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CHRIS McINTOSH BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE BACHELOR of DESIGN STUDIES SEGMENT ONE PORTFOLIO JANUARY 2012


CHRIS McINTOSH

435 CAMBRIDGE ST. #5 ALLSTON, MA 02134 857.654.2399 christopher.mcintosh@the-bac.edu

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CONTENTS RESUME 4 PERSONAL STATEMENT 6 FOUNDATION 8 Design Principles 10 Sketches 12 Orthogonal 13 Freehand 14 Perspective 15 CAD Drafting 16 3D CAD 17

STUDIO 18

A2 - The Ritual Marketplace B1 - Schindler House Transformation B2 - Apparatus on a Slope

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GATEWAY 40 Fields Corner Library 42 Greater Love Tabernacle 46

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN 62 BAC Climate Action Plan 64 Sustainable Design Courses 72

PRACTICE 74 Wilson Architects 76 DCAM 78

COMPETITION 82

2011 NOMA Student Design Competition

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RESUME EDUCATION BOSTON ARCHITECTURAL COLLEGE Aug 2009 - current

Bachelor of Design Studies - Sustainable Design

expected graduation May 2013

HILLSBOROUGH COMMUNITY COLLEGE Aug 2007 - Jun 2009 Associate of Arts - Architecture

EXPERIENCE DIVISION of CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT (DCAM) - BOSTON, MA

Sep 2011 - current

Intern - Energy Team

Develop templates for informational sheets for LEED-rated state facilities Assist energy planners and attend project kickoff meetings on & off site

WILSON ARCHITECTS - BOSTON, MA

Jul 2011 - Aug 2011

Office Administrator

Manage, edit and check CAD files for design projects Update project presentation books through InDesign and Photoshop

BAC FACILITIES DEPARTMENT - BOSTON, MA Greenhouse Gas Inventory - Project Research & Development Analyze building energy use to develop institutional Climate Action Plan Produce graphic display work to publicize Sustainable Campus Initiative HARVARD SCHOOL of PUBLIC HEALTH - BOSTON, MA Administrative Assistant Handle personal finances, schedules and e-mails for doctorate professor Coordinate meetings between professor and graduate students

Sep 2010 - May 2011

May 2010 - Jun 2010

NAI HUNNEMAN COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE - BOSTON, MA Apr 2010 - May 2010 Administrative Assistant Publish daily listings to multiple realtor databases throughout Boston & Cambridge Generate effective promotional listing documents through graphical layouts

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EXPERIENCE (CONTINUED)

ELDER SERVICE PLAN of HARBOR HEALTH - BOSTON, MA

Jan 2010 - Apr 2010

Greenhouse Gas Inventory - Project Research & Development Organize and maintain large medical record database (physical & computer-based) Process financial documents for billing and internal record keeping

LDI REPROPRINTING - TAMPA, FL

Jun 2007 - Aug 2009

Assistant Manager - Jan 2009 - Aug 2009 Electronic File Assistant - Nov 2007 - Jan 2009 Print Operator - Jun 2007 - Nov 2007

Manage daily orders (print, web & in-store) for top-ranked architectural printing company Advertise projects out for bid through company website Pilot an increase in production possibilities by implementing CAD file management

SKILLS

FLUENCY WORKING

Adobe Creative Suite (Photoshop, InDesign, Acrobat) (CS+) Google SketchUp AutoCAD (2000+) Autodesk Revit Orthogonal drafting various 3D rendering programs Freehand drawing / sketching Microsoft Office Suite (Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook)

LEADERSHIP

NATIONAL ORGANIZATION of MINORITY ARCHITECTURE STUDENTS

Boston Architectural College Chapter (BACNOMAS) Vice President Nov 2011 - Current Treasurer Nov 2009 - Nov 2011

2011 NOMA Student Design Competition - Jun 2011 - Oct 2011

Project Manager 3rd Place of 16 teams

CAREER INTERESTS

Urban planning & development Sustainable design Housing design (single & multi-family) Neighborhood planning City design Public transportation development

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PERSONAL STATEMENT Since starting at the BAC in 2009, I feel my skill set has drastically improved and I feel much more capable and focused as a designer. Practice has played a very important role in shaping my views as a design professional and what it means to design the built environment around me. Practice has taught me that designers have a responsibility not only to themselves as professionals, but as trusted shapers of their environment around them. Involving myself in pursuits outside of the academic realm has given me a stronger conviction and outlook on my career as a designer. With that said, my views on where I want to go in the design profession have shifted dramatically as well, and that is also due to my involvement in many opportunities that the BAC has provided. When I began my BAC career, I would have said I wanted to become a residential architect, focused on single- and multi-family housing. Through numerous opportunities, including the Gateway Project program and my involvement in NOMAS (National Organization of Minority Architecture Students), I have gained a broader knowledge of the social aspect of design, and the power that the design community has to shape communities and environments. It’s the feeling that I can make positive change in the built environment without the focus on traditional studio pursuits that has influenced my academic decision to change from the traditional B.Arch program to the BDS program. The BAC has opened my eyes to other potentially successful routes within the design field, giving me a perspective that I did not have when I entered merely two years ago. With these experiences in Practice, I feel that I can focus on issues relating to sustainable design, planning, and efficient community building. I can say now that my goals include becoming an urban designer and planner, shaping the future of cities and communities with a sustainable approach. Due to my experiences in Practice, I have gained a much stronger knowledge of the personal aspects of design. From dealing with the clientdesigner relationship, to project management, to sustainable planning, to goal-oriented teamwork, I have learned that good design is much more than making an attractive model or drawing set. From Practice, I have developed valuable leadership, presentation and communication skills that I have readily applied in my academic pursuits. I am much more willing and able to concretely express my concepts and ideas, and lead project teams toward a common goal. The BAC has extensively challenged my work ethic toward the design profession, as well. I have gained a greater sense of urgency to make a positive impact on my community, and the BAC has given me opportunities to do that so far. I can credit some of that urgency to age and experience; however, I feel that the skills I have learned here are essential to the pavement of my path to a successful design career. I am very thankful for my experience at the BAC so far, and very appreciative of the avenues the BAC has provided me to explore my true interests in the design field.

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FOUNDATION


Design Principles Sketches Orthogonal Freehand Perspective CAD Drafting 3D CAD

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Design Principles - Fall 2009

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Bohan-Kemp Residence - Wheeler Kearns Architects Section & plan analysis

Double House - MVRDV Section analysis

This exercise showed me how to understand qualities of space by analyzing dimensional relationships in both plan and section. Communicating those qualities through diagrams was also important to the exercise.

