that’s been one of the best in memory. The Los Angeles chapter of the American Cetacean Society, the only group to k eep track of whales in Southern California every day during whale season from sunup to sundown, has recorded 644 southbound sightings since early December off the coast of P oint Vicente. That’s more than the y’ve seen at this point in the season in 16 years. For comparison, at the same time last year, the society logged 588 whales, while previous years hovered around 300. Once the whales are seen in P oint Vicente, there’s a good shot the y’ll continue to hug the coastline and later pop up in San Diego. Alisa SchulmanJaniger, a board member with the society , alerted others in the tight-knit whale community to k eep their eyes peeled after she saw the 23-whale pod. Sure enough, the next day they arrived in San Diego waters. “I’m glad I w as able to share the inf ormation,� Janiger said. “The sightings inspired a lot of people.� From the Point Vicente Interpretive Center, more than 70 volunteers from the

society uses spotting scopes and binoculars to whale watch. Some dutifully scan the coast e very day, while others give a fe w hours of their time eac h week. They’re motivated by the activity’s “therapeutic nature,� among other r easons, Janiger said. Every year, more than 21,000 gray whales mak e their way from north of Alaska to Baja Calif ornia, where the females gi ve birth to calves. They ven- A few whales from a pod of 23 off the coast of Palos Verdes. The pod, believed to be the largest sighting ever in Southern California waters, made ture back up the coast in its way to San Diego Jan. 21. The rare sighting was yet another reason whale watchers and businesses have enjoyed this robust season. Photo the spring. Janiger said it’s courtesy of Alisa Schulman-Janiger not exactly clear why more whales have been spotted so far this season. There are a few possibilities, however. Last year, the society noted more calves than usual. When migrating to Mexico, whales follow three different routes. Calves and their mothers typically prefer the r oute that’s closest to the coast, because there are more bays and coves to protect them fr om predators, according to Janiger. Also, Janiger said the water up north last y ear started freezing earlier than normal, causing the whale migration to start earlier. As a result, there’s a chance the n umber of whales passing thr ough Southern California already peaked. If that’s the case, southbound whale counts will likely taper off faster in the coming weeks than previous years. While whales generally come in pulses, Janiger said there was a

steady number throughout January. Kate Jenks, a naturalist with La J olla’s Birch Aquarium, said some believe the high n umber of sightings could be a sign of a healthier whale population this season. But that could be a str etch. The whales detected on the coast are only a fraction of the population, she said. “It could just mean there are more traveling along the coast,â€? Jenks said. In any case, Jenks said she said the “last few weeks have been v ery interesting.â€? Researchers aren’t the only ones who have enjoyed the strong whale season. Businesses have benefited, too. On average, San Diego Whale Watch reported an extra 20 people each day in January on its tour boat. Ryan Nunnally, a sales associate with Helg ren’s Sportfishing and Harbor Cruises in Oceanside, said the number of people fr equenting whale cruises w as pretty comparable with last year’s figure in ear ly January. But with the w ord getting out a bout the r obust season, business really picked up in the last fe w weeks. “We’re seeing more of a demand,â€? Nunnally said, (No purchase necessary) adding that the whale sight1105 S. Coast Highway 101 • Encinitas ings have been consistent in the last month. Sale prices on selected items & figured off full retail

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THE COAST NEWS

A8

FEB. 8, 2013

Inspiring trainer Guitar orchestra looking for members teaches athletes how to make a comeback CHRIS AHRENS Sea Notes

As a tr ainer, Kita has countless success stories of coaching athletes in their comebacks, the latest being that of her fiancé, Josh Cangelosi, a surfer who shattered his shoulder while skateboarding six months ago . The doctors had never seen such a violent break, and prepared to replace the splinter ed bones with artificial parts. While the medical establishment was skeptical Josh would ever surf again, three months later he was surfing and tr aining in martial arts, all thanks to Kita’s rehab program. According to Kita, “I see many surfers making basic mistakes before and after entering the water. They should learn functional stretching, not just do that side bend thing. It’s also a good idea to warm up the core of the body with wind sprints and a fe w pull-ups, to jump up and down and do a fe w squats bef ore paddling out. To keep hydration levels up, put a little L-Glutamine in your water pre and post surf sessions. “Surfers often have back problems, and for those wanting to strengthen the lower lumbar, start with a single leg pelvic tilt and work up to double leg pelvic tilts. I’m an expert on curing bac k pain, after breaking my back, and I can teach people to get out of pain.” About a year ago I offered my editing services on the book Kita is writing in exchange for training. I can honestly say there’s nothing like what she does, and every serious surfer owes themselves at least a fe w sessions with Kita, especially if they are in pain, considering riding big waves or competing in the pro ranks. Contact Kita for a free 30minute fitness evaluation at (858) 349-6333, or email her at Kitafit.com Here’s to surfing your best!

I first became a ware of Kita Johnson while taking a boxing class. And how could I not notice: tall, radiant, blond hair streaked with pink, zebra stripped boxing gloves rocking the heavy bag with each strike.This girl is bad. After class I introduced myself and thus began a close friendship. Of course I didn’t realize it then, but Kita had once been the toast of Chicago where she worked as a trainer to the star s while endor sing various health products on TV. She was on top of the world. Then came her accident,some 15 years ago,where she was thrown from a horse and broke her bac k in fi ve places. The doctors gave her the news that she would never walk again. Thankfully, Kita never listened. According to her twin sister, Malia, “They didn’t know who they were talking to.”The words proved prophetic as Kita not only walked, but also returned stronger than e ver. Then, in 2003, another horse riding accident left her with a broken neck. Flat out in a hospital bed, the doctors again pronounced her immobile f or life. “I knew I w ould walk again, however, and I had my sister Malia hold r esistance bands in the bathtub f or me, putting tension on m y legs as she simulated walking movements.” Months later Kita had again defied all odds, this time returning to captur e world titles in two martial arts disciplines. You may recognize Kita, as she appeared as a fitness coach most mornings on KUSI for five years. She has also appeared on NBC regularly,stared in countless fitness videos and written a book with fitness guru Jay Robb. She has tr ained with Chris Ahrens is a surfer and author of Jack LaLanne, with whom she four books on surfing. Email him at used to have push up contests. cahrens@coastnewsgroup.com.

ENCINITAS — Guitarists of all skill levels are invited to participate in the Encinitas Guitar Orchestra’s upcoming session, which will focus on folk music from around the world. The session, entitled “A World Folk Music Celebration,” will include a variety of folk music styles including Afro Cuban, Calypso, South American, American folk, Irish and Spanish. A world music spe-

cialist is expected to join the group. Rehearsals are Mondays from 7 to 9 p.m. beginning Feb. 25 at Ranch View Baptist Chur ch, 415 Rancho Santa F e Road. Participating in the session costs $300. The orchestra’s 25 to 30 amateur guitarists will spend the spring practicing that will culminate in a performance May 17. The Encinitas Guitar

Orchestra is comprised of local musicians from beginner through advanced levels who learn technique and theory under the supervision of Peter Pupping and William Wilson, two accomplished Encinitas-based musicians and teachers. Pupping has organized and conducted a guitar orchestra since 1999. Pupping has been teaching and performing in Southern California for more

than 30 years. His band, the Peter Pupping Band, has released several CDs including the latest, “Café Pacifico.” Pupping earned bac helor’s and master’s degrees in music from San Diego State University. He organizes and directs the Encinitas Guitar Orchestra twice each year. For more information, contact Peter Pupping at Guitar Sounds, (760) 943-0755 or peter@guitarsounds.com.

Wine expert advances in competition DEL MAR — J oshua Orr, Del Mar r esident, inhouse sommelier and bar manager at the do wntown Marina Kitchen, has advanced as one of 25 young sommeliers in the nation to compete in the second round of the Chaîne des Rôtisseurs 2013 Young Sommelier Competition. The competition kicked off on Dec. 8, 2012, with an online written e xam, from which the top scoring sommeliers were selected. “It’s such an honor to be recognized as one of the country’s top 25 young sommeliers,” Orr said. “It is with great esteem that I move onto the second round and I hope to advance to the finals as the West’s regional winner,” he added. The Chaîne des Rôtisseurs is the w orld’s oldest international gastr onomic society, founded in

Joshua Orr, in-house sommelier and bar manager at the downtown Marina Kitchen. Courtesy photo

Paris in 1248. Each year the society sponsors young chef and sommelier competitions that attract contestants from throughout the world,

while the Chaîne Foundation provides scholarships for students in these fields. The competition’s next stage will be held betw een by March 2013, in six of the Chaîne’s regions, which includes the f ar West, Pacific Northwest, Southwest, Midwest, Southeast, Mid-Atlantic, Northeast, South Central, and Hawaii/Pacific. Members of the Chaîne will have an opportunity to meet the y oung men and women during this time and will select one r epresentative from each region. Orr is one of thr ee young sommeliers representing the f ar West. Winners of the r egional competition will advance to the finals, which will be held at the Société Mondiale du Vin annual meeting in Sonoma May 4. Orr holds the Advanced

Sommelier certification from the Court of Master Sommeliers and is curr ently studying to pass his Master Sommelier certification in the spring of this year. He has been with Marina Kitchen since the restaurant’s opening in May of 2012. Before joining Marina Kitchen, Orr worked in Las Vegas as a sommelier at B&B Ristorante at the Venetian Hotel and then at Fiamma Trattoria in the MGM Grand Hotel. Orr was also the wine director for Vineagogo, a wine company in San Diego. In addition to wine certifications, Orr is also certified as a specialist of Sak e from the Sak e Education Council and holds a bartender’s certification through Pernod Ricard’s Bar Smarts program.

Lagoon center opens Schools get nostalgic CARLSBAD — The Agua Hedionda Lagoon Discovery Center. 1580 Cannon Road, threw open its doors for its grand weekdays reopening Feb. 1. The community is once again invited to stop by the Discovery Center to see the remodeling and help name the new baby bearded dragon. Names for the lizard can be submitted at the Discovery Center. The winner will be announced at a dedication ceremony 1:30 p.m. Feb. 9. Other events coming up at the center include World Water Day March 23, the

Discovery Gala May 18 and Lagoon Day July 20. Ongoing activities include the monthly Birding Walk. Meet the local feathered friends bir d watching with Jordan Ahle the fir st Saturday of each month at 9 a.m. rain or shine. Bring your binoculars and get an introduction to birds at the lagoon Feb. 9 and March 9. The Discovery Center is always looking for volunteers. Contact Nanci Iaco vino at nanci@ aguahedionda.rg or call the Discovery Center at (760) 804-1969 for more information or to sign up.

CA R D I F F - B Y- T H E SEA — Madonna. Motley Crew. Men Without Hats. Cardiff parents can fondly remember it all at this year’s ’80s-promthemed gala, “Forever Young.” The March 2 event will be held at the Encinitas Community Center and will include a live auction, spotlight raffle, dinner and dancing to Atomic Groove. Parent volunteers and Cardiff Schools Education Association (SEA) officer s have been busy securing title sponsors and dona-

tions. Gala Auction CoChairwoman Jannine Landan said, “Solicitation letters were sent to mor e than 600 families and businesses. We’re seeking all type of auction items including fitness pac kages, gift certificates, experiences, travel and services.” Cardiff Schools Education Association is a volunteer, nonprofit organization representative of parents, staff, and community members concerned with improving the education of children within the district.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

A RTS &ENTERTAINMENT

A9 Send your arts & entertainment news to arts@thecoastnews.com

Production finds its way ‘home’ By Lillian Cox

CARLSBAD — The Trip to Bountiful playing now at The New Village Arts Theatre stars Sylvia M’Lafi Thompson as Carrie Watts, a role that earned Geraldine Page an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1985. The play, written by Horton Foote, is about an elderly woman in the twilight of her life that lives in a tiny apartment with her henpecked son and controlling daughter-in-law. Her only wish before she dies is to return to her hometown of Bountiful, Texas. Attempts to escape, timed each month with the arrival of her social security check, are repeatedly thwarted by her son who is concerned for her health and daughter-in-law who sa ys they can’t afford it. Finally, she is successful, making her way onto a b us where she strikes up an acquaintance with a young woman. Eventually, a sheriff catches up with her just before arriving at her destination. Feeling sympathy, he allows her to finish the trip and experience the sense of completeness she has yearned for. “This has long been one of my favorite plays and acting performances,” said Kristianne Kurner, who directs the production. “It’s such a wonderful piece about finding your way home and how you define yourself by memories and stories. “(Local actress) Sandra Ellis-Troy and I wanted to do it starring her as the elderly woman,” Kurner recalled. “When she passed away, I put the script a way because I wouldn’t be able to do it the same way without her. “Then I sa w Sylvia M’lasi Thompson in a production in Raisin in the Sun at The Moxy and thought M’lasi would be perfect to pla y Carrie Watts. Of every actor I’ve seen in San Diego, she has this almost amazing stage presence. You really can’t take your eyes off of her on stage — she has incredible strength and dignity and, at same time, is very fragile. ” Thompson was nominated for the 2012 Craig Noel

ARTS CALENDAR Got an item for Arts calendar? Send the details via email to calendar@coastnewsgroup.com.

No surface escapes paint in artist Diana Carey’s studio. Photo courtesy of Nadine Baurin

Sylvia M'Lafi Thompson as Carrie Watts in The Road to Bountiful produced by New Village Arts Theatre. Photo by Daren Sco

Awards, presented by the San Diego Theatre Critics Circle for outstanding female leading performance in Raisin in the Sun. “It (Carrie Watts) is one of the most important roles for an actress, especially a character actress,”Thompson explained. “I absolutely find Horton Foote’s writing from a woman’s perspective to be some of the most prolific and lyrical writing there is for a female character. When people ask me in years to come what some of m y favorite roles were, Carrie Watts will be at the top of the list.” Kurner also credits the performances of Walter Murray (Ludie Watts) and Yolanda Franklin (Jessie Mae Watts). Franklin was also nominated for a 2012 Craig Noel Award for outstanding female leading performance in “The Sugar Witch.” Janell Cannon stepped out of her r ole as award-winning author and illustrator of children’s books, most notably bestseller Stellaluna, to design the sets for the production. “I have done small, set ow.ly/h78lv.

FEB. 9

‘BOUNTIFUL’ ART The Foundry Studios at New Village Arts present “Finding Home: The Trip to Bountiful” exhibit

FEB. 8

OPERA NIGHT Opera fans

can bid on two tickets for the Episcopal Night at the Opera performance of Pizzetti’s “Murder in the Cathedral” at 7 p.m. April 5 a t the San Diego Civic Theatre. Bidding closes at noon March 8. Visit charityauctionstoday.com/store.php?username=edsd. ON STAGE “Into the Woods” being staged at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 8 and at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at Pacific Ridge School, 6269 El Fuerte St, Carlsbad. For tickets, call (760) 448-9820 or visit

from noon to 4 p .m. Feb. 9 through March 3 at 2787 State St., Carlsbad Village Tuesday through Sunday with an opening reception from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Feb. 9. For information, call (760) 433-3245 or visit NewVillageArts.org. PLEIN AIR EXHIBIT Meet

painting jobs for years with New Village Arts Theatre, but this is the fir st time the y asked me to do set design from scratch,” she said. “What I have learned is that theatre is not for wimps. It's hard work for all involved, and it has been fascinating to watch the cast and crew work out all of the kinks in the show. It is exhilarating to watch a scene when it has finally reached a flashpoint where it turns into the sort of magic that can transport an audience.” Preview performances are scheduled for 8 p.m., Feb. 7 and Feb. 8. Admission is “pay what you will.” The production opens at 8 p.m., Feb. 9 and continues through 2 p.m., March 3. Performances are scheduled for 8 p.m. on Thursday, Friday and Saturday; 3 p.m. matinees, Saturdays; and 2 p.m. matinees, Sunday. Regular admission is $29; and $27 for students, seniors and active duty military. Opening night admission on Feb. 9 is $36 and includes a small r eception afterwards. There will be a post-show discussion with the the artists at a reception with the artists at 3 p.m. Feb. 9 to launch the San Diego Plein Air group display through March at the Solana Beach Library, 157 Stevens Ave. Solana Beach. For more information, call (858) 7551404. HANDS-ON ART A free Family Open Studio will be held from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 9 in the Ruby G. Schulman Auditorium Carlsbad City Library complex, 1775 Dove Lane, for a hands-on art making event designed f or all ages. Families tour of the exhibition in the William D. Cannon Art Gallery, then make an art project related to the exhibition. CHRISTIAN BLUES Glenn Kaiser and the Full Throttle band will play Christian Blues at Rushing Wind Church at 6 p.m. Feb. 9, 4168 Avenida De La Plata, Oceanside. Finger food potluck at 5 p.m. For more information, visit (760) 940-0257.

cast on Feb. 10 at $29 regular admission. A special promotion on Valentine’s Day, Feb. 14 includes champagne, flowers and chocolate at a cost of $10/couple. New Village Arts Theatre is at 2787 State St. For information visit newvillagearts.org or call (760) 433-3245.

Cast:

Sylvia M’Lafi Thompson Yolanda Franklin Walter Murray Alexis Young David Macy-Beckwith Brenon Christofer John Tessmer

Crew:

Set Design: J anell Cannon Costumes: Mary Larson Lights: Christopher Loren Renda Original Music & Sound Design: Bill Bradbury Sound Engineering: Justin Lang Stage Manager: K evin Kornburger ASM: Elijah Howlett

SINGING SOLO Robin Henkel plays solo blues at Zel’s Del Mar, 8 to 10 p.m., 1247 Camino Del Mar, Del Mar. Call (858) 755-0076 for more information. OPENING NIGHT You are invited to the reception Santos Fine Art “Rock ‘n’ Roll Heaven” by Patrick Carney 6 to 10 p.m. Feb. 9 at 978 N. Coast Highway, Encinitas. The show will run through Feb. 23.

FEB. 11

PLAY READERS Encinitas

Theatre Consortium, Playwrights Forum presents a staged reading of “The Galt Regency” with Carment Beaubeaux, Todd Blakesley, Linda Castro and Brian Salmon at 7:30 p .m. Feb. 11 at the Encinitas Library, 540 Cornish Drive, Encinitas. Refreshments, and Talk Back. Cost is $5.

FEB. 15

Artist’s winding path leads to exhibit at park’s Japanese Friendship Gardens KAY COLVIN A Brush With Art “Life is not a str aight line,” declares Oceanside artist Diana Carey. The nonlinear evolution of her artistic creations have led to her current solo e xhibition at the Japanese Friendship Gardens in Balboa P ark titled “Creating A Storm; Sakur a Fubuki.” Having grown up in the Los Angeles area, Carey resided in Encinitas for 20 years, where she was an active member of the 101 Artists’ Colony and Full Moon Poets. When asked at what point she began seriously creating art, Diana responds emphatically, “I always created art. Always.” Fully immersed in her creative lifestyle as she completes a degree in Art History at San Diego State University, Carey says, “Art should evoke and portray the artist’s fibre, his struggles and his vision. The artist inter prets his vision. The viewer brings his

own visions and interpretations to the artists w ork. Together the real art work is determined.” This philosophy is e vident in the e volution of Carey’s artwork. During a period of less than two years during the late 1990’s, Carey was left emotionally reeling from a divorce and the death of several close friends and family members. To deal with the grief, she began painting hearts on the surf ace of stones, while writing original poetry on the reverse. Under the pseudon ym “d.goth,” Carey shared her “Hearts of Stone” not only through shops and galleries across the country, but also at local art fairs. She reflects, ”People would look at the art, read the poetry and tell me their stories about love, loss, joy and pain. I realized the healing aspect of art, not just to the artist but also to help others deal with grief and loss through artistic expression.” Her weekly classes at Casa de Amparo in San Marcos continue helping youth ages 5 to18 heal their emotions while taking refuge from abuTURN TO BRUSH WITH ART ON A19

STUDENT ART Del Mar Art information on the Scholarship Center Gallery of Fine Art is hosting an exhibition from Feb. 15 through March 2, highlighted by a Scholarship Award reception featuring J ulie Limerick and her talented Torrey Pines High School art students from 3 to 5 p.m. Feb. 24 at Del Mar Plaza 1555 Camino Del Mar Suite 122 Del Mar. For more

Program, e-mail scholarship@dmacgallery.com or call (858) 481-1678.

ACRYLIC

CLOSE-UP

Through Feb. 28, enjoy an Acrylic on Canvas art show at the Civic Center Gallery, City Hall, 505 S. Vulcan Ave., Encinitas.


THE COAST NEWS

A10

FEB. 8, 2013

New gallery opens in Village Use caution with ‘Side Effects’ By Noah S. Lee By Bryan Snyder

Special to The Coast News CARLSBAD — On Feb. 2, Carlsbad resident and artist Greg “Viz” Visintainer introduced his new Viz Art Ink Gallery to the Car lsbad Village. The gallery walls exhibit Visintainer’s art from originals to print reproductions. His imagery includes pop iconography, sports, cityscapes and geometric abstractions, but a step closer and guests were introduced to

Viz Art Ink takes doodle illustrations to the next level” * UHJ 9L] 9 LVLQW DLQHU $ UW LVW

Artist Greg “Viz” Visintainer introduces his work and gallery Viz Art Ink Gallery to the Carlsbad Village area earlier this month. Photo by Bryan a whole new world within Snyder

each composition. “Viz Art Ink takes doodle illustrations to the ne xt level,” Visintainer explains. “The main image is created by dozens of images within the main image.” Each composition begins with weeks of research, which ultimately leads to the hidden imagery that makes up each piece. Visintainer even goes as far as visiting locations around the U.S. as a way to inspire content for his future illustrations, as well as to do

the final piece justice. Visintainer’s approach to creating and selling art has been perfected through years of selling his illustrations at street fairs and festivals, but he began his pen ink illustrations as a simple way to pass time in class beginning at the age of 15. They later became a therapeutic process that helped him cope with hardships he faced in life. “It’s my meditation therapy and how I get rid of my

demons,” Visintainer explains. “Whenever I am going though tough times, I draw.” Though his pr ocess is very meditative, Visintainer also works closely with companies where he has created brand specific Viz Art Ink pieces for DC snowboards and apparel, which can be browsed at his gallery. Viz Art Ink Gallery is at 2906 State St. and is open Tuesday through Sunday from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

Are you a patient of Steven Soderbergh’s? If so, I advise you to not tak e the “Side Effects” medication he has prescribed to you and get a second opinion fr om a trustworthy doctor. I may enjoy thrillers as much as the ne xt moviegoer does, but I’ve also come to realize that even a fan of the genre has to under stand what makes this type of film work. As long as the puzzle spreads its clues for us to figure out and the fearful excitement is injected with just the right amount of intensity, then a thriller is fulfilling its pur pose. If any number of those qualifications is not met,then you can expect whatever it is y ou’re watching to be a disg race to the genre’s name. “Side Effects” exemplifies the ine vitable consequences of said disgrace and should not be taken by anyone. Successful psychiatrist Jonathan Banks (Jude Law) begins to conduct sessions with a y oung married woman named Emily Taylor (Rooney Mara), who is suffering from an anxiety disorder due to her husband Martin’s (Channing Tatum) jail release. Following Emily’s reunion with Martin, Banks prescribes a ne w pharmaceutical drug called Ablixa as treatment. Soon afterwards, however, Emily wakes up to find a cor pse in her apartment, having seemingly murdered the person. Banks then comes under fire from investigators, co-workers and his wife, all the while struggling to determine whether Emil y intended to murder the person, or if her situation is the result of medical malpr actice. Every thriller needs its clues, and every clue m ust be mapped out so that the audience and the main character can determine the solution simultaneously. In the case of “Side Effects,” the clues ar e only

Rooney Mara and Channing Tatum star in “Side Effects,” directed by Steven Soderbergh. Photo by Barry Wetcher

present toward the end and hardly, if ever, emerge in the beginning or middle. There isn’t enough to explain why the complications in Emily’s life resulted in several questionable situations, nor do w e comprehend the logic behind several characters’ actions. Banks’ search for the answers surrounding the murdered person in Emil y’s apartment is laced with aimless desperation, with no substantial findings until the climax. Even Alfred Hitchcock knew the boundaries of withholding and revealing critical inf ormation. In addition, the level of discomfort in the film comes too abruptly for both the audience and the main character to absorb. When Banks is informed by his co-w orker that maybe it’s time he downgrade his practice and move to a differ ent workplace, we’re suddenly yanked away from despising him to sympathizing for him. Such a hasty c hange in the mood not onl y gives the audience little time to adjust, but also creates a disquieting twist in the gut that compels moviegoers to sa y, “That does it! Eno ugh is enough, and I cannot tak e this anymore!” Talk about a bad case of cinematic o verdose.

With the e xception of Jude Law, none of the cast members’ performances contain much in the way of substance or movement. Law does what he can with the material gi ven to him despite Soderber gh’s disjointed direction. While the actor’s efforts deserve to be commended, he alone cannot sa ve this debacle from being loc ked away in a psyc hiatric hospital. If there is an y trace of life in Rooney Mara, the lack of expression in her c haracter gives no indication of it; her facial tics ar e so static you can’t help but wonder if she is being held bac k by super glue. Channing Tatum doesn’t get m uch screen time to justify his short-lived existence, and his marriage to Mara’s character contains little to no emotion. As for Catherine ZetaJones, well, let’s just say her involvement exhibits symptoms of a weak performance by a series regular in a soonto-be-cancelled television show. Should you decide to ignore my advice and pr oceed to w atch Soderbergh’s final big scr een project before taking a filmmaking sabbatical, the side effects you will most lik ely experience are boredom, frustration and disappointment. If the dir ector of “Side Effects” were a doctor , I would have his license revoked in a heartbeat and his office shut do wn until further notice.

MPAA rating: R for sexuality,nudity,violence and language Running time: 1 hour 45 minutes Playing: General release

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THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

Local artists stage play with lots of audience interaction COAST CITIES — North County residents are the producers and star s of a dinner theater comedy opening at 7 p.m. Feb. 14 at the Laf ayette Hotel, 2223 El Cajon Blvd. Encinitas resident Kim Frost plays the Mother of the Bride in “Once Upon a Wedding,” an interactive dinner theater comed y in whic h the audience is drawn into the action as wedding guests. The show is pr oduced by the

Laughbaum family of Laughing Tree Productions, who are San Marcos residents. The Laughbaums ar e three lifelong entertainers. Lisa and Michael just ended a 22-y ear stretch as the house band on the Bahia Belle in Mission Bay, and are now venturing out on their own, producing a sho w they wrote, directed, act and sing in, along with their 15year-old son, Ian, who’s been performing since he was 4 and

co-wrote the show. “The audience r eally becomes like a part of the family and gets to e xperience all the joys of attending a real wedding without the pressure of buying a gift. After all, every wedding needs its crashers,” Lisa Laughbaum said. For tickets, call (760) 5913113 or visit onceupona weddingthemusical.com. General admission is $64.95.

FAMILY MUSIC Violinist Michael Dvoskin, accompanied by pianist Irina Bessonova, will be February’s free family music program sponsored by the Friends of the Carmel Valley Library at 7 p.m. Feb. 13 in the library’s community room, 3919 Townsgate Drive. The duo will perform works by Dvorak, Beethoven, Brahms, Sarasate, Prokofiev, Bartok, Rachmaninoff, and Tchaikovsky. The program will last 45 minutes. Courtesy photo

‘This Is Jazz!’ back in Carlsbad CARLSBAD — The Carlsbad’s Cultural Arts Office presents the third year of “This Is Jazz!” Part seminar, part performance and part con versation, “This Is Jazz!” dives into the origins, styles and pla yers of the fir st 100 y ears of the great American art form. The programs, hosted by San Diego jazz author Dir k Sutro, feature celebrated performers and ensembles, terrific archival visuals and nota ble musical interludes. “This Is J azz!” programs are held on Saturdays at 4 p.m. beginning Feb.9 in the Ruby G. Schulman Auditorium at the Carlsbad City Library complex, 1775 Dove Lane at El Camino Real.All programs are free, but seating is limited. To prevent overflow, admission ticket distribution begins at 3 p.m.; doors open at 3:45 p.m. For information, visit carlsbadca.gov/arts or call the Arts Info Line, (760) 434-2904. The third season starts with guest artist, Mundell Lowe. A master of the six-string guitar, Lowe possesses an eightdecade career that moved from 1930s New Orleans to the exploding jazz scene of late 1940s New York to the first days of television with the NBC and CBS studio orchestras. In 1965 he mo ved to Los Angeles and began composing for film, and in the 1980s he returned to his fir st love, live performance. Along the way, he met and played with most of the g reat names in jazz. A longtime resident of San Diego,Lowe turned 90 in 2012. Joining him at “This Is Jazz!” will be another noted San Diego guitarist Bob Boss. Upcoming presentations include: — March 9, Jazz at the Movies with Composer Larr y Groupé. — April 6, ‘20s & ‘30s Swing with an ensemble to be announced — May 11, Latin Jazz with master trumpeter Gilbert Castellanos “This Is Jazz!” is supported by the Carlsbad Library and Arts Foundation’s Robert H. Gartner Cultural Endowment Fund.

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THE COAST NEWS

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FEB. 8, 2013

F OOD &W INE

Discovering Chuao chocolate Romance of Temecula wines DAVID BOYLAN Lick the Plate For those of us br ought up with mass-produced chocolate, discovering chocolates like those made b y Chuao is like opening a whole ne w pleasure area of the br ain. I mean really, how many times has a Snic kers bar pr oduced an endorphin release similar to that of a nice scalp massage? Nothing against Snickers, as they have satisfied many a sweet craving, but when you enter the r ealm of gourmet chocolate, produced with the finest ing redients, the difference is dramatic and from my personal experience, one of life’s great pleasures. Chuao Chocolatier is based in Car lsbad and I recently sat do wn with Chef and President Michael Antonorsi to talk a bout his business. Lick the Plate: Mic hael, your Venezuelan roots included a German mother and relatives that had a cacao farm. It seems like a natur al foundation for a car eer in the culinary arts.What was that experience like? Michael Antonorsi: My mother had the har dest job that exists: homemaker and mother.

FRANK MANGIO

Taste of Wine

She gave her 1,000 percent to k eep a perfectl y run home (German style with a tropical twist) and r aise four children.Watching my mother prepare feasts for her friends and family in our home w as always amazing because of the care she put into every detail. Venezuela is kno wn for the best cacao in the world, so growing up there, you’re surrounded by incredible chocolate. It’s a part of our cultur e and, in my family, it was a part our roots, as our ancestors had a cacao f arm. I must say though, that the vibe ar ound the tropical, coastal cacao plantations was always enchanting. LTP: You did not go right into the culinar y world upon graduation from college, opting for a few years in the technology sector followed by culinary school in P aris, where you trained as a F rench chef, followed by a specializ ed

training in pastr y and c hocolatier. What was that e xperience like? MA: All I w anted to do after graduating from UCSD was go to Europe for culinary school ... but I was afraid that my dad would kill me after he just supported me through my studies to become a bio engineer. So I continued to try to please my family, getting my MBA in Venezuela and starting up a computer networking and telecom company. It wasn’t until m y mid 30s, when I was married and had m y first two daughters, that I decided to listen to my heart. We took a leap of f aith and moved to Paris for culinary school. Sometimes making the decision to follow your dreams is hard; but not following them is a lot harder. LTP: You returned to the U.S. in 2002 and r eturned to your chocolate roots by openTURN TO LICK THE PLATE ON A19

The stars are aligned for a banner year in Temecula Wine Country this year. My in-box is full of exciting developments for most of the 35plus wineries that are anticipating an overwhelming public response to their ambitious programs of impr ovement offering more tastings, tours, dining, lodging and event activity. In a r ecent interview with Jim Carter, owner of the renowned South Coast Winery Resort and Spa, TASTE OF WINE learned that Carter plans to build a new winery, Carter Estates. It will be part of a much bigger resort, winery, spa, and office and meeting space. The existing property will be offering new hotel space in Mar ch. “We have 50 ne w all-suite rooms in a three story structure with units from 538 to 850 square feet. Each suite will have a fireplace, soothing tub and lanai dec k in the vineyards,” he said. “It will include a rooftop garden for receptions and banquets.” South Coast pr oduces 65,000 cases of wine annually and has no w topped 1,800 medals with the 2013 wine competition results, one of the highest in the nation. A short drive beyond Jim Carter’s winery on Ranc ho California Road, up on a hill, sits Monte De Oro. It has a spectacular 180 deg ree panoramic view, lavish allstone exterior, glass floor overlook to a barrel room and premium wines. Monte De

TASTE OF WINE columnist Frank Mangio exclusively interviews winery owner Jim Carter, who revealed ambitious plans for expansion in Temecula Wine Country. Photos by Frank Mangio

Oro electrified the wine world by winning the Best of Class, Red Blend at the 2013 San Francisco Chronicle Wine Competition with its 2008 Synergy 65, a five varietal estate grown wine. This wine earned the TASTE OF WINE February Wine of the Month. ($32 at the winery; Club price is $26.40.) Robert Renzoni Vineyards is taking the wraps off the new Robert Renzoni Prosecco coming in dir ect from Italy. They delighted their wine club recently with their brand of Brunello, one of Tuscany’s finest reds and will introduce the latest vintage in mid-February along with the latest Sonata Blend, a big seller at the Italian-style winery on De Portola Road. The Temecula Valley Winegrowers Association has its next wine country event March 2 and March 3 from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It’s the World of Wine (WoW) 2013. Visitors will be able to barrel taste the latest old world style wines that are locally made. Some 30-plus wineries wil l offer food and wine samplings. This is a self-guided event. Two-day tickets are $99 per

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Wine Bytes

Valentines Day events in Temecula are blooming and here are some that crossed my “Bytes” desk. Thornton Winery is pr esenting its Romantic Rendezvous Feb. 14 at 7 p .m. with an arr ay of fine cuisine and matching Thornton wines. $90. There is also an optional choice of menu items at Café Champagne from 5 to 9 p .m. For reservations, call (951) 699-0099. Callaway Winery has a Vine d’Amore Valentines Day dinner Feb. 9 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. held in the Barrel Room. Live entertainment with dinner and Callaway wines. $216 per couple inclusive; $195 for wine club. It also has a Pr e Fixe menu at Meritage Restaurant on Valentines Day at 5:30 p.m. and 7 p.m., for $75. To reserve either e vent, call (951) 587-8889. Falkner Winery will host a romantic dinner on Valentines Day at its Pinnacle Restaurant. A four-course meal with wine pairings is planned with li ve entertainment. Seatings start at 6:30 p.m. Cost is $79. VIP Food/Wine Club members pay $69. For an RSVP call the winery at (951) 676-8231 ext.1. Monte De Oro Winery has its Valentines Day fourcourse dinner with wine pairing at 7 p.m. A feature will be live music and dancing. Salmon and Filet Mignon top the menu. RSVP at montedeoro.com. Frank Mangio is a renowned wine connoisseur certified by Wine Spectator. His library can be viewed at www.tasteofwinetv.com. (Average Google certified 900 visits per day) He is one of the top five wine commentators on the Web. Reach him at mangiompc@aol.com.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

A13

New golf club chef has a confession: he likes fast food By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — Meet Brian Freerksen the new chef at the Ranc ho Santa F e Golf Club. He came on board just a few weeks ago and is already meeting with members to determine their desires. “This is their place. I have been going out and talking to members to get a feel f or what they want, he said. “It’s their home away from home.” Freerksen’s credentials are impressive.He has been the head chef or executive chef for some of the most w ell-know restaurants in the area from the Hotel Del Coronado to the Marine Room.Yet, he could be described as salt-of-the-earth genuine and easy going. “I am a simple eater myself and I am not pic ky,” he said.“I like simple, clean food.” When the golf club put out the call f or a ne w chef, there

was a lot of interest. “After an exhaustive search we interviewed dozens of candidates and elected the top five to come in f or cooking interviews,” said Al Castro, general manager. “With his ability and skills, plus the g reat personality, he was just who w e were looking for.” Over his y ears of e xperience Freerksen said he has learned that when people go out to dinner and it is not a special occasion, they order what they recognize. “I do the common things and put a twist on them, ” he said. “One of the things on the menu is liver and onions. I am not going to touch that. It’s one of those things you love or not.” But her said, for non-liver lovers, he is offering specials every night. “We’re doing a l ot of seafood, some red rice and Forbidden Rice. It’s a black rice

from China that got it name because the emperors were the only ones allo wed to eat it. We’re doing some pasta and teaming it up with fish, ” he said. Freerken’s relationship with food began early. His first

job was at McDonalds. “I was the burger flipper and the Egg McMuffin flipper.I did that for about two years.” He then joined the arm y as a cook wher e he w as stationed first at Fort Dix and then in Germany where he w as a

baker. “I was the night baker. I was baking all the cak es and pies,” he said. At that job, he realized he didn’t like baking v ery much mainly because baking ingredients must be exact and allowed

very little room for creativity. He put in five years active duty and three in reserve. Out of the arm y he got a job at the Chicken Dinner Restaurant at Knotts Berry TURN TO CHEF ON A19

Brian Freerksen, the new chef at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club, poses with his wife Amelia. Courtesy photo

February Events Stay Well with Scripps Scripps is committed to keeping you and your family well all year long. Here are some of our upcoming events. Living Lite Weight Management Monday, February 11; Tuesday, February 12; or Wednesday, February 13 All classes are from 6:45–8 p.m. Learn how to achieve and maintain a healthy body weight in this weekly, skill-based and highly structured behavioral support program. Cost: $48. Call for locations. Women and Heart Disease Friday, February 15, 10:15–11:45 a.m. Join Scripps advance practice nurse, Kristin Dixon, for an update on cardiac concerns for women. Cost: $2.50. Location: Lawrence Family Jewish Community Center in La Jolla. Bariatric Surgery Information Monday, February 18, 5:30–6:30 p.m. Join Mark Takata, MD, and William Fuller, MD,

to learn more about weight loss options. Free. Location: Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, Schaetzel Center, Great Hall. Bladder Basics and Incontinence Wednesday, February 20, 12:30–1:15 p.m. Join us to learn more about urinary incontinence, including typical urination habits, causes of incontinence, exercises and lifestyle changes. Free. Location: Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas, Outpatient Rehabilitation Center in the Vons shopping center across from hospital. Just What IS a Heart Attack? Wednesday, February 20, 6 p.m. What is a heart attack and why does it happen? Who is at risk? Join Scripps cardiologist Martin Charlat, MD, to learn about heart attack symptoms, treatment

options and prevention. Free. Location: Magdalena Ecke Family YMCA, Encinitas. High Tech Heart Thursday, February 28, 5:30–7 p.m. Join Scripps cardiologist Douglas Gibson, MD, for a presentation on the latest techniques in cardiac care including valve replacement without surgery, electrical treatments for heart failure and the artificial heart. Free. Location: Scripps Memorial Hospital La Jolla, Schaetzel Center, Great Hall.