This is an example of understanding how a space can be divided equally among two groups, and how this can be achieved sectionally. This diagram shows how to communicate the diagrammatic division within a section perspective.


Final Assignment The final exercise was to diagram the design process as I understand it. I concluded that the process begins with a client conspiring with a designer to solve a problem. The designer then focuses on the client’s needs, goals, and

constraints to diagram a legible solution. Through the iterative process, the designer exhaustively works and re-works a set of ideas for the client. The client’s input is incorportated into the evolution of the project until a series of principles govern the design solution. The process is continually re-worked until the design is completed, or the process begins again.

Design Principles was an extremely valuable course for me in that it showed me how to analyze and fully understand a designer’s intentions by diagramming and learning their ideas. I was able to learn design terms, methods, and processes that I can carry with me throughout my career, such as how the iterative process applies throughout all levels of design projects.

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Sketches 3

1

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1 sectional sketch of Schindler House (Spring 2010) 2 angled sketch of proposed Esplanade structure (Spring 2010) 3 daytime sketch of Commonwealth Avenue (Fall 2009)

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Sketching helps me to capture the essence of what I am trying to show, and it has proven to be a very valuable skill as I have progressed in my career. I have been able to quickly project ideas for designs through sketching, and it has allowed me to generate thoughts and concepts quickly and legibly.


Orthogonal - Fall 2009

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3

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Vanna Venturi House - Robert Venturi all drawings pencil on bond

1 upper floor plan 2 ground floor plan 3 exploded axonometric

From this course, I was able to learn valuable drafting techniques to thoroughly communicate the design of a building. This taught me how to understand a structure by drawing it,. It also gave me a great base of learning how spaces relate to each other.

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Freehand - Spring 2010 2

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1 live figure drawing - woman seated on a platform (charcoal on newsprint) 2 abstracted cube (ink on museum board) 3 reflective pottery on a blanket (graphite pencil)

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Doing freehand drawings is a nice departure from the rigors of design work, and this course helped me develop a talent I had put on the backburner. Learning effective drawing techniques in this course helped me to visualize and translate what I see on to paper, which has definitely helped me project my visualizations into effective images.


Perspective - Fall 2010

1 museum interior view (pencil and ink on trace) 2 office interior view (pencil on trace)

Doing perspective drawings has always amazed me at how real the drawings look. Until taking this course, I had not really been able to develop accuracy in the methods of drawing perspective. Drawing from the perspective grid has helped me visualize a space more accurately, and has been a great tool to help me accurately draw spaces.

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CAD Drafting 1

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SITE DIMENSIONS AND SETBACKS

SITE INFORMATION

1 site plan & setbacks at Tremont St & Roxbury (Spring 2011) 2 floor & furniture plan of Fields Corner Library scheme (Fall 2010)

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Learning how to represent buildings in CAD is obviously a very important tool to have to become a designer. I have been good at drawing CAD plans, but I’ve been able to learn even more effective methods to quickly produce accurate drawings since I’ve been at the BAC. I have learned to use CAD and hand drawings in tandem to fully visualize a project coming together.


3D CAD 1

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1 plan, elevation, and 3D extrusion of sink drawing (Fall 2010) 2 wall component study for Wilson Architects (Summer 2011)

Taking the next step to 3D CAD was very beneficial for me because I was able to take those skills and use them in a professional environment. By learning how to represent a project in 3D, I am able to produce visuals and understand building components much more effectively.

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STUDIO


A2 - Newbury Street Marketplace B1 - Schindler House Transformation B2 - Apparatus on a Slope

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A2 NEWBURY STREET MARKETPLACE

Ritual introduction

INSTRUCTOR: Kris Lucius SEMESTER: Fall 2009 DURATION: 5 weeks DESCRIPTION: To develop a visual language for translating diagrams of a specific given ritual into concepts for a type of market in an urban setting. The goal is to recognize, understand, and control the influence of site context and dimension on abstract concepts.

image courtesy For Zion Ministries

LOCATION: 12,000 SF current parking lot at Dartmouth & Newbury Streets, Boston PROGRAM: 6400 SF farmers market (ground floor) 6400 SF grocery store (upper floor) SKILLS USED: Research and analysis of a historic ritual Hand-drawn analytic diagramming Spatial analysis through model building SKILLS GAINED: Translation of research ideas into design concepts Investigating site and activity for program appropriateness Developing a visual language for site dimension concepts

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image courtesy Boston University

I was given the ritual of Sukkot, a seven-day Jewish festival intended to be a celebration of the previous year’s harvest. Observers are to construct temporary outside dwellings, known as sukkah, throughout the seven days. The sukkah is to be constructed out of solely natural materials, and to be as open to the elements as possible to emphasize man’s connection with nature.

Throughout the holiday, followers are supposed to realize that man is always covered by his wordly possessions, thus blurring his relationship with nature. By giving upthose comforts, man opens himself totally to God’s creation and understands the meaning of the harvest.


Ritual analysis HIGH taste HIGH knowledge of Torah

LOW taste LOW knowledge of Torah

HIGH aroma HIGH amount of good deeds

“heart”

HIGH aroma HIGH amount of good deeds

“eyes” HIGH taste HIGH knowledge of Torah

LOW taste LOW knowledge of Torah

LOW aroma LOW amount of good deeds

LOW aroma LOW amount of good deeds

“lips”

“spine”

knowledge of Torah

amount of good deeds

Diagrammatically, I represented these ideas through these 3 concentric boxes. The black box represents man’s wordly possession, the brown box is man’s blurred relationship with nature, and the white box is the idea of man totally open to the meaning of Sukkot.

Central to the celebration of Sukkot are the “four species”, which are four specific natural items that are brought into the sukkah and prayed over throughout the seven days. Each “species” represents a different type of Jew, relating the knowledge of the Torah and the amount of good deeds done. This also symbolizes the celebration of Jewish unity and the inclusion of all into the holiday.

I represented this idea in a four-quadrant diagram with each of the species occupying a section of the square. Each species’ meaning is represented by a colored square with the gradient combining to represent a full unit. The combination of the colors represents the fact that these symbols are to be put together to create a oneness with a true belief in God.