For more information and to register, call 1-800-SCRIPPS (727-4777).


THE COAST NEWS

A14

Aces for Health tournament readied in Rancho Santa Fe COAST CITIES — Player registration and sponsor ship opportunities are now available for the San Diego County Medical Society F oundation Aces for Health Golf Tournament to be held 11:30 a.m. to 7 p .m. Feb. 28 at the Del Mar Countr y Club, 6001

Clubhouse Drive, Rancho Santa Fe. Cost for the da y is $250 and reservations can be made by calling (858) 759-5500 or at delmarcountryclub.com/ or sdcmsf.org/golf. The tournament will raise funds f or SDCMSF’s

Project Access San Diego . Since 2008, PASD continues to provide specialty medical services to San Diego County’s medically uninsured residents The Aces for Health Golf Tournament schedule is 11:30 a.m. With registration and

luncheon and a 12:30 p .m. shotgun start time; Shamble Format and an a wards reception at 5 p.m. Each golf tournament package includes green fees, a golf cart, a gift bag, entry in the tournament putting contest, lunch and awards reception.

FEB. 8, 2013

Del Mar opens new welcome center DEL MAR — The Village of Del Mar announces the opening of the ne w Del Mar Community & Visitor Center at 1104 Camino Del Mar, Suite 1, across from City Hall. Come join the community at The Del Mar Village Association-sponsored grand opening celebration from 5 to 7 p.m. Feb. 21 with wine and tapas. Residents interested in volunteering at the ne w center should call (858) 7353650 or email inf o@ delmarmainstreet.com. The Visitor Center is open during the winter from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Mondays through Fridays and will have extended hours starting in the spring. The new center, staffed by the Del Mar Village Association, will provide information on hotels, dining, special events and acti vities in Del Mar.

On display will beVillage walking maps,visitors’ guides, restaurant menus and do wntown community and special events information. “We’re happy to have a visible location in the heart of Del Mar that will not onl y serve as an inf ormation gathering place for locals but will assist visitors as they explore our Village,” said Mathew Bergman, president of the Del Mar Village Association. In the future, the DMVA plans to sell Del Mar gifts such as holida y ornaments, wine glasses, license plate frames, water bottles and signature Del Mar surf wax. The Del Mar Village Association (DMVA) is a nonprofit organization made up of Del Mar residents, business owners and pr operty owners who are dedicated to working together to enhance the vitality of the Village while preserving the comm unity’s history and character.

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FEB. 8, 2013

S PORTS

A15 Contact us at sports@coastnewsgroup.com with story ideas, photos or suggestions

Jeff Garcia shows there’s more than one way to make it to NFL By Tony Cagala

SAN DIEGO — The irony of it all is that if Jeff Garcia was entering this year’s NFL draft, with his style of pla y, and with teams looking f or that mor e mobile, athletic quarterback, he’d surely be taken in the first round. As it happened, when Garcia entered the dr aft in 1994, more than 200 pla yers’ names were called and none were his. But that didn’t stop the 6 foot 1 inch, 190 pound quarterback from going on to ha ve an 18-year professional career in the NFL. On April 25, several hundred more young hopefuls will enter this year’s draft all intent on hearing their name called to begin their pr ofessional football careers. But even before that,those same hopefuls will have the chance to make an impression with their potential emplo yers at the weeklong NFL Scouting Combine beginning Feb. 20. Garcia, with his Test West Football Academy and their newest partnership with Velocity Sports P erformance Center, is helping to pr epare those young players not onl y physically, but mentally for what may or may not happen on their road to the NFL. “I had hopes of being drafted,” Garcia said. “It was a long day of sitting around and not getting a call, ” he said. What made it more embarrassing, he said, was that The Gilroy Dispatch, Garcia’s hometown paper in Gilr oy, Calif. shadowed him that day to see if anything would happen. “And it didn’ t happen,” Garcia said.“I didn’t get signed as a free agent. At the time, I believe there were 28 teams…and not one of them saw me as a fit, even as a fr ee agent quarterback and so that’s why I had to go up to Canada and really prove myself up there.” After four years in the Canadian Football League and winning the Grey Cup (the CFL

Former NFL quarterback Jeff Garcia (back right) watches on as Andrew Castaneda of Pittsburgh State University goes through drills. Garcia, who went undrafted in the 1994 NFL draft, would enjoy 18 years as a professional in the NFL. Photo by Tony Cagala

championship) with the Calgary Stampeders, the NFL took notice of Gar cia and in 1999 he was signed by the San Francisco 49ers. Though Garcia didn’t participate in the combine when he emerged from San J ose

Not only is the combine a chance for players to show what they can do , but, Garcia said, for the 32 NFL teams, they’re deciding whether the y oung men are worth making a tremendous investment in. “To play at the elite le vel,

I had hopes of being drafted...It was a long day of sitting around and not getting a call.”

Jeff Garcia Retired NFL Quarterback

State as a record-holding quarterback, he said it wasn’t nearly the same as it is today, especially with all of the TV coverage and marketing efforts. “The game has just become so big, so large that everything is getting promoted,” Garcia said.

you have to have the physical tools. But they (NFL teams) also want to see mental and emotional stability. They want to see that a y oung man can handle this transition and how is he going to deal with it. “Is he going to be a pr oblem in the community or some-

body who’s going to be r esponsible and bring positi ve things to the community,” Garcia said. That’s something, that with Garcia’s years of e xperience in trying to find positi ves in a life riddled with adversity, he can talk to the players about. “I’ve lived it,” he said.“My life — I had so man y trials and tribulations and learning experiences — very difficult experiences to o vercome, especially as a child.” When he was 7 years old his younger brother died in a drowning accident and more than a y ear later his y ounger sister was killed in an auto accident. Questioning the “Why?” and “How?” he could lose his siblings in such a way, Garcia leaned heavily on sports to help prevent him from going down that wrong path in life. Having that daily distraction, to get him to f ocus on something else instead of focusing on what their f amily had

just gone thr ough helped, he explained.“And I had a love for sports. I was passionate about it. But what sport has taught me is how to deal with people better; how to work as a team; how to commit myself to something, how to learn how to work through adversity.” It isn’t hard to feel positive after talking with Gar cia, the 42-year-old Rancho Santa Fe resident, grandson of Mexican immigrants and son of a f ootball coach. “Being a quarterback, it’s great working Jeff,” said Ryan Katz, the 6 f oot 1 inc h, 210 pound quarterback from SDSU, who will participate in this year’s combine. “He’s been in the league f or 18 years, he’s got that experience and that’s something, a young guy coming up, that’s what I’m looking for…to guide me thr ough this process.” The process includes helping players to realize that they are their own brand and how to interact with the media, too. “There’s nothing that bothers me mor e than seeing an athlete in front of a camera who does not kno w how to speak to the camera, or how to represent himself,” Garcia said. “You may not think it’ s a big deal as an athlete, but people are judging y ou… It’s important to have a certain manner about you; a certain c haracter about you that is exuded in how you speak and what you have to say.” For Katz, he said fr om a young age he was taught that he was his o wn brand. “Everything I do is going to be seen and heard,” Katz said.“So you just tr y and sta y positive and do the right thing.” He’ll try to make his mark during the combine with his energy and focus, he said. “Intelligence is going to be a big thing, and just doing the right thing. “These guys (scouts) ar e looking for positive young guys to come into their organization and give a good vibe, and that’s what I’m tr ying to do ,” Katz

said.

“I think that players are becoming more aware that they are a brand,” Garcia said, adding “that they have an opportunity to build their brand if the y represent themselves in a positive way, if they promote themselves in a positive way. But if you’re not promoting yourself to the public in a way the public embraces you, then why would anybody want to market you or to be associated with your brand.” Speaking of helping build brands, Garcia will soon begin working with Ne w York Jets quarterback Mark Sanchez, whose 2012 season could be described politely as “difficult” and that resulted in his benching to a rookie in the final tw o games of the season. Garcia said he’ll also start w orking with fallen quarterback JaMarcus Russell,the 2007 first overall draft pick on a “last shot,”“comeback” type of deal. Russell is a guy who is extremely talented, but mentally, just did not g rasp and understand what he needed to do, but is still young, is still very capable and can w e help him, said Garcia. “Well, we’re going to find out. We’re going to find out if he w ants to be helped, and that’s the key. You have to want to be helped in or der to be helped,” Garcia said. Once the combine has come and gone this year,Garcia still looks to keep active in reinvigorating sports tr aining in San Diego with their new sports complex (their partnership is only months-old and are still looking f or sponsorship help. Sponsorship inquiries may be made to Nadia Abdala at nabdala@ equityadvertisingventures.com). What Garcia looks to do is not only cater to the professional athlete, but also to the high school students involved in all sports to help them get better and instill a commitment in something, including how to overcome adversity. Something Garcia happens to kno w all about.

Rancho Santa Fe youth named to top polo team RANCHO SANTA FE — Local polo player, Harrison Samaniego, was recently selected to the U .S. Polo Association’s top national development program, Team USPA. The up-and-comer fr om Rancho Santa F e has been under the sport’ s influence since he was a baby and will look to take his game to the next level as part of the elite program. Though first introduced to the sport from his father, his mother, a former University of Virginia player, dedicated much time to teaching him and his brother how to play growing up. Under the guidance of his supportive family, Samaniego has had a successful young career highlighted by leading his high school team to the semifinals Rancho Santa Fe resident Harrison Samaniego was chosen as one of of last year’s USPA National eight members from around the nation to play with Team USPA. Photo I n t e r s c h o l a s t i c courtesy San Diego Polo Club

Championship. It’s the mental aspect of polo that draws Samaniego’s passion. He enjoys participating in a sport that ne ver stops teaching and he looks forward to developing his mind and body on Team USPA. Samaniego just started his freshman year at Ro ger Williams University and plans to major in en vironmental science. When he’s not pla ying polo or taking classes, he enjoys hunting and fishing. Samaniego will join fellow new Team USPA members Daniel Galindo of Thermal, Calif., Jeff Shuler of Hometown: Aiken, S.C., Kylie Sheehan of Owings Mills, Md., Miguel Questel ?of Campo, Devin Vass of Powell, Ohio, Patrick Uretz of Malibu, Calif. and Matthew Collins of Reisterstown, Md.

P H O T O G R A P H Y

Bill is a professional photographer who blends his lifelong passion for sports with his skills in photography to capture memorable moments of all types of action oriented events.Call Bill to learn more about how his sports, portrait and commercial photography services can meet your needs.

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858.405.9986


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FEB. 8, 2013

Macaroni and cheese grows up Warm up with the flavors of Jerusalem By Marialisa Calta

Several years ago, an effort was afoot to get children to eat more vegetables by hiding them in their meals.Pureed zucchini in the pizza sauce, mushed-up broccoli in the spaghetti — you get the idea. Controversy ensued,with many nutritionists opining that it makes more sense to introduce children to v egetables out in the open, rather than trying to sneak them into kids’ food.As a “movement,� it apparently faded away. I thought of these eff orts while contemplating a plate of macaroni and c heese — and kale.The recipe is from “Mac & Cheese, Please!� by Laura Werlin (Andrews McMeel, 2012), and no one could mistake it for typical kiddie food. Kale, fontina cheese, cayenne and nutmeg give this downhome dish a distinctly sophisticated treatment. Werlin unapologetically adds “grown-up�ingredients — smoked blue c heese, fennel, andouille sausage and truffles, to name a few — to many recipes. I hope ther e are many sophisticated children out there who appreciate such flavors, but if yours aren’t among them, rest assured that Werlin includes lots of v ariations that will appeal. It’s tempting, when perusing newly published cookbooks, to ignore a small volume that touts “50 Super Cheesy Recipes.� But Werlin is not someone to ignore. In 2000, she wrote the groundbreaking “The New American Cheese� (Stewart, Tabori & Chang), which spotlighted the then-nascent artisan cheese movement in the United States. Her next book, “The All American Cheese and Wine Book� (Stewart, Tabori & Chang, 2003), won the prestigious James Beard Award. But this expert on artisan c heese and fine wine has also directed her talents to books on grilled

By Marialisa Calta

Kale on top and in the middle adds a grown-up bite to a children’s classic dish. Photo by Maren Caruso

cheese and, now, macaroni and cheese. She even includes Velveeta in one recipe. Macaroni and cheese: Call it comfort food.Call it easy.Call it supper. Please, call me to the table when it’s served.

ZESTY KALE TWO WAYS AND FONTINA MAC & CHEESE

Yield: 6 servings 5 tablespoons olive oil, plus more to coat dish 1 tablespoon plus 1 1/4 teaspoons kosher salt 8 ounces ca vatelli pasta (or small shell pasta) 12 ounces curly-leaf kale 3/4 cup coar sely chopped yellow or red onion (about 1/2 medium onion) 1 medium clove garlic, peeled and minced 1/2 teaspoon r ed pepper flakes 2 ounces Pecorino Romano (or parmesan) cheese, finely grated (about 1 cup) Freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour 2 1/2 cups whole or reduced-fat milk 1/2 cup heavy cream 12 ounces fontina cheese, coarsely grated (about 4 cups) 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/4 teaspoon ground or freshly grated nutmeg Preheat oven to 375

degrees.Coat the inside of an 8inch square baking dish with olive oil. Set aside. Fill a large pot with water and add 1 tablespoon salt. Bring to a boil and ad d pasta. Cook, stirring once or twice, until pasta is tender but firm, about 8 minutes. Drain. Remove stems from the kale. Cut 4 whole lea ves into quarters and set aside. Coarsely chop remaining kale. In a large skillet, heat 2 tablespoons oil o ver medium. Add onion and cook 5 min utes, or until soft. Add chopped kale and garlic. Cover and cook, stirring occasionally, until the kale is tender (5 to 7 min utes). Stir in pepper flak es and 1/2 teaspoon salt and set aside. Place quartered kale leaves in a small bowl.Toss with 1 tablespoon olive oil, 1/2 cup Pecorino Romano, salt to taste and pepper. Set aside. Using the same pot in which pasta w as cooked, heat remaining 2 ta blespoons oil over medium-high. Slowly whisk in flour and stir constantly until a paste f orms, 30 to 45 seconds. Continue stirring 1 to 2 minutes, until the mixtur e starts to color and smell a bit nutty. Slowly whisk in milk, cream and r emaining 3/4 teaspoon salt. Cook until the mixture starts to thicken and is just beginning to bub ble around the edges, 5 to 7 minutes. It should be thic k enough to coat the bac k of a w ooden spoon. Add 3 cups f ontina, the remaining 1/2 cup P ecorino Romano, cayenne and nutmeg and stir until the sauce is smooth but not too runn y. It should be similar in te xture to cake batter. If too soupy, continue cooking until it thickens. Add pasta and c hopped kale mixture and stir to combine. Pour into the pr epared baking dish. Sprinkle remaining 1 cup fontina on top. Distribute quartered kale leaves over the top. Place the dish on a rimmed baking sheet and bak e until bubbling and golden br own, about 30 minutes. Let cool 15 minutes before serving. Recipe from “Mac & Cheese, Please!� by Laura Werlin (Andrews McMeel, 2012.)

When you live in northern New England in the dead of winter, reading cookbooks is a form of escapism, especially when their recipes call for sun-warmed tomatoes, crisp cucumbers, brightly colored fruits and fr agrant, fresh herbs. That may explain why “Jerusalem: A Cookbook,� by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (Ten Speed Pr ess, 2012), seems to ha ve taken my small, snowbound community by storm. Aside from combating seasonal affective disorder, the appeal of “Jerusalem� lies in its exploration of what the authors characterize as “an immense tapestr y of cuisines� that flavor the storied city. “Consider this,� the authors write. “There are Greek Orthodox monks in this city; Russian Orthodox priests; Hasidic Jews originating from Poland; nonOrthodox Jews from Tunisia, from Libya, from France or from Britain; Sephardic Jews who have been here for generations; there are Palestinian Muslims fr om the West Bank and many others from the city and well beyond; there are secular Ashkenazic Jews from Romania, Germany and Lithuania and more recently arrived Sephardim from Morocco, Iraq, Iran or Turkey; there are Christian Arabs and Armenian Orthodox; there are Yemeni Jews and Ethiopian Jews but there are also Ethiopian Copts; there are Jews from Argentina and others from southern India. There are Russian nuns looking after monasteries and a whole neighborhood of Jews from ... Uzbekistan.� Citizens, the authors write, are often isolated in their neighborhoods, and the fight among various factions to protect their piece of land/cultural heritage/way of life can get “pretty ugly.� “Food, at the moment, seems to be the one unifying force in this highl y fractured place,� they say. The authors should know. Both were born in Jerusalem in 1968, and both were raised there — Ottolenghi in a Jewish sector, Tamimi in an Arab neighborhood. Thirty years later they met for the fir st time in London, where they learned they shared a language, a history and a passion for food. They became partners in a restaurant business. “It takes a giant leap of faith, but we are happy to take it — what have we got to lose? — to imagine that hummus will eventually bring Jerusalemites together, if nothing else will,� they write.

RYAN SOLARSH Your Carlsbad/Oceanside Territory Manager

Call Ryan for all your advertising needs.

760.436.9737

x102

rsolarsh@coastnewsgroup.com

On a cold winter day, warm up with a hearty dish of eggplant and lamb. Photo by Jonathan Lovekin

Here you will find not a recipe for hummus but one for stuffed eggplant. It takes no leap at all to enjoy this delectable dish from a storied city.

STUFFED EGGPLANT WITH LAMB & PINE NUTS ings

Yield: 4 ge nerous serv-

4 medium eggplants? (about 2 pounds), halved lengthwise 6 tablespoons olive oil 2 1/2 teaspoons salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 teaspoon g round cumin 1 tablespoon sweet paprika 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon 2 medium onions, peeled and finely chopped 1 pound ground lamb 7 tablespoons pine nuts Handful of flatleaf parsley, chopped 2 teaspoons tomato paste 3 teaspoons superfine sugar 2/3 cup water 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice 1 teaspoon tamarind paste (see note) 4 cinnamon sticks Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Place the eggplant halves, skin-side down, in a roasting pan large enough to accommodate them sn ugly.

1x2 X IS NEWSPAPER TALK FOR A ONE COLUMN BY v AD 4OO SMALL TO BE EFFECTIVE 9OU RE READING THIS AREN T YOU #ALL FOR MORE INFO

Brush the flesh with 4 tablespoons oil and season with 1 teaspoon salt and plenty of black pepper. Roast about 20 minutes, until golden brown. Remove from the oven and allow to cool slightly. While the eggplants are cooking, heat the remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a large frying pan. Mix together cumin, paprika and cinnamon and add half of this spice mix to the pan, along with the onions. Cook over medium-high heat about 8 minutes, stirring often. Add lamb, pine nuts, parsley, tomato paste, 1 teaspoon sugar, 1 teaspoon salt and some black pepper. Continue to cook and stir another 8 minutes, until the meat is no longer pink. Place remaining spice mix in a bowl and add water, lemon juice, tamarind paste, the remaining 2 teaspoons sugar, cinnamon sticks and 1/2 teaspoon salt; mix well. Reduce oven temperature to 375 degrees. Scrape the spice-lemon juice mixture into the bottom of the roasting pan. Spoon lamb mixture on top of each eggplant half. Cover the pan tightly with aluminum foil, return to the oven and roast 1 1/2 hours, at which point the eggplants should be completel y soft and the sauce thick. Twice during the cooking, remove the foil and baste eggplants with the sauce on the bottom of the pan, adding water if the sauce dries out. Serve warm, not hot, or at room temperature. Note: Tamarind paste is sold in some supermarkets with the Mexican or international foods. If you can’t find it, you can substitute pomegranate molasses. If you can’t find either, substitute Worcestershire sauce and a squeeze more lemon juice. Reprinted with permission from “Jerusalem: A Cookbook� by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi (Ten Speed Press, 2012.)


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FEB. 8, 2013

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Strong season ahead for film club Make a pioneer-style rag doll OCEANSIDE — There are months of a ward-winning, independent movie-viewing available through the North County Film Club, with eight films left to run in its 2013 Winter schedule. The line-up includes: — Feb. 10 – “Beasts of the Southern Wild” — March 3 – “Mrs. Henderson Presents” — March 17 – “Searching for Sugarman” — April 7 – “Ruby Sparks” — April 28 – “Moonrise Kingdom” — May 19 – “Hermano” — June 2 – “The Sessions” — June 23 – “My Sister’s

Sister” For more information contact the North County F ilm Club at ncfilmclub.com, e-mail ncfilmclub@ gmail.com or call (760) 500-1927. Based in Oceanside, the club’s goal is to bring the best of limited release and foreign films to North San Diego County. North County F ilm Club wishes to develop the niche audience of film lovers in North County, making it possible and profitable for theaters to show these films. The club offers a one-year membership card with special benefits pr ovided by its partner , the UltraStar Theater at Mission Marketplace, 431 College

Blvd., Oceanside. Members have the opportunity to vote on which movies will be included in the f ollowing season’s film lineup. Some visitors have reported that clic king these e-mail links causes them to be ask ed to sign up f or a Hotmail account. This is not a f ault of this Web site, but is a def ault setting on those visitor s’ computers, particularly those running Windows and/or Microsoft Internet Explorer. Be sure that your preferred email client is set as your default email application; how this is done v aries with your computer’s operating system,Web browser,and email client.

Scout works toward Gold Award CARLSBAD — Girl Scouts of San Diego are particularly proud of Jackie Nakamura,a junior at Carlsbad High School. Nakamura maintains a high GPA and is on the v arsity tennis team, but in addition, she is working hard to get her Girl Scout Gold Award. Her approved proposal is “To educate children the importance of character traits through stories and exercises.” To accomplish this, Nakamura is teaching “Character Traits” at Pacific Rim Elementary School Kids

Care Program. Nakamura goes back to her former grammar school at Pacific Rim Elementary school two times a month during the school year to work with the children in the pr ogram. She wants make a car eer of teaching and has de veloped lesson plans and fun acti vities for other students to use in the future to contin ue to teac h these children the importance of character traits. Teaching is nothing new to Nakamura. In fifth g rade at Pacific Rim she used her earlyout time to v olunteer in the

kindergarten classroom. She has worked with c hildren at vacation Bible school, summers on Indian reservations, trips to Mexico and last y ear a w eeklong summer camp in Costa Rica. She has given more than 300 community service hours to teaching and w orking with children in her community. Nakamura will complete her Gold Award this year,which represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting. She has been a girl scout for 11 years in troop 1116, service unit 641 with Diedr e Girod as her troop leader.

Don Diego Scholarship winners celebrate at the 2012 Don Diego Gala, with Don Diego Board Vice Chairman Jon Liss; 2012 scholarship recipients RaeAnne van Tol, Kirby Challman, Kendall Lynch and Meredith Lehmann, and Don Diego Board Chairman Paul Ecke III. Courtesy photo

Scholarships offered to local high schoolers DEL MAR — The Don Diego Scholarship Foundation is offering four $5,000 college scholarships to outstanding high school seniors throughout San Diego County who have participated in the San Diego County Fair and/or other activities associated with the Del Mar Fairgrounds.The deadline to apply is April 1, 2013. Eligibility requirements and the application form are at dondiegofund.org/files/pdf/201 3DonDiegoScholarshipApplica tion.pdf. Applications can be completed online or in print. For questions, contact Executive Director Chana Mannen at cmannen@ sdfair.com or (858) 792-4210. In 2013, the foundation will award one $5,000 scholarship in eac h of the f ollowing categories: 1) 4-H member; 2) Future Farmers of America (FFA) member; 3) employee at the Fair, Racetrack or Fairgrounds; and 4) e xhibitor at the Fair. Over the y ears, scholarships have gone to students across the county , from

Fallbrook and Escondido to Alpine and El Cajon; from Carlsbad and Encinitas. Recipients like 2003 recipient Alysha Stehly, who co-owns Vesper Vineyards in Valley Center, often return to the region to make a difference in their community and the scholarship enables them to pursue their college and career dreams.

The Foundation was named after Tom Hernandez, who served as the Fair’s goodwill ambassador fr om 19471984. Funds are raised through an ann ual gala, the Amigo Club whic h offers entrance to y ear-round Fairgrounds events for just $99, and donations. For more information, visit dondiegofund.org.

ENCINITAS — Every Saturday and Sunday in February drop by the San Dieguito Heritage Museum, 450 Quail Gardens Drive, from noon to 4 p.m. for a history lesson and craft activities. The promise of a new life in the West led many pioneer families to b rave the elements and risks of a tr eacherous journey. The experience was long and scary but children still f ound ways to play and enjo y themselves. Long before computers or video games, pioneer children had to use their imaginations to stitc h their o wn dolls. They would use whatever they could find to cr eate their dolls: socks,discarded rags, bottles, flowers, cornhusks, and even vegetables. Come to the m useum during the month of February and create your own rag doll. Each weekend there will be free hands-on experiences that highlight a certain era of San Dieguito history. These activities will change monthly.The historic eras and corresponding activities may include: — Native American period: rock painting and acorn grinding, — Rancho Period:

Play like pioneer children and make your own rag doll Saturday and Sunday from noon to 4 p.m. in February at the San Dieguito Heritage Museum. Courtesy photo

adobe brick making, cattle roping and soap making — Pioneer Da ys: butter making, washboard clothes washing and quilt making — Flower-growing period: seed planting, plant identification and plant dyeing — Surfing and concern

for ocean ecology: balsa minisurfboard shaping, kelp cookie making and ocean a wareness experiences. For more information visit the museum’s Web site at sdheritage.org or call the museum office at (760) 6329711.


THE COAST NEWS

A18

OBAMACARE

PET WEEK OF THE

Rosco is a 2-year-old, 60-pound, neutered, male Bassadore. (That’s a bassett / Labrador mix.) Rosco and his brother, Flash, are both easygoing and friendly. Flash could use a fe w more walks and a fe w less treats. Their previous people moved to a place that doesn’t allow pets. Rosco's $145 adoption fee includes his medical exam, up to date vaccinations, neuter, and microchip identification. For more information about other do gs, cats and r abbits that

CONTINUED FROM A4

need families call (760) 753-6413, log on to sdpets.org, or visit Rancho Coastal Humane Society at 389 Requeza Street in Encinitas. Kennels are open 11 a.m. to 5 p .m., Wednesday through Monday.

Sophie in the spotlight RANCHO SANTA FE — Last week, Helen Woodward Animal Center added a heroic 2-year-old Maltipoo named Sophie to its list of r esident orphan animals. The canine, who had defended a 7-month old puppy from a vicious coyote attack, charmed Center staffers with her gentle nuzzles and friendly tail-wags, in spite of the multiple bite wounds still healing along her nec k, shoulder and side. Little did workers know that in onl y a matter of days, Sophie would have the hearts of do g-lovers across America too. Now thriving under center veterinary care, Sophie and her story quickly gained media attention, eventually reaching Shepard Smith’s evening segment on F ox National Ne ws. While the pup w as healing from the latest pr ocedure to her most serious nec k injury, the media air ed Helen Woodward Animal Center’s contact information and the calls began pouring in. With the large number of requests and inquiries rising, Helen Woodward Animal Center is now requesting that a 300 word-or-less essay accompany each application, stating why Sophie would be best suited to the potential adopter. “It is going to be a v ery difficult decision,” said Shannon Bush, Customer Service Lead, “but Sophie is worth it. She really embodies every characteristic people hope to find in a furr y family

switch to Medi-Cal by the end of 2014. As many as 1 million more low-income Californians are newly eligible but not y et signed up f or Medi-Cal, the state’s variant of Medicaid. Not all will enroll even though the federal government will pay all their medical costs in 2014-2016 and 90 per cent after that. Those who do get insured will cost the state less than $75 million, below even the amount of state tax r evenue likely be cr eated by the 100,000 new healthcare jobs the Berkeley researchers estimate the ne w health insurance system will spawn. Meanwhile, 85 percent of whatever it costs to inf orm and sign up ne w Medi-Cal patients will be paid b y the federal government. The 15 percent state contribution may be less than what it no w pays for emergency care to the uninsured.

STREETSCAPE CONTINUED FROM A4

Sophie, the heroic 2-year-old Maltipoo who defended a 7-monthold puppy from a coyote attack is doing well and garnering national attention with her story. Courtesy photo

member…loyalty, heart and sincere devotion. She also happens to be really, really cute.” Sophie should be full y healed and ready for adoption within two weeks. Helen Woodward Animal Center would like to unite the pup with her ne w family on Valentine’s Day. If you would like to adopt Sophie, submit your application along with a 300 word-or-less essay, no later than Feb. 10. Applications can be downloaded at: animalcenter.org/_downloads/a d_AdoptionApplicationDogs.p df. Send applications and essays to 6461 El Apajo Road, PO Box 64, in Rancho Santa Fe, 92067 or fax to (858) 756-0605 or email to J onellel@ animalcenter.org. For Sophie updates, click on animalcenter.org/adoptions/sophie-canine-combatscoyote.aspx.

Only two of the 13 board members own real estate on Highway 101.Two of our board members rented space and found they could not mak e it in Leucadia, as other businesses have as well (too many to name), given the hostile r oad conditions and current physical environment that does not encourage buying enough local business. The volunteer (unpaid) president of L101 is William Morrison, a landscape ar chitect,also a Leucadian,who has served tirelessly as board president and is a f ounding member of the group. He is not paid for his position and holds no contr act with the city of Encinitas nor has he ever. The board mem-

So enticing are these benefits that even Arizona’s ultraconservative GOP Go v. Jan Brewer reversed course and decided to take her state into the new system’s expanded Medicaid setup. Even before new MediCal enrollments begin in earnest, reported Anthony Wright, executive director of the Sacramento-based consumer advocate group Health Access, California was getting a net benefit of $500 million per year from Affordable Health. That money was one reason Gov. Jerry Brown could propose a balanced new budget this year. Once the system is full y operational next year, he said, the net benefit to Calif ornia should be upw ards of $1 billion, compared with previous state health care spending. Wright and Lucia both said that while neither the y nor anyone else can y et pinpoint the e xact amount of California’s fiscal Obamacar e bonanza, “there is the opportunity for a lot of ad ditional

savings.” Beside the benefits to newly-eligible Californians, more than 2.1 million o ver-65 Medicare patients in the state are already getting fr ee preventive services like mammograms, pap smears and colonoscopies, or free annual visits with their doctor s. That’s in addition to 6 million state residents who stopped f orking over co-pays for such preventive services when the fir st parts of the Affordable Health Care Act became effective in 2011. All is certainl y not perfect in this r osy Obamacare picture. Even if everyone eligible enrolls, there will still be more than 1 million of the uninsured living in California, with counties and hospitals mostly on the hook f or their emergency room care. Ex-Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger famously claimed that eac h of them costs everyone who pa ys for health insurance $200 per year, calling it a “hidden tax.” His figure was pretty close to

accurate, says Wright, who adds this means health insurance buyers will sta y on the hook for about $200 million – much less than before, but still a considerable amount. Disputes over who should fund this safety-net car e will continue through the spring and into future budget-writing seasons, keeping politicians busy. But it’s high time to recognize the minim um that Obamacare offers California: Coverage for many hundreds of thousands of the previously uninsured, plus savings both to low-income individuals and the state that to gether will mount well into the billions. Email Thomas Elias a t tdelias@aol.com. Elias is author of the curr ent book "T he Burzynski Breakthrough: The Most Promising Cancer Treatment and the Government's Campaign to Squelch It," now available in an updated fourth printing. For more Elias columns, go to californiafocus.net.

bers are all quality of life advocates, have lived in the immediate community for years and love their Leucadia/Encinitas and want to see it impr ove along with the majority of the community. No one fr om the board wants a Starbucks, the GAP or thr ee-to-five story office buildings along our main street Highway 101. The Streetscape concept was not imposed by outsiders. It has been fully vetted, a number of times and o ver the years by the comm unity dating back to 1992 when the Leucadia Specific Plan w as adopted by the comm unity and approved by the past City Council. The same feedback (from the Leucadia Specific Plan/vision plan fr om 1992) was received when the Streetscape community meet-

ings and workshops began in 2007 leading up to the Streetscape Plan concept 4A being adopted b y the City Council in January 2010 (note: four council member s voted for it, not three as as was suggested) in January 2010 with heavy support by the community. This is not a plan that was stuffed down anyone’s throats at any point in time.It is in fact the culmination of decades of feedback and goal setting/visioning from the public and business o wners on Highway 101. As usual, there will always be people who pr efer to see no c hange in Leucadia and to “keep it funky.” Finally, this is no “trendy, generic plan” being imposed on your (or my) neighborhood. It’s what the majority of Leucadians and businesses

want for the do wntown Leucadia area. Even residents of surrounding cities w ant an improved Leucadia downtown they can safely visit and enjoy. After decades of paying property taxes with fe w to no improvements in our seaside town, it’s now Leucadia’s time. The vision is f or a more beautiful coastal highway corridor, where visitors and residents alike can come to recreate, relax, shop and dine without concern f or their safety , and where businesses thrive. It’s about preserving the good of what w e have and enhancing what no longer works! I hope this sets the record straight.Thank you. Patricia Bell is a Leucadia 101 MainStreet Association board member and Leucadia resident.

effectiveness in running projects, making proper, timely, findings and filings. Right now, we have a kind of vacuum. Because the City’s been doing things wr ong, can’t admit its mistak es, so as to stop repeating them, because these mistak es weren’t before brought to the Coastal Commission’ s attention, doesn’t mean City actions were correct. Lack of qualification and lac k of transparency have negatively impacted our City f or years. Staff’s been going along with the agenda of a pr evious council majority , too

long “ensconced” in Encinitas. We’re hoping for a new paradigm. On flimsy, illegal and unsubstantiated grounds, residents adjacent to the North 101 Corridor and local commuters shouldn’t be forced to be part of a “lane-diet nightmare,” as characterized by Councilmember Kristin Gaspar. Staff, in writing its report, tried to “have it both ways.” They wanted to stand behind previous methods and recommendations, also acknowledging, through their Agenda #5 recommendation, that the Coastal Commission is the “expert” with regard to traffic impact being a vital element of environmental review. Not only is our comm unity literally being di vided by staff’s inconsistency, but staff’s “hedging its bets,” with a r eport that implies, “we’re doing it right; the Coastal Commission’s wrong; we recommend you go by its direction,” is alienating Council from a public agency, the Coastal Commission, which most citizens in Encinitas deepl y respect. Our coastline is vital to our community’s character and quality of life. Lynn Marr, Leucadia

Encinitas staff divides community, alienates CONTINUED FROM A4 Council from Coastal continuing to waste taxpayer money on a project that will Commission

LETTERS

never get built? Our v ery popular Mayor is against the project and if histor y holds, SANDAG will r espect his wishes on that too! Thank you SANDAG for sticking by our Mayor and the v oters in Oceanside! Mandy Barre, Oceanside

FEB. 8, 2013

Staff should have stood by proper Encinitas protocol with respect to our Gener al and 101 Corridor Specific Plans and our Local Coastal Program, staff’s wording for the January 30 Agenda, as well as its r ecommendation to abide by Coastal Commission direction. The Coastal Commission is the expert on the Coastal Act, not staff, not Council. We need a shak e-up on staff. Lack of tr aining and qualifications is affecting


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FEB. 8, 2013

concluded that the c harter petition would have a disparate impact on minority students, lower socioeconomic students, students with disabilities, and English Learner students. The district team also found that the petition did not adequately describe how OPA would achieve a racial and ethnic balance in its student enrollment reflective of the CUSD population. Additionally, the team stated that the petition did not adequately explain how OPA’s governing body, based in Chino Valley, would effectively oversee a school over 80 miles away in Car lsbad or ho w it would cover the start-up costs of opening a c harter in Carlsbad. The team’s findings were presented to the board during a public action meeting on Dec. 5, 2012. After taking directive from the CUSD review team, the board heard final public comments and made its decision on the c harter petition. Dozens of par ents and teachers spoke out in f avor and against the charter school at the meeting. Some argued that CUSD students deser ved a choice of schools, while other speakers stated that CUSD offers excellent schools and claimed that OPA selectively chooses its students. OPA representatives were not allowed to present on their proposed charter or ans wer questions raised by the board during the meeting. After over an hour-long presentation by the district’s review team, OPA administrators were granted five minutes each to speak only during the public comment portion of the meeting. Beam said that he and

other OPA staff belie ve that the CUSD was determined to deny its charter petition from the start and did not portr ay the petition fairly. “(The district’s) request for a response for several questions (about the petition) pretty much told us the r easons why they were planning on denying this in advance,” said Beam about the petition’s initial review by the CUSD . “There was no meaningful program or meaningful dialogue about our pr ogram beyond what was on the (petition) paper.” He said that contr ary to the CUSD review team’s findings, OPA would specialize in meeting the needs of underrepresented students, including special needs students and English Learner students. He also said that OPA had a great deal of inter est from teachers wishing to appl y for positions at a c harter location in Carlsbad. Lovely maintained that OPA’s charter petition w as reviewed fairly without bias. “We (CUSD administr ation) went through (OPA’s petition) very methodically, and we spent an inor dinate amount of time to mak e sure we looked at everything objectively,” said Lovely. She said that because the district evaluates charter petitions with state standar ds, there is no possibility of prejudice in the r eview. “The district really has no option but to follow the Ed Code,” she said. Lovely also said that OPA was granted a fair opportunity to present their proposed charter during the review process. Two members of the district review team met with Beam and another OPA representative to ad dress matters within the petition bef ore reaching a conclusion, according to Lovely.