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A2 Newbury Street Marketplace

Site documentation

1/16” = 1’-0”

Taking the ritual research, the next step was to create a marketplace based on the ideals and place it on a site, located at the corner of Newbury Street & Dartmouth Street.

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To initiate the process, site visits and documentation were done to familiarize myself with the surroundings and potential market development. Seeing as this was a busy pedestrian corner, I concluded that my marketplace would need to be open to the flow of pedestrians at that corner to be successful.


Site analysis & concept development

1 - TRANSPORTATION TYPES

2 - ACTIVITY QUADRANTS

In the above transportation diagram (1), I diagrammed the way people move to and through the site. The blue arrows represent vehicular traffic, while the green represents pedestrian. The size and opacity of the arrows correspond to the amount and intensity of the traffic.

From that analysis, I referred back to the relationship of the symbols of the Four Species of Sukkot and diagrammed the amount of activity as an A-B relationship (2). The activity immediately at the corner is the most intense, while the activity at the 8’ wall is the least intense.

My next conclusion was to determine the type of market this would be. I concluded that to represent the ideas of man returning to nature and becoming in touch with the outside world, that the market should be an outdoor farmer’s market. Farmer’s markets are local, sustainable, and highly in tune with the environment. I thought this would be a great interpretation of the ideals of Sukkot.

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A2 Newbury Street Marketplace

Concept translation

A

amount of crop production

b a

B

SPRING

SUMMER

FALL

WINTER

ing

spr ter

win

b B A a

r

me

sum fall

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Since farmers markets produce different amounts of food at different times of year, I realized that the market would need varying amounts of activity time based on the seasons of crop production (3). From that analysis, I applied the same A-B relationship rules to my activity diagram, to determine where the seasonal activity would occur on the site (4).

Using the relationship, my design featured a simple box shape with partitions that can determine how much space the farmer’s market uses based on the seasonal relationships. The shaded areas represent parts of the market that are closed during that particular season. Another idea introduced at this point was the inclusion of a traditional grocery store that would sit above the market. This was to increase the site’s attractiveness and to provide consistent year-round revenue for the farmer’s market below.


Final development & conclusion

The connection back to Sukkot was manifested in the relationship between the seasons and food production for the market, as well as the relatioship between the grocery and farmer’s market. These relationships all work together to stimulate the community in a healthy way, much the same way as the holiday of Sukkot stimulates believers to come back in contact with nature.

The final market features a glass lower floor for the farmer’s market, while the above story is shaded. The shading is meant to differentiate the program types, as well as give the passerby an idea as if a building is floating above ground, making the site more attractive. Circulation into the space occurs at street level so as to maximize time spent at the farmer’s market before entering the grocery. The central core of the building is reserved for upward circulation into the grocery store. This project showed me how to turn research and ideas into concepts for a physical design. I think this project helped me develop my approach to incorporating all parts of the design process into the physical development of conceptual design.

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B1 SCHINDLER HOUSE TRANSFORMATION INSTRUCTOR: Jared Ramsdell SEMESTER: Spring 2010 DURATION: 6 weeks DESCRIPTION: Study and analyze a 20th century house and the concepts behind the architect’s thinking. Use that understanding to propose significant and fundamental alterations to the design.

WILLOUGHBY AVENUE

SKILLS GAINED: Develop a knowledge of formal analysis methods Articulating a thesis about an existing work Combining diagrams to talk about design elements

N. KINGS ROAD

SKILLS USED: 2D drafting to produce working drawings Diagramming and analytic skill development Using analysis as a tool for design

N. ORLANDO AVENUE

PROJECT: Schindler House by Rudolf M. Schindler 1922 - Los Angeles, CA

WARING AVENUE

N

I chose to analyze the Schindler House for this project because it has been defined as the first modern-style house , and the precedent for “California living”. Since I grew up in California and being heavily interested in residential architecture, I figured it would be a great project to understand what that style truly means, gain a sense of modern architecture, and develop tools for learning how to do an analysis of a building.

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Project documentation

To understand the building, first I needed to draw the building. Producing accurate base drawings of the plan and elevations allowed me to get a sense of the structural layout of the structure, and understand Schindler’s attempts to define indoor/ outdoor living to adapt to the Southern California climate.

By doing the drawings and initial research on the house, I was able to uncover that Schindler was inspired by community campground architecture in Yosemite, and he desiguch like that camp space, as a joint live/work space for two families. The residence is essentially two equal homes in one, rotated around a communal living space.

The home features sliding glass panels that open up onto the exterior courtyards giving the home a connection to the outdoors. Schindler’s use of industrial materialsshows his economical and no-frills approach to this house. He designed the home to accommodate the users’ basic needs of living space, sleeping space, and utility space.

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B1 Schindler House Transformation

ORGANIZATIONAL LOGIC

Diagrammatic analysis

VIEWS

USER SEPARATION

PROGRAM LAYERS

STRUCTURE USER SEPARATION

Early diagrams helped me to understand some of the ideas behind Schindler’s thinking. He connected two main studio spaces around a central utility space, giving the structure this implied pinwheel rotation. Opening up each studio to the outdoor views allows users to freely interact with the outdoors and extend their living space. The structural elements allow this to happen as well, as concrete walls essentially frame the main boundaries, while the lesser structure

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Transformation diagrams EXISTING

PROPOSED

EXISTING

PROPOSED

ORGANIZATIONAL LOGIC VIEWS

PUBLIC vs. PRIVATE

COMMUNAL SPACE

Further diagram development helped me to understand what changes I want to propose for the transformation. I focused on Schindler’s de􀃶nitions of public and private space. Since Schindler wants to create an open and functional space for two families, I would like to blur that division between the two main family spaces by opening up the central corridor. Currently, the house has a concrete wall facing east and a patio opening to the west. I would like to replace the concrete wall with another glass and canvas wall to open up to the second patio. I believe this will turn

FORM / GEOMETRY

PROGRAMMATIC RELATIONSHIP

the two spaces into one, creating an even more collaborative and communal space for the two families to use and share. This will also combine the two patios into one larger patio for both families, linked by the central corridor/living area. To link to the guest space, I propose opening up the corridor between the kitchen/utility space and guest bath by shifting the dividing wall farther north. With these moves, I feel that I can improve on Schindler’s definition of communal living in the indoor/ outdoor realm.