The review team stated that it spent o ver 200 hour s assessing the petition. Furthermore, the district board’s governance policies do not allow them to hear presentations directly from petitioners during internal r eview processes or public meetings, she said. Hoping to ha ve the district’s decision appealed, OPA has submitted its original petition and supplemental materials to the county. “We also hope to clarify some misinformation that the district used in their denial, ” said Beam. Both CUSD and OPA representatives will give presentations on the c harter petition before the county at the 6 p.m. public meeting Feb. 13. The county will then make a decision on OP A’s appeal at its ne xt meeting in March, according to Lor a Duzyk, SDCBOE’s assistant superintendent of business services. Over the past 11 y ears, the county boar d has hear d five charter petition appeals, according to Duzyk. Literary First’s charter in El Cajon was approved, while three petitions w ere denied and the last was withdrawn. If OPA’s appeal is approved, the charter will operate under the countyinstead of the district. If the appeal is denied, OPA has the option of appealing to the state. “We have faith that the county or if necessar y the state will judge the petition fairly,” said Beam. “I would hope that (the SDCBOE) would honor the findings of the (CUSD) staff and uphold the boar d’s decision on the charter. “We’re confident that our findings are accurate,” said Lovely.

on 2nd Amendment rights. “This would respect hunters’ rights,” Barth said. The proposal resembles the assault w eapons ban that expired in 2004. The legislation would ban the sale, transfer, importation or manufacturing of certain

assault weapons. It also bans magazines that can hold more than 10 rounds. Lemon Grove and Del Mar have passed a similar resolution. Additionally, the resolution authorized Barth to join Mayors Against Illegal

Guns. More than 720 ma yors, including Chula Vista Mayor Cheryl Cox, from 40 states are part of the group. The National Rifle Association and other gunrights advocates have vehemently opposed any proposal to curb assault rifles.

Barth also said there’s a mental health component to mass shootings that can’t be denied. She said she’s going to monitor state and federal legislation, as well as other mental-health efforts, and potentially bring back more information to Council.

ilies had f allen in lo ve with. Our entrepreneurial adventure began, with my brother as the business side and m yself on the cr eative side as the chocolatier.The rest is history. LTP: Your business has exploded, with three chocolate cafes in Southern Calif ornia and a wholesale business that has expanded nationwide. What are your plans for future growth or are you comfortable with where you are at? MA: Yes, we have been very blessed by the support of our chocolate and our mission to arouse the senses. I believe

the whole world needs this ... and we just might be the ones to share it with them. LTP: With Valentine’s Day coming up, tell me about some of your chocolates and related treats that w ould make good gifts. MA: Our Love Child bonbon is the r esult of tw o Valentine’s favorites — the chocolate covered strawberry and dessert wine — becoming one. We soak dried str awberries in port wine bef ore enveloping them in a decadent dark chocolate and port wine ganache, and then enr obe

them in dark chocolate and a drizzle of white c hocolate. We only make them once a y ear, they are coveted that m uch more. We also offer an Aphrodisiac Bonbon Collection featuring bonbons and truffles infused with luscious fruits, fragrant herbs and exotic spices to get y ou in the mood. We can r ecommend wine pairings in our cafes, as well, to take your evening to the next level. And, for the little ones, we have the Bundle of Love, a bag of mini c hocolate bars to shar e at parties or

school. Chuao has thr ee San Diego locations. The Lumberyard in Encinitas, UTC, and Del Mar Highlands. Get more information at chuaochocolatier.com.

In 2008 Carey felt driven to experiment with the abstract expressionist technique of throwing paint pioneer ed by Jackson Pollock. Unlike Pollock, however, Carey discovered a preference for having a subject to anc hor her paintings. With the gestur al technique of thr owing, splashing and dripping paint onto lar ge canvases, she creates abstract impressionist works of art infused with the essence of her subject, such as tangled bir d nests or the blossoming c herry trees in “Cherry Blossom

Storm,” the signature piece of her exhibit currently at the Japanese Friendship Gardens. Acknowledging the importance of the viewer in the artistic process, Carey says, “The audience has the po wer of determining the status of an artist and painting, and also determining the interpretation of the artist’ s own interpretation.” Excited by this concept of relationship between art and audience, Carey has created a 21-block montage f or her “Sakura Fubuki“ (tr anslated Cherry Blossom Storm) exhibit,

which will evolve as individual pieces are purchased and removed throughout the tw omonth show. She says,“It gives a transparency to the symbiotic relationship of artist and audience.” Carey’s work has been shown in many national exhibitions, including the National Catholic Museum exhibition at the Historical Society of Washington, DC, as well as internationally at the Cultur e Inside Gallery in Luxembourg. “Creating A Storm; Sakura Fubuki,” a solo exhibit

of gestural paintings and stone art by Diana Carey, is currently on display at the J apanese Friendship Gardens in Balboa Park through April 28. Learn more about the artist and her current exhibit at dianacareyart.blogspot.com

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TROUBLE AT TRESTLES? Pro surfer Kelly Slater carves a wave during a surf contest at Lower Trestles. On Friday, officials in Sacramento will decide whether to recommend Trestles for the National Register of Historic Places. The Navy and Marine Corps oppose the designation, saying it could interfere with training. Surfers and other groups have voiced support, adding the designation would protect the area from development. Photo by Jared Whitlock

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MiraCosta College, and TriCity Hospital, Galaraneau said that it is, “an ideal site to add density.” Galaraneau also explained that it w as necessary for McMillin to build the additional 156 units that do not meet Carlsbad’s housing requirements in order to make the pr oject economically viable to build. Environmental advocates have opposed the project because the site includes sensitive habitats and borders the historic Marr on Adobe and El Salto Falls.

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tion at the r equest of citizens, and that “something needs to be done.” She believes Feinstein’s legislation would protect people without infringing

LICK THE PLATE CONTINUED FROM A12

ing Chuao with y our brother Richard. You settled in Encinitas. What was it a bout this area that appealed to you? MA: After my culinary studies in P aris, my brother and I were looking for our next adventure. He had married a native San Diegan woman and, as USCD alums, we both had a special place in our hearts f or this city. We also saw a lack of fine chocolate here, so we set up shop in Encinitas, a laid back beach town that our fam-

BRUSH WITH ART CONTINUED FROM A9

sive and negligent homes. Carey’s work acquired an additional dimension when she began breaking the stones, allowing more abstract images to emerge from the cr acked and broken surfaces. These “contemporary frescoes” won acclaim as Best of Show, First Place, and a Special Award at the 2001 Del Mar Fair. This body of w ork paved the way for her curr ent abstract impressionist style.

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While the Quarry Creek residential project was originally going to be pr esented in a Planning Commission public hearing on Wednesday, McMillin was granted a continuance to finish mitigation eff orts with the city of Oceanside on the project’s effects on tr affic. The project will now be presented at the F eb. 20 Planning Commission meeting. The Quarry Creek residential project must receive approval in tw o Planning Commission hearings and two City Council hearings to gain final authorization from the city, said Lynch.

Lick the Plate can now be heard on KPRi, 102.1 FM Monday-Friday during the 7pm hour. David Boylan is founder of Artichoke Creative and Artichoke Apparel, an Encinitas based marketing firm and clothing line. Reach him at david@artichoke-creative.com or (858) 395-6905.

Kay Colvin is an art consultant and director of the L Street Fine Art Gallery in San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter. She specializes in promoting emerging and mid-career artists and bringing enrichment programs to elementary schools through The Kid’s College. Contact her at kaycolvin@lstreetfineart.com.

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Farm, but he didn’t last there because they could not gi ve him enough hour s. So, he went to work at a warehouse driving a fork lift for a while. “Working at a w arehouse was not my thing,” he said. “He went off in search of a cooking job. “I actually applied for a job at Mic hael’s in Santa Monica. It was pretty big back then.The chef told me if was serious a bout this I should go to culinary school,” he said. He signed up at Western Culinary Institute and excelled. He graduated in 1991 and went to w ork for the Hotel Del Coronado as a seasonal part-time, outside chef. “I was outside making Cesar Salads and Shrimp cocktails,” he said. “I got my break when the c hef pulled me up to the Prince of Wales — it w as their fine dinning place. He saw I could handle it and I stayed there for about two years.” He went on to open the Lowes Coronado Bay as a cook and then w as pulled back to the Prince of Wales, he said. When the hotel management decided to c hange the whole concept of the r estaurant, they explored getting a well known chef to head it, but they gave him a chance to compete for the job,which he won, he said. “I planned a men u and did a tasting f or 20 people,” he said.“They decided ‘this is our guy,’” he said. There he sta yed for about five years, until he was approached to be chef at the Marine Room. “I wasn’t there very long when I was approached to be the chef of Dak ota’s downtown. “I was there to get more experience in a free-standing restaurant.All I had done had been at hotels or r esorts,” he said. The restaurant at the time had a southw estern influence, but he had little experience in that br and of fare. “They sent me to Ne w Mexico, I went and ate f or three or four days and then came back to see what w e could here,” he said. There he stayed for 2 ? years until he w as invited to be the c hef at a br and new restaurant Baleen at Paradise Point. “From there to a local beach and tennis club f or four years and no w I am here,” he said. He said all his mo ving around was to try to do something different, “I like change and I like to teach people and learn from them,” he said. He said he took the Rancho Santa Fe job because he is at a time in his life when he wants to settle down. “I can’t keep popping all around. I have six kids.I don’t know how I had time to do all that,” he said. But he has a confession to make. He loves all kinds of fast foods. “At Taco Bell I love their Burrito Supreme or Taco Supreme,” he said.


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City of Encinitas Planning and Building Department NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING AND PENDING ACTION ON ADMINISTRATIVE APPLICATIONS AND COASTAL DEVELOPMENT PERMITS The Planning & Building Department of the City of Encinitas is currently reviewing the following Administrative Applications. Item 2 requires an Administrative Hearing. The application submittals are available for review and comment during regular business hours, 7:00 AM to 6:00 PM Monday through Friday. City Hall is closed alternate Fridays (2/15, 3/1 etc.) and closed Monday, February 18, 2012 in observance of Presidents’ Day. 1. CASE NUMBERS: 12-194 CDP FILING DATE: December 3, 2012 APPLICANT: Brookfield Del Mar Builders LOCATION: 809 Dolphin Circle PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The applicant requests approval of a Coastal Development Permit for the use of temporary sales trailer associated with a previously approved residential subdivision. The project site is located in the Rural Residential 2 (RR-2) Zone and Coastal Zone. (APN: 254-740-19) ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: The project is exempt from environmental review pursuant to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guideline Section 15304(e). Section 15304(e) exempts from environmental review minor public or private alterations in the condition of land, such as minor temporary uses having negligible or no permanent effects on the environment PRIOR TO 6:00 P.M. TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2013, ANY INTERESTED PERSON MAY REVIEW THE APPLICATION FOR ITEM 1 AND PRESENT TESTIMONY, ORALLY OR IN WRITING, TO THE PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT. WRITTEN TESTIMONY IS PREFERRED IN ORDER TO HAVE A RECORD OF THE COMMENTS RECEIVED.

PUBLIC HEARING FOR ITEM 2: Tuesday, February 19, 2013 at 5:00 p.m., to be held at the Planning and Building Depar tment, Lilac Room, 505 South Vulcan Ave, Encinitas. THE CITY OF ENCINITAS IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC ENTITY AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELIGION, VETERANS STATUS OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICE. IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT/SECTION 504 REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973, IF YOU NEED SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THESE MEETINGS, PLEASE CONTACT THE PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT AT (760) 633-2710. 2. CASE NUMBER: 12-137 MIN/CDP FILING DATE: September 4, 2012 APPLICANT: Rogers LOCATION: 1911 Sheridan Road PROJECT DESCRIPTION: A request for a Minor Use Permit and Coastal Development Permit to convert an existing, nonpermitted barn to a two-story, 2,101 SF, detached accessory structure (consisting of a one-car garage and guest house) located in the rear yard. The project is located at 1911 Sheridan Road (APN 216-06309) in the Residential-3 (R-3) zone within the Community of Leucadia and the Coastal Zone of the City of Encinitas. ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: The project is found to be exempt from Environmental Review pursuant to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines Section 15303(e), which exempts accessory (appurtenant) structures including garages, carports, patios, swimming pools, and fences. PRIOR TO OR AT THE HEARING TO BE HELD AT 5:00 P.M. ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 2013, ANY INTERESTED PERSON MAY REVIEW THE APPLICATION FOR ITEM 2 AND PRESENT TESTIMONY, ORALLY OR IN WRITING, TO THE PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT. WRITTEN TESTIMONY IS PREFERRED IN ORDER TO HAVE A RECORD OF THE COMMENTS RECEIVED. If additional information is not required, the Planning and Building Department will render determinations on the applications, pursuant to Section 2.28.090 of the City of Encinitas Municipal Code, after the close of the review periods. Appeals of the Department’s determinations for Items 1 or 2, accompanied by the appropriate filing fee, may be filed within 15 calendar days from the date of the determination. Appeals will be considered by the City Council pursuant to Chapter 1.12 of the Municipal Code. Any filing of an appeal will suspend this action as well as any processing of permits in reliance thereon in accordance with Encinitas Municipal Code Section 1.12.020(D)(1) until such time as an action is taken on the appeal. Items 1 and 2 are located within the Coastal Zone and require issuance of regular Coastal Development Permits. The actions of the Planning and Building Director on Items 1 or 2 may not be appealed to the California Coastal Commission. Under California Government Code Sec. 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or prior to the date and time of the determination. For further information on Items 1, contact Andrew Maynard, Associate Planner, at (760) 633-2718 or amaynard@encinitasca.gov; on Item 2, contact J. Dichoso at (760) 633-2681, or by e-mail at jdichoso@encinitasca.gov; or the Planning and Building Department at (760) 633-2710, 505 S. Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024 or planning@encinitasca.gov. 02/08/13 CN 14557

T.S. No. 2012-3127 Order No. 725137968 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/24/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by the trustee in the her einafter described pr operty under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by

the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount ma y be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: FALLBROOK SELF ST ORAGE, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION Duly Appointed Trustee: S.B.S. TRUST DEED NETWORK, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION Recorded 5/25/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0372921 in book XX, page XX of Official Records in the office of the Recor der of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale:3/1/2013 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entr ance to the east county regional center b y statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other reasonable estimated charges: $216,001.18 Pr operty being sold “as is – Where is” Street Address or other common designation of the purported real property: NKA NEC OF AMMUNITION DRIVE AND ALTURAS ROAD FALLBROOK, CA 92028 A.P.N. 104161-37-00; 104-161-39-00 SEE

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CITY OF CARLSBAD ORDINANCE NO. CS-199

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CITY OF CARLSBAD

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, CALIFORNIA, APPROVING A MUNICIPAL CODE AMENDMENT CONSISTING OF AMENDMENTS TO TITLE 2 AND TITLE 21 OF THE CARLSBAD MUNICIPAL CODE TO MODIFY REFERENCES TO THE HOUSING AND REDEVELOPMENT COMMISSION. CASE NAME: MODIFY REFERENCES TO HOUSING & REDEVELOPMENT COMMISSION CASE NO.: MCA 12-03 The City Council of the City of Carlsbad, California, does ordain as follows: SECTION 1: That Section 2.40.010 of the Carlsbad Municipal Code is amended to read as follows: 2.40.010 Established. Pursuant to Section 34291 of the California Health and Safety Code, a housing commission is created as an advisory body to the city council and community development commission. SECTION 2: That Section 2.40.060 of the Carlsbad Municipal Code is amended to read as follows: 2.40.060 Functions. The housing commission shall advise and make recommendations to the community development commission and/or the city council on the following matters: 1. Establishment of, or amendment of affordable housing programs, policies and regulations; 2. Adoption of, or amendments to, the general plan housing element, and related strategies or programs; 3. Review of project concept and affordability objectives of off-site combined projects as defined by Chapter 21.85 of this code and located outside of the master plan area, specific plan area or subdivision which has the inclusionary housing requirement; 4. Requests for financial assistance and/or incentives for the development of affordable housing projects; 5. Requests to sell or purchase affordable housing credits for transaction/purchases of ten credits or more to satisfy an inclusionary housing obligation; 6. The commission shall annually report to the city council on the status and progress of affordable housing programs;

Summary of Ordinance No. CS-200 per Government Code §36933(c) An Ordinance of the City Council of the City of Carlsbad, California Amending Title 13, Chapter 13.10; Title 15, Chapter 15.08; Title 18, Chapter 18.42; Title 20, Chapter 20.44; Title 21, Chapters 21.85 and 21.90 Regarding Fees and Fee Deferrals The proposed ordinance would allow a developer the option of deferring certain development impact fees from the map recordation, grading permit issuance or building permit issuance stage, to the request for final building inspection stage. The following development impact fees would be eligible for deferral: • Park in Lieu Fees – utilized for the development, construction or rehabilitation of new or existing public park and recreational facilities; • Local Facilities Management Plan – utilized for the construction of improvements or facilities identified in a local facilities management plan and which are not otherwise financed by any other fee; • Traffic Impact – utilized to construct or finance various circulation road improvements; • Master Drainage (PLDA) – utilized for constructing planned local drainage facilities; • Sewer Connection – utilized for the construction of improvements to the sewer system; • Sewer Capacity & Benefit Area - utilized for the construction of improvements to the sewer system; • Housing Impact & In Lieu – utilized for the affordable housing needs of lower-income households.

7. Other special assignments as requested by the community development commission and/or city council as related to the development of affordable housing.

The fee deferral program would only be available to the following types of projects under the following conditions:

SECTION 3: That Section 21.54.040(B) of the Carlsbad Municipal Code is amended to read as follows:

• Residential projects of five or more dwelling units;

B. For purposes of this section, “city planner” shall be interchangeable with “city engineer” and “housing and neighborhood services director”, and “city council” shall be interchangeable with “community development commission”.

• New commercial, office, or industrial buildings or building additions (but not TI’s);

SECTION 4: That Section 21.54.140(A) of the Carlsbad Municipal Code is amended to read as follows:

• All deferred fees shall be paid prior to requesting a final inspection for each individual building permit;

A. This section shall apply to those decisions or determinations of the city planner or housing and neighborhood services director made pursuant to this title or city planner determinations pursuant to Title 19 or Title 20. Accordingly, in this section, "housing and neighborhood services director" shall be interchangeable with "city planner;" "housing and neighborhood services department" shall be interchangeable with "planning division;" and "community development commission" shall be interchangeable with "city council."

• Fees shall be calculated and paid at an amount based on the City Council adopted fee schedule in effect at the time of requesting a final inspection; and

SECTION 5: That Section 21.54.150(A) of the Carlsbad Municipal Code is amended to read as follows:

• This development impact fee deferral program would sunset two years from the effective date of the new ordinances unless extended by action of the City Council.

A. This section shall apply to those decisions or determinations of the planning commission made pursuant to this title or Title 19. Accordingly, in this section, "housing and neighborhood services director" shall be interchangeable with "city planner;" "housing and neighborhood services department" shall be interchangeable with "planning division;" and "community development commission" shall be interchangeable with "city council."

A certified copy of the full text of the proposed ordinance is posted in the Office of the City Clerk, 1200 Carlsbad Village Drive, Carlsbad, CA 92008.

EFFECTIVE DATE: This ordinance shall be effective thirty days after its adoption; and the city clerk shall certify the adoption of this ordinance and cause the a summary of the ordinance prepared by the City Attorney to be published at least once in a newspaper of general circulation in the City of Carlsbad within fifteen days after its adoption. INTRODUCED AND FIRST READ at a regular meeting of the Carlsbad City Council on the 8th day of January, 2013, and thereafter. PASSED AND ADOPTED at a regular meeting of the City Council of the City of Carlsbad on the 29th day of January 2013, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Council Members Hall, Packard, Wood, Blackburn, Douglas. NOES: None. ABSENT: None. APPROVED AS TO FORM AND LEGALITY CELIA A. BREWER, City Attorney MATT HALL, Mayor ATTEST: KAREN R. KUNDTZ, Assistant City Clerk (SEAL) 02/08/13 CN 14542

CITY OF ENCINITAS PUBLIC NOTICE OF COMMISSION RECRUITMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Encinitas is accepting applications f or appointment to City Commissions. Application forms may be obtained fr om the City Clerk’s Office, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, via e-mail from khollywood@encinitasca.gov, or from the City’s website www.encinitasca.gov. All applicants must be registered voters in the City of Encinitas. ALL APPLICATIONS ARE DUE BY FEBRUARY 28, 2013, 6:00 P.M. Applicants will be asked to attend the March 13, 2013, City Council meeting to briefly discuss (2 to 3 min utes) their qualifications and inter est in ser ving on a commission. Appointments are scheduled to be made by the City Council at its meeting on Mar ch 20, 2013, 6:00 p.m. Terms will begin March 2013. Applicants who would like specific information on the various Commissions should contact the following Departments: Commission for the Arts – City Manager’s Office at 633-2746 Environmental Commission – Public Works Department 633-2827 Parks and Recreation Commission - Parks and Recreation at 633-2740 Planning Commission - Planning Department at 633-2681 Senior Citizens Commission - Parks and Recreation at 633-2740 Traffic Commission - Traffic Engineering at 633-2705 The following is a list of appointments to be made: COMMISSION FOR THE ARTS -- Three (3) appointments to be made for two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; ENVIRONMENTAL COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; P ARKS AND RECREATION COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending March 2015; PLANNING COMMISSION – Two (2) appointments to be made for two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015 (Terms are expiring for the representatives of Cardiff by the Sea and Old Encinitas); SENIOR CITIZEN COMMISSION – Three (3) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending Mar ch 2015; TRAFFIC COMMISSION – Two (2) appointments to be made f or two-year terms with a term ending March 2015 (Terms are expiring for the representatives of Cardiff by the Sea and Olivenhain). For more information, please contact Kathy Hollywood at 760-633-2601. 01/18/13, 01/25/13, 02/08/13 CN 14460

EXHIBIT "A" LEGAL DESCRIP TION ATTACHED HERETO AND MADE PART OF EXHIBIT "A" THE LAND REFERRED TO HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN THE UNINCORPORATED AREA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AND IS DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PARCEL 1: THAT PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SAN BERNARDINO MERIDIAN, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, WHICH IS 600.00 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, SAID POINT BEING ALSO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE

LAND CONVEYED BY ANDREW J. CLEMMENS TO ALBERT B. CLEMMENS, BY DEED D ATED MAY 19, 1911 AND RECORDED May 26, 1911 IN BOOK 523, PAGE 58 OF DEEDS, RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID CLEMMEN'S LAND , A DISTANCE OF 462.00 FEET TO THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED TO ALBERT B. CLEMMENS ET UX, RECORDED July 8, 1932 IN BOOK 142, PAGE 43 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS; THENCE ALONG THE EASTERLY LINE THEREOF NORTH 01 DEGREES 19' 49": EAST (RECORD NOR TH 00 DEGREES 47' 00" EAST) TO THE INTERSECTION WITH THE SOUTHEASTERLY RIGHT OF WAY OF LINE OF THE ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE RAILWAY RIGHT OF WAY; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID SOUTHEASTERL Y RIGHT OF WAY LINE TO THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTH-

WEST QUARTER OF SAID SEC TION 25; THENCE SOUTH ALONG THE SAID WEST LINE TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PARCEL OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, RECORDED June 11, 1942, IN BOOK 1351, PAGE 409 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION LYING WITHIN THE FOLLOWING DESCRIBED LAND. BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SEC TION 25, WHICH IS 600.00 FEET NORTH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25, SAID POINT BEING ALSO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE LAND CONVEYED BY ANDREW J. CLEMMENS TO ALBERT B. CLEMMENS, BY DEED D ATED MAY 19, 1911, AND RECORDED MAY 26, 1911, IN BOOK 523, PAGE 58 OF DEEDS, RECORDS OF SAN

PASSED AND ADOPTED at a Regular Meeting of the City Council of the City of Carlsbad, California, on the 29th day of January 2013, by the following vote, to wit: AYES: Council Members Hall, Packard, Wood, Blackburn, Douglas. NOES: None. 02/08/13 CN 14541

CITY OF ENCINITAS PLANNING AND BUILDING DEPARTMENT LEGAL NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BY THE CITY COUNCIL PLACE OF MEETING: Council Chambers, Civic Center 505 South Vulcan Avenue Encinitas, CA 92024 THE ABOVE MENTIONED AGENCY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY PUBLIC ENTITY AND DOES NOT DISCRIMINATE ON THE BASIS OF RACE, COLOR, ETHNIC ORIGIN, NATIONAL ORIGIN, SEX, RELIGION, VETERANS STATUS OR PHYSICAL OR MENTAL DISABILITY IN EMPLOYMENT OR THE PROVISION OF SERVICE. IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT/SECTION 504 REHABILITATION ACT OF 1973, IF YOU NEED SPECIAL ASSISTANCE TO PARTICIPATE IN THESE MEETINGS, PLEASE CONTACT THE CITY CLERK AT (760) 633-2601. It is hereby given that a Public Hearing will be held on Wednesday, February 20, 2013 at 6:00 p.m., or as soon as possible thereafter, by the Encinitas City Council to discuss the following hearing item of the City of Encinitas: CASE NUMBER: 12-124 MUPMOD/DR/CDP FILING DATE: September 4, 2012 APPLICANT: Lux Art Institute LOCATION: 1578 S. El Camino Real (APN: 262-160-16) APPELLANT: Donna Westbrook DESCRIPTION: Public Hearing to consider an appeal filed by Donna Westbrook of the Planning Commission’s approval of Major Use Permit Modification, Design Review Permit and Coastal Development Permit application to modify an existing use permit for the Lux Art Institute Museum to integrate the subject property with on-site facilities as part of the museum campus. The applicant is also proposing interior and exterior architectural improvements to the existing building on the subject property and to utilize it as an education center for the Lux Art Institute Museum. Site improvements are also proposed throughout the entire site with minor accessory structures in the rear yard for outdoor uses and events associated with the proposed education center. The subject property is located in the Residential 3 (R-3) zone and within the Southern El Camino Real Museum Overlay Zone and Coastal Zone in the City of Encinitas. ENVIRONMENTAL STATUS: The project has been determined to be exempt from environmental review pursuant to Section 15301(a) of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines. Section 15301(a) exempts interior or exterior alterations of existing private structures involving such things as interior partitions, plumbing, and electrical conveyances. This appeal will be considered by the City Council pursuant to Chapter 1.12 of the Municipal Code. Any person who wishes to submit a written position with arguments, documents, exhibits, letters, photos, charts, diagrams, videos, etc., addressing the challenged determination MUST submit these to the City Clerk by 5:00 P.M. on Wednesday, February 13, 2013, seven (7) calendar days prior to this hearing. No new information will be considered by the City Council after this deadline. Upon filing with the City Clerk, those items will be available to the public. Any questions, please contact the City Clerk at (760) 633 -2601. Under California Government Code Section 65009, if you challenge the nature of the proposed action in court, you may be limited to raising only the issues you or someone else raised regarding the matter described in this notice or written correspondence delivered to the City at or before the time and date of the determination. For further information, or to review the project application prior to the hearing, contact Roy Sapa’u, Senior Planner, at (760) 633-2734, or the Planning and Building Department at (760) 633-2710, 505 South Vulcan Avenue, Encinitas, CA 92024-3633. 02/08/13 CN 14556

DIEGO COUNTY; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID CLEMMENS' LAND A DISTANCE OF 462.00 FEET TO POINT; THENCE NORTH AT RIGHT ANGLES TO SAID NORTH LINE OF CLEMMENS' LAND TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY LINE OF AMMUNI-

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Coast News Legals From Page A20 TION ROAD AS CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, BY DEED RECORDED June 11, 1942, IN BOOK 1351, PAGE 409 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 12' 30" WEST 120.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING NORTH 89 DEGREES 12' 30" WEST 83.63 FEET TO THE BEGINNING OF A TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1050 FEET ; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE 158.81 FEET ; THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15' EAST 90.18 FEET ; THENCE NORTH 60 DEGREES 35' EAST 270.00 FEET TO POINT "X" OF THIS DESCRIPTION; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 15' 00" WEST 205.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. AND ALSO EXCEPTING THEREFROM THAT PORTION LYING SOUTHEASTERLY OF A LINE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID NOR THWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25; THENCE SOUTH 87 DEGREES 42' 00" WEST 362.99 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 18' 00" WEST 167.60 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 35 DEGREES 06' 00" WEST 143.32 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 59 DEGREES 01' 00" WEST 302.46 FEET TO THE EAST LINE OF THE TRACT OF LAND DESCRIBED IN DEED TO CLEMMENS AND WIFE DATED MAY 31, 1932 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 142, PAGE 43 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, AND THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING OF SAID LINE; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG A STRAIGHT ALONG A STRAIGHT LINE TO SAID POINT "X" DESCRIBED IN THE ABOVE DESCRIBED EXCEPTION; THENCE ALONG SAID EXCEPTION SOUTH 60 DEGREES 35' 00" WEST 270.00 FEET AND SOUTH 31 DEGREES 15' 00" WEST 90.18 FEET TO THE NORTHERLY LINE OF AMMUNITION ROAD ABOVE DESCRIBED. PARCEL 2: THAT PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SAN BERNARDINO MERIDIAN, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , STATE OF C ALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE WEST LINE OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25; WHICH IS 600.00 FEET NOR TH OF THE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SAID SECTION 25; SAID POINT BEING ALSO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE LAND CONVEYED BY ANDREW J. CLEMMENS TO ALBERT B. CLEMMENS, BY DEED DATED MAY 19, 1911 AND RECORDED MA Y 26, 1911, IN BOOK 523, PAGE 58 OF DEEDS, RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY; THENCE EAST ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF SAID CLEMMENS' LAND A DISTANCE OF 462.00 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE NORTH AT RIGHT ANGLES TO THE SAID NOR TH LINE OF CLEMMENS' LAND TO AN INTERSECTION WITH THE NORTHERLY LINE OF AMMUNITION ROAD AS CONVEYED TO THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, BY DEED RECORDED June 11, 1942, IN BOOK 1351, PAGE 409 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS; THENCE ALONG SAID NORTHERLY LINE NORTH 89 DEGREES 12' 30" WEST 203.63 FEET TO THE BEGINNING OF A TANGENT CURVE CONCAVE SOUTHERLY AND HAVING A RADIUS OF 1050 FEET; THENCE WESTERLY ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE 107.83 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE CONTINUING WESTERLY ALONG SAID CUR VE, 50.98 FEET; THENCE NORTH 31 DEGREES 15' EAST 90.18 FEET ; THENCE NORTH 60 DEGREES 35' EAST 270.00 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 15' EAST 90.18 FEET; THENCE NORTH 60 DEGREES 35' EAST 270.00 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 11 DEGREES 15' WEST 40.00 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 19' 54" WEST 106.50 FEET ; THENCE NORTH 58 DEGREES 50' 06" WEST 16.44 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 31 DEGREES 09' 54" WEST 35.00 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 56 DEGREES 19' 54" WEST 125.00 FEET ; THENCE SOUTH 05 DEGREES 05' 33" EAST 15.00 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING. APN: 104161-37-00 PARCEL 3: THAT PORTION OF THE NORTHEAST

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QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25, IN TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SAN BERNARDINO MERIDIAN, IN THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, ACCORDING TO OFFICIAL PLAT THEREOF, LYING BETWEEN LINES BEING PARALLEL WITH AND 25 FEET ON EACH SIDE OF THE CENTER LINE OF THE FALLBROOK BRANCH OF THE ATCHISON, TOPEKA AND SANTA FE RAIL WAY COMPANY AS CONSTRUCTED ACROSS SAID SECTIONS, SAID CENTER LINE IN REFERENCE TO SAID NOR THEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25 BEING DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF SAID CENTER LINE WITH THE WEST LINE OF SAID NORTHEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER AS ENGINEER'S ST ATION 3434 PLUS 63.78 DISTANT 585.80 FEET SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID WEST LINE FROM THE NORTH LINE OF SAID SECTION 25; THENCE NORTHEASTERLY ON A 4 DEGREES CURVE, CONCAVE TO THE SOUTHEAST, 368.20 FEET; THENCE ON A TANGENT, NORTH 51 DEGREES 24' EAST , 1020.36 FEET TO A POINT IN THE NORTH LINE OF SOUTH 10 ACRES OF THE SOUTHEAST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 10, TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 3 WEST, DISTANT 264.93 FEET WESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTH LINE FROM THE NORTHEAST CORNER OF SAID SOUTH 10 ACRES SAID CENTER LINE ALSO INTERSECTING SAID NORTH LINE OF SECTION 25 AT ENGINEER'S STATION 3443 PLUS 32.02, DISTANT 667.32 FEET NORTH 89 DEGREES 071/2' ALONG SAID NOR TH LINE OF SECTION 25 FR OM THE NORTH QUARTER CORNER THEREOF. EXCEPTING THAT PORTION OF SAID NOR THEAST QUARTER OF THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 25 LYING EASTERLY OF A LINE DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE NORTHWESTERLY LINE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LAND WITH THE LOCATION OR SOUTHERL Y PROLONGATION OF THE WEST LINE OF THE EAST 699.87 FEET OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF THE SOUTHWEST QUARTER OF SECTION 24; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY ALONG SAID NORTHWESTERLY LINE, 233.9 FEET TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINNING; THENCE SOUTHEASTERLY 64.7 FEET MORE OR LESS, TO A POINT IN THE SOUTHEASTERLY LINE OF THE ABOVE DESCRIBED LAND , DISTANT 234.3 FEET SOUTHWESTERLY FROM THE SOUTHERLY PROLONGATION OF SAID WEST LINE OF THE EAST 699.87 FEET. APN: 104-161-39-00 THE BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT, IN ITS DIS CRETION, TO EXERCISE ITS RIGHTS AND REMEDIES IN ANY MANNER PERMITTED UNDER SECTION 9604 OF THE UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE, OR ANY OTHER APPLICABLE SECTION, AS TO ALL OR SOME OF THE PERSONAL PROPERTY, FIXTURES AND OTHER GENERAL TANGIBLES AND INTANGIBLES MORE PARTICULARY DESCRIBED IN THE DEED OF TRUST, INCLUDING THE ASSIGNMENT OF RENTS AND THE SECURITY INTEREST IN THE RENTS AND PERSONAL PROPERTY. The undersigned trustee disclaims an y liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address of other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the trustee within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks invovled in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pur-

suant to Section 2924g of California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call FOR SALES INFORMA TION, PLEASE CALL (714) 573-1965 or LOG ONTO or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com, using the file n umber assigned to this case 2012-3127. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediatel y be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 2/4/2013 S.B.S. TRUST DEED NETWORK, A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION 31194 La Ba ya Drive, Suite 106 Westlake Village, California 91362 (818) 991-4600 LUIS ALVARADO, TRUSTEE SALE OFFICER WE ARE ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT, AND ANY INFORMATION WE OBTAIN WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1019530 2/8, 2/15, 02/22/2013 CN 14560

call 877-484-9942 or 800-280-2832 or visit this Internet Web site www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com using the file number assigned to this case 7037.98983. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. Date: February 4, 2013 NOR THWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee Bonita Salazar , Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Sale Info website: www.USAForeclosure.com or www.Auction.com Automated Sales Line: 877-484-9942 Reinstatement and P ay-Off Requests: 866-387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE ORDER # 7037.98983: 02/08/2013,02/15/2013,02/22/2013 CN 14558

information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call (714) 5731965 or visit this Internet Web site www. Priorityposting.com , using the file n umber assigned to this case 25271CA. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. In addition, the borrower on the loan shall be sent a written notice if the sale has been postponed f or at least ten (10) business days. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 02-04-2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1019382 2/8, 2/15, 02/22/2013 CN 14555

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE File No. 7037.98983 Title Order No. NXCA-0074112 MIN No . APN 125293-43-00 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 02/23/11. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PR OTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check dr awn by state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in §5102 to the F inancial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held b y duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): LOUIS ANTHONY CHAVEZ AND YOLANDA J CHAVEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS Recorded: 03/04/11, as Instrument No . 20110118861, of Official Recor ds of SAN DIEGO County , California. Date of Sale: 02/28/13 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: On the grounds of the Scottish Rite Ev ent Center, located at 1895 Camino Del Rio South,, San Diego, CA The purported property address is: 3620 LAKE PARK RD, FALLBROOK, CA 92028 Assessors Parcel No. 125293-43-00 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad vances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $370,444.25. If the sale is set aside f or any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a r eturn of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall ha ve no further recourse against the beneficiar y, the Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should under stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bid ding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear o wnership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and siz e of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold mor e than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may