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B1 Schindler House Transformation

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Final development

The transformed floor plan and interior perspective show the proposed central living area opened up to create a flow between the east and west outdoor spaces. This allows the building to take advantage of potential cross breezes and views and gives the heavy structure a lighter feel. The two user groups can fully interact and share within this common area yet still have their own private living quarters. This new space could also potentially become a public gathering space if the users were to hold a joint gathering


Final model & conclusion

By studying the book Precedents in Architecture, I was able to learn valuable diagrammatic terms for this project. Using structure, organizational logic, form and geometry helped me articulate the changes I wanted to propose to the building. I was able to better understand Schindler’s thesis for the house and develop my own thesis building off of his inspirations. I learned that the process of documenting and analyzing the structure helps the designer truly understand the intentions of existing works, and gives another designer tools for using precedents in their designs.

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TECTONIC TECTONIC STRATEGIES STRATEGIES TECTONIC STRATEGIES TECTONIC STRATEGI

B2 APPARATUS ON A SLOPE

INTIAL ANA

INSTRUCTOR: Michael Crehan SEMESTER: Fall 2010 DURATION: 5 weeks DESCRIPTION: To translate and transform a tectonic concept into a basic architectrual language in oder to engage a sloped site. Concepts emphasized include engaging structure with site, developing a sectional quality through structure, and clear organization of space based on tectonic concept.

CLAMPING

PINNING

BRANCHING

LOCATION: Peter’s Hill at Arnold Arboretum, Boston, MA PROGRAM: Satellite public educational pavilion at the Arboretum Entry/Information area for 3-5 people Exhibit/Display spaces for 15-25 people Staff Area for 4-5 people Utility/Service as needed Public toilets Circulation as required SKILLS USED: Diagramming and site analysis Tectonic and building component analysis Programmatic development within a given site SKILLS GAINED: Applying tectonic properties to a physical site Understanding connections between program & site Developing knowledge of threshold conditions between building & site

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The formative idea for tectonic exploration came from exploring images of types of structures. From studying these images and early diagrams, I was able to draw some conclusions as to how my tectonic module could operate.


Tectonic development

From my analysis, I developed a process to formulating my tectonic module. First, there is the idea of clamping to create an enclosure. Second is the act of pinning by penetrating another object. Third, is the idea of branching an elemenrt from a central core to allow itself to be attached to other modules.

After building the module, I was able to find that the modules were able to be rotated on different axes once they were put together. This could allow a dynamic change in direction or structural capabilities of an apparatus if it was to be built.

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B2 Apparatus On A Slope

Site selection

1

2

1 3

2

3 1 view looking northeast at edge condition 2 view looking southwest toward site entry 3 view toward east from top of hill slope

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The chosen site, on the eastern portion of the Arboretum site, provides ample open space for a potential pavilion development. The space is relatively clear of trees, as compared to the other site choices. The openness also brings in plenty of natural light making this an attractive site as well.


Site analysis

1 1

2 1 sun path 2 prevailing winds

Several iterations of site analysis diagrams were completed to give a general overview of site opportunities. Based on the analysis, a pavilion on my site would need to be open to take advantage of limited sunlight, and interact with the pathway to capture the major pedestrian site traffic.

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B2 Apparatus On A Slope

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Site intervention

i found that nteracting with the sloped site can take on different forms and functions. A general concern that came about was how to best cut into the slope and take advantage of the usable hillside space. Initial diagrams focused on incorporating views and separating parts of the program. By separating the public and private aspects of the program, a

logical flow of activity is established as the user accesses the pavilion. The public program parts (entry, exhibit spaces) would need to interact with the paths and open areas of the site, whereas the more private aspercts of the program (staff area, utility) could happen on the interior of the structure, away from the main flow of access. Yet, all of these spaces would be connected by a circulation element.


Tectonic translation

After reconsidering the tectonic apparatus, and the functionality of the site, a new diagram was developed. The idea centered on folding spaces into the hillside, with the “pin” being a vertical circulation piece to hold the program elements together and provide access to all spaces of the potential pavilion.

A scheme incorporating three pavilion structures was introduced. One being a “main” structure, connecting with the existing path, provides viewpoints down the slope and toward the other structures. A defined path progression from structure to structure defines a circulation path and acts as the pin between spaces.

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B2 Apparatus On A Slope

Program development

A

A

A

B

B

B 1 2 3 4 5 6

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entry / information area public view space public restroom staff area utility / service exhibit / display space

Each pavilion structure engages the user and the existing landscape, which provides for a seamless threshold between the site and pavilions. The open areas of each pavilion provide a view of the sloped open hillside and draw you toward the next pavilion in the process. The exhibit

spaces would be set up sequentially, giving the user a singular experience while accessing all parts of the program and interacting with the site fully. Taking advantage of the sectional qualities of the site was a large focus of the project as well.


Final application & conclusion

site/pavilion threshold Referring back to my original tectonic goals, the clamping occurs as the user is drawin in to the entry pavilion at the top of the hill. The pin is the vertical circulation that connects users from the entry down into the slope. The layering of the structure supports the separaration of public and private spaces. Layering also occurs in section as the user experiences each pavilion, giving way to the open space between the three pavilions.

I felt this was a successful translation of my original tectonic concepts from idea to site, then to program. I was able to learn that site and program should always be interconnected, and the threshold between them is important to create a successful user experience. Although the form is a somewhat literal translation, the concept behind the separation of spaces is what drove the project to fully interact with the site.

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GATEWAY


Fields Corner Library

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Greater Love Tabernacle

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FIELDS CORNER LIBRARY

LOCATION: 1520 Dorchester Avenue, Boston, MA

Dorch

DESCRIPTION: To develop a schematic design to renovate the existing Fields Corner Branch Library to include a new library program, and three floors of rentable apartments above the library

ester A ve

CLIENT: My Lam, Real Estate Director at Viet-AID, Dorchester, MA

PROGRAM SIZE: 9,000 SF footprint, approx, 25,000 SF built area TEAM: 5 BAC Students DURATION: October 2010 - December 2010 ROLE: Schematic designer, concept development

map courtesy Bing

SKILLS USED: Code and programming research AutoCAD drafting for building measurements SketchUp to develop initial 3D schemes SKILLS GAINED: Property and zoning analysis Enhaned 3D modeling skill improvement for design development Design team interaction and teamwork

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In the initial phase of the project, my role for the team was to pull together zoning, code, and deed information for the Fields Corner Library. I was introduced to the Registry of Deeds and assessor maps, and was able to bring together the necessary data to proceed in developing the project. From my data gathered, we concluded that we could have a max. height of 40 feet, and only build on the area highlighted in yellow above. We needed to incorporate two means of egress as well.


Site schematic approach

VIEW 1

1

2

VIEW 2 During the early schematic phase, I approached the program from a perspective of being efficient yet attractive. Since the client wanted to get as much living space onto the site as possible, efficiency would be needed to accomplish this.

The library is currently underused, and it lies on a major corner in the neighborhood. Increasing the building’s attractiveness would be key to the program’s success. I chose to focus on the approaches to the building from street level, and the potential views that apartment residents

would have on the upper floors. My initial scheme included a grand entry structure on the main corner of the project to announce the building’s presence. A secondary entry would be included along Park Street for library and apartment use.

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Fields Corner Library

Individual schematic design

LIGHT WELL open to below

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Further development of the scheme included placement of emergency exits for the building, and the development of a practical circulation scheme for the apartments. A concern of mine was giving the apartments adequate outdoor views despite the cramped nature of the site.

To do this, I proposed including a light well of space between some of the apartments, which would eventually bring more natural light into the library space as well. I proposed a central circulation scheme and developed ideas to include multiple apartment types for increased rental attractiveness.


Rental Option 1: 3 Three Bedroom units at 1300sf 6 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby No Community Space Total units: 21 units

Team schematic design & conclusion

Rental Option 1: 3 Three Bedroom units at 1300sf 6 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby No Community Space Total units: 21 units

Rental Option 2: 3 Three Bedroom units at 1300sf 5 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby 1 Community Room per floor Total units: 18 units

Rental Option 2: 3 Three Bedroom units at 1300sf 5 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby 1 Community Room per floor Total units: 18 units

Condo Option: No Three Bedroom units 7 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby No Community Space Total units: 21 units

Rental Option 2: 3 Three Bedroom units at 1300sf 5 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby 1 Community Room per floor Total units: 18 units

Condo Option: No Three Bedroom units 7 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby No Community Space Total units: 21 units

Condo Option: No Three Bedroom units 7 Two Bedroom Units at 1000 sf per floor 2 Means of egress 1 Elevator lobby No Community Space Total units: 21 units

Ideas from all teammates’ schemes were brought into the final proposal, and three options were proposed to the client. His focus was to maximize the amount of income by including units to hold a maximum amount of residents. Rather than a design focus, the solution focused on fitting the program to the client’s liking.

This project was a good introduction to the Gateway Program for me, while at the same time giving me valuable teamwork experience. I gained an appreciation for client-based design work through this project, and learned to mesh the needs of the client with the skills of the designer.

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GREATER LOVE TABERNACLE CLIENT: Greater Love Tabernacle Church Dorchester, MA - Pastor William E. Dickerson II DESCRIPTION: Renovate the existing church and lumberyard building next door to create a new multipurpose center for the church and surrounding neighborhood. The scope also includes a new building to connect the two existing buildings into one complex. LOCATION: 101 Nightingale Street, Dorchester, MA PROGRAM SIZE: 45,000 SF TEAM: 5 BAC Students DURATION: January 2011 - June 2011 ROLE: Schematic design Create a Vision Book for potential fundraising to get the project built SKILLS USED: Schematic design development Team coordination and interaction with real-world clients Adobe Creative Suite to develop presentation materials SKILLS GAINED: Develop a relationship, present design concepts and ideas to clients without a design background Refinement and advancement of 3D rendering Preparing an initial set of construction documents

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To initiate the project, the team visited the site several times to document existing conditions. The church was built in 1929, and has remained largely intact, while the existing lumberyard has gone through numerous renovations and changes in use. Currently, the lumberyard building is in a state of disrepair.


Site documentation

In addition to site documentation, my role during this phase was to compile zoning information, a role I felt prepared to take on due to my experience in the previous Gateway project. I was able to determine that the lumberyard site could be zoned for public assembly, meaning that the client could proceed to build a community center on site.

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Greater Love Tabernacle

Existing conditions drawings

Lumberyard First Floor Plan

orig. scale: 1/8” = 1’-0”

Lumberyard Second Floor Plan

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Prior to developing program, the team was tasked with developing a set of existing construction drawings to use for the basis of our design. My role in this phase was to measure and draw plans for the lumberyard building. I learned how to take accurate site measurements and translate those into CAD to create existing condition drawings


Initial approach & design ideas

Beginning the design phase, we were to characterize our thoughts on program placement based on our site analysis, independent from the team. My focus was on the idea of connectivity, linking retail, church space, and public space, to create a unity and harmony which the church expects from this project.

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Greater Love Tabernacle

Conceptual development

UPDATED SANCTUARY

MATERIAL CHOICES

bright, open and welcoming space materials should be light, open to natural lighting new technologies? (sound, video, etc.) accessible seating

EXISTING BRICK

LIGHT WOOD

TEEN CAFE well-lit open spaces and plan COMBINED WITH GLASS

colorful and comfortable - to match user personalities multi-functional furniture and spaces low-maintenance, easy to clean spaces should encourage creativity

KEY CONCEPTS “CONNECTION”

the building should serve to bring all communities together and bridge rivalries. Through the design, the spaces should all link together to serve as one facility

FUTURE HOPE state-of-the-art workshop facilities vocational center with modern amenities should materials conducive real-world builta Useinclude of the existing bricktoconstitutes work sensitivity to the meaning of the church to mostly wood construction for carpentry the neighborhood. Brick provides strength, workshop/garage should accommodate various sized is long-lasting, and establishes historical groups

connection.

Use of wood establishes the connection of the site as a former lumberyard and is highly customizable to produce finely-crafted finishes. The juxtaposition with brick finishes can provide a sense of warmth and can feel inviting.

MATERIAL CHOICES EXISTING BRICK

“BEACON”

RETAIL

LIGHT WOOD

should be modeled to fit with existing Blue Hill Ave retail facades brick &natural glass should usedcan to attract customers Glass allows lightbeand highlight bright openings along main street frontage architectural elements of a structure. The should establish visual connection with community new building should incorporate plenty center and church

ENTRY/CONNECTION

of natural sunlight and outside views to brightly lit - open to public and private circulation mix of materials to indicate mixture of program establish a connection with the community.