Trustee Sale No . 25271CA Title Order No. 1283127 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 05-02-2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03-01-2013 at 10:00 A.M., MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SERVICE as the dul y appointed Trustee under and pur suant to Deed of Trust Recorded 05-172005, Book , Page , Instrument 2005-0412673 of official r ecords in the Office of the Recor der of SAN DIEGO County, California, executed by: PENNY L. JONGEJAN, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN as Trustor, MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS NOMINEE FOR TROXLER & ASSOCIATES, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a cashier’ s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authoriz ed to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the dul y appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held by the trustee in the her einafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without con venant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possesssion, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set f orth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA 92020 Legal Description: AS MORE FULL Y DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The street address and other common designation of the real property purported as: 3525 PASEO DE ELENIT A #179 , OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 APN Number: 165-362-26-39 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges:$232,246.62 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not the property itself. Placing the highest bid at trustee auction does not automati cally entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE Trustee's Sale No . 05-FWA-123129 YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 8/9/2004. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On March 1, 2013, at 10:30 AM, AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGION AL CENTER BY ST ATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, in the City of EL CAJON, County of SAN DIEGO , State of C ALIFORNIA, REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, a California corporation, as duly appointed Trustee under that cer tain Deed of Trust executed by ALEXANDRA ROYCE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN, as Trustors, recorded on 8/16/2004, as Instrument No. 2004-0776404, of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County , State of C ALIFORNIA, under the power of sale ther ein contained, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, for cash, or cashier's check (payable at the time of sale in lawful money of the United States) without warranty express or implied as to title, use, possession or encumbr ances, all right, title and inter est conveyed to and now held by it as such Trustee, in and to the f ollowing described property situated in the aforesaid County and State, to-wit: TAX PARCEL NO. 256-100-27-02 From information which the Trustee deems r eliable, but for which Trustee makes no r epresentation or w arranty, the street address or other common designation of the above described property is pur ported to be 242 C ALLE DE SERENO, ENCINITAS, CA 92024. Said property is being sold for the purpose of paying the obligations secured by said Deed of Trust, including fees and e xpenses of sale. The total amount of the unpaid principal balance, interest thereon, together with r easonably estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Trustee's Sale is $478,618.90. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bid ding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bid ding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that t he same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pur-

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being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 714-573-1965 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file n umber assigned to this case 20120191200865. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: PRIORITY POSTING & PUBLISHING, INC. 17501 IRVINE BLVD., SUITE ONE TUSTIN, CA 92780 714-573-1965 www .priorityposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated: 2/4/2013 Trustee Sale No. : 20120191200865 P1018980 2/8, 2/15, 02/22/2013 CN Title Order No.: 120292545 14550 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE T.S TRUST, DATED 3/8/2010. UNLESS No. 1370273-40 APN: 160-590-66-00 YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT TRA: 07077 LOAN NO: Xxxxx7544 YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE REF: Sandoval, Rogelio I IMPORSOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU TANT NOTICE TO PROPERTY NEED AN EXPLANATION OF OWNER: YOU ARE IN DEF AULT THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED- UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, ING AGAINST YOU, YOU DATED April 25, 2006. UNLESS SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appoint- YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE ed Trustee under and pur suant to SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU Deed of Trust Recorded on NEED AN EXPLANATION OF 05/03/2010 as Instrument No. 2010- THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED0221422 of official r ecords in the ING AGAINST YOU, YOU office of the County Recor der of SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. San Diego County, State of C ALI- On February 28, 2013, at 10:00am, FORNIA. EXECUTED BY: Cal-Western Reconveyance ANTHONY Q. SANNA AND COR- Corporation, as duly appointed NELIA R. SANNA, WILL SELL AT trustee under and pur suant to PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST Deed of Trust recorded May 05, BIDDER FOR C ASH, CASHIER'S 2006, as Inst. No. 2006-0317638 in CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or book XX, page XX of Official other form of payment authorized Records in the office of the County by 2924h(b), (payable at time of Recorder of San Diego County , sale in lawful money of the United State of Calif ornia, executed by States). DATE OF SALE: 3/4/2013 Rogelio I. Sandoval, Jr. and Nancy TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE G. Sandoval, Husband And Wife As OF SALE: At the entr ance to the Joint Tenants, will sell at public East County Regional Center b y auction to highest bid der for cash, statue, 250 E. Main Street, El cashier’s check drawn on a state or Cajon, CA 92020 STREET national bank, a check drawn by a ADDRESS and other common des- state or feder al credit union, or a ignation, if any, of the real proper- check drawn by a state or feder al ty described above is purported to savings and loan association, savbe: 538 RANCHO DEL CERR O , ings association, or savings bank FALLBROOK, CA 92028 APN#: specified in section 5102 of the 121-311-07-00 The undersigned financial code and authorized to do Trustee disclaims an y liability for business in this state: At the any incorrectness of the str eet entrance to the east county regionaddress and other common desig- al center b y Statue, 250 E. Main nation, if any , shown herein. Said Street El Cajon, California, all sale will be made, but without right, title and interest conveyed to covenant or warranty, expressed or and now held by it under said Deed implied, regarding title, posses- of Trust in the property situated in sion, or encumbrances, to pay the said County and State described remaining principal sum of the as: Completely described in said note(s) secured by said Deed of deed of trust The street address Trust, with interest thereon, as pro- and other common designation, if vided in said note(s), advances, any, of the real property described under the terms of said Deed of above is purported to be: 445 Calle Trust, fees, charges and e xpenses Corazon Oceanside C A 92057of the Trustee and of the trusts cre- 8511 The undersigned Trustee disated by said Deed of Trust. The claims any liability for any incortotal amount of the unpaid balance rectness of the str eet address and of the obligation secur ed by the other common designation, if any, property to be sold and reasonable shown herein. Said sale will be estimated costs, expenses and held, but without covenant or waradvances at the time of the initial ranty, express or implied, regardpublication of the Notice of Sale is ing title, possession, condition or $645,108.10. The beneficiary under encumbrances, including fees, said Deed of Trust heretofore execharges and e xpenses of the cuted and deli vered to the under Trustee and of the trusts cr eated signed a written Declar ation of by said Deed of Trust, to pay the Default and Demand f or Sale, and remaining principal sums of the a written Notice of Def ault and note(s) secured by said Deed of Election to Sell. The undersigned Trust. The total amount of the caused said Notice of Def ault and unpaid balance of the obligation Election to Sell to be r ecorded in secured by the property to be sold the county where the real property and reasonable estimated costs, is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien suant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 800-542-2550 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www.rtrustee.com, using the file number assigned to this case. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best w ay to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c), the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to e xplore options to a void foreclosure; or that it has made eff orts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to e xplore options to avoid foreclosure by one or more of the f ollowing methods: by telephone, by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meeting or the borr ower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent and that the compliance with Ci vil Code Section 2923.5 was made at least thirty (30) days prior to the date of this Notice of Sale. Dated: 1/30/2013 REGIONAL SERVICE CORPORATION, Trustee By: MARILEE HAKKINEN, AUTHORIZED AGENT Agent for Trustee: AGENCY SALES AND POSTING 3210 EL CAMINO REAL, SUITE 200 IRVINE, CA 92602 Telephone Number: (800) 542-2550 Sale Information: (714) 730-2727 or http://www.rtustee.com A-4357652 02/08/2013, 02/15/2013, 02/22/2013 CN 14554

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Coast News Legals From Page A21 expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is: $420,370.70. If the Trustee is una ble to con vey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the r eturn of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall ha ve no further recourse. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and deli vered to the undersigned a written declar ation of Default and Demand f or Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call (619)590-1221 or visit the internet website www.rppsales.com, using the file number assigned to this case 1370273-40. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web Site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. For sales information:(619)590-1221. Cal-Western Reconveyance Corporation, 525 East Main Street, P.O. Box 22004, El Cajon, CA 920229004 Dated: J anuary 30, 2013. (R425509 02/08/13, 02/15/13, 02/22/13) CN 14540 Trustee Sale No. 255020CA Loan No. 5303941313 Title Order No. 1012693 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 1/25/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPER TY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED INGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 3/8/2013 at 09:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECON VEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 01/31/2006, Book NA, Page NA, Instrument 20060072964, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, executed by: W. DAVID MCREYNOLDS, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPA RATE PROPERTY., as Trustor, COMMERCIAL CAPITAL BANK, FSB A FEDERALLY CHARTED SAVINGS BANK, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in sec tion 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the

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hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warran ty, expressed or implied, regard ing title, possession, or encum brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) rea sonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101 Legal Description: PAR CEL 1: AN UNDIVIDED 1/66TH INTEREST IN AND TO PARCEL 1 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 5423, ACCORDING TO MAP THERE OF NO. 6771, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, OCTOBER 28, 1970. EXCEPTING THERE FROM THE FOLLOWING: A. ALL UNITS AS SHOWN UPON THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN OF DEL MAR HEIGHTS AND PORTOFINO DRIVE RECORDED ON APRIL 22, 1977 AS FILE NO. 77151087, OF OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY. PARCEL 2: UNIT A, BUILDING 9, AS SHOWN UPON THE CONDOMINIUM PLAN ABOVE REFERRED TO. PAR CEL 3: AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER A STRIP OF LAND 24.00 FEET WIDE ACROSS THAT PORTION OF PARCEL 2 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 5423, IN THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFOR NIA, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY DECEM BER 28, 1976, THE CENTER LINE OF SAID 24.00 FOOT STRIP DESCRIBED AS FOL LOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT ON THE SOUTHERLY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2; DIS TANT THEREON SOUTH 70°05`00" WEST 185.19 FEET FROM THE SOUTHEASTERLY CORNER THEREOF; THENCE NORTH 19°55`00" WEST, 122.00 FEET TO THE BEGINNING OF A TANGENT CURVE, CON CAVE SOUTHWESTERLY HAVING A RADIUS OF 50.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY AND WESTERLY ALONG SAID CURVE, THROUGH A CEN TRAL OF 90 °00`00", A DIS TANCE OF 78.54 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 70 °05`00" WEST 104.16 FEET TO THE BEGINNING OF A TANGENT CURVE, CONCAVE SOUTH EASTERLY, HAVING A RAD FUS OF 50.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTHWESTERLY AND SOUTHERLY ALONG SAID CURVE. THROUGH A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 90 °00`00", A DISTANCE OF 78.54 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 19 °55`00" EAST 122.00 FEET TO POINT "Z" OF THIS DESCRIPTION. PARCEL 4: AN EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS ACROSS THAT PORTION OF PARCEL 2 OF PARCEL MAP NO. 5423. IN THE CITY OF SAN DIEGO, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFOR NIA, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, DECEM BER 28, 1976, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT THE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED POINT "Z"; THENCE NORTH 70 °05`00" EAST ALONG THE SOUTHER LY LINE OF SAID PARCEL 2, A DISTANCE OF 3.51 FEET TO AN ANGLE POINT IN SAID SOUTHERLY BOUNDARY; THENCE ALONG THE BOUND ARY OF SAID PARCEL 2 SOUTH 19°55`00" EAST 82.00 FEET; AND SOUTH 38 °50`58" WEST 111.04 FEET TO THE MOST SOUTHWESTERLY CORNER OF SAID PARCEL 2, BEING A POINT ON THE ARC OF A CURVE, CONCAVE NORTHEASTERLY, HAVING A RADIUS OF 420.00 FEET; THENCE NORTHWESTERLY ALONG THE SOUTHWESTER LY BOUNDARY OF SAID PAR CEL 2, ALONG THE ARC OF SAID CURVE, THROUGH A CENTRAL ANGLE OF 1 °42`01" A DISTANCE OF 12.46 FEET; THENCE NORTH 36 °31`00" EAST 94.54 FEET TO THE BEGINNING OF A TANGENT CURVE. CONCAVE NORTH WESTERLY,HAVING A RADIUS OF 15.00 FEET;THENCE ALONG SAID CURVE, THROUGH A CEN TRAL ANGLE OF 56 °26`00" A DISTANCE OF 14.77 FEET; THENCE NORTH 19 °55`00" WEST 63.91 FEET; THENCE NORTH 70°05`00" EAST 12.00 FEET TO THE POINT OF BEGINNING. Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $375,073.84 (estimated) Street address and other common des ignation of the real property: 13676 RUETTE LE PARC A DEL MAR, CA 92014 APN Number:301-210-11-49 The undersigned Trustee disclaims

any liability for any incorrect ness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclo sure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the follow ing methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery; by e-mail; by face to face meet ing. DATE: 2/5/2013 CALIFOR NIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee DEREK WEARRENEE, ASSISTANT SECRE TARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA2-4379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800-8926902 CALIFORNIA RECON VEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPT ING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. For Sales Information:www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priorityposting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-2802832 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the proper ty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee,beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made avail able to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale infor mation) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale infor mation), or auction.com at 1-800280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about post ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1018134 2/8, 2/15, 02/22/2013 CN 14538

ANNE VRKLAN HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TEN ANTS, as Trustor, WASHING TON MUTUAL BANK, FA, as Beneficiary, will sell at public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn by a state or national bank, a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal credit union, or a cashier’s check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association, or savings bank specified in sec tion 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state. Sale will be held by the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held by the trustee in the hereinafter described property under and pursuant to the Deed of Trust. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warran ty, expressed or implied, regard ing title, possession, or encum brances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) rea sonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY STATUE, 250 EAST MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA Legal Description: PARCEL 1: LOT 355 OF CARLSBAD TRACT MAP CT 02-14, UNIT 5, IN THE CITY OF CARLSBAD, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALIFOR NIA, ACCORDING TO MAP THEREOF NUMBER 14776, FILED IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY OF RECORDER ON APRIL 29, 2004. EXCEPTING THERE FROM ALL OIL, OIL RIGHTS, MINERALS, MINERAL RIGHTS. NATURAL GAS RIGHTS, AND OTHER HYDRO CARBONS BY WHATSOEVER NAME KNOWN,GEOTHERMAL STEAM AND ALL PRODUCTS DERIVED FROM ANY OF THE FOREGOING, THAT MAY BE WITHIN OR UNDER THE PAR CEL OF LAND HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED,TOGETHER WITH THE PERPETUAL RIGHT OF DRILLING, MINING, OR EXPLORING AND OPERATING THEREFORE AND STORING IN AND REMOVING SAME FROM SAID LAND OR ANY OTHER LAND, INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO WHIPSTOCK OR DIRECTIONALLY DRILL AND MINE FROM LANDS OTHER THAN THOSE HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED, OIL OR GAS WELLS, TUNNELS AND SHAFTS INTO, THROUGH OR ACROSS THE SUBSURFACE OF THE LAND HEREINABOVE DESCRIBED, AND TO BOTTOM SUCH WHIPSTOCKED OR DIRECTIONALLY DRILLED WELLS, TUNNELS AND SHAFTS UNDER AND BENEATH OR BEYOND THE EXTERIOR LIMITS THEREOF, AND TO REDRILL, RETUN NEL, EQUIP, MAINTAIN, REPAIR, DEEPEN AND OPER ATE ANY SUCH WELLS OR MINES WITHOUT, HOWEVER THE RIGHT TO DRILL, MINE, STORE, EXPLORE OR OPER ATE THROUGH THE SURFACE OR THE UPPER 500 FEET OF THE SUBSURFACE OF THE LAND, AS RESERVED BY BRESSI GARDENLANE, LLC., BY VARIOUS DEEDS OF RECORD. PARCEL 2: EASE MENTS AND RIGHTS OF OWNERS AS SET FORTH IN THAT DECLARATION OF COVENANTS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS AND RESERVATION OF EASE MENTS FOR BRESSI RANCH, RECORDED ON JANUARY 14, 2005, AS INSTRUMENT NO. 2005- 0037207, IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAN DIEGO COUNTY, AND ANY AMENDMENTS THERE TO ("DECLARATION). Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,064,939.18 (estimat ed) Street address and other common designation of the real property: 2570 DOGWOOD ROAD CARLSBAD, CA 92009 APN Number: 213-170-19-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrect ness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". In compliance with California Civil Code 2923.5(c) the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary, or authorized agent declares: that it has contacted the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclo sure; or that it has made efforts to contact the borrower(s) to assess their financial situation and to explore options to avoid foreclosure by one of the follow ing methods: by telephone; by United States mail; either 1st class or certified; by overnight delivery; by personal delivery;

by e-mail; by face to face meet ing. DATE: 01-29-2013 CALI FORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY, as Trustee FRED RESTREPO, ASSISTANT SEC RETARY California Reconveyance Company 9200 Oakdale Avenue Mail Stop: CA24379 Chatsworth, CA 91311 800892-6902 CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY IS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPT ING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. For Sales Information: www.lpsasap.com or 1-714-730-2727 www.priority posting.com or 1-714-573-1965 www.auction.com or 1-800-2802832 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the proper ty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applica ble, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, this information can be obtained from one of the following three companies: LPS Agency Sales & Posting at (714) 730-2727, or visit the Internet Web site www.lpsasap.com (Registration required to search for sale infor mation) or Priority Posting & Publishing at (714) 573-1965 or visit the Internet Web site www.priorityposting.com (Click on the link for “Advanced Search” to search for sale infor mation), or auction.com at 1-800280-2832 or visit the Internet Web site www.auction.com, using the Trustee Sale No. shown above. Information about post ponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. P1017897 2/8, 2/15, 02/22/2013 CN 14537

TENANTS Recorded: 10/12/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0725075 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California; Date of Sale: 3/1/2013 at 10:00:00 AM Place of Sale: At the entrance to the east county regional center by statue, 250 E. Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 Amount of unpaid bal ance and other charges: $425,890.72 The purported property address is: 3473 BLESSED MOTHER DR, FALLBROOK , CA 92028 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 123-200-40-00 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encour aged to investigate the exis tence, priority, and size of out standing liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPER TY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made avail able to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 714-573-1965 for infor mation regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-11-479535-RM . Information about postpone ments that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other com mon designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Mortgagor, the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-6457711 For NON SALE informa tion only Sale Line: 714-573-1965 Or Login to: http://www.quality loan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECT ING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a credit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-11-479535-RM IDSPub #0044962 2/8/2013 2/15/2013 2/22/2013 CN 14535

No.: 120325052-CA-GTI YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/1/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, pos session, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JULIA E GRIESS, A SINGLE WOMAN Recorded: 6/13/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0400744 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California; Date of Sale: 3/8/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101, in the Auction.com Room Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $327,476.60 The purported property address is: 1754 EDGEFIELD LANE, ENCINITAS, CA 92024 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 257-31240-07 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the proper ty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applica ble, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 800-280-2832 for information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-12-529579-JP . Information about postpone ments that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other com mon designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained

Trustee Sale No.747324CA Loan No. 3061827238 Title Order No. 110122389-CA-MAI NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 04-20-2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPER TY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED INGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 03-01-2013 at 10:00 AM, CALIFORNIA RECONVEYANCE COMPANY as the duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded 04-27-2006, Book N/A, Page N/A, Instrument 20060297686, of official records in the Office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California, executed by: ROBERT JOSEPH VRKLAN AND, CHRISTINE

NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-11-479535-RM Order No.: 110523278-CA-GTO YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 10/2/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PRO CEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, pos session, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JOHN F MORGAN AND MARY F MORGAN HUS - NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-12-529579-JP Order BAND AND WIFE, AS JOINT

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THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

TRAIN

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noise and vibr ation from additional train traffic and impacts to the r ecently restored San Dieguito Lagoon. Track alignment and the location and length of the platform should be addressed to impr ove the habitat rather than cr eate adverse impacts, the letter states. “You’re double tracking in an incr edibly sensitive location,” Councilman Don Mosier said. There could also be potential issues with the increased track height, as the bridge will be raised — possibly as high as 7 to 10 feet — so it’s out of the flood plain. That could align the trains with second-story windows, causing an incr eased invasion of pri vacy, light intrusion, view blockage, noise and air quality impacts, according to the letter. “The alignment of the second track is of particular concern, as any shift to the west would place the tr acks closer to existing residential neighborhoods,” the letter states. Del Mar officials also asked SANDAG to consider a using CEQA (California Environmental Quality Act), analysis in ad dition to the NEPA review, which doesn’t require the lead agency — in this case, the Federal Railroad Administration — to mitigate an y negative impacts. “This is not being reviewed under CEQA. I

think that’s a major issu e,” said Al Corti, who was speaking as a resident. Corti, a council member, had to recuse himself fr om the discussion because he li ves within 500 feet of the project area. “If SANDAG and (NCTD) really care about the community and want to mitigate the impacts then wh y won’t they … commit themselves to mitigating an y impacts that the y find?” he asked. Mosier agreed, offering a compromise. “There are so man y potential environmental impacts that w e’d like to have the most sensiti ve review of ho w those ar e going to be mitigated, ” he said. “If you can’t do a full CEQA, you can use a CEQA equivalent that w ould address those concerns.” The goals of the ad hoc committee are to gain a complete understanding of the project, identify issues and problems and identify and prioritize mitigation measures. Council members agreed to f orm the committee at the Jan. 28 meeting, noting that SANDAG’s definition of community outreach differs from Del Mar’s. “When they talk a bout outreach it’s a certain kind of outreach,” Mayor Terry Sinnott said. “It’s very well orchestrated, very structured… I don’t think it meets the standard of what w e would normally do as a community when we have a project that is so significant.” So far 11 peopl e have agreed to ser ve on the com-

mittee. They are Jim Benedict, Robin Crabtree, Maureen Dime, Nancy Fisher, Barbara Johansen, Bill Michalsky, Hershell Price, Wendy Ramp, Alexandra Veen, Betsy Winsett and Bob Zizka. Mosier suggested they add someone with CEQA or lagoon restoration knowledge, such as Dwight Warden or Justin Kulongoski, because he said he w ould like the committee to address the en vironmental impacts as w ell as the r esidential ones. Sinnott said he hopes SANDAG will f ollow suggestions made by the group. “Our whole pur pose of involving the comm unity … is to find out what the mitigations might be,” he said. “It would be a … sham e if w e went through all these efforts and the mitigations were just listed on a piece of paper.” “SANDAG is not the perfect agency to deal with, ” Mosier said. “I think we need to make the best we can and we need to do it now.” Only the pr eliminary design and en vironmental studies are funded f or the $100 million project, which likely won’t be compl ete for at least another two decades. “We are going to ha ve more public meetings, ” Councilwoman Sherryl Parks said. “If you’d like to come to these public meetings (and) learn more we urge you to do that because this is the process that will w ork and make the city of Del Mar heard in this important pr oject.”

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THE COAST NEWS

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FEB. 8, 2013

EUROPEAN DELICATESSEN • GOURMET MARKET • BUTCHER SHOPPE

John wishes all of his lady customers a Happy Valentine’s Day!

Tip Top Meats was built as a Meat Market from the Ground Up t differs from any other store where a makeshift meat department is added to a grocery or convenience store. We process thousands of pounds of meat every week. Our experienced staff of 7 butchers and 4 full time sausage makers produce 3-5,000 lbs of our fine sausages and lunch meats for our retail store and eatery only. We are the difference between a planned professional state licensed butcher shop and a meat department somewhere else. We have reliable suppliers with consistent fine quality. We still sell whole sides of USDA Prime and Choice beef. Sides and whole hogs, lamb or veal and primal cuts are sold for wholesale prices. We absolutely will cut the meat the way you like it and by the highest professional standards. Our prices will reflect the quality, the manner In which it is cut, trimmed and handled with almost no waste. For the quality, price and variety we are the competition!

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B

FEB. 8, 2013

SECTION

Local doctor saves patients’ backs By Tracy Moran

RANCHO SANTA FE — Ranch resident Kamshad Raiszadeh’s career in medicine seems natural, given his upbringing. With a chemistry professor father and pathologist mother, it wasn’t unusual

highest honors in bioc hemistry, minored in art. “I liked building things,” he said, which translated to his inter est in the spine and the “delicate work you need to do on the spine, the combination of the struc-

spine surgery at the Hospital for Joint Disease in Ne w York. Today, he is a married father of four who lives in Rancho Santa Fe. He and his brother Ramin Raiszadeh both specialize in the spine.

came to to wn, I had a standard spinal surgery practice, but I saw what he was doing and saw the good results his patients were getting.” Raiszadeh said that since he finished his specialty tr aining in ’96, there’s been “a huge boom in spinal surgery” for back and neck pain that has a difficult-to-discern cause. “Oftentimes surgeons

My consistent message is, I’d rather not operate on you...” Kamshad Raiszadeh Spinal Surgeon

Rancho Santa Fe resident Dr. Kamshad Raiszadeh is a spine specialist who believes that “the body can heal most spinal conditions without injections or surgery.” Courtesy photo

for him and his tw o younger brothers to spend hours looking through slides at his parent’s lab. Many family friends were medical professionals, which impressed upon the thr ee boys how rewarding it could be to help diagnose and treat people. His parents, who came to the United States to study before returning to Ir an, chose to relocate to America for good at the time of the Iranian Revolution. “My brothers and I have a lot to thank them f or,” Raiszadeh said. “There was lots of sacrifice. It wasn’t easy leaving everything you know and saying, ‘This is not safe for my kids.’ I don’t know if I could be that brave.” Inspired by their parents’ dedication, all three became orthopedic surgeons. Raiszadeh, who graduated U.C. Berkeley with

In addition to being surgeons, they run three Spine Zone clinics in San Diego County (see accompan ying article.) The belief that “the body can heal most spinal conditions without injections or sur gery” is the philosophy behind the program. “My consistent message is, I’d rather not oper ate on you if your body can heal the condition,” said Raiszadeh. “My biggest successes ar e often the ones wher e I get people to impr ove without surgery, returning back to their regular activities and feeling great. To me that’s a congruous message between my spine sur gical practice and Spine Zone.” Raiszadeh’s philosophy of spinal car e was largely Cathie influenced by orthopedic Kamshad surgeon Vert Mooney. “He was a guru of nonexcruciattreatment,” Courtesy operative Raiszadeh said. “When I

ture and working around the nerves.” After earning his medical degree at U .C. San Francisco, he completed his orthopedic residency at U.C. Davis and fello wship training in adult and pediatric

Ironman competitor Summerford turned to Raiszadeh to solve the ing pain in her back. photo

are faced with ha ving nothing else to offer but surgery,” he said, adding, “and that’s where Spine Zone comes in. It helps pr event surgery, even in patients who’ve tried multiple other treatments.” Certainly there are cases where spinal surgery is the best option. For Encinitas r esident and Ironman competitor Cathie Summerford, spinal surgery by Raiszadeh changed her life. “I’m pretty tough,” she said. “In a million y ears I never thought I’d have back surgery.” But she was in excruciating pain and after a year of tr ying alternative methods, went to see Raiszadeh. “I had three problems,” she said, “a slipped disc, a bulging disc that w as causing foot drop, and stenosis … It was amazing I w as even walking.” But now, she said, she’s “in better shape and more balanced in all ar enas than before surgery. Not only is Dr. Kamshad Raiszadeh the best sur geon you could find, he is just a plain great guy who goes a bove and beyond in the personal care and issues of each patient.” Raiszadeh said his goal is to empower people to make TURN TO DOCTOR ON B17

Spine Zone puts surgery as its last option By Tracy Moran

COAST CITIES — You’ve probably felt it — whether it’s a dull ache in your low back or a s harp pain across your shoulders, the majority of Americans will experience back pain at some point. The causes are myriad — on-the-job injury, sedentary lifestyle, aging and stress can all be contributing factors. Sometimes the cause is elusive, though the pain can be excruciating. Treatment options abound — ice, heat, rest, physical therapy, chiropractic, acupuncture, decompression, medications, injections and surgery are just some of the healing methods people turn to seeking relief. While spinal sur gery has become incr easingly popular, San Diego County residents seeking back-pain relief have another option — the Spine Zone clinics, co-founded by brothers Kamshad and Ramin Raiszadeh, orthopedic surgeons who specialize in the spine. Their medically supervised Spine Zone clinics offer strengthening and stretching programs designed specifically to alleviate back pain and to prevent its recurrence. “The joint is only as good as the muscle support around it,” said Kamshad Raiszadeh. “We really focus on getting that muscle support.” While some people may shun e xercise when their back hurts, according to WebMD, it’s “a big myth that exercise is bad for back pain.” “Regular exercise prevents back pain,” according to the site. “For people suffering an acute injur y resulting in lo wer back pain, doctors may recommend an exercise program that begins with gentle

exercises and g radually increases in intensity. Once the acute pain subsides, an exercise regimen may help prevent future recurrence of back pain.” That’s been the experience for the Raiszadehs. Ramin Raiszadeh noted that 90 percent of patients he sees will improve with some sort of physical therapy, and the specific equipment and protocols incorporated at the Spine Zone are “a proven entity to afford excellent improvement in quality of life, without the need for surgery.” Patients who c hoose Spine Zone enjoy a level of confidence in their tr eatment protocol, said Kamshad Raiszadeh, TURN TO SPINE ZONE ON B17

Spine Zone Clinic Director Dan Noel demonstrates one of the exercise machines to treat back ailments. Photo by Tracy Moran

Call today for your appointment

(760)944-0301 186 North Coast Highway 101 Encinitas, CA 92024 www.portofinobeachinn.com


THE COAST NEWS

B2

FEB. 8, 2013

Elementary school librarian and columnist Jean Gillette if she were an amoeba.

Under the microscope JEAN GILLETTE Small Talk

“ She will always be the wind beneath his wings. “

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In my first year as an elementary school librarian, the time came f or the ann ual book fair. Some determined PT A volunteer handed me a red, curly wig and a dress patterned in stars and planets and said, firmly, “Here. Wear this. You get to be Ms. Frizzle for the book fair!â€? And so I did. You’d be amazed the response you get just by slapping on a red wig. I never had to courage to get up on stage, but this was the next best thing, and I was hooked. Every year since, about 16 of them, the annual book fair has had a theme and I have cobbled together a related costume. I can’t remember most of them, but a fe w favorites include an ice queen, a fullbody dog suit that I borrowed, a shark, a jungle explorer, a bee, a bug, a clown, a pirate, an alien, a cowgirl and Waldo of “Where’sâ€? fame. It has been hilarious fun.There is no audience like 5- to 11-yearolds — and their wonderful parents. They are always enthusiastic, fascinated and ready to laugh out loud. Many of them ar e astounded that I will spray my hair green or white or whatever. For me it’s not a big deal. It washes right out, but they applaud my silliness as if I had shaved my head. The kids ador e it if I paint up my face with color and glitter, which I will do at the drop of a hat. It all satisfies a mildly frustrated artist deep within in me, and it beats the heck out of getting a tattoo. That same lo w-talent artist loves to hit the yardage store, break out her hot glue gun and stick together a costume. I am the queen of quick and dirty. No fine seams or elegant presentation. I go for high humor and am big on the silly side. The best example might be this very year’s fair just past. The theme was “Story Laboratory.â€? The dĂŠcor was test tubes, lab coats, “Read-ioactiveâ€? Zones and such. I decided to be an amoeba or something you might see under a microscope, forgetting that most K TURN TO SMALL TALK ON B17


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

B3

ODD ‘King tides’ pose threat, won’t be as severe this time FILES

by CHUCK SHEPHERD

By Jared Whitlock

One for the Road

Cliche Come to Life: The Kerry, Ireland, county council voted in J anuary to let some people drive drunk. The councillors reasoned that in the county’ s isolated regions, some seniors live alone and need the camaraderie of the pub, but fear a DUI arrest on the way home. The councillors thus empowered police to issue DUI permits to those tar geted drivers. Besides, reasoned the councillors, the area is so sparsely populated that such drivers never encounter anyone else on the road at night. (The councillors’ beneficence might also ha ve been influenced, reported BBC News, by the fact that “several” of the fi ve voting “yea” own pubs.)

Can’t Possibly Be True

Spare the Waterboard, Spoil the Child: William Province, 42, was arrested in Jefferson County, Mont., in December and charged with waterboarding four boys, two of whom were his own sons, at his home in December . (Also in J anuary, Kirill Bartashevitch, 52, was charged with making “terroristic” threats to his highschool-age daughter after he allegedly pointed his new AK-47 at her because her report card showed 2 B’ s instead of all A’s. He said he had recently purchased the gun because he fear ed that President Obama intended to ban them.) Emma Whittington, of Hutchinson, Kan., rushed her daughter to the ER in December when the gir l, 7 months old, developed a golfball-sized lump on her nec k. Two days later, at a hospital in Wichita, a doctor gentl y pulled a feather out of the lump and hypothesized that it had been in the midst of emerging from her thr oat. Doctors said the gir l probably swallowed the feather accidentally, that it got stuck in throat tissue, and that her body was trying to eject it through the skin. A man with admittedl y limited English skills went to a courthouse in Springfield, Mass., in December to address a tr affic ticket, but somehow wound up on a jury trying Donald Campbell on two counts of assault. Officials said the man simply got in the wrong line and followed jurors into a room while the real sixth juror had mistakenly gone to another room.The jury, including the accidental juror, found Campbell guilty, but he was awarded a ne w trial when the mistake was discovered.

Sounds Like a Joke

Twin brothers Aric Hale and Sean Hale, 28, were both arrested on New Year’s Eve in Manchester, Conn., after fighting each other at a hotel and later at a residence. Police said a 27year-old woman was openly dating the tw o men, and that Sean thought it was his turn and asked Aric for privacy. Aric begged to differ about whose turn it was.

COAST CITIES — In the past, “king tides” have flooded beachside restaurants in Cardiff, flung rocks at coastal homes and submerged the San Elijo Lagoon. But lifeguards aren’t expecting any damage on that level from the latest king tide e vent, Feb. 7 through Feb. 9. King tides — tides se veral feet larger than normal that pound the beach — occur several times a y ear when the gravitational pull of the moon and sun ar e in alignment. According to Encinitas lifeguard Capt. Larry Giles, the king tides are particularly problematic if they overlap with big surf. Luckily, wave heights aren’t predicted to be larger than 3 to 4 feet Thursday and into the weekend. “We’ll be watchful, but we’re not anticipating problems,” Giles said. “The lack of powerful surf helps a lot.” Encinitas lifeguards shored up infr astructure during previous king tides. For instance, they placed sandbags on Cardiff State Beach to pr event flooding on Coast Highw ay 101, the Seaside Reef parking lot and for restaurants on that stretch. As Giles noted, despite the efforts, flooding was still an issue at times. In addition to smaller surf, Cardiff State Beach is better prepared to handle king tides because of a recent beach replenishment, the sand fr om which acts as a barrier. At Moonlight Beac h, lifeguards build a sand berm during the summer to dissipate the ener gy of storm surges during king tide events. “The berm pr otects

A “king tide” encroaches on homes near Del Mar’s Dog Beach. The high tide events are problematic for coastal homes and infrastructure, a new reality we’ll have to deal with, according to scientists. Photo courtesy of Gabriel Buhr

lifeguard stations and other infrastructure,” Giles said. Because most coastal homes in Encinitas are atop cliffs, they aren’t immediately threatened by king tides. But high tides contribute to cliff er osion, eventually posing a risk for homes. Beachside homes sit on 17th to 29th str eets in Del Mar without the short-term safety of cliffs. Still, with only moderate surf e xpected, Del Mar lifeguar d Thomas Bryant said that he doesn’t expect king tides to be a major f actor this time around for those homes. Bryant noted that king tides, combined with big surf, have wreaked havoc in the past, especially during strong El Ninos in the ear ly 1980s. “You had homes flood-

ed and windows smashed up,” Bryant said. However, Bryant said recent years have been “a bit more calm.” When forecasts show that big surf and king tides will converge, lifeguards notify homeowners that they should boar d up their homes and place sandbags. In North County, other areas are vulnerable to king tide surges, including Torrey Pines and Oceanside, according to the California King Tides Initiative. The nonprofit group encourages volunteers to snap pictures of king tide events to show what daily tides will look like in the future if predicted sea le vel rises come to pass. Scientists estimate that California will lose signifi-

cant portions of its coast as a result of sea level rises from climate change. “We want to illustr ate the new normal,” Travis Pritchard said. Pritchard is one of the initiative’s volunteers. He’s also San Diego Coastkeeper’s water quality lab manager. During the last king tide e vent in January, Pritchard said there was flooding in Ocean Beach and La Jolla. “We’d like for people and governments to start looking at mitigation strategies for the sea le vel increase,” Pritchard said. Pritchard noted homeowners have employed seawalls as a pr otection measure, but those “carry problems of their own.” The seawalls stop natural cliff erosion, shrinking beaches.

Freeway service patrol program expands COAST CITIES — SANDAG announced an expansion of its San Diego Freeway Service Patrol (FSP), a publicly funded motorist aid pr ogram that used to operate in the region only during w eekday rush hours, now adding weekends as part of a pilot initiative. For motorist aid during FSP service hours, call 511 and say “Roadside Assistance.” To learn more about the San Diego FSP and see a map of the local service area, visit 511sd.com/FSP. Using a fleet of 19 tow trucks and eight light-duty pickup trucks, FSP drivers assist stranded motorists with a gallon of gas, a jumpstart, water for the radiator or a tire change. The goal of the FSP program is to resolve traffic tieups caused by vehicle breakdowns as quickly as possible. “The Freeway Service Patrol is an effective tool to improve traffic flow on our region’s most congested freeways,” SANDAG Executive Director Gary Gallegos said. “This past year alone, the program helped more than

50,000 stranded motorists get back on the road or move their disabled vehicles out of the way.” The weekend pilot program has been operating in North County since October and expanded into metr o San Diego this month. Weekend FSP service is available on Interstates 5, 8, 15, and 805 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Complete data is not yet available, but — as an example — since the weekend service began in North County last fall, FSP drivers have helped one motorist per hour on average on the I-15. Expansion plans include adding pilot midday service throughout the region starting J uly 2013. Also starting this summer, FSP will be restructured to provide better towing coverage; six tow trucks will be added to the fleet, for a total of 25 tow trucks. While the n umber of pickup trucks in the fleet will remain the same, they will be r edeployed to improve coverage in metro San Diego. Currently, the patrol

operates weekdays during morning and afternoon rush hours, 5:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 3 to 7 p.m., serving sections of Interstates 5, 8, 15, and 805, and State Routes 52, 54, 56, 67, 78, 94, 125, 163, and 905. Weekday pilot service on the new State Route 905 in Otay Mesa also began this month.

Holidays are excluded. The San Diego FSP is part of a statewide program that began in 1993. FSP programs now exist in 13 metr opolitan areas throughout California and are funded through the state budget and other local sources.

And not onl y do homeo wners have to worry about king tides, but so do go vernments responsible for stormwater and other kinds of infrastructure. “We clearly need some other solutions,” Pritchard said. Although this king tide event isn’t severe as previous ones, camera-toting volunteers will still be taking photos. Since 2011, the San Diego wing of the California King Tides Initiative has uploaded more than 310 photos.

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THE COAST NEWS

B4

FEB. 8, 2013

The Soldier Ride ride promotes health, camaraderie and healing. Last year riders crossed the finish line together. Photo by Promise Yee

Wounded Warrior Soldier Ride pedals through O’side By Promise Yee

OCEANSIDE — The Wounded Warrior Project Soldier Ride will begin F eb. 7 and ends its thr ee-day bicycle challenge with a 29-mile ride starting at Buccaneer P ark on Feb 9. The ride pushes wounded troops to ride increasingly longer distances eac h day. It also allows them to connect with other soldiers. The weekend promotes health, camaraderie and healing. On Feb. 7 troops arrive in San Diego and ar e fitted f or bikes. “Fifty warriors meet Thursday for a bik e fitting,” Dan Schnock, Soldier Ride director, said. “Some are fitted with hand cr ank bikes, some have reclined bikes.” The day focuses on w ellness with yoga and a n utrition class. On Feb. 8 the fir st ride takes off from Pier 32 in National City for a 17-mile ride. The final ride is held in Oceanside. The overall goal of the weekend is to help tr oops get used to their new normal whether it’s physical limitations or dealing with posttr aumatic stress disorder. “All alumni of the Wounded Warrior Project are anyone injured post 9/11, combat or stateside,” Schnock said.

The project has ser ved more than 25,000 troops. “We’re just scratching the surface,” Schnock said. Tom Kurlick will be flying in from Memphis,Tenn.,to take part in the ride. He suffered two severe concussions while serving overseas as an Army nurse. Kurlick said he is looking forward to the trip out to California and the camaraderie of the ride. “It was 32 degrees today,” he said. “Not very conducive to biking.” Kurlick said he has f aced some personal challenges upon his return from being in w artorn countries and a way from family and friends. “It takes a little bit coming back to that and dealing with some of the stressors when you come back from war,” he said. The Soldier Ride gi ves troops a break from their routine and a chance to gain a new perspective. “It’s a great way to honor warriors,” Kurlick said. Seventy-five percent of participants are first-time riders. Twenty-five percent are experienced course riders who help fellow soldiers. Dan Curran of Spokane, Wash., will also take part in the ride.He has participated in two Soldier Rides. He recalls the c hallenges his first time out.

Curran suffered from spinal injuries and post-tr aumatic stress disorder when he returned home fr om deployment. He became isolated and gained a significant amount of weight. “I hadn’t been doing much,”Curran said.“I stayed in my house.” He said he looked forward to the idea of spending a weekend with fello w soldiers, but wondered if he had the ph ysical stamina for the ride. “It was pretty difficult,”he said. “There were some decent hills.” “There were guys who couldn’t sit upright on the bike or had one leg, ” he added. “I thought if these guys can tough it out I can finish too.” Since his first ride Curran has stayed in touc h with soldiers he met.One fellow soldier lives close by. “We became close on the ride and are good friends back home,” Curran said. He bought himself a bik e last year and now stays active year-round. “Wounded Warriors completely turned m y life ar ound 180,” Curran said. “I was on a downward spiral. I got jumpstarted. I’m 80 pounds lighter , don’t drink — I made a lot of good changes.” “Life is easier,” he added. “I feel better , sleep better. I totally turned around.” The Soldier Ride began as cross country fundraiser bike ride by one solo rider . It’s second year several wounded warriors joined the ride. Then the Wounded Warrior Project got involved and or ganized weekend rides for injured troops. The Soldier Ride is currently held in 16 cities across the U.S.

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Kim Wolf spoke with her 8-month-old son Graham in strong favor of adding stop signs on Levante Street, where she and her family live, at the Jan. 29 Carlsbad City Council meeting. Photo by Rachel Stine

New ordinances look to stop speeders in neighborhoods By Rachel Stine

CARLSBAD — Ordinances to install 11 ne w stop signs on three residential streets in Carlsbad was introduced and unanimousl y supported by City Council at its Jan. 29 meeting. After months of studying residential streets within the city, the CRTMP (Carlsbad Residential Traffic Management Program) identified Magnolia Avenue, Esfera Street, and Levante Street as eligible for traffic calming measures due to frequent speeding problems. “I’m not kidding ya, there must be people dri ving 50 (mph) up near my house. It’s a nightmare,” said Patrick Gravit,who has lived on Esfera Street for the past 24 years. If the ordinances receive final approval at the F eb. 12 City Council meeting, the CRTMP will install tw o additional stop signs on Magnolia Avenue between Highland Drive and Pio Pico Dri ve, two stop signs on Esfer a Street between Cadencia Str eet to Piragua Street, and seven new

stop signs on Le vante Street between Escencio Terrace and La Costa Avenue. All of the selected streets have speed limits of 25 miles per hour but typically have cars speeding at an average of 32 mph, according to the CRTMP’s findings. Taking into consideration input from residents on those streets, the CRTMP determined that stop signs would be the most effective traffic calming measure on these str eets, as opposed to speed cushions, speed tables and narr owing lanes. “We worked with the residents on each of the streets to develop the best solutions to achieve the desired results for the neighborhood. We received feedback from residents and did field obser vations on tw o previous traffic calming pilot pr ojects that allowed us to provide input to the residents of Magnolia, Esfera, and Levante,” said Bryan Jones, Carlsbad’s deputy transportation director and leader of the CRTMP. Council members and a

couple of public speakers questioned why the CR TMP chose to place so man y stop signs on Levante Street, which already has five stop signs. “That many stop signs to me, from a layman’s perspective, seems excessive,” said Councilmember Keith Blackburn. Jones convinced Blackburn of his pr oposal by explaining that the suggested stop signs w ould be str ategically placed to reduce the block lengths to 500 to 1,000 feet and therefore reduce speeding. The majority of those who commented on the or dinances at the meeting supported the stop signs. “Residents who live on Levante have asked for many years to please make our street safe,” said Kim Wolf. Living in her home on Levante Street since 2009, Wolf said she witnessed a car flip over onto her front yard one night because of speeding. She also has posted a sign on her lawn that says,“We live here, please slow down.”

Heart health screenings set for area teens COAST CITIES — The Eric Paredes Save A Life Foundation is w orking to prevent fatal cardiac arrest in teens caused b y Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) with special screenings during February, Heart Month, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at San Dieguito, La Costa Canyon, Canyon Crest and Torrey Pines High Schools. Visit EPSaveALife.org to register. The free screenings are open to all San Diego teens who register online and prepare the par ent Rhina and Hector Paredes founded the Eric Paredes Save A Life consent/health history pack- Foundation in 2010 after they lost their son to Sudden Cardiac Arrest, a syndrome caused by an underlying heart condition that can often be et. More than 1,000 teens detected with a simple EKG. The foundation is offering free cardiac can be accommodated at screens to teens countywide. Visit EPSaveALife.org to register. Courtesy photo any one screening. The Paredes Rhina and Hector Foundation works with a vol- Foundation has scr eened started this unteer medical team consist- nearly 6,000 teens in San Paredes ing of San Diego cardiologists Diego. 146 had undetected Foundation for their son,Eric, abnormalities and a San Diego freshman athlete and area health professionals heart who visit local high schools to upon further f ollow-up, 66 who died of SCA in 2009. Their mission is to pr eperform free cardiac screen- were at risk for SCA and four had life-saving corrective sur- vent this tr agedy from hapings (EKGs and ECGs). pening to other families. The EP Sa ve A Life geries.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

B5

Japanese farming, culture make way into book By Lillian Cox

The Oceanside Police Department honors Officer Kathryn Held (right) as the Officer of the Award for the fourth quarter of 2012. Photo courtesy Oceanside Police Department

Police honor outstanding officer OCEANSIDE — The Oceanside Police Department named Officer Kathryn Held for the Officer of the Quarter Award for the Fourth Quarter of 2012. The Officer of the Quarter award recognizes police department employees who ha ve provided exemplary service to the community or performed in a manner worthy of recognition. During the F ourth Quarter of 2012, Held, a member of the F ield Operation Division in uniformed patrol, responded to a residence concerning a report of possible utility theft, with multiple unknown individuals inside a house. Prior to going in-service for the da y, Held had reviewed and made herself familiar with w anted suspect posters who w ere believed to be at lar ge throughout the city, as she does routinely each day before “hitting the streets.” While handling this call for service, Held made contact with a m an whom she immediately recognized from one of the posters as being wanted for being in possession of a stolen firearm. Officer Held calmly detained the suspect outside the house and while using sound officer safety tactics requested additional patrol units to assist her before proceeding further. Once additional units arrived, Held took the investigative lead and quickly established rapport with the suspect and other r esidents. Subsequently Held was able to locate and recover the stolen firearm; taking it off the streets and out of the hands of a criminal who would potentially use it in the commission of futur e crimes. According to a OPD press release, Held’s keen eye, quick recognition and

interrogative skills dir ectly contributed to the success of this investigation, the arrest of a dangerous suspect, and lawful seizure of not only the firearm, but also other incriminating evidence. The Commander of the Field Operation Division, Capt.Tom Aguigui said in his letter announcing the award. “Your overall efforts in this matter clearly validate your selection as the Officer of the 4th Quarter 2012. I congratulate you on a job well done.” Officers are assigned to a beat for one year at a time, allowing officers and community members to become familiar with each other and build trust, enabling a better working relationship that helps remedy problems plaguing an ar ea. Officers are responsible for handling thousands of radio calls each year, take numerous crime reports, enforce traffic laws, make hundreds of arr ests, resolve disputes and prevent crime. Officer Held is a former U.S. Marine with 10 years of honorable service to our nation. She has more than 21 years with the Oceanside Police Department with countless citation and letters for excellence in professional service to her name. During her career, she has held a variety of assignments including Acting Patrol Supervisor, Patrol Corporal, Field Training Officer, Vice Crimes Detective, Property Crimes Detective, Gangs, and Neighborhood Enhancement Team (NETwork) Officer.

RANCHO SANTA FE — Author Nancy Singleton Hachisu will share her love of Japanese farm culture and food with a cooking demonstration and signing of her first book, “Japanese Farm Food,” at Chino Farms 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Feb. 10. Singleton Hachisu first traveled to Japan, after graduating from Stanford University in 1988, with the goal of staying a year to learn the language. She never went home. “I came to Japan for the food, but stayed for love,” she writes in her book. “Organic farmer boy Tadaaki Hachisu captured my heart with his, ‘Would you like to be a Japanese farmer’s wife?’... Besides his good looks and solid country values, one more thing drew me to this guy. He loved food as much as I did and w ent to g reat lengths to grow it or find it.” “Japanese Farm Food” is 385 pages and includes 135 simple recipes and 100 photos by Kenji Miura that illustrate food, community and life in rural Japan. It is the recipient of the Gourmand World Cookbook Awards 2012: USA Winner, Best Japanese Cuisine Book. Its first release by Andrews McMeel Publishing in September 2012 quic kly

“I came to Japan for the food, but stayed for love,” Nancy Singleton Hachisu wrote in her first book, “Japanese Farm Food.” She’ll be doing a book signing at Chino Farms Feb. 10 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Photo courtesy Kenji Miura

sold out. In January, Chino Farms received advanced copies of the second release due this month. “I couldn’t get any books last fall,” explained Nina McConnel whose husband, Tom Chino, owns Chino Farms with his siblings.“I just got some fr om the second

publication and said to a customer, ‘These would make a great present.’ She said, ‘I think it would make a great wedding present ... I’m going to buy a stack.’” Singleton Hachisu is the fourth author to participate in the Good Earth/Gr eat Chefs Series following Alice

Waters, Nancy Silverton and Jeanne Kelley. The series was created by McConnel and Milane Christiansen, founder of The Book Works, which hosted popular book signings for several years. “Milane and I shared a similar customer base and ethic in creating the best,” McConnel explained. “With the loss of independent book stores, and the rise in online purchasing, people still want the opportunity to meet authors. So far, our authors have sold twice as man y books at Chino Farms than any other book signing event.” Chef and author David Tanis wrote in The New York Times, “The book offer s a breadth of information, with lessons about Japanese products and tec hniques, and instructions for everything from homemade tofu to udon noodles. But for me, the recipes for simple vegetable dishes, often flavored with only a bit of miso or a splash of sake, are the most fascinating.” Singleton Hachisu says she will most likely be cooking a big pot of light miso soup for visitors at the signing using daikon, carrots, napa cabbage and negi (Japanese leeks) and boiled and TURN TO COOKBOOK ON B17

African drum circle sounds off at library By Promise Yee

OCEANSIDE — According to Chazz Ross, there are three rules to African drumming. “Have fun, have fun, and go back to rule No. 1,” he said. Ross will lead an all-ages African drum cir cle at the Civic Center Libr ary on F eb. 16. Ross describes African drumming as aer obic, aggressive and played loudly. He brings along 26 djembe African drums and n umerous rhythm instruments for full audience participation. Ross teaches participants to echo back the sounds he makes. Instruction is set to a story in which Ross leads the group on a m usical journey through the jungle with animal and nature sounds. “They’ll be playing sounds of animals, land, wind, weather, different sounds like thunder storms and rain,” Ross said. Ross also encourages participants to cr eate improvisational drum rhythms and share them with the group. “It’s extremely fun,” Ross said. “They follow me and make up their own sounds.” “It’s the drummers’ show,” he added. Ross said drumming is instinctual and e xpres-

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sive.“Everybody has their own rhythm,” he said. “Anybody who has a heartbeat.”Drumming also provides the r eward of ear ly mastery. “They realize they can do things they didn’t think the y could do immediately,” Ross said. Ross is a Dr eam Shapers roster artist. Dream Shapers is a nonprofit cooperative that pr omotes performing artists and event educators. Performers include dancers, storytellers, mimes, trick ropers and traveling zookeepers.All artists must audition and have previous experience to get a spot on the Dream Shapers roster. Those who perform in sc hools must also list the learning standards their performance teaches. An African Drum Cir cle Extravaganza will be held at Feb. 16 in the Ci vic Center Library Community Room. Admission is free.

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THE COAST NEWS

B6

FEB. 8, 2013

C AMP P ENDLETON N EWS

From ‘military brat’ to 44 years of dedicated service By Lance Cpl. Trevon Peracca

CAMP PENDLETON — The teenage militar y brat pumping gasoline at Camp Pendleton in the early 1960s had no inkling of retiring on the base – let alone twice. Michael G. Hire retired a

Service to others is extremely important to me.” Michael G.Hire Retired Marine

first time as a lieutenant colonel after 24 y ears of Marine Corps service. His second retirement came at the El Camino Country Club in

Oceanside, Calif., Jan. 26, after serving 20 years with the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society, where he r ecently served as dir ector of the Camp Pendleton office. Hire started his career as one of the few — a United States Marine. He earned a bachelor’s degree in radio and television broadcasting at San Diego State University before attending Officer Candidate School in Quantico, Va., in 1968. As a second lieutenant, he served in Vietnam, and he went on to serve as executive officer for 1st Battalion, 4th Marines, here. He also served as an executive director for the relief society at Marine Air-Ground Combat Center Twentynine Palms, Calif. His final assignment as a Marine officer was as an administrator where he served as the assistant chief of staff f or

Michael G. Hire, director of the Navy-Marine Corps Relief Society Camp Pendleton, disclaimed some humorous remarks made by friends during his retirement dinner at the El Camino Country Club in Oceanside, Calif., Jan. 26. Photo by Lance Cpl. Trevon S. Peracca

manpower here. Hire leaned back in his chair and look ed up while scratching his head. He said in addition to his previous experience, he remembered members of his family being

volunteers for the society , which helped influence his decision to become the director, post Marine Corps. “Service to other s is extremely important to me,” said Hire with a proud expres-

sion on his face. “Whether it’s serving the nation as an active-duty Marine or being the director of (the society), the mission of serving is the same. There is a need for excel-

lence, and every Marine, sailor and spouse d eserves excellent service.” Hire retired from the Marine Corps after 24 years on a Friday, and assumed his position as a director with the society the following Monday in August, 1992. He was responsible for more than 4,900 clients. “For the past 20 (years), I got to do exactly what I wanted to do: continue to serve Marines, sailors and f amilies,” said the 67-y ear-old, about his time with the society. Hire’s bright blue eyes lit up when he spoke about his future plans to jump on his motorcycle and visit friends and family across the country. Now that he will have more time, he plans on continuing some of his other hobbies which include attending renaissance fairs, country dancing, scuba diving and watching NCIS.

Marksmanship training begins CAMP PENDLETON — When recruits arrive at Edson Range aboard Marine Corps Base Camp P endleton, they begin their second phase of recruit training. Their purpose is to learn the basic fundamentals of marksmanship and ho w to properly fire the M16-A4 service rifle. Recruits are taught the basics during the fir st week known as Grass Week and are under constant supervision of Marines who specializ e in marksmanship, better known as primary marksmanship instructors. PMIs teach recruits fundamental aspects of shooting such as breathing control, stability and ho w to pr operly squeeze the trigger. “Recruits are taught by PMI’s the basic fundamentals of marksmanship such as natural point of aim, slow-steady squeeze of the trigger and the placement of the rifle on their shoulder pocket during Grass

Expires 2-28-13

Week,” said Sgt. Michael A. Carroll, drill instructor, Platoon 1049, Co. C, 1st RTBn. “If recruits apply those fundamentals shot after shot, there is no w ay that the y won’t hit the tar get. It’s all about the basics.” Once PMIs complete the classroom instructions, recruits receive the command “attack the circle” and move to a semi-cir cular area to “snap in.” This time allows them to practice the fundamentals they discussed. The semi-circular area surrounds a white drum with different size targets painted on it. The targets are of different size to simulate what they look like at distances of 200, 300 and 500 yards, the exact distances recruits will be shooting from. Recruits spend se veral hours “snapping in” which allows them to gain confidence in differ ent shooting positions. “This week is a test of their discipline. It takes a lot of discipline to sta y in those different positions. I see a lot of them putting out through the pain,” said Carroll. “You can’t just give recruits a rifle.” Once Grass Week is over, recruits move on to F iring Week to apply the fundamental marksmanship principles they learned and to qualify in order to mo ve forward with training.

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Some recruits prepare for Firing Week physically and mentally by going the extra mile. “I’ve been spending a lot of time doing legs str etches and practicing the sitting position. I’m not fle xible so repetition was key,” said Recruit Tyon L. Downing, Plt. 1049, Co. C, 1st RTBn. The smell of gunpo wder fills the morning air during the sixth week of recruit training. Brass flies in every direction coming out of rifles’ chambers. Firing Week, the first time recruits are able to fire their weapons in recruit training, is also a week long. They are given several days to hone their skills before qualifying f or an official score. Although qualifying is important for recruits in order to contin ue with training, every Marine is r equired to qualify annually to ensure they are combat-ready since every Marine is a basic rifleman. “A Marine is a rifleman first. The key is patience, if you don’t take the time to take well aimed shots y ou won’t be a good shooter,” said Downing. To others, qualifying at the range becomes somewhat of a pregame ritual that has to be performed the exact same way every time in order to be mentally prepared, according to Sgt. Mark A. Peters, senior drill instructor, Plt. 3229, Co. K, 3rd RTBn. “It’s about consistency throughout the w eek. Everything needs to be consistent from what the recruits eat to what the y wear in order to boost their confidence,” said Peters.“It’s about the fundamentals and mechanics, but it’s mostly about getting them in the right mindset. Consistency gets you in the right mindset.”

Brig. Gen. Vincent A. Coglianese, the base commanding general and regional authority for five Marine Corps installations in the Southwestern United States, and Disney Channel’s “Shake it Up” star Adam Irigoyen read to an audience of military children and parents during the Books on Bases event hosted by Blue Star Familes and sponsored by Disney here Jan. 26. Books on Bases provided free, age appropriate books to military families to promote the importance of reading. Photo by Lance Cpl. Derrick K. Irions

Reading is FUNdamental By LCpl. Derrick K. Irions

CAMP PENDLETON — The commanding gener al reached for book to r ead to more than 150 attendees. The children were so quiet the general’s voice could be hear d echoing in the room as he r ead to the audience a story of overcoming obstacles and perseverance through adversity. He shared a tale with children of all ages to pr ovoke inspiration, “Billy Twitters and His Blue Whale Problem.” Brig. Gen. Vincent A. Coglianese, the commanding general here and regional authority f or five Southwestern Marine Corps installations, and Disney Channel’s “Shake it Up” star Adam Irigoyen took turns reading the children’s book to militar y children during a Books on Bases event here Jan. 26. One of the best ways to promote literacy in children is to read to and with them, as often as possible accor ding to Blue Star F amilies website. Blue Star Families

is a nonprofit, military family member-driven group. “This past w eek, NPR had a stor y about a stud y showing interactively reading to children under the age of f our can incr ease their IQ scor e by up to six points,” explained AnnaMaria M. White, the public relations manager for the nonpr ofit organization. White said r eading helps military children work through the unique challenges they may encounter as a member of a military family, including deployments, separations and moves. “They’re constantly going to ne w schools and meeting new friends,” said White. “Reading helps give them some escapism as well as self-expression, and it generally just helps them become more resilient.” After the r eading, the children received free books and participated in arts and cr afts; some designing personalized book markers others creating paper swords or braided

tiaras, and acting out adventures from their o wn imaginations. “My daughter was very excited and happ y to receive her ne w books,” said Katie Rubenac ker about 9-year-old Rebecca. “She began r eading one of them while w e were still there.” Being an a vid reader herself and having recently moved here from Okinawa, Japan with her f amily, Rubenacker said she recognized the positi ve impact that the e vent could ha ve on her children. White credits some of the Books on Bases pr ogram’s success to the support from Disney. The family oriented company agreed to donate 30,000 books to militar y families and libr aries throughout the country and provided approximately 4,000 free books during their visit to Pendleton.More information about similar Blue Star Families’ events and infortmation visit their website.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

B7

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES

Many students with advanced degrees return to MiraCosta College Spring semester is under way, and 14,400 students are taking credit classes at MiraCosta College. For some students, this semester is the first time they have set foot on a college campus. Others are here for their second, third or fourth semester, and are well along on their way toward completing a higher education. Meanwhile, a growing portion of the student body consists of those who have returned to community college, even though they already have bachelor’s or, in some cases, master’s degrees. Take the college’ s Registered Nursing Program, for example. The new cohort of nursing students began on January 14, and the group is once again strong with several students holding bachelor’s and master’s degrees in other fields of study. Then there are students like Briana McClur e, who earned a bachelor’s degree in theatre arts from UC Irvine in June 2012. Just a few short months after graduation, she enrolled in business courses at MiraCosta College. “In the future I want to create my own theatre production company, so it makes sense to take business classes to learn how the business side of it works,” Briana said. Briana is not unique; one of every eleven students at MiraCosta College has

already earned a bachelor’s degree or higher. Students with four-year degrees who return to a community college run the gamut of experience and interest. Some have come to brush up on the latest developments in their pro-

MiraCosta College has such a great reputation and such a great offering of courses in biotechnology.” Natasha Roark Carlsbad resident

fessions. Others have found that a bachelor’s degree in their original field of study isn’t enough. Still others have come for an edge in boosting their chances of getting a promotion at work. Most have come because of the college’s tremendous value and earned reputation for teaching excellence.When compared to the cost of taking classes at a public or private university, $46 per unit

for classes at Mir aCosta College is among the least expensive in the nation. “It’s an excellent value,” said Natasha Roar k, a 31year-old Carlsbad resident with a Bac helor of Science degree in molecular biolo gy from UC Santa Cruz, who is taking classes at Mir aCosta College to brush up on her technical knowledge and skills. “MiraCosta College has such a g reat reputation and such a great offering of courses in biotechnology,” she said. “I heard from several people in the biotechnology industry who recommended the college.” Mike Fino teaches biology at MiraCosta College. He estimates that one quarter to one third of the students in the college’s biotechnology program have a bac helor’s degree or higher. “Some of the time, students with bac helor degrees haven’t really developed the skills that ar e going to get them hired,” Fino said. “We’re helping them build employable skills.” Natasha agrees. She now works as a paid intern at Life Technologies Corporation in Carlsbad. “I use everything that I learned at MiraCosta College e very single day at work,” she said. “The things the y teach you are just invaluable.”

Ninety percent of Pacific Academy students achieve honor roll status Enrolling in a quality college preparatory school enhances students’ c hances of attaining the academic and emotional pr eparation needed to succeed at the university level and beyond. This preparation ideally starts in Mid dle School. Pacific Academy, established in 1997, has been a pri vate

individual needs and learning styles. Parents receive frequent progress reports and are encouraged to contact staff. As a result, rather than possibly falling through the cracks in a crowded public school, ninety percent of Pacific Academy students achieve honor roll status. In addition, students receive

Our ultimate aim, is to develop ‘Global Citizens’ of the 21st century.” Dr.Erika Sanchez Pacific Academy principal,

school for grades 7-12. In order to best ser ve students and its comm unity, Pacific Academy is e xpanding it’s Middle School Program, to serve 6th g rade. Middle School Students at P acific Academy enjoy a 1:10 teacher-student ratio unattainable by today’s public budget strapped schools. Smaller class siz es allow teachers to provide hands-on project-based learning and community based learning that students find relevant and enjoyable. Teachers actively identify student strengths and de velop individual education plans that include parents and cater to

individualized college counseling, starting in the 6th grade, to provide all the support needed thr ough the developmental process. This Middle School expansion will allo w 6th graders to take advantage of middle school programs and privileges experienced by our students. All of our students, high school and middle school, participate in exploratory education eac h Friday and may include community service projects, field trips, workshops, guest presentations, or student projects. All teachers have full teaching credentials and bachelor degrees, and many

hold Masters or Doctor ates in Education lik e Dr. Erika Sanchez, Pacific Academy’s principal, who earned a Masters and Doctoral degree in sociology with an emphasis in education. “Our ultimate aim, ” stated Erika Sanc hez, “is to develop ‘Global Citizens’ of the 21st centur y, critical thinkers [who] make choices guided by respect for oneself and others.” Character traits like responsibility or cooperation permeate the curriculum each quarter, and students who demonstr ate the emphasized character trait, receive recognition. Mr. Vikas Srivastava, this semester’s project-based learning facilitator, and all students collaborated and ar e planning a three-legged walk that pairs students fr om diverse backgrounds in an effort to eliminate discrimination and stereotyping. Mr. Vikas explains, “The theory is that e veryone is di verse because we all ha ve unique stories, and if we got to know one another’s stories, we would have more understanding and compassion between us.” After participating in numerous projects like this one, it’s no surprise that Pacific Academy students become compassionate, creative, inquisitive, and responsible global citizens.

Don’t miss out on all MiraCosta College has to offer! Catch one of our great events this semester; many are free!

Lectures Even the Rain (Ta mbién la l luvia)

Jiro Dreams of Sushi (Jiro sni o sushi)

Tickets and event details available online at www.miracosta.edu/artsandevents or call 760.795.6815.


THE COAST NEWS

B8

FEB. 8, 2013

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES

North County’s Best Private K-8 School Academy great alternative to home ■ Students Thrive holdsKeystone its classes Monda y schooling, and also offers one

Both Inside and Outside the Classroom at Keystone Academy A P r i v a t e K - 8 H y b r i d S c h o o l A n d Tu t o r i n g C e n t e r • Condensed accelerated schedule, Monday – Thursday from 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. • Academically rigorous curriculum aligned with California G.A.T.E. standards • Afternoon tutoring

• Daily Homework Club • Maximum student teacher ratio of 12 to 1 • Emphasis on differentiating curriculum for the gifted and talented student

Our unique and innovative program challenges and engages students in their learning and still allows time within the day to explore other interests and activities.

JOIN US AT OUR OPEN HOUSE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 26 • 5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m.

722 Genevieve Street | Solana Beach | (858) 847-3366 keystone-school.com | info@keystone-school.com Where Education Matters

Traditional schools might have procedures to identify students as “gifted,” and they may have a G.A.T.E. program to ser ve those students. Keystone Academy believes all students will benefit from the pr oven strategies of gifted education. These strategies include a rigorous academic en vironment with high e xpectations tailored to the indi vidual needs of each learner.

through Thursday from 8 a.m. – 12 p .m., with Friday as a home study day, and after school programs available for those who need them. This shorter class schedule, made possible by the advanced method of curriculum pr esentation, allows students more time to engage in cultivating other life skills necessary for their career and personal development. Many Keystone students ar e on their way to becoming professional athletes, dancers, and singers, while maintaining a fast paced and highl y challenging education. Keystone Academy is a

on one or small group tutoring in all subject ar eas for grades K-9. Their homework club, available Monday through Thursday from 12 p.m. – 5 p .m., gives students access to a wide r ange of resources and the support of a credentialed teacher. Keystone Academy will host an inf ormative open house on February 26th from 5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. for prospective parents and students in their newly expanded facility at 722 Gene vieve Street in Solana Beach. For more information visit www.keystoneschool.com or call (858) 8473366.

ICE students flourish in many ways ■ Innovation

Centre Encinitas program founded on love and respect

"In my opinion, as an experienced educator in this model of instruction, the Innovation Centre Encinitas program is a “gem” in our community. I believe this because the other ICE staff members and I kno w that every child is a precious gift.

At ICE, we value and appreciate every child’s unique strengths, talents, and passions. As ICE educator s, our mission is to determine where all of the children are on their educational, social, and emotional journeys, and we are masterful at tailoring instruction to best meet everyone’s individual needs. ICE is a program that is founded on love and respect, and all of our teac hers are skilled at pr acticing the art of positive discipline. Our students are joyful, and they continue to learn, grow, and flourish in so many ways. Future ICE middle school students w ould also

have the opportunity to receive individualized instruction in environment that is safe and r espectful. These students w ould have many opportunities to extend their learning and gain real-world experience as a result of working alongside community business owners. ICE middles school students would carry out indepth research projects that would enable them to mak e positive changes in their world. This type of mid dle school program is har d to find, so express your interest now!” — Ellen Ludwig, Site Coordinator, Innovation Centre Encinitas

Visit Sanderling Waldorf School:

Find out how to create a lifelong love of learning Sanderling Waldorf School is pleased to in vite local parents to visit the school at a n umber of upcoming outreach events: a panel evening discussion with Waldorf graduates on February 13 at 6:30 pm; the Family Open House on March 16 fr om 10 am to noon; Classroom Observation Mornings on April 16 and May 14 at 9 am; and Parent-Education Afternoons on April 24 and May 22 at 3:30 pm. The first of these events, “Why Waldorf Works: An Alumni Evening” on February 13 at 6:30 pm, provides an opportunity to meet and hear the stories of adult Waldorf-school graduates. This adults-only, interactive evening allows for plenty of time to ask questions of the panel of teachers and graduates. At the F amily Open House on March 16 from 10 am to noon, guests of all ages are welcome to tour the school’s new location in North Carlsbad; meet teachers, faculty members and school parents; and participate in a n umber of acti vities designed to help them get to know the school. SWS is located at 1905 Magnolia Avenue, in 16 e xclusively

leased classrooms on the campus of Magnolia Elementary School. Please note that the school’s entrance is off of Valley Street, between the Magnolia and Valley Middle School fields. There is no access to the SWS campus from Magnolia’s campus. The adults-only Classroom Observation Mornings on April 16 and May 14 at 9 am offer the chance to see Waldorf education in action. Visitors spend time in v arious classrooms while lessons ar e taking place; the morning closes with a Q&A session led by an experienced Waldorf teacher. The adults-only Parent-Education Afternoons on April 24 and May 22 at 3:30 pm ar e a natural follow-up to the morning observation, with a full school tour, participatory activities, and an intr oduction to the school’s faculty. “We greatly enjoy providing a br oad variety of ways to learn more about SWS and Waldorf education,” said Emily Towe, SWS Director of Enr ollment and Marketing. SWS offers an arts-centered, developmentally structured curriculum f or Nursery/Kindergarten and

Grades 1-8. The play-based Nursery/Kindergarten program is designed to pr ovide a gentle, nurturing environment for children ages three to six years. Formal academic work begins in the g rade school, with specialty subjects including Spanish, German, handwork (knitting, crocheting and sewing), outdoor games, musical instruments, gardening, and much more. Waldorf Education w as founded in 1919 b y Rudolf Steiner, an Austrian philosopher and teac her who also developed biodynamic agriculture. More than 1,000 Waldorf schools exist in more than 60 countries around the world. Waldorf schools are non-sectarian and non-denominational; and strive to teach a respect for nature while encouraging the development of the “whole” child: head, heart and hands. Teachers in Waldorf schools are dedicated to gener ating an inner enthusiasm for learning within every child. For more information about Sanderling Waldorf School or to RSVP f or an upcoming event, visit sanderlingschool.org or call 760.635.3747.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

B9

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES Quality education prepares our students Rancho Encinitas Academy serves students f rom PreKindergarten through 8th grade. The mission of the school is to n urture a student’s natural wonder and love of learning. The educational environment is f acilitated by a positi ve, relaxed atmosphere combined with the guidance of highly skilled, credentialed, caring and creative teachers. Quality education at the school prepares students f or the challenges of the futur e by fostering knowledge, creativity and self-r eliance. Edison Academy, a school within a sc hool, serves students in grades 3 through 8. It specializes in educational

tional needs. The goal of both programs is to empo wer students to be successful when facing future challenges. The schools also offer specials in art, music, and physical education. In addition, there are specials in Spanish and Yoga (up to Grade 4). Rancho Encinitas Academy campus covers two acres of landscaped grounds. There are 7 separate buildings custom designed and constructed especially for the sc hool. The school has bunny hutches and aviaries. The campus, Individualized or spe- with its ar chitecture, landcialized instruction is avail- scaping, and proximity to the able for students in r eading, ocean is conducive to a relaxwriting and math to accom- ing and tr anquil learning modate a student’ s educa- experience. instruction for students who are average to above average with mild to moder ate learning disabilities.

The educational environment is facilitated by a positive, relaxed atmosphere

A unique private graduate school In the heart of Encinitas’ spiritually eclectic yoga and holistic community lies a unique pri vate niche graduate school, the California School for Human Science (CIHS). Celebrating its 20th year, CIHS’ entire curriculum reflects Encinitas’ place on the frontier of the healing arts, consciousness, and subtle energy practice. Offering selective Master’s and Doctorate programs in Integral Health, which encompasses the ne w paradigm of integ ral sciences or subtle energy studies in the healing arts and complementary health pr actices; Comparative Religion and

Philosophy taught fr om an Eastern, consciousnessbased perspective; two California approved licenseeligible MFT and PhD Clinical Psychology degrees taught from a holistic, nonmedical model appr oach; Integral Psychology, where the emphasis is on ener gy psychology/medicine theory and practice; and a Bachelor of Arts completion program. Founded in 1992 b y a spiritual leader, researcher, and scientist, Dr. Hiroshi Motoyama’s lifework is the integration of science and spirit. Dr. Motoyama’s research transformed the culture around which subtle energy was legitimized as an

academic field of stud y, and CIHS was born out of that dream. CIHS offers an unprecedented opportunity to pursue a rigorous graduate education that honors consciousness and the mind/body/spirit connection. We welcome all like minds to CIHS’ progressive learning community as the opportunity to pursue a graduate degree without compromising oneness and consciousness, which represents the cultural shift of which we are all a part, is without parallel. Please visit www.cihs.edu or call to make an appointment: 760-6341771.