COMBINED WITH GLASS

should be an example of good design in the re gion to show community togetherness

“OPEN TO ALL” reflects GLT’s mission of inclusivity and to reach anyone in the area

act as a bridge - connection point to church and lumberyard

KEY CONCEPTS “CONNECTION”

the building should serve to bring all communities together and bridge rivalries. Through the design, the spaces should all link together to serve as one facility

“BEACON” should be an example of good design in the re gion to show community togetherness Use of the existing brick constitutes a sensitivity to the meaning of the church to the neighborhood. Brick provides strength, is long-lasting, and establishes historical connection.

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Use of wood establishes the connection of the site as a former lumberyard and is highly customizable to produce finely-crafted finishes. The juxtaposition with brick finishes can provide a sense of warmth and can feel inviting.

Glass allows natural light and can highlight architectural elements of a structure. The new building should incorporate plenty of natural sunlight and outside views to establish a connection with the community.

The next phase of the project involved presenting our initial ideas on materiality. The goal of this part of the process was to get feedback on what he wanted the visual and material feel of the new center to be. We had to simplify our design language so that our ideas would translate and the client would understand our

“OPEN TO ALL” reflects GLT’s mission of inclusivity and to reach anyone in the area

ideas for future presentations. Updating the materials to further ehnhance the idea of a connected site is paramount to the vision of the new center. Understanding the quality that each space needs will provide the necessary elements that are key to making the center work as a unit.


Teen design charrette

In a few words, write down what each of these images means to you. Then pick 5-8 of the images that you would like to see in the new Teen Cafe.

Furthermore, the team conducted a charette with the teens and elders of the church to help the team decide what programmatic elements to design in the new center. The team developed an idea of using icons and different sized construction paper pieces to delineate program and hierarchy for the teens.

The charette was a highly successful experience for myself and the team, as we were motivated by the personal interaction with the church members. We were able to communicate our design needs to the teens, as well as get their valuable feedback on what they want in a new complex.

51


Greater Love Tabernacle

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Schematic development

During the design development, the team was tasked to explore two separate design options; one more conservative, and one less constrained. As part of the conservative team, I sought to find ways to use as much of the existing structure as possible, yet incorporate new features and design elements.

I chose to focus on the retail portion of the program to be housed on the Talbot Avenue facade, the main vehicular corridor to the site. Giving the retail and teen center portions a high visibility along this facade would give the site an attractiveness that had not been seen before.


Initial schematic presentation

Presenting our key concepts to the Pastor and church members was a big step during this process. Our conservative proposal kept the entire existing church and lumberyard footprints intact, while renovating the interiors. We chose to open up the front yard and create a new landscaped space for public gatherings.

53


Greater Love Tabernacle

Schematic option 2

drawings courtesy Ruthie Kuhlman and Ray Galgano

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The second design option focused on a more radical change to the building’s exterior. The Talbot Avenue facade featured a beacon element over the street to attract users from nearby Blue Hill Avenue. Also, working the new function hall to be a flexible space was key, allowing for a front and rear courtyard behind the centerpiece function hall.

After this phase, the Pastor liked elements of both the conservative and design-centered proposals, thus the team was tasked to come together once again to develop one clear proposal for a final building design.


Final design

Overall, the final design includes updating the existing Greater Love facade with a lighter material and the accessible entry. A new elevator tower adjacent to the church provides access to all levels of the complex. The lumberyard building will be completely renovated and updated.

The new building’s materials consist of stone siding, light wood, dark cherry wood and glass. The existing church facade will be be clad in a lighter color finish to match the new building facades. Stone siding will cover much of the new function hall and lumberyard buildings.

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Greater Love Tabernacle

Working drawings & presentation

GROUND FLOOR PLAN

REAR COURTYARD NEW PARKING

EXISTING PARKING

T BO

L TA E AV U

N E FRONT COURTYARD

SITE PLAN NIGHTINGALE STREET

My role was to develop the visual presentation for the Pastor, which would then be presented to the church congregation. I focused on using clear distinct colors for program deliniation and using CAD & Photoshop to give the plans character.

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THIRD FLOOR PLAN

SECOND FLOOR PLAN

Using Revit and AutoCAD, I was able to generate a strong set of presentable working drawings that can be used to communicate the project to designers and non-designers alike.

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Overall Changes Greater Love Tabernacle

Renderings & presentation

Before

After After

The new Talbot Avenue building facade is the main beacon of the center, revitalizing the social hub of the community. Each space will have its own attractive identity, and reflect the colorful welcoming nature of the Greater Love community.

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Joining the two buildings will be the grand function hall with an administrative suite on the third floor. The new function hall will be the place for celebration within the area. The central grand space illustrates the connection to the community by providing outdoor courtyards in the front and back.


The team and I developed a clear comparison between the existing building and our design proposal, as well as including familiar faces in the rendered views to give the congregation a familiarity with the design, and to feel welcomed into the process.

59


Greater Love Tabernacle

Construction phasing

PHASE 2

PHASE 3

PHASE 1 DEMOLITION

DEMOLITION

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION OVERALL VIEW

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As one of the goals of the project was potential development of the program, we were tasked with phasing the project as if actual construction would be happening based on our design decisions. This would act as a feasible strategy to achieve the church’s vision.. OVERALL VIEW My role in this part of the project was to develop the CAD and visual aspects of the phasing presentation.

Phase 1 involves additions to the church facade facing Nightingale Street. Phase 2 focuses on renovating the entire lumberyard building. The structure as it sits now would be demolished and renovated to our design. While the renovation is occuring, the central landscape for the site will also be developed.


PHASE 4

PHASE 3

DEMOLITION

DEMOLITION

CONSTRUCTION

CONSTRUCTION

OVERALL VIEW

DEMOLITION

CONSTRUCTION

OVERALL VIEW

Phase 3 consists of the connecting structure between the church and lumberyard building. This structure will house the new function hall and third floor offices. The plan was designed so that the structure will connect the circulation between the two buildings and allow the landscape to develop as well.

Phase 4 deals with the final re-organization of the church interior. This mostly involves converting the basement level into a more efficient community space by adding classrooms and a multipurpose space. This process taught us how to design with the end goal of construction in mind.

61


Greater Love Tabernacle

Vision Book Based on the input of all parties involved, the new Greater Love Tabernacle center will enhance the church’s overall vision and make this place an exciting and stimulating place to be in.