Safer communities thru unique training Safe and secur e communities rely on pr oactive and responsible individuals who have the a wareness, training, and skills to r esponsibly act when needed. Aegis Academy is firmly committed to making a difference in Southern California by providing professional firearms training to responsible citizens who ar e willing to take an active role in learning, developing, and maintaining the sk ills required to protect themselves and their families. Raising the le vel of firearms safety and pr oficiency in the comm unity not only reduces the potential f or firearms accidents, it directly contributes to the safety and security among the gener al public by reducing the potential for violent crime. Furthermore, reducing the number of violent incidents eases the burden on local law enforcement. Engaged and proactive citizens can g reatly contribute to a culture of safety and security for future generations. The tenets of per sonal responsibility and safe communities form the foundation of Aegis Academ y and are deeply rooted in e very member of the Aegis Team. Hand selected from across the spectrum of military special operations units, elite law enforcement veterans, and other uniquely qualified per sonnel, Aegis Academy’s instructors form the most pr ofessional team of mentors in the indus-

try today. In addition to the decades of training experience they possess, they all have personal experience surviving and winning violent encounters. More importantly, they were selected for their personal commitment to continue making a difference in the comm unity by sharing a lifetime of applicable skills with interested mem-

Extensive experience incredibly friendly, and very patient." Pam G,Yelp San Diego

bers of the public. Aegis Academy has re-set the industry standard by effectively combining programmatic physical skill de velopment with refined awareness and conscious decision making. For novice shooters through experienced competitors, Aegis Academy offers a wide variety of pr ograms that include firearm familiarization, instructor development, and courses in pistol, rifle, and shotgun taught at the basic, intermediate, and advanced levels. What makes Aegis Academy different is its clientcentered approach that is

focused on long-term sk ill development and its adoption of periodization tec hniques proven effective by top athletes around the w orld. Through adaptation, conditioning, transition, and refinement, shooters of all levels will reach their personal goals and achieve elevated levels of proficiency. Hundreds of Aegis clients have benefitted fr om this unique instruction. Pamela G. from San Diego didn’t aspire to own a gun,but stated that “It is incredibly important to be able to handle one. If you are looking for a course on any kind of gun, Aegis is the place to go . Professional, experienced and thorough education is what you will get here.” Experienced shooters also gain proficiency in the courses. Darren from Encinitas states, “Despite a couple decades of experience with handguns, I found this cour se to be v ery instructional and developed a greater sense of confidence in my shooting a bilities/consistency and safe handling procedures.” Whether you are new to firearms, have received some training in the past, or are a trained professional, Aegis Academy offers a v ariety of professionally developed curriculum to help y ou take an active role in y our personal security and pr otect the ones you love. To learn more, please visit www.aegisacademy.com or call 1-800-852-2692.

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THE COAST NEWS

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FEB. 8, 2013

EDUCATIONAL O PPORTUNITIES Olivenhain Country Preschool and Infant Center for the Ar ts...

A balance of academics and arts

Where our school is your child’s 2nd home. We appreciate the opportunity to introduce you to OCP and look forward to sharing with you the unique advantages of our environment and programs. We invite you to tour our facility, meet our teachers, and see for yourself how kids are laughing and growing while learning at OCP.

Del Mar Pines School 3975 Torrington Road San Diego, CA 92130

858.481.5615

www.delmarpines.com

classroom environment, with reduced class time. It teaches at G.A.T .E. standards and offers a condensed schedule Monday through Thursday from 8 Business news and special a.m. to noon with Friday as a home-study day. For more achievements for information, call (858) 847North San Diego County. or visit k eystoneSend information via email to 3366 school.com.

Who’s NEWS?

community@ coastnewsgroup.com.

Grand opening

North County r esident and teacher Natalie Christ will host a grand opening of Simply Moksha at 282 N. El Camino Real in the Kaila Beauty Bar and Med Spa all day Feb. 12. Moksha means “letting go or liber ation.� The boutique encourages all to focus on present moment a wareness. Products include inspirational word stones, meditation scarves, zafus (meditation cushions), body care by Natural Selection, jewelry, angel cards and oracle decks, Buddha statues, incense, canvas art, inspiring scrolls, singing bowls, journals and clothing.

School expands

Keystone Academy will hold an Open House 5:30 to 7 p.m. Feb. 26 in its newly upgraded facility, 722 Genevieve St., Suite C, Solana Beach. The K-8 school offers an accelerated

One for the troops

Guests at local Islands restaurants are paying it forward and buying beer s for active military and veterans. The promotion began at the Encinitas and Vista locations “Buy Your Friend a Beer� allows Islands guests to purchase a beer f or a member of the militar y. Once a beer is pur chased, a name is added to a board in the Islands bar . Any member of the military can claim a free beer by showing a military ID, provided that there are enough tallies on the board.

Love in Del Mar air

Enter for a chance to win a dinner f or two with your sweetheart from either Jake’s Del Mar, PrepKitchen Del Mar, Hotel Indigo Ocean View Bar & Grill or Del Mar Rendezvous. Just “like� the Del Mar Village Association or the a bove-mentioned restaurants on F acebook and comment on DMV A’s blog post on what y ou think is the most romantic place

in Del Mar, to be entered to win one of fi ve gift car ds. Winners will be announced Feb. 14 at noon.

Locals on board

Three North County residents have joined the Susan G. Komen for the Cure, San Diego boar d of Directors for 2013-2014. Catherine Blair of Del Mar has been named Pr esident. Craig Pobst of Car lsbad, founder of Kitchen Inc. and Elle Piji of Uni versity City, principal of Intellus Training have been elected to the board.

Anniversary

Communications agency (W)right On Communications, Inc. is celebrating its 15th Anniversary in 2013. Founded by President Julie Wright in January 1998, the public relations firm, was named a 2012 Most Admired Company by the San Diego Metropolitan.

Next step

Pamela Bledsoe with Carlsbad-based Professional Community Management of California Inc., has earned the California-specific designation of “Certified Community Association Manager� from the California Association of Community Managers during the last quarter of 2012. The CCAM certification is

Olivenhain Country Preschool and Infant Center for the Arts mission is to provide your child with a safe, loving, nurturing environment to acquir e proper skills and v alues to prepare them for their future. Here at OCP our teachers provide an environment of many mediums encouraging your child to e xplore and learn. For example, Cooking, the arts, rhythm and movement, gardening, sign language and Spanish. Beginning a f oreign language at an early age, along with our continued use of

these skills thr oughout our program, allows us to see the benefits of a second language in action. When learning is pr esented through many mediums, with a balance of academics and arts along with kinesthetic and tactile e xperiences, children will r etain more of this knowledge. Our daily activities include a v ariety of learning, all wrapped in fun, play and exploration, with your child using their imagination. We look f orward to sharing with you the unique advantages of our en viron-

ment and programs and we invite you to tour our facility, meet our teac hers, and see for yourself how kids are laughing and g rowing while learning at OCP.

Come and experience what makes us unique: • A safe, loving, nurturing environment • Hands on art & crafts, cooking, gardening • Our f amily values: politeness, good manners & respect • Art & natur e exploration in a cheerful setting

Learn. Laugh. Grow. At Del Mar Pines, we believe the elementary school years are the most formative of a child’s life. For over thirty years we’ve challenged the minds and engaged the hearts of our students by encouraging a thirst for knowledge and an inquisitive spirit. Through a safe, nurturing environment, we provide students the opportunity to express intellectual curiosity and creative expression while promoting strong interpersonal relationships. Our goal for each student

Each student leaves as an independent, resourceful thinker with a lifelong love of learning. is to leave Del Mar Pines School as an independent, resourceful thinker with a lifelong love of learning.

Come see for yourself the difference our elementary school experience can have on your child’s life.

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awarded to community managers who ha ve completed CACM’s educational curriculum program and ha ve work experience in the field of community association management.

Guiding Coastkeeper

San Diego Coastkeeper, an environmental nonprofit, welcomes Capt. Sue Stewart to its boar d of dir ectors. Stewart served 24 y ears as an attorney in the United States Navy’s Judge Advocate General’s Corps. Other new board members include President Jo Brooks, retired attorney in international environmental law for the Department of State; Vice President Sandy Edwin Kaupp, medical researcher, U.S. Navy; Vice President and Interim Treasurer Harriet Lazer, retired/former CFO at The Walker Group; Secretary Eleanor Musick, partner at Procopio, Cory, Hargreaves & Savitch. For more information, visit sdcoastkeeper.org

Landfill opposition

Environmental Health Coalition, a San Diego nonprofit that fights f or toxicfree communities, presented its contin ued opposition to the Gr egory Canyon Landfill at a public hearing Jan. 31 California Center for the Arts, Escondido. For more information, visit environmentalhealth.org/.

From left, April Stone, Elizabeth Sanchez of Angel Faces and Rancho Santa Fe Rotary Club President Matt Wellhouser gathered as the club presented Angel Faces with a $10,000 check from its Golf tournament and Auction benefit in November. Courtesy image

Rotary keeps busy pace RANCHO SANTA FE — Rancho Santa F e’s Rotary Club keeps a busy pace as the new year unfolds. Club members started out the New Year with a trip to Rosarito Beach, Mexico on Jan. 5 where Rotarians distributed food and blankets to long lines of people in need. On Jan. 15, Rancho Santa Fe Rotarians gathered with other Rotarians f or a joint meeting of the district’s seven Rotary Clubs. The meeting, held at the Solana Beach Boys and Girls Club, celebrated Rotary achievements in the elimination of polio in the world. On Jan. 22, the Rancho Santa Fe Rotarians welcomed fellow Rotarian Chuc k Limandri who spoke to the club about “Litigation at the U.S. Supreme Court.� At the lunc h meeting,

President Matt Wellhauser presented Angel Faces with a check for $10,000 from the recent Rancho Santa F e Rotary/Kids Korps golf tournament benefit. The club hosted Neil Martin, a Patent attorney will speak about the “World of Patents — The Process and Their Importance to the Business World,� Jan. 29 and held a Rotary Social Happy Hour Feb. 5 at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club. Save the date f or the upcoming RSF Rotary’s Taste of Rancho Santa Fe on July 20. Rancho Santa Fe Rotary meetings are held at noon on Tuesdays at the Rancho Santa Fe Golf Club, 5827 Via de la Cumbre. For more information, v i s i t RanchoSantaFeRotary.org.


FEB. 8, 2013

Sweet picks for Valentine’s Day When it comes to chocolate, the good stuff doesn’ t come cheap. To find the ultimate chocolate experience, in time f or Valentine’s Day, taste testers at ShopSmart, the shopping magazine fr om Consumer Reports, nibbled on thousands of bo xed bonbons, from hand-crafted assortments going f or $90 a pound to a $10 Whitman’s Sampler. According to tests, you’ll have to shell out at least $26 a box for the good stuff . But there’s lots to choose from in the $40-and-up range, including exotic flavors such as mango and c hili pepper. ShopSmart’s top pic k this year is Woodhouse Chocolate Assortment, which beat Norman Love Confections for the first time. Though chocolatiers rarely run sales, there are ways to save. To avoid shipping costs (which can ad d a lot to the final price, especially if y ou order in the summertime, when rates are higher), go online to see if there’s a retail store near you. Also, sign up for e-newsletters, which may include coupons. And check the chocolate maker’s website for cheaper shipping options. One more tip: Can’t eat nuts or hate the gooey, fruity centers? Ask whether the retailer will customize a box for you — many will!

LOVE AT FIRST BITE

Here are six sweet selections to consider f or your loved ones this Valentine’s

Day (prices do not include shipping): • Woodhouse Chocolate Assortment (16 ounces, 48 pieces), $90. Deemed the yummiest in ShopSmart’s taste tests, these chocolates were bursting with flavors like cinnamon toast, pecan pie, mint and r eal whipped cream fillings. Visit woodhousechocolate.com. • Candinas (16 ounces, 36 pieces), $49. A mix of dark and milk chocolates that are ultra-smooth, with yummy hazelnut, caramel and liqueur-flavored centers that hint of fresh cream and butter.Visit candinas.com. • L.A. Burdick Large Wood Box Assortment (16 ounces, 64 pieces), $65. ShopSmart’s tasters made note of these bonbons’ intense chocolate flavor with subtler fillings such as cherry liquor and haz elnut. Visit burdickchocolate.com. • Fran’s Assorted Truffles Collection (12 ounces, 36 pieces), $50.These milk- and dar k-chocolate truffles have delicious chocolate-based fillings of haz elnut, coffee and car amel flavors. Visit franschocolates.com. • Vosges Exotic Truffle Collection (6.4 ounces, 16 pieces), $40. This delicious mix of traditional and unusual flavors (curry, paprika and wasabi) is w ell worth the taste bud shoc k, say ShopSmart’s tasters. Visit vosgeschocolate.com. • Theo Chocolate Confection Collection (4.5 ounces, 12 pieces), $26. Flavorful, dark chocolate encases outstanding fillings of lemon ganac he, fig, mint and more. Visit theochocolate.com.

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College offers Red Cross health courses OCEANSIDE — MiraCosta College’s Community Services Program is offering se veral heart/first aid courses this spring: Offerings include: • American Heart Association BLS Health Care Provider Course: This class provides a wide v ariety of health car e professionals with the a bility to recognize several lifethreatening emergencies, provide CPR, use an automated external defibrillator (AED) and relieve choking in a safe and effecti ve manner. This one-day class is available from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 9, March 23, April 13 and Ma y 18, in Room 3511 at MiraCosta College 1 Barnard Drive. Fee is $65. • Heartsaver Adult/Child CPR and AED: Participants learn h ow to perform CPR and car e for breathing and car diac emergencies in adults and children, in addition to learning how to use an AED on adult and c hild victims of cardiac arrest. Participants receive lifesaving information, hands-on training, and an American Heart Association booklet. This one-day class is scheduled from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 9, March 23, April 13 and Ma y 18, in Room 3511 at MiraCosta College 1 Barnard Drive. Fee is $60. • Heartsaver First Aid with CPR and AED: This course is r ecommended for medical professionals, lifeguards, fitness instructors, teachers, and public and private safety and security employees. This class teac hes participants how to r ecognize and care for breathing and cardiac emergencies in

adults, children and infants; how to perf orm one- and two-rescuer CPR; ho w to use a resuscitation mask (pocket mask) and ho w to use an AED for victims of

sudden cardiac arrest and how to handle common first aid emergencies. This one-day class is scheduled 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Feb. 9, March 23, April 13

and May 18, in Room 3511, in Room 3609 at Mir aCosta College, 1 Barnard Drive. Fee is $99. To register, call (858) 524-6522.

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FEB. 8, 2013

Whale watching season has arrived

Huge pods of bottle-nosed dolphins (think Flipper) entertain whale watchers regularly off the coast of Dana Point. Sometimes they number in the thousands, according to boat captain Jack Van Dyke. Photo by Irene Gilgoff for Dana Wharf

This Pacific white-sided dolphin delights boat passengers with his antics during a January whale-watching trip off the coast of Dana Point. Photo courtesy of Dana Wharf.

E’LOUISE ONDASH Hit the Road

NOW OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Jack Van Dyke, a native South Korean and one-time Carlsbad resident, is captain of the Dana Pride, owned by Dana Wharf Whale Watching. He uses the microphone to share his vast knowledge about dolphins and whales during the two-hour trips. The 95-foot boat makes several trips daily along the coast off of Dana Point during gray whale migration season (December through March). Photo by E’Louise Ondash

I’ve seen dolphins bef ore, but this is crazy. There are hundreds of them — the bottle-nosed v ariety (think Flipper) — jumping straight out of the w ater, playing in our boat’s wake and just having what looks like a grand ol’ time. Many of the friendl y, warm-blooded mammals r ace right alongside the Dana Pride, showing off for all they’re worth. My friend, Shannon, and I are aboard the Dana Pride, which is pushing its w ay north off the coast of Dana Point.The 40-some passengers are shouting, pointing this way and that, and shooting photos of the dolphins that are everywhere. For a moment, I consider how much fun it must be to be a dolphin of any variety. So far, on our tw o-hour cruise, we’ve

seen common-nosed dolphin, Pacific white-sided dolphin and now this massive pod of Flippers. They almost make us forget why we are really out here — to search for gray whales. It’s that time of year again — when landlubbers seek out close encounters with these barnacle-covered cetaceans as they migrate the mor e than 12,000 miles fr om the Alaska coast to the w arm waters of Scammon’s Lagoon off the Baja coast.And luck is with us today — at least as far as the weather is concerned. It’s a Chamber-ofCommerce January day and the warmth of the sun is m uch welcomed after our recent cold spell. Captain Jack Van Dyke is at the helm of the 95-foot Dana Pride and he’ s been spotting gray whales near ly every day since December. We hope he’ll to add to the tally today. In contrast to dolphins, grays are more solitary. They generally travel alone or perhaps with one or tw o other whales. That common wisdom was challenged in January

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when a pod of 23 was sighted off of Palos Verdes. It was the largest number of whales seen together in 30 years, according to news reports. Here are a few other facts about gray whales: • They grow from 30 feet to 50 feet long (a bout the length of a sc hool bus) and weigh between 27,000 pounds and 36,000 pounds. • They have baleen, not teeth. Whales feed by scooping up giant mouthfuls of krill and other tiny sea life fr om the ocean floor.The baleen act as a filter, allowing water and other unwanted material to escape, leaving the krill. • They have a double blowhole (dolphins have one), and their spouts are about 15 feet high. • They spend summers in the Bering and Chukc hi seas off the coast of Alaska, where they load up on food. Once gray whales start their migration south to Mexico,they swim continuously and never eat. • When they reach their destination off the coast of Mexico, gray whales breed and give birth. • The best time to see gray whales off the Southern California coast is betw een late December and late March.

After being out f or about an hour-and-a-half, Captain Jack returns south and we spot a spout just above the horizon. The boat makes a beeline f or the whale, and shortly, we are close to the g ray and can see the ridge of its solid, barnaclecovered back skimming along the water each time it surfaces for a deep breath. Captain Jack keeps the boat slightly behind the behemoth. With cameras ready, passengers stand close to the r ailing, trying to anticipate when the whale will break to the surface.We see the fluke once, but after that, he keeps a fairly low profile during surf acing. Still, it’s quite thrilling to get so close. Finally, we turn toward the harbor and in a fe w minutes, are home. It will be several days, however, before our gray whale reaches its destination. Whale watching is offered at: Dana Point — Dana Wharf; danawharf.com; (949) 496-5794. Oceanside — Sunset Sails; sail-oceanside.com; (760) 2075572. E’Louise Ondash is a freelance writer living in North County. Tell her about your travels at eondash@coastnewsgroup.com.


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

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Kathy Collins of Rancho Santa Fe spends hours at her sewing machine creating her award-winning wall art. Photo by Patty McCormac

Quilter takes craft to a whole new level By Patty McCormac

RANCHO SANTA FE — When Kathy Collins starts talking about quilting, she takes passion to a whole new level. When she begins explaining about her craft, the excitement comes bubbling out. Collins does not do traditional quilting used as bedding though. Her quilting is quite a departure from the traditional squares and is considered an art form that is winning awards in competition around the nation. “I’ve won a couple of seconds in thr ee national competitions this year,” she said. But that is not enough for Collins. She is still shooting for a first place which has eluded her somehow. “I don’t care about winning prizes. It’s about winning first place. It’s about prestige,” she said. She said her pieces fall into the category of wall art. “I like to put on Swarovski Crystals, sequins and beading for embellishments. It is more like art on fabric.” She said she has always loved art. “It is one of my passions. My husband and I collect it,” she said. “We have an art gallery downtown in the Gaslamp District.” She has been creating her art for about seven years,

she said. “I work on it most every day. Right now I’m doing a whole series on trees. It has a more oriental flair with cherry blossoms in the spring,” she said. She gets a thrill out of entering her work in competition. “I entered in the Paducah Kentucky show, the

I don’t care about winning prizes. It’s about winning first place. It’s about prestige” Kathy Collins Quilter

mother of all quilting shows,” she said. “I entered it the last week of December and I won’t hear until the third of March (if she has been accepted) and the show is in the summer.” She said she thinks there is a small cash award for the winner, but again it is not about the money. Recently, she entered a national competition f or Swarovski Crystals with a theme of music. Her entry was named

“The girl with the crystal tattoo. Music to my eyes.” It was a model wearing a garment with a crystal musical staff on the back made up of blue crystals. “ I got into the semifinals with about 30 others from around the nation,” she said. She also entered a competition in a national magazine and took second place. She is preparing for her next competition sponsored by “Quilt” magazine that is themed “West Coast Wonders.” Collins decided against doing the ob vious Golden Gate Bridge. She decided instead on the “gnarly” Monterey cypress. “This is going to look cool,” she said. She said the piece needs to be entered by the end of February for a show to be held in the summer. In the past she has created wall art with w omen’s faces set in a labyrinth of color and she did a series of “Alice in Wonderland” one “with a stac k of cups all wonky. It was very whimsical.” “You can’t enter all the shows. You don’t have enough time,” she said. And the criteria f or judging are different at every show. “Each show has its own staff of judges and you never know what they are looking for,” she said.

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NFL champs on hand for benefit COAST CITIES — The UC San Diego Division of Urology is hosting a prostate cancer “Breakfast with Champions” fundraiser from 8 to 10 a.m. Feb. 22 at the La J olla Country Club, 7301 High Ave. The event will feature NFL Hall of Famers and pr ostate cancer sur vivors Mike Haynes and Deacon J ones who will discuss their experiences as cham-

pions, both on and off the field. All proceeds benefit prostate cancer research. Tickets are $250 and sponsor ships are available. For more information, call (858) 534-4289, email the UC San Diego Division of Urology, or visit urology.ucsd.edu. For more information, call (858) 534-4289.

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FEB. 8, 2013

Through the eyes of a Boomer JOE MORIS Baby Boomer Peace My column is one man’s take on life — a ba by boomer’s life. Those of you whose parents are baby boomers might find it har d to under stand what our gener ation has been through because I had a tough time under standing what my parents went through. Unless you actually experience something, all the reading of te xtbooks won’t change a person’s perception of reality when it is experienced in real time. We grew up in a time when there were only three television stations. We all watched the same sho ws at the same time. There were no computers growing up, at least not per sonal computers. For many of us if w e actually needed to mak e a phone call w e had to go through an operator because we shared “party lines” where we had to w ait for someone else to finish their phone call bef ore we could make ours. The world was also a pretty scary place. We had

just completed a major world war and then we wearily went through another one located in the fr ozen tundra of Korea. The first wave of ba by boomers followed World War II and then man y of our fathers raced off to the second war and came home to the loving arms of their wives and cr eated the ne xt wave of baby boomers. Another friend of mine passed away two weeks ago. Her name was Barbara. She had just turned 60. About 12 years ago she beat breast cancer. She was married to my good friend Don. Don, Barbara, my now former wife and I had g reat times going down to Bajamar and playing golf along the Pacific while the mist of w aves splashing against the rocks would cool our brows with its spray on a warm summer day. We would wander into Ensenada for a night of margaritas and good f ood. We had our moments of life that can never quite be duplicated. That is life. Life is fleeting and w e have the indelible memories. Barbara is gone now. Just a simple stomach ache forced her to see her doctor. It turned out to be a large mass on her stomac h and two weeks later Barbara was back home in hea ven from whence she began. All that is left is a sense of loss by those left behind. Her son David saw many of his fellow soldiers lose their lives on the battlefields of Iraq and Afghanistan. But, losing one’s mother is a different story. Barbara was only 60. Just before Christmas, my friend Ted Weeks lost his father. Ted Sr. was a character and a v ery giving and generous man. He served during WWII. Ted Treadwell, is home with Ted’s mom Nellie, now. They too are young again in

Heaven and r eady to plan their future up there. Yes, our lives seemed so much slower and simpler many decades ago when w e baby boomers were just children, but in r etrospect, we worked hard getting through school, doing our duty to defend our country for those who either voluntarily or not so voluntarily served their country. Remember, we baby boomers had to deal with the Selective Service draft. Our lives were not entir ely our own. There was an ugly war in a very strange place in Indonesia and that too w as scary because e very night, one of those thr ee, if not all three, television stations were showing our boys being killed in jungles with rain and 100 percent humidity. We live in a f ast paced world today. We live in real time. It’s hard to imagine what 50 years from now will be lik e. But, despite the dr aft and the craziness, we were able to pursue our dr eams without too much interference. Today it seems lik e everything we do has something to do with the go vernment. I wish that m y grandkids generation knew what it was like to live under personal responsibility instead of “shared” responsibility. I’m too young to see the w orld change as much as it has,and then I’m too old to honestl y believe that the w orld could be the way it once was. We live in a d ynamic world, not a static one. We go with the flow and we live to find our peace. May peace be with you Barbara and Treadwell. Our day will come too , but until then, may our days be filled with good memories, good friends and family and peace. Joe Moris may be contacted at (760) 500-6755 or by email at joe@coastalcountry.net.

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Coast News Legals From Page A22 by sending a written r equest to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of fir st publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is unable to convey title for any reason, the successful bid der's sole and e xclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall ha ve no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall ha ve no further recourse against the Mortgagor , the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Ser vice Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego, CA 92101 619-6457711 For NON SALE inf ormation only Sale Line: 800-280-2832 Or Login to: http://www.qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been disc harged through bankruptcy, you may have been r eleased of per sonal liability for this loan in whic h case this letter is intended to exercise the note holder s right’s against the r eal property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PR OVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a cr edit report agency if y ou fail to fulfill the terms of your credit obligations. TS No.: CA-12-529579-JP IDSPub #0044977 2/8/2013 2/15/2013 2/22/2013 CN 14534 T.S. No.: 2012-20536 Loan No .: 7090732970 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 6/21/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held b y the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held b y the trustee in the hereinafter described pr operty under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the da y of sale. Trustor: MARIA DELGA DO, A MARRIED WOMAN AS HER SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive, LLC Recorded 6/30/2006 as Instrument No. 2006-0465593 in book ---, page --- and r erecorded on --- as --- of Official Recor ds in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County, California, Date of Sale: 3/8/2013 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: At the main entrance to the East County Regional Center b y statue, 250 Main street, El Cajon, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $1,037,239.32 Street Address or other common designation of real property: 908 AVEN DE SAN CLEMENTE, ENCINITAS, CALIFORNIA 92024 A.P.N.: 259-101-07-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no str eet address or other common desig nation is shown, directions to the location of the pr operty may be obtained by sending a written

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request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to Calif ornia Civil Code §2923.54 the under signed, on behalf of the beneficiar y, loan servicer or authoriz ed agent, declares as f ollows: The beneficiary or ser vicing agent declares that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of e xemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timefr ame for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of Calif ornia Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been pr ovided or the loan is e xempt from the requirements. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bid ding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or ma y be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off , before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to in vestigate the e xistence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee f or this information. If you consult either of these r esources, you should be a ware that the same lender my hold mor e than one mortgage or deed of trust on this property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed,and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www.altisource.com/Mortg ageServices/DefaultManagemen t/TrusteeServices.aspx, using the file number assigned to this case 2012-20536. Information about postponements that ar e very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale ma y not immediatel y be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale Date: 1/22/2013 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beach Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beach, California 92648 Automated Sale Inf ormation Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/Mortg ageServices/DefaultManagemen t/TrusteeServices.aspx For NonAutomated Sale Inf ormation, call:(866) 240-3530 Laterrika Thompkins, Trustee Sale Assistant 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14533

described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is pur ported to be: 6675 PASEO DEL NOR TE NO. D , CARLSBAD, CA 92011 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without co venant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid bal ance of the obligations secur ed by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and ad vances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $349,028.32 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and ad vances will increase this figure prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, savings association or sa vings bank specified in Section 5102 of the California Financial Code and authorized to do business in California, or other suc h funds as may be accepta ble to the trustee. In the e vent tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the pa yee or endorsee as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to con vey title f or any reason, the successful bid der`s sole and e xclusive remedy shall be the return of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall ha ve no further recourse. Notice to P otential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should under stand that there are risks in volved in bidding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automaticall y entitle you to free and clear o wnership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bid der at the auction, you are or ma y be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the e xistence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this pr operty by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insur ance company, either of whic h may charge you a fee f or this information. If you consult either of these r esources, you should be a ware that the same Lender may hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the property. Notice to Property Owner The sale date sho wn on this Notice of Sale ma y be postponed one or mor e times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about Trustee Sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this pr operty, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site address on the previous page for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file number assigned to this case, CA09007426-11-1. Information about postponements that ar e very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale ma y not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the sc heduled sale. DATE: 1/28/2013 TRUSTEE CORPS TS No. CA09007426-11-1 17100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614 949-252-8300 Lupe Tabita, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com AUTOMATED SALES INFORMATION PLEASE CALL AUCTION.COM AT 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE

CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1018018 2/1, 2/8, 02/15/2013 CN 14528

Information about postponements that ar e very short in duration or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale ma y not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMATION PLEASE CALL: NATIONWIDE POSTING & PUBLICATION A DIVISION OF FIRST AMERICAN TITLE INSURANCE COMPANY 5005 WINDPLAY DRIVE, SUITE 1 EL DORADO HILLS, CA 957629334 916-939-0772 www .nationwideposting.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee Dated:01/21/2013 NPP0212916 COAST NEWS 02/01/2013,02/08/2013, 02/15/2013 CN 14523

the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or ma y be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off , before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to in vestigate the e xistence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee f or this information. If you consult either of these r esources, you should be a ware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this pr operty, you may call (855)986-9342, or visit this Internet Web site www.superiordefault.com using the file number assigned to this case 1205883CA . Information about postponements that ar e very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediatel y be reflected in the telephone inf ormation or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. Date: 1/24/2013. Trustee Sales Information: 855-986-9342, w w w. s u p e r i o r d e f a u l t . c o m Seaside Trustee Inc., P.O. Box 2676, Ventura, CA 93014. By: Carlos M. Olmos, Office Clerk. (02/01/13, 02/08/13, 02/15/13, SDI-3404) CN 14522

and loan association, savings association or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Calif ornia Financial Code and authoriz ed to do business in California, or other such funds as may be acceptable to the Trustee. In the e vent tender other than cash is accepted, the Trustee may withhold the issuance of the Trustee`s Deed Upon Sale until funds become available to the payee or endor see as a matter of right. The property offered for sale excludes all funds held on account by the property receiver, if applicable. If the Trustee is unable to convey title f or any reason, the successful bidder`s sole and e xclusive remedy shall be the r eturn of monies paid to the Trustee and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. Notice to P otential Bidders If you are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a Trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a Trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same Lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or Deed of Trust on the pr operty. Notice to Property Owner The sale date shown on this Notice of Sale may be postponed one or mor e times by the Mortgagee, Beneficiary, Trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about Trustee Sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call Auction.com at 800.280.2832 for information regarding the Trustee's Sale or visit the Internet Web site ad dress on the pr evious page for information regarding the sale of this property, using the file number assigned to this case, CA05001489-12-1.Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. Date: January 23, 2013 TRUSTEE CORPSTS No . CA05001489-12-117100 Gillette Ave, Irvine, CA 92614949-252-8300 Tina Godoy, Authorized Signatory SALE INFORMATION CAN BE OBTAINED ONLINE AT www.Auction.com FOR AUTOMATED SALES INFORMA TION PLEASE CALL AUCTION.COM at 800.280.2832 TRUSTEE CORPS MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED MAY BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1016961 2/1, 2/8, 02/15/2013 CN 14519

APN: 214-300-05-03 TS No: CA09007426-11-1 TO No: 6212922 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/25/2006. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On 2/22/2013 at 09:00 AM, Auction.com Room at Sheraton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the dul y Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the po wer of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on 08/01/2006 as Instrument No . 2006-0543143 of official r ecords in the Office of the Recor der of San Diego County, California, executed by JAMES C. HAMILTON, A MARRIED MAN AS HIS SOLE AND SEPARATE PROPERTY, as Trustor(s), in favor of INCG CAPITAL GROUP INC. as Beneficiary, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County, California describing the land ther ein as: As more fully described in said Deed of Trust The property heretofore

Trustee Sale No . 20100134003724 Title Order No.100453656 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/21/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PR OTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE.IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE N ATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 04/01/2005 as Instrument No. 2005-0267314 of official records in the office of the County Recor der of SAN DIEGO County, State of C ALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: ALI SHAPOURI AND LAURA AMANDA SHAPOURI, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR C ASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other f orm of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in la wful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 02/21/2013 TIME OF SALE: 10:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN ST., EL CAJON, CA. STREET ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the r eal property described above is purported to be: 7759 VIA ZAFIRO, RANCHO SANTA FE, CALIFORNIA 92067 APN#: 265-45215 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbr ances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secur ed by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust,fees,charges and e xpenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secured by the pr operty to be sold and r easonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $2,385,544.14. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and deli vered to the undersigned a written Declaration of Def ault and Demand for Sale , and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county wher e the r eal property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bid ding on this property lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be r esponsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off , before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to in vestigate the e xistence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder 's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this inf ormation. If you consult either of these r esources, you should be a ware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information a bout trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this pr operty, you may call 916-939-0772 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Website www.nationwideposting.com for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file n umber assigned to this case 20100134003724.

T.S. No.: 1205883CA Loan No .: 152485 A.P.N.: 160-230-12-00 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 12/17/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bid der for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state of national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the F inancial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held b y the duly appointed trustee as shown below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and now held b y the trustee in the hereinafter described pr operty under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described belo w. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges, and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be g reater on the da y of sale. Trustor: JOSE G. DOMINGUEZ AND MARCELINA DOMINGUEZ, HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, Duly Appointed Trustee: Seaside Trustee Inc., Recorded 1/3/2008, as Instrument No. 20080002284, in book XX, page, XX of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, California. Date of Sale: 2/22/2013 Time: 10:30 AM Place of Sale: AT THE ENTRANCE TO THE EAST COUNTY REGIONAL CENTER BY THE STATUE, 250 E. MAIN STREET, EL CAJON, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other c harges: $773,256.93. Street Address or other common designation of real property: 320 ABCD SOUTH EL C AMINO REAL, OCEANSIDE, CA 92054. A.P.N.:160-230-12-00.As required by California Civil Code Section 2923.5, the current beneficiary has declared to Seaside Trustee Inc, the original trustee, the duly appointed substituted trustee, or acting as agent f or the trustee, that the requirements of said section has been met by one or more of the f ollowing: 1. Borrower was contacted to assess their financial situation and to e xplore the options f or the borrower to a void foreclosure. 2. The borrower has surrendered the property to the mortgagee, trustee, beneficiary or authorized agent. 3. Due diligence to contact the borr ower was made as r equired by said Section 2923.5 The undersigned Trustee disclaims an y liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no str eet address or other common designation is sho wn, directions to the location of the property may be obtained b y sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of fir st publication of this Notice of Sale. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the pr operty itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that

APN: 167-480-19-10 TS No: CA05001489-12-1 TO No: 1240720 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED May 16, 2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. On February 22, 2013 at 09:00 AM, Auction.com Room at Sher aton San Diego Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101, MTC FINANCIAL INC. dba TRUSTEE CORPS, as the dul y Appointed Trustee, under and pursuant to the po wer of sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust Recorded on Ma y 29, 2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0361475 of official records in the Office of the Recorder of San Diego County , California, executed by MARC S STEELE AND MELISSA A STEELE HUSBAND AND WIFE AS JOINT TENANTS, as Trustor(s), in favor of INDYMAC BANK, F.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHARTERED SAVINGS BANK as Lender and MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REGISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC. as nominee for Lender, its successors and/or assigns, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO THE HIGHEST BIDDER, in lawful money of the United States, all payable at the time of sale, that certain property situated in said County , California describing the land therein as: AS MORE FULL Y DESCRIBED IN SAID DEED OF TRUST The property heretofore described is being sold "as is". The street address and other common designation, if any, of the real property described a bove is pur ported to be: 2836 ANDOVER AVE, CARLSBAD, CA 92010 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address and other common designation, if any, shown herein. Said sale will be made without covenant or w arranty, express or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the Note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said Note(s), advances if any, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, estimated fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligations secured by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of this Notice of Trustee`s Sale is estimated to be $345,834.14 (Estimated), provided, however, prepayment premiums, accrued interest and advances will incr ease this figur e prior to sale. Beneficiary`s bid at said sale may include all or part of said amount. In addition to cash, the Trustee will accept a cashier`s check drawn on a state or national bank, a check drawn by a state or federal credit union or a c heck drawn by a state or federal savings

Trustee Sale No .: 20120159902895 Title Order No.: 1269203 FHA/VA/PMI No.: NO TICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 07/06/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. NDEX WEST, LLC, as duly appointed Trustee under and pursuant to Deed of Trust Recorded on 07/19/2007 as Instrument No. 2007-0482101 of official records in the office of the County Recorder of SAN DIEGO County, State of C ALIFORNIA. EXECUTED BY: CAMILLA CARPENTER, WILL SELL AT PUBLIC AUCTION TO HIGHEST BIDDER FOR CASH, CASHIER'S CHECK/CASH EQUIVALENT or other form of payment authorized by 2924h(b), (payable at time of sale in lawful money of the United States). DATE OF SALE: 2/22/2013 TIME OF SALE: 9:00 AM PLACE OF SALE: SHERA TON SAN DIEGO HOTEL & MARIN A, 1380 HARBOR ISLAND DRIVE SAN DIEGO, CA 92101 STREET

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Coast News Legals From Page B15 ADDRESS and other common designation, if any, of the real property described above is purported to be: 2528 NAVARRA DRIVE, UNIT B , CARLSBAD, CA 92009 APN#: 216-170-56-08 The undersigned Trustee disclaims an y liability for any incorrectness of the str eet address and other common designation, if any , shown herein. Said sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by said Deed of Trust, with interest thereon, as provided in said note(s), advances, under the terms of said Deed of Trust, fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee and of the trusts created by said Deed of Trust. The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secur ed by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $444,711.67. The beneficiary under said Deed of Trust heretofore executed and deli vered to the undersigned a written Declar ation of Default and Demand f or Sale, and a written Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell. The undersigned caused said Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell to be r ecorded in the county where the real property is located. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this property lien, you should under stand that ther e are risks in volved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the pr operty. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 800-280-2832 f or information regarding the trustee's sale or visit this Internet Web site www .auction.com for information regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file number assigned to this case 20120159902895. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the sc heduled sale may not immediatel y be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. FOR TRUSTEE SALE INFORMA TION PLEASE C ALL: AUCTION.COM, LLC ONE MAUCHLY IRVINE, CA 92618 800280-2832 www.auction.com NDEx West, L.L.C. MAY BE ACTING AS A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE.