BUILDING DEVELOPMENT

Vision • Full Religious Complex

VISION BOOK PREPARED BY

ADVISOR:

– – – – –

Vision • Full Religious Complex – – – – –

RAY GALGANO RUTHIE KUHLMAN CHRIS McINTOSH MIKE SWANSON LAURA PORTNEY JUNE 2011

44

Spiritual Training Economic Development General Education Health Education Social Action

Spiritual Training Economic Development General Education Health Education Social Action

• Global Impact

“Celebration of life and overall unity throughout the Community” “Place where people can Come Together”

• Global Impact

“Celebration of life and overall unity throughout the Community” “Place where people can Come Together” FINAL PLANS

Groups of teens used cutouts of images representing potential activities in the space to decide which functions were most important. The groups also decided how their space was to be laid out using construction paper and colored sticks.

OVERALL GROUND FLOOR PLAN

REAR COURTYARD NEW PARKING

TEEN CHARETTE FEEDBACK

E

U

N

E AV FRONT COURTYARD

NIGHTINGALE STREET

27

62

T BO

They give us hope for a better future for inner-city teens

EXISTING PARKING

L TA

happening in our community today

The teens also visited their future space to gain inspiration. The groups came together in the end to discuss their group work and to address concerns with the space. The teens were very excited to contribute to the design process.

Another role that I took on during the project was to develop a Vision Book, which documented the entire design process. I did the design and produced the visual layout for the book. The book was formatted in 11x17 landscape to include half-size sets of the construction drawings that were produced.

52

The goal for the Vision Book was to give it to the Pastor to use for fundraising purposes to get the design built. The book had to showcase his vision along with our design interpretations and be easy to interpret for all audiences.

SITE PLAN


Conclusion

This project was an exhausting, yet extremely rewarding experience. I was able to learn so much about the workings of a client-designer relationship and understand what it means to work as a design team. I learned how to communicate my thinking and our team’s ideas to the client. The key to working with clients without a design background is learning how to simplify our design into legible components, and

I feel our team did a very good job with that aspect. I am very proud of the amount of work I was able to bring to the table to get the job done. Being able to interact with the congregation of the church on their terms helped us see their intentions through to the final design. It was so inspiring to see their particpation and excitement for the project, and I can truly say this project has inspired me to do more socially-oriented work in the future.

63


64

SUSTAINABLE DESIGN


BAC Climate Action Plan

66

Sustainable Design Courses

72

65


BAC CLIMATE ACTION PLAN FIRM: Boston Architectural College Facilities Department CLIENT: American College and University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC) DESCRIPTION: In 2009, BAC President Ted Landsmark signed ACUPCC, requiring the BAC to report its total greenhouse gas emissions from campus-wide activities and to later determine when the school can become a carbon-balanced campus. The Climate Action Plan (CAP) is a comprehensive outline of the strategies that will be used to reach that goal. TYPE: Energy audit, greenhouse gas analysis, energy pojections, capital project recommendations TEAM: 4 BAC Students DURATION: September 2010 - May 2011 ROLE: Develop graphics pertaining to data analysis, cost projections Publicize the BAC’s Sustainable Campus Initiative SKILLS USED: Microsoft Excel to develop data spreadsheets AutoCAD drafting for building measurements Adobe Creative Suite to produce visual presentation of climate data SKILLS GAINED: Effective visual communication of complex, multi-level energy data Energy modeling for sustainable design Coordination with institution heads to plan future beneficial projects

66

The compiled emissions data was compiled is calculated in eCO2 (Carbon Dioxide Equivalent), a metric used to compare the emissions from various greenhouse gases based on their global warming potential. In the year 2010 alone, the BAC emitted 2,500

In the year 2010 alone, the BAC emitted 2,500 metric tonnes of eCO2. The BAC’s largest emissions comes from electricity usage, totalling approximately 1.8 million kilowatt hours, which is enough energy to power 200 homes for one year.


Greenhouse gas analysis

Most of the analysis that was completed was intended to show the opportunity that the BAC has to drastically reduce its carbon footprint and take greater steps toward a sustainable future. To present these ideas to the Sustainability Council, a series of graphs were developed that showed

different emissions scenarios. One, if the BAC stayed kept emissions at the same rate, and another, if the BAC incorporated all aspects of the Climate Action Plan. I was able to learn how our actions affect our school’s emissions profile and how to effectively display those effects.

67


Climate Action Plan

Institution emissions analysis

Energy Comparison 10,000 9,000 8,000 7,000

M M B T U

6,000

Natural Gas

5,000

Electricity

4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

Over the course of the year, several iterations of data analysis were created, presented, and revised by myself and the student team. Examples of graphs that I compiled are above.

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This effort included corroborating energy consumption and cost data over time since 2004. The team tracked spending and use of electricity, natural gas and water use in all buildings owned and operated by the BAC.


Findings & projection

The student team developed the Climate Action Plan to be implemented in phases. The team ultimately concluded that the BAC can achieve its goal of becoming carbon-neutral by 2045 by implementing these phases.

Learning how to present this information to the council and heads of the institution showed me how to communicate these complex processes and ideas effectively. I was able to learn how model our energy use and present it in a way to show others in the school how our actions have affected our emissions profile.

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Climate Action Plan

Promoting sustainability

How can the BAC How become can the a carbon-balanced BAC How become can thea carbon-balanced BAC institution? become a carbon-balanced institution? Whyinstitution? does the BAC Whyneed doesa the Climate BAC Why Action need doesaPlan? the Climate BAC Action need a Plan? Climate ActionWhat Plan? has the BAC What been hasdoing the BAC toWhat limit been has its doing emissions? the BAC to limit beenitsdoing emissions? to limit its emissions? carbon-balanced: refers to thecarbon-balanced: idea of creating emissions refers tobut the carbon-balanced: offsetting idea of creating them elsewhere emissions refers to rather but the offsetting idea thanofonsite creating them elsewhere emissions rather but offsetting than onsite them elsewhere rather than onsite

by understanding thebyinstitution’s understanding greenhouse the by institution’s understanding gas emissions greenhouse the institution’s gas emissions greenhouse gas emissions to understand what to theunderstand institution’swhat carbon tothe understand footprint institution’s what actually carbon theconsists institution’s footprint of actually carbonconsists footprint instituting of actuallyrecycling consists instituting and of campus-wide recyclingenergy instituting and campus-wide policies recyclingenergy and campus-wide policies energy policies The BAC recognizes the effects that The daily BAC recognizes the effectsThe thatBAC daily recognizes the effects that daily

GREENHOUSE GASES are any of the gases that, when trapped by the atmosphere, contribute to the greenhouse effect, and increase the Earth’s temperature. The primary gases calculated by ACUPCC standards are: carbon dioxide....................CO2 sulfur hexafluoride...............SF6 methane................................CH4 nitrous oxide......................N2O