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NDEx West, L.L.C. as Trustee THENCE SOUTH 10 DEG. 10'10" Dated: 1/14/2013 P1014808 2/1, 2/8, WEST 69.75 FEET ; THENCE 02/15/2013 CN 14516 SOUTH 59 DEG. 33'45" WEST 139.49 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 46 DEG. 21'12" EAST 835.20 FEET ; Trustee Sale No . 24142CA Title THENCE SOUTH 49 DEG. 00'43" Order No. 95503156 NOTICE OF EAST 460.00 FEET ; THENCE TRUSTEE’S SALE YOU ARE IN NORTH 44 DEG. 59'17" EAST DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF 262.21 FEET; THENCE NORTH 60 TRUST DATED 1/10/2007. DEG. 56'32" WEST 398.20 FEET UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO TO A LINE WHICH BEARS PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT SOUTH 19 DEG. 50'54" WEST MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC FROM THE TRUE POINT OF SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLA- BEGINNING; THENCE NORTH 19 NATION OF THE NATURE OF DEG. 50'54" EAST 482.81 FEET THE PROCEEDINGS AGAINST TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGINYOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A NING. PARCEL 2: AN EASEMENT LAWYER. On 2/15/2013 at 10:00 AND RIGHT OF WAY, TOGETHER AM, MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE WITH THE RIGHT TO CONVEY SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A SAME TO OTHERS, FOR ROAD, CALIFORNIA CORPORATION SEWER, WATER, GAS, POWER DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED AND TELEPHONE LINES, TELESERVICE as the dul y appointed VISION CABLE AND APPURTETrustee under and pur suant to NANCES THERETO, OVER, Deed of Trust Recorded UNDER, ALONG AND ACROSS 01/25/2007, Book Page , Instrument THOSE STRIPS OF LAND 2007-0054486 of official r ecords in DESCRIBED PARCEL 2 OF DEED the Office of the Recor der of San TO AMERICAN SAW AND KNIFE Diego County, California, executed WORKS, LTD, RECORDED APRIL by: FELICIA AMENTA AN 23, 1962 AS INSTRUMENT NO. UNMARRIED WOMAN as Trustor, 69399. THE EASEMENTS MORTGAGE ELECTRONIC REG- DESCRIBED IN P ARCEL 2 ISTRATION SYSTEMS, INC., AS ABOVE ARE HEREBY NOMINEE FOR INDYMAC BANK, DECLARED TO BE APPURF.S.B., A FEDERALLY CHAR- TENANT TO AND FOR THE USE TERED SAVINGS BANK, as OF THE PRESENT AND FUTURE Beneficiary, will sell at public auc- OWNERS OF ALL OR ANY PORtion sale to the highest bid der for TION OF P ARCEL 1 ABOVE cash, cashier's check drawn by a DESCRIBED. The street address state or national bank, a cashier’s and other common designation of check drawn by a state or feder al the real property purported as: credit union, or a cashier’ s check VACANT LAND DIRECTIONS drawn by a state or federal savings MAY BE OBTAINED BY WRITTEN and loan association, savings asso- REQUEST SUBMITTED TO THE ciation, or savings bank specified BENEFICIARY WITHIN TEN in section 5102 of the F inancial DAYS FROM THE FIRST PUBLICode and authoriz ed to do busi- CATION OF THIS NOTICE: C/O ness in this state. Sale will be held MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERby the duly appointed trustee as VICE 8485 W. SUNSET RD. SUITE shown below, of all right, title, and 205 LAS VEGAS, NV 89113 APN interest conveyed to and no w held N u m b e r : 1 0 2 - 0 7 1 - 1 6 - 0 0 by the trustee in the her einafter Amount of unpaid balance and described property under and pur- other charges:$295,298.13 NOTICE suant to the Deed of Trust. The sale TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou will be made, but without con- are considering bidding on this venant or w arranty, expressed or property lien, you should under implied, regarding title, possess- stand that there are risks involved sion, or encumbrances, to pay the in bidding at a trustee auction. You remaining principal sum of the will be bid ding on a lien, not the notes (s) secur ed by the Deed of property itself. Placing the highest Trust, interest thereon, estimated bid at trustee auction does not fees, charges and e xpenses of the automatically entitle y ou to fr ee Trustee for the total amount (at the and clear ownership of the propertime of the initial publication of ty. You should also be a ware that the Notice of Sale) reasonably esti- the lien being auctioned off may be mated to be set f orth below. The a junior lien. If you are the highest amount may be greater on the day bidder at the auction, you are or of sale. Place of Sale: At the may be r esponsible for paying off entrance to the East County all liens senior to the lien being Regional Center b y statue, 250 E. auctioned off, before you can Main Street, El Cajon, CA 92020 receive clear title to the pr operty. Legal Description: SEE EXHIBIT You are encouraged to investigate ''A'' ATTACHED HERETO AND the existence, priority, and size of MADE A PART HEREOF EXHIBIT outstanding liens that may exist on "A" THE LAND REFERRED TO this property by contacting the HEREIN BELOW IS SITUATED IN county recorder’s office or a title THE COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , insurance company, either of which STATE OF C ALIFORNIA, AND IS may charge you a fee for this inforDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: mation. If you consult either of THOSE PORTION OF SECTION 4, these resources, you should be TOWNSHIP 9 SOUTH, RANGE 4 aware that the same lender ma y WEST, SAN BERNARDINO hold more than one mortgage or MERIDIAN, IN THE UNINCORPO- deed of trust on the pr operty. RATED AREA OF THE COUNTY NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: OF SAN DIEGO, STATE OF CALI- The sale date shown on this notice FORNIA, ACCORDING TO OFFI- may be postponed one or mor e CIAL PLAT THEREOF, times by the mortgagee, beneficiDESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: PAR- ary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to CEL 1: COMMENCING AT A Section 2924g of the Calif ornia POINT ON THE NORTH LINE OF Civil Code. The law requires that SAID SECTION 4, DISTANT information about trustee sale THEREON, SOUTH 89 DEG. postponements be made a vailable 50'38" EAST 209.70 FEET FR OM to you and to the public, as a courTHE SOUTHWEST CORNER OF tesy to those not pr esent at the SECTION 33 TOWNSHIP 8 sale. If you wish to learn whether SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST; your sale date has been postponed, THENCE SOUTH 14 DEG. 38'00" and, if applicable, the rescheduled EAST 148.61 FEET ; THENCE time and date f or the sale of this SOUTH 8 DEG. 23'04" EAST property, you may call (714) 573285.15 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 68 1965 or visit this Internet Web site DEG. 24'54" WEST 124.37 FEET ; www. Priorityposting.com , using THENCE SOUTH 25 DEG. 16'46" the file n umber assigned to this WEST 288.33 FEET ; THENCE case 24142CA. Information about SOUTH 50 DEG. 48'43" WEST postponements that are very short 118.72 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 8 in duration or that occur close in DEG. 51'06" EAST 172.05 FEET ; time to the scheduled sale may not THENCE SOUTH 45 DEG. 18'47" immediately be r eflected in the WEST 155.80 FEET ; THENCE telephone information or on the SOUTH 2 DEG. 50'22" EAST Internet Web site. In addition, the 325.17 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 65 borrower on the loan shall be sent DEG. 07'32" WEST 298.62 FEET ; a written notice if the sale has THENCE SOUTH 10 DEG. 10'10" been postponed f or at least ten WEST 166.44 FEET TO POINT "A" (10) business days. The best way to OF THIS DESCRIPTION; THENCE verify postponement inf ormation SOUTH 79 DEG. 49'50" EAST is to attend the scheduled sale. The 30.00 FEET; THENCE SOUTH 77 undersigned Trustee disclaims any DEG. 13'45" EAST 810.76 FEET liability for any incorrectness of TO THE TRUE POINT OF BEGIN- the street address and other comNING; THENCE RETRACING THE mon designation, if any, shown LAST 2 ABOVE DESCRIBED herein. The property heretofore COURSES TO SAID POINT "A"; described is being sold “as is”. DATE: 1/23/2013 MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE f/k/a MTDS, INC., A CALIFORNIA CORPORATION DBA MERIDIAN TRUST DEED SER VICE 3 SAN JOAQUIN PLAZA, SUITE 215, NEWPORT BEACH, CA 92660 Sales Line: (714) 573-1965 OR (702) 586-4500 JESSE J. FERNANDEZ, PUBLICATION LEAD MERIDIAN FORECLOSURE SERVICE IS ASSISTING THE BENEFICIARY TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. P1016111 1/25, 2/1, 02/08/2013 CN 14502 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE File No. 7717.21730 Title Order No. 7195180 MIN No . 100285700000233006 APN 161-57346-00 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST, DATED 03/21/07. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT

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YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER.A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the F inancial code and authorized to do business in this state, will be held b y duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to satisfy the obligation secured by said Deed of Trust. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. Trustor(s): VICTORIA BURTNETTE, AN UNMARRIED WOMAN Recorded: 3/27/07, as Instrument No. 2007-0204955, of Official Records of San Diego County, California. Date of Sale: 02/14/13 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: On the grounds of the Scottish Rite Event Center, located at 1895 Camino Del Rio South,, San Diego, CA The purported property address is: 1864 AVENIDA SEGOVIA,OCEANSIDE, CA 92056 Assessors Parcel No. 161-573-46-00 The total amount of the unpaid balance of the obligation secur ed by the property to be sold and reasonable estimated costs, expenses and advances at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale is $433,949.44. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the purchaser at the sale shall be entitled onl y to a return of the deposit paid, plus interest. The purchaser shall ha ve no further recourse against the beneficiary, the Trustor or the trustee. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bid ding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auc tioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder's office or a title insur ance company, either of which may charge you a fee f or this inf ormation. If you consult either of these resources, you should be a ware that the same lender ma y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or mor e times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the Calif ornia Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made a vailable to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not pr esent at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sale date has been postponed, and if applica ble, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this property, you may call 877-4849942 or visit this Internet Website www.USA-Foreclosure.com or www.Auction.com using the file number assigned to this case 7717.21730. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the sc heduled sale. Date: Thursday, January 17, 2013 NORTHWEST TRUSTEE SERVICES, INC., as Trustee David Ochoa Authorized Signatory 1241 E. Dyer Road, Suite 250, Santa Ana, CA 92705 Reinstatement and Pay-Off Requests: (866) 387-NWTS THIS OFFICE IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. ORDER# 7717.21730: 01/25/2013,02/01/2013,02/08/2013 CN 14499

association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 of the Financial Code and authorized to do business in this state will be held b y the duly appointed trustee as sho wn below, of all right, title, and interest conveyed to and no w held b y the trustee in the her einafter described property under and pursuant to a Deed of Trust described below. The sale will be made, but without covenant or w arranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and e xpenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) r easonably estimated to be set f orth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. Trustor: FRANCISCO GARCIA, AN UNMARRIED MAN Duly Appointed Trustee: Western Progressive,LLC Recorded 8/2/2005 as Instrument No . 20050658087 in book ---, page --- and rerecorded on --- as --- of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of San Diego County , California, Date of Sale: 2/21/2013 at 10:30 AM Place of Sale: At the main entrance to the East County Regional Center b y statue, 250 Main street, El Cajon, CA Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $299,830.00 Str eet Address or other common designation of r eal property: 4455 BERMUDA DUNES PLA CE, OCEANSIDE, CALIFORNIA 92057 A.P.N.: 157-581-23-00 The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the street address or other common designation, if any, shown above. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiar y within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. Pursuant to Calif ornia Civil Code §2923.54 the under signed, on behalf of the beneficiar y, loan servicer or authorized agent, declares as follows: The beneficiary or servicing agent declar es that it has obtained from the Commissioner of Corporation a final or temporary order of e xemption pursuant to California Civil Code Section 2923.53 that is current and valid on the date the Notice of Sale is filed and/or the timefr ame for giving Notice of Sale Specified in subdivision (s) of Calif ornia Civil Code Section 2923.52 applies and has been provided or the loan is exempt from the r equirements. NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are considering bidding on this pr operty lien, you should understand that ther e are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bid ding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automati cally entitle y ou to fr ee and clear ownership of the pr operty. You should also be a ware that the lien being auctioned off ma y be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can r eceive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that ma y exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender m y hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on this pr operty. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale ma y be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call (866)-960-8299 or visit this Internet Web site http://www .altisource.com/MortgageServices/Defa ultManagement/TrusteeServices.a spx, using the file number assigned to this case 2012-18935. Information about postponements that are very short in dur ation or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to v erify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale Date: 1/10/2013 Western Progressive, LLC, as Trustee c/o 18377 Beac h Blvd., Suite 210 Huntington Beac h, California 92648 Automated Sale Information Line: (866) 960-8299 http://www.altisource.com/Mortgag eServices/DefaultManagement/Tru steeServices.aspx For NonAutomated Sale Inf ormation, call:

T.S. No.: 2012-18935 Loan No .: 34901082 NOTICE OF TRUSTEE'S SALE YOU ARE IN DEF AULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 7/28/2005. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier's check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by a state or feder al credit union, or a check drawn by a state or feder al savings and loan

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this Internet Web site (866) 240-3530 Laterrika Thompkins , Trustee Sale Assistant http://www.priorityposting.com 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/2013 CN 14495 regarding the sale of this pr operty, using the file n umber assigned to this case T.S. No. 20120179. T.S. No. 20120179 LOAN NO.: Information about postponements 1557759/SYLVER NOTICE OF that are very short in dur ation or TRUSTEE’S SALE UNDER DEED that occur close in time to the OF TRUST YOU ARE IN DEFAULT scheduled sale may not immediateUNDER A DEED OF TRUST, ly be r eflected in the telephone DATED January 18, 2008 UNLESS information or on the Internet Web YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT site. The best w ay to v erify postYOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE ponement information is to attend SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU the scheduled sale. The mortgage NEED AN EXPLANATION OF loan servicer, beneficiary, or THE NATURE OF THE PROCEED- authorized agent has not obtained ING AGAINST YOU, YOU from the commissioner a final or SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. temporary order of exemption purNotice is hereby given that UNION- suant to Section 2923.53. The timeBANCAL MORTGAGE CORPORA- frame for giving notice of sale specTION, as trustee, or successor ified in subdi vision (a) of Section trustee, or substituted trustee pur- 2923.52 has been met. suant to the Deed of Trust execut- UnionBanCal Mortgage 8248 ed by *MARSHALL SYLVER*, AN Mercury Court. M-520, PO BOX UNMARRIED MAN Recor ded 85416 San Diego, California 921861/28/2008 in Book N/A P age N/A 5416 858-496-5484 UNIONB ANInst. # 2008-0040975 , of Official CAL MORTGAGE CORPORATION Records in the office of the County By: TONI SCANDLYN, VICE PRESRecorder of San Diego county , IDENT P1014030 1/25, 2/1, California, and pursuant to the 02/08/2013 CN 14490 Notice of Def ault and Election to Sell there under r ecorded 6/11/2012 in Book N/A P age N/A NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS Inst. # 2012-038944 of said Officials No. CA-12-529123-JP Order No.: Records, will SELL on 2/15/2013 at 1290710 YOU ARE IN DEF AULT 10:00 AM : At the entrance to the UNDER A DEED OF TRUST East County Regional Center b y DATED 3/9/2006. UNLESS YOU statue, 250 E. Main Street, El TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT Cajon, CA at public auction to the YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE highest bidder for cash (payable at SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU time of sale in lawful money of the NEED AN EXPLANATION OF United States) (NOTE: CASHIER’S THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDCHECK(S) MUST BE MADE ING AGAINST YOU, YOU PAYABLE TO UNIONBANCAL SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. MORTGAGE CORPORATION) all A public auction sale to the highest right, title and interest conveyed to bidder for cash, cashier's check and now held by it under said Deed drawn on a state or national bank, of Trust in the property situated in check drawn by state or feder al said County and State described credit union, or a check drawn by a as: As more fully described in said state or feder al savings and loan Deed of Trust The property hereto- association, or savings association, fore described is being sold “as is”. or savings bank specified in The street address and other com- Section 5102 to the F inancial code mon designation, if any, of the real and authorized to do business in property described a bove is pur- this state, will be held b y duly ported to be: 5327 C ARLSBAD appointed trustee. The sale will be BOULEVARD CARLSBAD, CALI- made, but without covenant or warFORNIA 92008 APN# 210-120-34- ranty, expressed or implied, regard00 The undersigned Trustee dis- ing title, possession, or encumclaims any liability for any incor- brances, to pay the remaining prinrectness of the str eet address and cipal sum of the note(s) secured by other common designation, if any, the Deed of Trust, with interest and shown herein. The total amount of late charges thereon, as provided the unpaid balance of the obligain the note(s), advances, under the tion secured by the property to be terms of the Deed of Trust, interest sold and r easonable estimated thereon, fees, charges and expenscosts, expenses and ad vances at es of the Trustee for the total the time of the initial publication amount (at the time of the initial of the Notice of Sale is publication of the Notice of Sale) $6,067,631.35. The Beneficiary may reasonably estimated to be set elect to bid less than the full cr ed- forth below. The amount may be it bid. In addition to cash, the greater on the day of sale. BENEFITrustee will accept a cashier’ s CIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS check drawn on a state or national THAN THE T OTAL AMOUNT bank, a check drawn by a state or DUE. Trustor(s): JONATHAN J. federal credit union or a c heck SORCI, A SINGLE MAN Recorded: drawn by a state or federal savings 6/9/2006 as Instrument No . 2006and loan association, savings asso- 0411645 of Official Recor ds in the ciation or savings bank specified in office of the Recor der of SAN Section 5102 of the Financial Code DIEGO County, California; Date of and authorized to do business in Sale: 2/22/2013 at 9:00 AM Place of this state. In the event tender other Sale: At the Sher aton San Diego than cash is accepted, the Trustee Hotel & Marina, 1380 Harbor may withhold the issuance of the Island Drive, San Diego, CA 92101, Trustee’s Deed until funds become in the Auction.com Room Amount available to the pa yee or endorsee of unpaid balance and other as a matter of right. Said sale will charges: $354,696.51 The purportbe made, but without co venant or ed property address is: 39765 warranty, expressed or implied, CALLE DE LUZ, FALLBROOK, CA regarding title, possession or 92028 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 101encumbrances, to satisfy the 562-10-00 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL indebtedness secured by said BIDDERS: If y ou are considering Deed, advances thereunder, with bidding on this pr operty lien, you interest as pr ovided therein, and should understand that ther e are the unpaid principal of the note risks involved in bid ding at a secured by said deed with inter est trustee auction. You will be bidthereon as pr ovided in said Note, ding on a lien, not on the property fees, charges and e xpenses of the itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee and of the trusts created by trustee auction does not automati said Deed of Trust. NOTICE TO cally entitle you to fr ee and clear POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If y ou are ownership of the pr operty. You considering bidding on this proper- should also be a ware that the lien ty lien, you should understand that being auctioned off ma y be a junthere are risks involved in bidding ior lien. If you are the highest bidat a trustee auction. You will be der at the auction, you are or may bidding on a lien, not on the pr op- be responsible for paying off all erty itself. Placing the highest bid liens senior to the lien being aucat a trustee auction does not auto- tioned off, before you can r eceive matically entitle y ou to fr ee and clear title to the pr operty. You are clear ownership of the pr operty. encouraged to investigate the exisYou should also be a ware that the tence, priority, and size of outlien being auctioned off ma y be a standing liens that ma y exist on junior lien. If you are the highest this property by contacting the bidder at the auction, you are or county recorder’s office or a title may be responsible for paying off insurance company, either of which all liens senior to the lien being may charge you a fee for this inforauctioned off, before you can mation. If you consult either of receive clear title to the pr operty. these resources, you should be You are encouraged to investigate aware that the same lender ma y the existence, priority, and size of hold more than one mortgage or outstanding liens that may exist on deed of trust on the pr operty. this property by contacting the NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: county recorder’s office or a title The sale date shown on this notice insurance company, either of which of sale ma y be postponed one or may charge you a fee for this infor- more times by the mortgagee, benmation. If you consult either of eficiary, trustee, or a court, purthese resources, you should be suant to Section 2924g of the aware that t he same lender ma y California Civil Code. The law hold more than one mortgage or requires that inf ormation about deed of trust on the pr operty. trustee sale postponements be NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: made available to y ou and to the The sale date shown on this notice public, as a courtesy to those not of sale ma y be postponed one or present at the sale. If you wish to more times by the mortgagee, benlearn whether your sa le date has eficiary, trustee, or a court, purbeen postponed, and, if applicable, suant to Section 2924g of the the rescheduled time and date f or California Civil Code. The law requires that inf ormation about trustee sale postponements be made available to y ou and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether y our sale date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date f or the sale of this pr operty, you may call 714-573-1965 f or information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit

See more Coast News Legals Page B18


THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

With heart attacks, minutes matter Health Watch By the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas

When a heart attac k strikes, what happens in the next few minutes can make a critical difference in both the immediate and long-term health consequences. Each year, about 1.2 million people in the United States have heart attacks. A heart attac k results when the flow of blood to the heart is sud denly cut off , often due to a build-up of plaque in the arteries caused by coronary heart disease. Left untreated, the plaque eventually becomes so thick that it pr events blood from getting through. If blood flo w is not quic kly restored, the heart is deprived of o xygen and

The discomfort may radiate down one or both arms or up to the jaw, neck or shoulders. Sudden and pr ofuse sweating may also occur , as well as shortness of breath, a lightheaded feeling, or nausea. However, these symptoms are not al ways present — some people ma y have only mild discomfort, or just feel short of breath. Women often ha ve very different heart attack symptoms than men, and they can be less predictable. Research by the National Institutes of Health indicates that women often experience new or different physical symptoms as long as a month or more before experiencing heart attacks. The most commonl y reported symptoms included unusual fatigue, sleep disturbances, shortness of b reath, indigestion, and anxiety.

Too often, people make the mistake of waiting to seek medical care because they don’t want to “look silly� if they aren’t having a heart attack after all. begins to die. If enough of the heart muscle is damaged, the heart attack can be fatal. That’s why it is vital to get medical attention immediately if you believe you or someone else may be having a heart attack. The sooner you get treatment, the less likely the damage to the heart m uscle. Immediate intervention by a medical professional team is critical to getting the blocked artery open with angioplasty and sten t placement and r estoring blood flow to the heart muscle. If treatment is received within several hours, longterm damage can often b e minimized or avoided. Once up to six h ours have passed without tr eatment, the injury tends to be more severe. After 12 hours, heart damage is lik ely to be permanent. The ability to r ecognize heart attack symptoms is critical. For men, the typical warning signs include an intense feeling of pr essure, pain or squeezing around the chest.

NIH research revealed that more than 40 percent of women reported no c hest pain before or during the heart attack. If you suspect y ou’re having a heart attac k, don’t write it off as indigestion or wait to see if y ou feel better. Call 911 immediately and tell the operator you are having symptoms of a heart attack. Too often, people make the mistake of w aiting to seek medical car e because they don’t want to “look silly� if they aren’t having a heart attack after all. To learn mor e, join Scripps for a fr ee presentation on heart attac k prevention and new treatments Feb. 20, from 6 to 7 p.m. at Magdalena Ecke Family YMCA, 200 Saxony Rd. Call 1-800-SCRIPPS (727-4777) to register. Health Watch is brought to you by the physicians and staff at Scripps Memorial Hospital Encinitas. For more information or for physician referral call 1-800-SCRIPPS.

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Art show seeks entrants COAST CITIES — Applications for artists to be juried into the f ourth annual Art in the Pines are due Feb. 15. Artists who are California residents are invited to appl y for the show to be held at the Visitors’ Center, San Diego. The show, set for May 4 and May 5 at Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve, will benefit children’s nature programs at The Torrey

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through sixth-graders have not yet looked through microscopes. I cut green vinyl into two wiggly, shapeless pieces and glued them to gether, leaving head and armholes. I decorated it with a nucleus and various vacuoles made of felt. I spotted my face and sprayed my hair to match and ta-da. Let the fun begin. The majority of little ones thought I was green eggs and ham. After I stopped laughing, I figured that was book-related enough to be acceptable. I then launched into an explanation of an amoeba, which made their eyes glaze over. I decided to opt for a germ.

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the best c hoice for their health care. “Education is v ery important,� he said, “to know what your options are and not to panic when you have an episode of bac k pain.� Becoming educated on your spine care options -- and your surgeon -- is crucial. San Diego attorne y Kathryn Meadows, who specializes in malpractice and injury cases, advises people to get a r ecommendation from someone who has experience with a particular doctor. It’s especially helpful to get a recommendation from another doctor, perhaps your own general practitioner. She also suggested checking the California Medical Board website to see if there has been any disciplinary action against a doctor. Though, she added, the information there is not always complete. “Oftentimes there are multiple complaints against a doctor before there is public disciplinary action taken.� And if there is a private reprimand, the public

Pines Reserve. The event will offer a Plein-air competition with an award ceremony and artists’ booth for sale of nature-based artwork. There will also be music, artist demonstrations, food, free nature hikes, raffle, silent auction and children activities. This event is hosted by the volunteer docents of the Torrey Pines State Natural Reserve.

That got their attention. A sprinkling of others guessed I was a booger (close enough to a germ) and vomit, which was visually pretty accurate. I couldn’t fault any of them and it kept my laughing all week. The book fair was a grand success, although I doubt my amoeba outfit sold any books. It did, I think, add to the party atmosphere and convey my excitement about all things written and educational. It’s quite enough to inspire me again next year and I’m stocked up on glue sticks. Jean Gillette is a freelance writer who may have been a well-read court jester in a former life. Contact her at jgillette@coastnewsgroup.com

will not know, she said. In addition, it’s important to learn whether your physician is board certified by the American Board of Medical Specialties (ABMS), she said, explaining that spine surgeons are generally certified in either orthopedic surgery or neurosurgery. Also, if a surgeon has had his or her surgical privileges at a hospital or sur gery center revoked or suspended, this is a huge red flag. Patients should always ask this question, as such a suspension or revocation is generally due to a significant number of unwarranted surgical complications and/or mistak es, Meadows said. Raiszadeh is certified by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery, an ABMS member board. He has surgical privileges at hospitals and sur gery centers throughout the county, and he and his brother, Ramin, serve as co-medical directors of the Advanced Spine Institute & Minimall y Invasive Spine center at Alvarado Hospital and are starting a spine center of excellence at the Ne w Palomar Hospital.

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refreshed greens dressed with sesame-miso (goma-ae) or tofu-miso (shira-ae). “For the demo, I will stir fry some julienned vegetables, perhaps carrots, and flavor them with red pepper, ginger and soy sauce,� she said. “This is the first signing venue where I will arri ve without vegetables and I am tremendously excited to cook from what is growing at Chino Farms right now. The final menu will evolve naturally once I can actuall y touch their beautiful pr oduce.� Singleton Hachisu took on the book pr oject after raising three sons and spending several years cooking, teaching cooking and helping with f arming which “toughened me to the point

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because they are receiving “a spinal surgeon’s perspective.� While he cautioned that, “there’s no quick fix out there,� those who c hoose Spine Zone are “empowered to treat (their) problem.� This concept is important to him, as he would like to change the paradigm of non-operative treatment to one of empo werment, he said. “I’d like to see this paradigm get added to every spine professional’s thought process,� he said, “so people really understand and harness the body’s own power to heal itself.� Dr. Steven Pratt, a San Diego ophthalmologist and New York Times-bestselling author on health and longevity, is an advocate of the Spine Zone. Pratt was feeling the cum ulative effects of a lifetime of physi-

where I knew I could do anything.� “The hardest part about writing the book w as wrestling myself into a positive frame of mind to start the main push of pulling all the pieces together and filling in the gaps,� she added. “I did it over the course of one long summer, but that was the summer after the earthquake and it really took until the fall to shake off the feeling of malaise. But I put on my earphones, cranked up early Joan Baez on my iPhone and was in the zone.� Chino Farms is located on 50 acres adjacent to Via de la Valle at 6123 Calzada Del Bosque, Rancho Santa Fe.The farm grows hundreds of varieties of produce each year, pulling from seeds from around the world, for walk-in customers and r estaurants including Mille Fleur and Market Bar & Restaurant.

cal activity, and the lingering effects of sports injuries, when a tennis-pro friend recommended Dr. Kamshad Raiszadeh. “I’m a firm believer in exercise, stretching and gaining muscle strength,â€? Pratt said, “which is why I loved the concept (of Spine Zone) ‌ I’m 100 percent behind what he’s doing there.â€? Pratt said his back “was not an easy fix,â€? and he was “open to any and all suggestionsâ€? on healing it, including surgery. “As a surgeon myself,â€? he said, “I know there are some things y ou can’t fix with rehab.â€? However, Pratt avoided surgery and was able to heal his back through the Spine Zone program. Dan Noel, Spine Zone clinic director, often sees results like Pratt’s. “That’s why I w ant my parents, my friends, people on the street to know about this,â€? Noel said.

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THE COAST NEWS

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Coast News Legals From Page B16 the sale of this pr operty, you may call 800-280-2832 f or information regarding the trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file n umber assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-12529123-JP . Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be r eflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement inf ormation is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is sho wn, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 da ys of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the Trustee is una ble to convey title for any reason, the successful bidder's sole and e xclusive remedy shall be the r eturn of monies paid to the Trustee, and the successful bidder shall have no further recourse. If the sale is set aside for any reason, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return of the deposit paid. The Purchaser shall ha ve no further recourse against the Mortgagor , the Mortgagee, or the Mortgagee’s Attorney. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 2141 5th Avenue San Diego , CA 92101 619645-7711 For NON SALE inf ormation only Sale Line: 800-280-2832 O r Login to: h t t p : / / w w w. q u a l i t y l o a n . c o m Reinstatement Line: (866) 6457711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is inten ded to exercise the note holders right’s against the r eal property only. THIS NOTICE IS SENT FOR THE PURPOSE OF COLLECTING A DEBT. THIS FIRM IS ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT ON BEHALF OF THE HOLDER AND OWNER OF THE NOTE. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED BY OR PROVIDED TO THIS FIRM OR THE CREDITOR WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. As required by law, you are hereby notified that a negative credit report reflecting on your credit record may be submitted to a cr edit report agency if you fail to fulfill the terms of y our credit obligations. TS No.: CA-12529123-JP IDSPub #0044288 1/25/2013 2/1/2013 2/8/2013 CN 14488 NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (UCC Sec. 6105) Escrow No. 13-30988 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a bulk sale is a bout to be made. The name(s), business address(es) of the Seller(s), are: Matthew K. Banhagel 2105 San Elijo Avenue Cardiff, CA 92007 Doing Business as: Subway At Cardiff #17667 2105 San Elijo Avenue Cardiff, CA 92007. All other business name(s) and address(es) used b y the Seller(s) within the past thr ee years, as stated b y the Seller(s), is/are: Encinitas Subw ay #42849 Encinitas Partners, 138 Encinitas Blvd Encinitas, CA 92034. The location in Calif ornia of the Chief Executive Officer of the Seller(s) is: 2433 Newcastle Avenue Cardiff, CA 92007. The name(s) and address of the Buy er(s) is/are: Marc Minh Tran and Ma y Huon Tran 5527 Brettonwood Court San Diego C A 92130. The assets being sold ar e generally described as: All Fixtures and Equipment, Business Name, Goodwill, Inventory, Covenant Not to Compete, and other tangible

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assets and are located at: 2105 San Elijo Avenue Cardiff By The Sea, CA 92007. The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: Maritime Escrow, Inc. 7750-A El Camino Real Car lsbad, CA 92009 and the anticipated sale date is April 2, 2013. The bulk sale is subject to Calif ornia Uniform Commercial Code Section 6106.2 YES. The name and ad dress of the person with whom claims ma y be filed is: Maritime Escr ow, Inc. 7750-A El Camino Real Car lsbad, CA 92009 Attention M. Howard Tadlock and the last date f or filing claims by any creditor shall be March 29, 2013, which is the business day before the sale date specified above. Dated: 01/20/13 Buyer(s) By: /s/ Marc Minh Tran By: /s/ May Huon Tran 2/8/13 CNS2442684# CN 14561

North County Di vision, 325 South Melrose Drive Vista, CA 92081 on March 26, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. Date: January 29, 2013 K. Michael Kirkman Judge of the Superior Court 02/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14532

the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the per sonal representative appointed b y the court within the later of either (1) f our months from the date of fir st issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Calif ornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 da ys from the date of mailing or per sonal delivery to y ou of a notice under section 9052 of the Calif ornia Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority ma y affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Calif ornia law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a per son interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request f or Special Notice (f orm DE-154) of the filing of an in ventory and appraisal of estate assets or of an y petition or account as pr ovided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice f orm is available from the court cler k. Petitioner/Attorney for Petitioner: Harold G. Ayer, Esq., 3131 Camino Del Rio N., Ste 1610, San Diego, CA 92108, Telephone: 619-563-5404 2/1, 2/8, 2/15/13 CNS-2436742# CN 14517

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER 37-2013-00032865-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Ambra Lynne Austin filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: a. Present name Ambra Lynne Austin changed to pr oposed name Ahmbra Lynne Boudreaux THE COURT ORDERS that all per sons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated below to sho w cause, if any, why the petition f or a change of name should not be g ranted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two days before the matter is scheduled to be hear d and m ust appear at the hearing to sho w cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: In Dept 26 of the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego, North County Division, 325 S Melr ose Drive, Vista, CA 92081 on March 26, 2013 at 8:30 a.m. Date: January 31, 2013 K Michael Kirkman Judge of the Superior Court 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN 14543 NOTICE OF APPLICATION FOR CHANGE IN OWNERSHIP OF ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGE LICENSE Date of Filingg Application: January 23, 2013 To Whom It May Concern: The Name(s) of the Applicant(s) is/are: NATIVE FOODS CALIFORNIA LLC The applicants listed a bove are applying to the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control to sell alcoholic beverages at: 127 N EL CAMINO REAL STE H & J ENCINITAS, CA 92024-5399 Type of license(s) applied for: 41 - On-Sale Beer and Wine Eating Place The Coast News 02/08/2013 CN 14539 ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER 37-2013-00032331-CU-PT-NC TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: Petitioner(s): Melissa Aspen Hill filed a petition with this court for a decree changing names as follows: a. Present name Melissa Aspen Hill changed to pr oposed name Aspen Hill. THE COURT ORDERS that all per sons interested in this matter appear before this Court at the hearing indicated belo w to show cause, if any, why the petition for a change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least tw o days before the matter is sc heduled to be hear d and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timel y filed, the court may grant the petition without a hear ing. NOTICE OF HEARING: In Dept 26 of the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego ,

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: SHARON LEE RESINGER CASE #: 37-2013-00032760-PR-LA-CTL To all heir s, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who ma y otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: Sharon L. Resinger, Sharon Resinger, Shari Lee Resinger, Shari L. Resinger, Shari Resinger, Shari Resinger-Andersack, Shari Andersack-Resinger, Sharon Lee Andersack, Sharon L. Andersack, Sharon Andersack, Shari Andersack, Sharon Lee Speerstra, Sharon L. Speerstra, Shari L. Andersacks, Sharon L. SpeerstraResinger, Shari L. SpeerstraResinger, Shari L. Speerstra, Shari Speerstra, Shari L. Speerstara. A PETITION FOR PR OBATE has been filed b y Martin Bradley Resinger in the Superior Court of California, County of San Diego . THE PETITION FOR PR OBATE requests that Martin Bradley Resinger be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to admin ister the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per sonal representative to take many actions without obtaining court appr oval. Before taking certain v ery important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the pr oposed action.) The independent administr ation authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on MARCH 12, 2013 at 11 a.m. in Dept. PC-1, located at SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SAN DIEGO , Central Division, 1409 Fourth Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file writ ten objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in per son or b y your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the deceased, you must file your claim with the court and mail a cop y to the personal representative appointed by the court within f our months from the date of fir st issuance of letter s as pr ovided in Probate Code section 9100. The time for filing claims will not expire before four months from the hearing dated noticed above. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file k ept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an in ventory and appr aisal of estate assets or of an y petition or account as pr ovided in Pr obate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is a vailable from the court cler k. Attorney for Petitioner: Karen L. Gleason Huss (SBN 144612) 1739 Sorr el Court, Carlsbad, CA 92011-5146 Telephone: 760-438-4082 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/2013 CN 14548 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF AUDREY LESLIE CASE NO. 372013-00030384-PR-LA-CTLROA #: 1 (IMAGED FILE) To all heir s, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who ma y otherwise be inter ested in the will or estate, or both, of: AUDREY LESLIE A Petition for Probate has been filed b y DOUGLAS CALLISON in the Superior Court of California, County of SAN DIEGO. The Petition for Probate requests that DOUGLAS C ALLISON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per sonal representative to take many actions without obtaining court appr oval. Before taking certain v ery important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority . A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on MAR 07 2013 at 1:30 P .M. in Dept. PC-2 located at 1409 4th Avenue, San Diego, CA 92101-3105 Central Division/Madge Bradley Building. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court bef ore

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF THERESA ABBISSO CASE NO. 37-2013-00030133-PR-LA-CTL ROA #: 1 (IMAGED FILE) To all heir s, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who ma y otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of: THERESA ABBISSO A Petition for Probate has been filed b y LEONARD ABBISSO in the Superior Court of Calif ornia, County of SAN DIEGO . The Petition for Probate requests that LEONARD ABBISSO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The Petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the per sonal representative to take many actions without obtaining court appr oval. Before taking certain v ery important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority . A hearing on the petition will be held in this court on February 26, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. in Dept. PC-1 located at 1409 4th Avenue, San Diego, CA 921013105 Central Division/Madge Bradley Building. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file writ ten objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in per son or b y your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the dece dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a cop y to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) f our months fr om the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (f orm DE-154) of the filing of an in ventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as pr ovided in Pr obate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is a vailable from the court clerk. Petitioner/Attorney for Petitioner: Dennis P earce Kelly, Esq., Village Law Center, 1132 San Marino Drive, Suite 201, Lake San Marcos, CA 92078-4600, Telephone: 760.471.5244 1/25, 2/1, 2/8/13 CNS2435573# CN 14506 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-003521 The name(s) of the business: A. SRS Financial Group B. SRS Financial. Located at: 3553 P aseo De Francisco #208 Oceanside, CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: A Corporation. The transaction of business began: 01/16/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. SRS Financial Group, Inc. 3553 Paseo De Francisco #208 Oceanside, CA 92056. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Feb. 05, 2013. S/Seth Ruben Sharon 02/08, 02/15, 02/22,

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ness is conducted b y: An Individual The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Ratsmy Manzano 6201 Alverton Dr. Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an 31, 2013. S/Ratsmy Manzano 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN14547

Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1.Kyre Bryan Madeira-Wilcox 927 A Bracero Rd. Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 03, 2013 S/Kyre Bryan Madeira-Wilcox 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14525

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-003093 The name(s) of the business: A. Somers Media Located at: 947 Greenlake Court, Cardiff, CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual The transaction of business began: 05/05/12. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Theresa Somers 947 Greenlake Court, Cardiff, CA 92007. This statement was filed with the FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Recorder/County Clerk of San STATEMENT FILE #2013-001225 Diego on Jan 31, 2013. S/Theresa Somers 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, The name(s) of the business: A. DRS Fulfillment & Packaging B. 03/01/13 CN14546 DRS Fulfillment & Assembly Services C. CD’s We Copy D. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME Digital Replication Services, Inc. STATEMENT FILE #2013-002847 The name(s) of the business: Located at: 988 S. Andreasen Dr. Ste. B Escondido, CA San Diego A. Ladder MD Located at: 4312 92029. Mailing Address: Same. Canyon Vista Dr, Oceanside, CA Mailing This business is conducted b y: A San Diego 92057. Corporation. The transaction of Address: Same. This business is business began: 01/01/13. This conducted by: An Individual The business is hereby registered by transaction of business began: Not the following owner(s): 1. Digital Yet Started. This business is hereReplication Services, Inc. 988 S. by registered by the f ollowing Andreasen Dr. Ste. B Escondido, owner(s): 1. Dirk Weldon Draper, CA 92029 This statement was filed 4312 Canyon Vista Dr, Oceanside, with the Recorder/County Clerk of CA 92057 This statement was filed San Diego on J an. 14, 2013. with the Recorder/County Clerk of S/Frank A. Martin 02/08, 02/15, San Diego on Jan 30, 2013. S/Dirk Weldon Draper 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN 14559 03/01/13 CN14545 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-002307 STATEMENT FILE #2013-003098 The name(s) of the business: The name(s) of the business: A. Cali-Coast Construction A. Brooks Interiors Located at: Company Located at: 1879 Rockhoff Rd. Escondido, CA San 1635 Mapleleaf Court, Encinitas, Mailing Diego 92026. Mailing Address: CA San Diego 92024. Same. This business is conducted Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual The by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/01/13. This transaction of busine ss began: business is hereby registered by 11/01/07. This business is hereby the following owner(s): 1. Miguel registered by the f ollowing Rodriguez 1879 Rockhoff Rd. owner(s): 1. Cynthia K Brooks, Escondido, CA 92026 This state- 1635 Mapleleaf Court, Encinitas, CA 92024 This statement was filed ment was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San with the Recorder/County Clerk of Diego on J an. 24, 2013. S/Miguel San Diego on J an 31, 2013. Rodriguez 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, S/Cynthia K Brooks. 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN14544 03/01/13 CN 14553

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001992 The name(s) of the business: A. PJI Processing Company Located at: 404 Encinitas Blvd. #385 Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Patrick J. Immenso 404 Encinitas Blvd. #385 Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 22, 2013 S/Patrick J. Immenso 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14521

03/01/13 CN 14563 STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME FILE #2013-003518 A. The name(s) of the business: SRS Financial B. SRS Financial and Investment Company Located at: 3553 P aseo De Francisco Unit 208 Oceanside, CA San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. The Ficititious Business Name referred to above was filed in San Diego County on: 11-16-10 and assigned File No. 2010-030744 is abandoned by the f ollowing registrant(s): 1. Seth Ruben Sharon 3553 Paseo De Francisco Unit 208 Oceanside, CA 92056-4156. This statement was filed with Ernest J . Dronenburg, Jr., Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego County, on Feb. 05, 2013. S/Seth Ruben Shar on 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN 14562

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-002033 The name(s) of the business: A. Kith & Kind B. kind films Located at: 7083 Estr ella De Mar Rd. #12-B Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/21/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Gretchen K. Bayer 7083 Estrella De Mar Rd. #12-B Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 22, 2013. S/Gretchen K. Bayer 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN 14552

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-002597 The name(s) of the business: A. Kettle Bud B. Jorge Mendoza. PT Located at: 2739 Woodwind Rd. Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Jorge Mendoza 2739 Woodwind Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92008 . This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 28, 2013 S/Jorge Mendoza 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14531

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-003212 The name(s) of the business: A. SD Remodeling B. SanDiego Remodeling Located at: 3420 Vale Blossom Ct. #203 Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92067. Mailing Address: P.O. Box 1488 Ranc ho Santa F e, CA 92067. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Dmitriy Zagorodniy 3420 Vale Blossom Ct. #203 Carlsbad, CA 92010. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on F eb. 01, 2013. S/Dmitriy Zagorodniy 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN14551

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-002418 The name(s) of the business: A. Catjama Located at: 3267 Bernardo Ln. Escondido, CA San Diego 92029. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: A Married Couple. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Jonathan Hayles 3267 Bernardo Ln. Escondido, CA 92029 2. Andrea Hayles 3267 Bernardo Ln. Escondido, CA 92029 . This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 25, 2013 S/Jonathan Hayles 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14527

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-003096 The name(s) of the business: A. The Dirty Sauce Company Located at: 1732 Mac kinnon Ave. Cardiff, CA San Diego 92007. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Eunice Scarfo 1732 Mackinnon Ave. Cardiff, CA 92007. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an 31, 2013. S/Eunice Scarfo 02/08, 02/15, 02/22, 03/01/13 CN14549

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001302 The name(s) of the business: A. Catjama Located at: 2258 Montgomery Ave. Cardiff, CA San Diego 92007. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: A Married Couple. The transaction of business began: 01/09/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Mark Whitehouse 2258 Montgomery Ave. Cardiff, CA 92007 2. Deborah Slee 2258 Montgomery Ave. Cardiff, CA 92007. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013 S/Mark Whitehouse 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14526

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-003085 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000264 The name(s) of the business: A. A & M Communications The name(s) of the business: Located at: 6201 Alverton Dr. A. Kyre Wilcox Pools Located at: Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92009. 927 A Bracero Rd. Encinitas, CA Mailing Address: Same. This busi- San Diego 92024. Mailing Address:

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-002283 The name(s) of the business: A. JJR Carpet Cleaning Located at: 665 Elaine Av. Oceanside, CA San Diego 92057. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Jesefina Ridriguez 665 Elaine Av. Oceanside, CA 92057. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 24, 2013 S/Josefina Rodriguez 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14520 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000707 The name(s) of the business: A. Group Think B. Money MindEd Located at: 3556 Valley St. Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/01/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Jackie Weitzberg 3556 Valley St. Carlsbad, CA 92008. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 09, 2013 S/Jackie Weitzberg 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14513 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001761 The name(s) of the business: A. Las Playas Print Co Located at: 3045 Jefferson St. San Diego, CA San Diego 92110. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: A Corporation. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Cadence Group, Inc. 3045 Jefferson St. San Diego, CA 92110. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 17, 2013 S/Stephen Johnson 2/01, 02/08, 02/15, 02/22/13 CN 14512 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001430 The name(s) of the business: A. Pure LED International Located at: 2105 Camino Vida Roble Sutie C Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 12/01/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Marc Zartarian 2105 Camino Vida Roble #C Carlsbad, CA 92011 This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 15, 2013 S/Marc Zartarian 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14504 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001432 The name(s) of the business: A. RCH Consulting Located at: 147 W. Glaucus St. Unit A Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Renee Herrell 147 W. Glaucus St. Unit A Encinitas, CA 92024 This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 15, 2013 S/Renee Herrell 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13

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in your mind, this isn’t likely to be the case. Diverting your attention elsewhere could dilute your efforts.

SOUP TO NUTS by Rick Stromoski

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25, 2013

CANCER (June 21-July 22) — There is a hard way to do things and an easy way. Even though you might recognize the difference, for some reason you’ll make things tougher than they need to be.

For many years, you might have been of the opinion that fortuitous things happened to others, not you.That is all likely to change in the year ahead, as your luck will take a positive turn that even you can’t deny.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — If you find yourself in the position of being unable to finalize an important project, don’t make things worse by stewing over it. Let those fruits ripen a bit longer on the tree.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Disappointment is likely if someone for whom you do a favor is unable to adequately express his or her thanks. You’ll feel better if you don’t expect anything.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Don’t turn your household into a military installation. Harsh rules and commands won’t be nearly as effective as making polite pleas.

By Bernice Bede Osol

FRANK & ERNEST by Bob Thaves

PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — A burned child fears the fire, but you’re not a kid anymore. Stop shunning a former collaborator just because he or she erred in the past. Be the bigger person and forgive and forget. THE BORN LOSER by Art & Chip Sansom

ARIES (March 21-April 19) — You’re in a better position career-wise than you might think. Though you might see only dark clouds ahead, don’t retreat from doing what you should and can do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Because all your focus is placed on lofty objectives, it might be difficult for you to see the multitudes of lesser but still profitable opportunities. Remember, small things can add up.

BIG NATE by Lincoln Peirce

MONTY by Jim Meddick

ARLO & JANIS by Jimmy Johnson

THE GRIZZWELLS by Bill Schorr

COW & BOY by Mark Leiknes

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Remember, the mind is a remarkable mechanism for performing wonders. All you have to do is marshal your thinking to conquer doubt and accomplish whatever you wish. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Because of an inability to capitalize on a good opportunity, the biggest problem you’ll have to contend with is accepting your shortcomings. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — It might be wise to analyze your desire for something material. There’s a chance you may be seeking it for the wrong reasons.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Even though you might be truly grateGEMINI (May 21-June 20) — ful to someone who does a favor for Although a joint venture in which you, you might be unable to express you’re involved should be uppermost your gratitude in a way that you feel is adequate. Nonetheless, do your best.


THE COAST NEWS

B20 Legals 800

Coast News Legals From Page B18 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001435 The name(s) of the business: A. B.C. Containers, Inc. Located at: 276 Trade St. San Marcos, CA San Diego 92078. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: A Corporation. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. B.C. Containers, Inc. 276 Trade St. San Marcos, CA 92078. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 15, 2013 S/Mark Anderson 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14498

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001676 The name(s) of the business: A.Vanilla Bean Toys Located at: 1026 Third Street Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. E l i s e O r o z c o 1 0 2 6 Th i r d S t r e e t Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 17, 2013 S/Elise Orozco 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14497

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001241 The name(s) of the business: A. Boardworks B. Boardworks Surf C. Boardworks SUP D. Boardworks International Located at: 5925 Priestl y Drive, Suite 120 Car lsbad, CA San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: A Limited Liability Company. The transaction of business began: 10/09/08. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Papa Hana LLC 5925 Priestly Drive, Suite 120 Carlsbad, CA 92008. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013 S/Michael Fox 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14496 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001593 The name(s) of the business: A. FAM-Well, Inc. B. FAM Bar Juicery Located at: 2515 Pioneer Ave. #5 Vista, CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: 227 Cereus St. Encinitas, CA 92024. This business is conducted b y: A Corporation. The transaction of business began: 11/22/12. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. FAM-Well, Inc. 227 Cereus St. Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recor der/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 16, 2013 S/Kevin L. Murphy 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14493

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000133 The name(s) of the business: A. The Catlin Buildings Located at: 26352 Carmel Rancho Lane Carmel, CA, Monterey 93923. Mailing Address: 7261 Almaden Lane Carlsbad, CA 92009. This business is conducted b y: A Limited Liability Company. The transaction of business began: 07/06/11. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Catlin Capital Investments 7261 Almaden Lane Carlsbad, CA 92009

Legals 800 This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 03, 2013 S/Joi Catlin 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14492 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001510 The name(s) of the business: A. Petiquette 101 Located at: 1832 Corte Amarillo Oceanside, CA, San Diego 92056. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/05/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Mary Kay Snyder 1832 Corte Amarillo Oceanside, CA 92056 This statement was filed with the Recor der/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 16, 2013 S/Mary Kay Snyder 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14491 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001379 The name(s) of the business: A. Epoch Sports Located at: 4607 Telescope Ave. Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92008. Mailing Address: PO Bo x 1823 Carlsbad, CA 92018. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/05/13. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Chris Facione 4607 Telescope Ave. Carlsbad, CA 92008. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 15, 2013. S/Chris Facione 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14489 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001490 The name(s) of the business: A. Pacific Wave Riders Foundation B. Triton Builders C. Riptide Surf and Skate Located at: 7803 Camino Raposa, San Diego, CA San Diego 92122. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 09/01/04. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Greg Moline 7803 Camino Raposa San Diego, CA 92122. This statement w as filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 16, 2013. S/Greg Moline 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14487 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-033613 The name(s) of the business: A. Blue Ribbon Carpet & Upholstery Located at: 804 Leucadia Blvd. Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: PO Bo x 232306 Encinitas, CA 92023. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 09/01/65. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Timothy W. Swanson 804 Leucadia Blvd. Leucadia, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 28, 2012. S/Timothy W. Swanson 01/25, 02/01, 02/08, 02/15/13 CN 14486 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001209 The name(s) of the business: A. RPM Pool Service Located at: 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: PO Box 130482 Carlsbad, CA 92013. This business is conducted by: A Married Couple. The transaction of business began: 04/01/10. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Petr A. Mastny 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92011 2. Marcela A. Mastny 1714 Catalpa Rd. Carlsbad, CA 92011. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 14, 2013. S/Petr A. Mastny 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14481 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001321 The name(s) of the business: A. BWG Appraisals Located at: 442 Summer View Circle Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/24/07. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. William A. Grow 442 Summer View Circle Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 14, 2013. S/William A. Grow 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14480 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000410 The name(s) of the business: A. Aloha Taxi Located at: 1614 Wesley Way Vista, CA San Diego 92081. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: Not Yet Started. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Chris Powell 1614 Wesley Way Vista, CA 92081. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on

Legals 800 Jan. 07, 2013. S/Chris Powell 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14479 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001357 The name(s) of the business: A. Heavenly Asphalt Located at: 1076 N. Coast Hwy. 101 Luecadia, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 01/14/13. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. LeGrande Cooper 1076 N. Coast Hwy. 101 Luecadia, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recor der/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 15, 2013. S/LeGrande Cooper 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14478

FEB. 8, 2013

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COMMUNITY HATHA YOGA CLASS Every Sat. from 9:20 to 10:30 at Encinitas Fitness and Bo xing. 613 Westlake in Encinitas. $5 for Non-Members, All Levels Welcome. For More Information call (760) 436-8682

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-033155 The name(s) of the business: A. Balardeta Racing LLC Located at: 659 Lynwood Drive Encinitas, CA San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: A Limited Liability Company. The transaction of business began: 11/15/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Balardeta Racing LLC 659 Lynwood Drive Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 21, 2012. S/Joseph J. Balardeta 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14477 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001183 The name(s) of the business: A. Synapco Services Group B. Synapco Services c) Synapco Located at: 2811 Via Topacio Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92010. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 12/18/02. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Stephen H. Hinkle 2811 Via Topacio Carlsbad, CA 92010. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 14, 2013. S/Stephen H. Hinkle 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14476 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001216 The name(s) of the business: A. Carlsbad Performing Arts Academy Located at: 6106 Avenida Encinas Ste. F Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92011. Mailing Address: 4028 Vista Calaveras St. Oceanside, CA 92056. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 07/21/07. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Mary White 4028 Vista Calaveras St. Oceanside, CA 92056. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 14, 2013. S/Mary White 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14475 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-001130 The name(s) of the business: A. Matrix Light Institute B. Art Of Heartful Living Located at: 7955 La Selva Way Carlsbad, CA, San Diego 92009. Mailing Address: Same. This business is conducted b y: A Corporation. The transaction of business began: 12/28/95. This business is hereby registered by the f ollowing owner(s): 1. Matrix Universalis 7955 La Selva Way Carlsbad, CA 92009. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Jan. 11, 2013. S/James Woeber 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14474 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2013-000657 The name(s) of the business: A. Homestead Toolbox Located at: 4 Lynn Lane Oceanside, CA, San Diego 92058. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: NOT YET STARTED. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. LuEllen Raymor 4 Lynn Lane Oceanside, CA 92058. This statement was filed with the Recor der/County Clerk of San Diego on J an. 08, 2013 S/LuEllen Raymor 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14463 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FILE #2012-032913 The name(s) of the business: A. JR Alliance Located at: 307 A Hillcrest Dr. Encinitas, CA, San Diego 92024. Mailing Address: SAME. This business is conducted by: An Individual. The transaction of business began: 09/27/12. This business is hereby registered by the following owner(s): 1. Julie F. Regan 307A Hillcrest Dr. Encinitas, CA 92024. This statement was filed with the Recorder/County Clerk of San Diego on Dec. 19, 2012 S/Julie F. Regan 01/18, 01/25, 02/01, 02/08/13 CN 14462

Lost & Found FOUND - ANTIQUE BRACELET Found near Prep Kitchen in Del Mar, Please call Susan with a description at (203) 4152077

Garage Sales

COMMUNITY GARAGE SALE Encinitas Terrace Apartments in The Community Room ne xt to P ool. 454 Requeza near I-5 and Encinitas Blvd.Sat. 2/9/13 from 8am until 1pm, Come see and Buy a Variety of Household Items, Jewelry, Decor and More. Cash Only. For more information please call the Manager Jean at (760) 944-8532

Items For Sale 200 Antiques

THE COAST NEWS GROUP

FIREFLYS AND FLOWERS Beautiful Leaded Scene, Round 12 Inch Diameter, Perfect Condition, Ready to Hang. $29 OBO Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

ANTIQUE VICTORIAN SETEE Beautiful Rosewood, New York Appraised at $2500, Will Sacrifice for $300 (760) 753-8311

FRACKING Please use y our favorite search engine to sear ch for fracking or fracing to stop polluting our en vironment. (330) 961-0095

KEYSTONE MOVIE CAMERA 1950ís Vintage K-30 (Capri Model) 8mm, nice condition and only $29 OBO. Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

INDEX F.Y.I..................................... ..100 HEALTH & WELL BEING ....150 ITEMS FOR SALE................200 BUSINESS SERV.............. ...300 FINANCIAL SERV.................310 HOME SERVICES................325 MISC. SERVICES............. ....350 PERSONAL SERV................375

HELP WANTED................ ....400 JOBS WANTED................ ....450 BUSINESS OPPS.................475 ROOMMATES.......................500 RENTALS..............................600 REAL ESTATE.................... ..700 LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE.... 800 AUTOMOTIVE..................... 900

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DEADLINES

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Ask for Classified Dept.

760-436-9737 ext. 100 or fax ad copy 760-943-0850 To view or place ads online go to: coastnewsgroup.com

OWL DRUG COMPANY BOTTLE Hard To Find 6 inch Clear Medicine Bottle with Logo “1920ís” Great Condition $19 OBO please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

Appliances

SHARP TWIN ENERGY VACUUM Clean, New Bag, Good Condition $20 (760) 207-8537

FRIGIDARE WASHING MACHINE For Sale: White Frigidare Gallery Front Loader Washer With Stand, Lightly Used, Excellent Condition $400 call Val Leucadia (760) 753-4412

SEARS WASHER/DRYER Large Capacity Electric Washer/Dryer, White, Excellent Condition $375 f or Both (760) 753-8311

Computer/Electronics

AMPLIFIED CORDLESS PHONE Hearing Aide Compatible, amplifies to 40 decimals, “Digital Clarity P ower” brand. White with large lighted keypads and tone settings $15 (760) 599-9141

CELL PHONES Curr ently offering fr ee cell phones with a new contract.Visit our website at: http://www.tmiwireless.com/?aid=54955

Computer/Electronics

HP ALL-IN-ONE PRINTER Prints, Scans, Copies Like New, Complete and Ink Cartridges included. 4 SD Card Slots $50 cash (760) 724-9440

SATELLITE RECEIVER WITH DISH An adth satellite r eceiver #8800ir for european programming is f or sale with a globe cast dish. Includes wireless remote and memory card. $95 set (760) 758-8344

SPRINT 3G/4G MOBILE Sierra Wireless Broadband, Rotating USB Connector , compatible with Windows 7, XP, Vista and MAC OS, X No Contr act, Box Included $50 (760) 839-3115

Furniture HAMILTON GRANDFATHER CLOCK 3 Chimes, 3 Brass Weights, Walnut $250 (760) 753-8311

or stop by office at: 315 S. Coast Hwy. 101, Encinitas

Place your own FREE print ad at coastnewsgroup.com If your item is under $150 dollars or is a vehicle for sale, you can place it FREE!


B21

THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

Items For Sale 200

Items For Sale 200

NANI CLASSIFIED ADS

Help Wanted 400 ADOPTION

Miscellaneous

Sporting Goods

“JOHN LENNON HARDBACK BOOK” 1st American Edition, 1985, New Condition, 624 pages, Includes “Maldives Lennon Mint Stamp $12.00 (760) 845-3024 15 GALLON PLANTS $35.00 eac h, Fan Palm, Jade, Crown-of-Thorns, Black Pines, Loquots and Macadamia Nut (760) 436-6604 3 LADIES COATS MED. SIZE 1. Black and Borgana Feaux Fur 2. Tan/Suede with Fur Collar (knee length) 3. Snow Boarding Jacket $25 each (760) 207-8537 BATTLE STAR series, carriers, amphibious, & battleships. 1941 - pr esent day. Awesome ship designs onto appar el, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein BRASS CON TRUMPET With Case and Con Mouthpiece, Plays Well $100 (619) 277-3961 BRIGGS AND STRATTON MOWER Pro Plan Model Briggs and Str atton Power Mower, also Edger and 21 inc h regular lawn mower, all in good w orking condition, $50 takes all call Everett (760) 8939184 BRITA BRAND WATER FILTER Never Used - In Box $20 (760) 207-8537 CLAIROL BRAND HO T ROLLERS Clean and in Good Condition $5 (760) 207-8537 FABRICS FOR SALE Br ocade, Taffeta and Cottons. 1-3 yard pieces, good for upholstery $1.50 each piece OBO (760) 599-9141 FIREWOOD FOR SALE Wheelbarrows full, Oak, Pine and Eucalyptus, Avocado & Citrus - $25 per wheelbarrow full (760) 942-7430 HOT WHEELS box of fifty hot wheels in original packaging. random models. $40 (760) 726-8491 IRISH CRYSTAL BY “SHANNON” Square Footed, 7 inch diameter bell shaped compote. Never Used $15 (760) 599-9141 LAMBíS WOOL COAT Womenís Size 18W, “Jones/New York” brand, 32 inches long, Cream Color with Herring Bone design, New with tags still on, $260 value, selling for $35 (760) 599-9141 LIGHT FIXTURES $20. EA 12” satin nickel w/ opaque glass. includes bulbs. never used & in box. (760) 721-7672

TENNIS RACQUET Head Crossbow 10 43/8 grip light weight powerful excellent condition $50 (760) 632-2487

LIKE NEW HUNTER AIR PURIFIER. $99.00-hunter 30381 hepatech air purifier features a whisper -quiet fan that draws air into the unit without excessive noise. Operational manual included. Pictures available. (760) 842-1970 LOVE SEAT FURNITURE COVER 1 Piece, 70 inches Long, 100% Polyester, Washable, Chocolate Color $20 (760) 599-9141 NAVY aircraft carriers awesome ship battle star designs onto appar el, mugs, posters,& steins. Honorable gifts. zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET New Serta made Queen Pillo wtop mattress set. Still in original f actory plastic wrap. $150.00 (619) 985-6259 SCHATZ ANNIVERSARY CLOCK Beautiful German Made Cloc k with Quartz Movement, Keeps Perfect Time, A Treasure at the Fantastic Price of $29 OBO Please call Shelly (760) 809-4657

AUTO DONATIONS

Items Wanted JACK DANIELS Collector looking f or old jd or lem motlo w bottles and advertising or display items. Up to $149 each (760) 630-2480 OLD COMIC BOOKS WANTED. Local collector will pay you big cash $$$. (858) 999-7905

POLITICAL SURVEY - EASY $25 Oceanside call 858-621-3879 asap

Business Opps 475

OLYOíS PIZZA MEMORABILIA Anything considered but would love any pictures or t-shirts (adult size).

WANTED Wanted Used Saxophones, flutes, clairnets, any condition, will pay cash. 760-346-9931 (760) 705-0215.

AUTOS WANTED

CABLE TV

Bundle & Save on your CABLE, INTERNET PHONE, AND MORE. High Speed Internet starting at less than $20/mo. CALL NOW! 800-291-4159

DIABETIC TEST STRIPS WANTED Any Type, Any Brand. Will pay up to $10 a box. Call Ronda at (760) 593-7033.

HAULING I will haul y our trash, yard materials, left behind furniture for move outs, construction clean up, help moving, etc. for very affordable rates. $40 dump fee in addition to labor fee. call or text Everett at (760) 893-9184

Take time for yourself... let us do the dirty work!

ELECTRONICS

Real Estate 700 Homes for Sale ENCINITAS 4BR SFD HOME $589K Single story on a cul-de-sac and w alking distance to par ks, elementary school, sports & play areas. Nicely updated, fire place, spacious kitchen, vaulted ceilings, and ceiling f ans. Call 760-720-4488 Agent. Ca DRE# #01302799

Automobiles 900

ANGEL’S

Cars

Martha Padilla - Owner

1995 WHITE TOYOTA CELICA 179k miles, Automatic, Power Steering and Breaks, Air Conditioning Runs Gr eat! $2450 or Best Offer (760) 453-2513

Cleaning Service Deep cleaning in living areas, kitchen, dining, bathrooms, bedrooms & windows

Cell 760-712-8279 Or 760-580-6857 Se Habla Español

ornelas.f.p@gmail.com Licensed (#00026922) and Bonded

Be our fan on

theCoastNews.com

DONATE YOUR CAR to CHILDREN’S CANCER FUND of AMERICA and help end CHILDHOOD CANCER. Tax Deductible. Next Day Towing. Receive Vacation Voucher. 7 Days 1-800-469-8593

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED! Top $$$$$ PAID! Running or Not, All Years, Makes, Models. Free Towing! We’re Local! 7 Days/Week. Call Toll Free: 1-888-416-2330

Wanted To Buy

VANISHING CHEF AVAILABLE Guys and Girls - Want to impress your date, I will come to y our home, cook a 5 star meal and “Vanish”. You can say you cooked it! I am a former 5 Star Executive Chef for Caesar’s Palace in Vegas. Call Chef Tristan (760) 893-9184

A-1 DONATE YOUR CAR! Breast Cancer Research Foundation! Most highly rated breast cancer charity in America! Tax Deductible/Fast Free Pick Up. 1-800-3996506 www.carsforbreastcancer.org

DONATE CAR AND GET $1000 GROCERY COUPONS – Help United Breast Cancer Foundation – Fast Free Towing – 24hr Response – Tax Deduction 888-777-8799

Wanted for my nephewís Christmas present! (760) 994-7265

2004 MCCORMICK MTX120 Tractor ($19,000), 2wd, 16 speed power shift, left hand reverser, 120 engine hp, 100 pto hp, air seat, am/fm, rear wiper, 3 remotes, toplink, very good condition!. For more info/photo: rog. Perez@aol. Com 81 AMC SPIRIT BL HATCHBACK Good Condition - $700 (760) 207-8537 MAZDA SPORT Miata, mx, turbo, 2 seater, black soft top with co ver, cd stereo, air, manual, (stick 6 speed), performance tires with spare, apprx. 38,000 miles. (760) 207-0073 San Mar cos, $15,950.00 0B0.

and click link

Motorhomes FORD FIELD MOTOR HOME 1986, 52k miles, smogged and r egistered, 26 ft, 6 beds, $3950 (760) 415-3883

VIETNAM war battle star collection: apparel / mugs / key chains Visit Online Store www.zazzle.com/sgtskullnstein

Help Wanted 400

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring adoption expert. Choose from families Nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6296 Florida Agency #100021542 Void in Illinois/New Mexico

*LOWER THAT CABLE BILL! Get Satellite TV today! FREE System, installation and HD/DVR upgrade. Programming starting at $19.99. Call NOW 1-800-935-8195

FINANCIAL

Do you receive regular monthly payments from an annuity or insurance settlement and NEED CASH NOW? Call J.G. Wentworth today at 1-800-741-0159.

HEALTH & MEDICAL

FREE RX SAVINGS CARD Save up to 85% at over 60K pharmacies. All US Residents qualify. CALL 888-960-0026

HEALTH & MEDICAL

VIAGRA 100MG and CIALIS 20mg! 40 Pills + 4 FREE for only $99. #1 Male Enhancement, Discreet Shipping. Save $500! Buy The Blue Pill! Now 1-888-796-8870

HELP WANTED

HELP WANTED!! Up to $1000 WEEKLY PAID IN ADVANCE!! MAILING OUR BROCHURES/POSTCARDS or PAID BIWEEKLY!! TYPING ADS for our company. PT/FT. www.FreeToJoinPositions.com

HELP WANTED! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 888-331-0888 www.howtowork-fromhome.com $294 DAILY! MAILING POSTCARDS! Guaranteed Legit Opportunity! www.ThePostcardGuru.com NOW ACCEPTING! ZNZ Referral Agents! $20$60/Hour! www.FreeJobPosition.com BIG PAYCHECKS! Paid Friday! www.LegitCashJobs.com

MISCELLANEOUS

**OLD GUITARS WANTED! ** Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rickenbacker. Prairie State, D’Angelico, Stromberg, and Gibson Mandolins/Banjos. 1920’s thru 1980’s. TOP CASH PAID! 1-800-401-0440

EXPERIENCED CATERING MANAGER After 30 years, our Catering Manager is retiring and we need a seasoned pro • full time • very good pay • sales bonuses • hands on experience a must

FREE CLASSIFIEDS Sell your car at any price, or any one item $150 or less for FREE! Go online to: .coastnewsgroup.com. or call our free ad hotline

6118 Paseo Del Norte, Carlsbad

760.438.2620

760-436-1070 Deadline is Monday at 4 p.m.

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WORK ON JET ENGINES – Train for hands on Aviation Maintenance Career. FAA approved program. Financial aid if qualified – Job placement assistance. Call AIM (866) 854-6156.

MONEY TO LEND

LAWSUIT SETTLEMENT LOANS Get Cash Before Your Case Settles! Fast Approval. All Cases Qualify Call (866) 7091100 www.glofin.com

MOTORCYCLES/WANT TO BUY

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. Call AIM (888) 686-1704

WANTED JAPANESE MOTORCYCLE KAWASAKI 1967-1980 Z1-900, KZ900, KZ1000, ZIR, KX1000MKII, A1-250, W1650, H1-500, H2-750, S1-250, S2-350, S3400 SUZUKI GS400, GT380, GT750, Honda CB750 (1969,1970) CASH. FREE PICKUP. 1-800-772-1142, 1-310-721-0726 usa@classicrunners.com

CASH PAID- UP TO $28/BOX for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. BEST PRICES! Call 1-888-776-7771. www.Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com

20 ACRES FREE! Own 60 acres for 40 acre price/payment. $0-Down, $168/mo. Money Back Guarantee, NO CREDIT CHECKS. West Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com

ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Call 800-510-0784 www.CenturaOnline.com

CASH FOR CARS: All Cars/Trucks Wanted. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Any Make/Model. Call For Instant Offer: 1-800-864-5960

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE

WANTED TO BUY

Diabetic Test Strips Wanted Check us out online! All Major Brands Bought Dtsbuyers.com 1 888 978 6911

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Reader Advisory: The National Trade Association we belong to has purchased the above classifieds. Determining the value of their service or product is advised by this publication. In order to avoid misunderstandings, some advertisers do not offer employment but rather supply the readers with manuals, directories and other materials designed to help their clients establish mail order selling and other businesses at home. Under NO circumstance should you send any money in advance or give the client your checking, license ID, or credit card numbers. Also beware of ads that claim to guarantee loans regardless of credit and note that if a credit repair company does business only over the phone it is illegal to request any money before delivering its service. All funds are based in US dollars. Toll free numbers may or may not reach Canada.

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THE COAST NEWS

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FREE CONSULTATION NO FEE TILL RECOVERY!

FEB. 8, 2013

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THE COAST NEWS

FEB. 8, 2013

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New uses for baby socks SARA NOEL Frugal Living If your baby has g rown out of his or her soc ks, why not repurpose them? Make cat toys: Insert catnip and se w the opening closed. You can add yarn or ribbon to drag or dangle the toy, or put a jingle bell inside,too. Catnip is a per ennial herb; you can g row it indoor s or outdoors for added savings. Craft cute ornaments for next year: Stuff a ba by sock with poly-fil and make minisnowmen. For instructions, v i s i t spoonful.com/crafts/babysock-snowmen or crafts.kaboose.com/socksnowman-ornament.html. Other uses: Baby socks can be used a bod y scrubber with soap sli vers inside. Polish leather shoes or pur ses, or use them to dust and clean around your home. The first reader shares how she reuses baby socks: Reuse baby socks: I use baby socks to co ver the hot things in m y car, like the gearshift and the glowplug pull. My mechanic laughed his head off when he first saw them and then ask ed me where to buy them when I came back to pick the car up. — Edna, Texas Re-purpose clothing:

Our family’s worn-out clothes get a second life as rags. I cut the tips off the soc ks so they don’t accidentally wind up back in the sock drawer, and I cut the T-shirts into smaller, more manageable pieces. All these rags of varying sizes are kept in a small plastic tr ash bin under the kitc hen sink. The kids know exactly where to go and what to do when there’s a spill. We also reuse our plastic grocery bags as garbage bags. They fit perfectl y over the kitchen trash bin when the handles of the g rocery bag are gently stretched and secured over the sides of the trash bin. There’s really no need to buy plastic trash bags. — Connie, Rhode Island Fels-Naptha rave: I found two bars packed together in a bag at a thrift store for $1. I bought it because I r emember my grandmother and mother using it. I recently moistened the bar and rub bed it on a grease spot on a gray sweater. It took the stain out! I am so happy, this was a dollar w ellspent. — Elena, email New laundry soap recipe: I decided to tr y dry soap, so here is what I did: 1 large plastic cat litter tub 2 boxes Borax 2 boxes washing soda 8 pounds baking soda or OxiClean 6 bars Fels-Naptha soap (fine ground in f ood processor)

1 bottle Purex scent crystals (I used lavender), 32-load size 1 small box Gain powder, optional (I just added this for the scent.) Stir in some of eac h and continue adding in layers as it fills the tub and gets har d to mix. I ended up using m y hands. I put some in the Pur ex bottle and use the little cap to measure out about two tablespoons. It should last the y ear. I used it last night and w as very happy with it. Total cost was about $30-35, or $2.91 a month, which equates to roughly 10 cents per load. — Cricket, Texas Lye soap for stains: I made some lye soap recently and just used some on one of my ruined new tops.The soap took out the g rease stains, and my top is good as ne w again! It even rescued one of my husband’s T-shirts. Be careful what you use it on, but it worked great for me! Both of the shirts I used it on w ere cotton or cotton blend. — C.H., South Carolina Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a website that offers practical, moneysaving strategies for everyday living. To send tips, comments or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, MO, 64106, or email sara@frugalvillage.com.

eautiful spacious 5 Bdrm, 4 Bathroom home with15 acres of income-producing Haas avocado groves. This one-of-a-kind ranch home is surrounded by rolling hills and has magnificent panoramic views, a swimming pool, and an 1100 sq. ft. guest home and 950 sq. ft. metal garage/workshop. $1,495,000 with $93,000 net income per year.

B

ew on the Market. 2/2 with N 1550 sf and attached 2 car Garage in La Costa!! Ocean and Lagoon Views!! Seller says sell!! No Mello Roos and low $298 HOA fees. Hurry on this one!! $369,000

OwnYour Own Surf Break asa Aguas Vivas is a fullservice private luxury villa perfectly situated on Punta Mita’s secluded beach and surf break, with suites accommodating up to twelve guests. Casa Aguas Vivas — House of Living Waters — was built to blend into the environment which surrounds the home. The building, which is appropriate to the climate and made from material indigenous to the area, is a statement of individuality. The palapa roofs and river stone mesh with the ocean, palms, and pools to create a romantic and unique home. The curvilinear architecture and stairways defy straight walls and convention, as does the outdoor dining room and bar area under a palapa umbrella. A cobblestone stairway from the palapa bar to the ocean, places you onto a mile of sugar-fine sand to the south. $2,950,000

C


THE COAST NEWS

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FEB. 8, 2013

0URCHASE OR LEASE ANY NEW PREVIOUSLY UNTITLED 3UBARU AND RECEIVE A COMPLIMENTARY FACTORY SCHEDULED MAINTENANCE PLAN FOR YEARS OR MILES WHICHEVER COMES lRST 3EE 3UBARU !DDED 3ECURITY -AINTENANCE 0LAN FOR INTERVALS COVERAGES AND LIMITATIONS #USTOMER MUST TAKE DELIVERY BEFORE AND RESIDE WITHIN THE PROMOTIONAL AREA !T PARTICIPATING DEALERS ONLY 3EE DEALER FOR PROGRAM DETAILS AND ELIGIBILITY

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