GREENHOUSE GASES GREENHOUSE GASES eCO2: (Carbon Dioxide Equivalent) eCO2: a metric (Carbon measure Dioxide usedEquivalent) to compare eCO2: a metric the(Carbon emissions measure Dioxide from used Equivalent) to compare a metric the emissions measure from to environment. compareoperations the emissions operations have used on our As an havefrom on our environment. operations As anhave on our environment. As an are any of the gases that, when are any of the gases that, when various greenhouse gases based on various their greenhouse global warming gases potential basedvarious on theirgreenhouse global warming gasespotential based on their global warming trapped by the atmosphere, trapped by the atmosphere, institution, the BACpotential is actively determining institution, the BAC is actively determining institution, the BAC is actively determining contribute to the greenhouse contribute to the greenhouse ways to lower emissions and develop ways to lower emissions and develop ways to lower emissions and develop effect, and increase the Earth’s effect, and increase the Earth’s temperature. The primary temperature. primary SCOPEThe 1: Direct emissions from sources SCOPE 1: Direct emissions from sources SCOPE 1: Direct emissions from sources sustainable practices. sustainable practices. sustainable practices. that the school owns and controls. Things that the school owns and controls. Things that the school owns and controls. Things gases calculated by ACUPCC gases calculated by ACUPCC such as onsite refrigeration and combustion such as onsite refrigeration and combustion such as onsite refrigeration and combustion standards are: standards are: fossil fuelsCLEAN CLEAN AIR-COOL AIR-COOL CLEAN AIR-COOL of onsite contribute to Scope 1. of onsite fossil fuels contribute to Scope 1. of onsite fossil fuels contribute to Scope 1. Analysis of the school’s energy costs, Analysis of the school’s energy costs, Analysis of the school’s energy costs, PLANET is an organization PLANET is an organization PLANET is an organization SCOPE 2: Indirect emissions from SCOPE 2: Indirect emissions from SCOPE 2: Indirect emissions from carbon dioxide....................CO dioxide....................CO designed to 2find and promotecarbon designed to find and promote designed to find and promote 2 to sources whose products are linked onsources whose products are linked to onsources whose products areusage, linked to on-and waste, have been completed usage, and by waste, have been completed usage, and by waste, have been completed by solutions to global warming. solutionsPurchased to global warming. solutions to global warming. campus energy consumption. campus energy consumption. Purchased campus energy consumption. Purchased sulfur hexafluoride...............SF sulfurenergy, hexafluoride...............SF such as natural gas, have electricity, and energy, such as natural electricity, and and students and staff members to determine students and staff members to determine students and staff members to determine They have developed the Campus They Theygas, have developed the Campus energy, such as natural gas, electricity, 6 6 developed the Campus Scope 2. to Scope 2. Carbon Calculator, which the BAC water contribute toCarbon Calculator, which the BAC water contributeCarbon Calculator, which the BAC water contribute to Scope 2. the best strategies to move forward the with best strategies a to move forward the best withstrategies a to move forward with a methane................................CH methane................................CH uses to define and track the uses to define and track the uses to define and track the 4 4 SCOPE 3: Other emissions that are SCOPE 3: Other emissions that are SCOPE 3: Other emissions that are to the Climate Action commitment Plan. to the Climate Action commitment Plan. to the Climate Action Plan. school’s GHG emissions in three attributable to sources school’s GHG emissions in three attributable to sources school’s who provide who GHG provide emissions in three attributable to sources who commitment provide nitrous oxide......................N O nitrous oxide......................N O 3 can services to the institution. Scope services to the institution. 3 can services to the institution. Scope 3 can different scopes: different differentScope scopes: 2 2 scopes: include emissions from study abroad flights, commuting to campus, and waste

Hydrofluorocarbons.........HFC

Hydrofluorocarbons.........HFC

Hydrofluorocarbons.........HFC management companies.

Perfluorocarbons................PFC

Perfluorocarbons................PFC

Perfluorocarbons................PFC

include emissions from study abroad flights, commuting to campus, and waste management companies.

include emissions from study abroad flights, commuting to campus, and waste management companies.

image courtesy Clean Air-Cool Planet

image courtesy Clean Air-Cool Planet

image courtesy Clean Air-Cool Planet

ENERGYefforts, STAR the BAC our current recycling efforts, the BAC our current recycling The BAC uses a system where all recyclable materials The BAC are taken uses a system where From all recyclable materials The BAC areuses taken a system where allFrom recyclable materials are taken APPLIANCES all of separated. the following resources in 2010: saved all of the RATED following by one collection entity, rather than being separated. by one Thiscollection system entity, rather saved than being by oneThis collection system entity, rather than being separated. This resources system in 2010: Trees Treesrecycle items, reduces the effort needed by the BAC to manuallyreduces recyclethe items, effort needed by the BAC 486 to manually reduces recycle theitems, effort needed by the BAC to486 manually ensures that all recyclable items will be used properly, ensures andthat reduces all recyclable items will be used properly, ensuresand thatreduces all recyclable items will be used properly, and reduces 11,148 gallons of oil 11,148 gallons of oil carbon emissions from having multiple trash collections. carbon emissions from having multiple trash collections. carbon emissions from having multiple trash collections. 114, 340 kilowatt hours

GREEN SEAL ENERGY STAR CLEANING PRODUCTS RATED APPLIANCES

image courtesy Energy Star 114, 340Green kilowatt hours image courtesy Seal

The BAC actively promotes the use of Energy Star rated appliances in all facilities. 200,075 gallons of water

2,403 cubic feet of incinerated waste....

image courtesy Energy Star image courtesy Green Seal

All BAC facilities use methods The BACand actively materials promotes the use of which do not use toxic Energy substances Star rated andappliances in all facilities. 200,075 gallons ofarewater not harmful to the environment when used. Green Seal certifies these products as greener and healthier.

2,403 cubic feet of incinerated waste....

...ABOUT THE SIZE OF A 13’ LIGHTING RETROFIT CUBE!

GREEN SEAL CLEANING PRODUCTS

11,148 gallons of oil

image courtesy Energy Star 114, 340 kilowatt hours

200,075 gallons of water

2,403 cubic feet of incinerated waste.... ...ABOUT THE SIZE OF A 13’ CUBE!

GREEN SEAL ENERGY STARthe BAC From our current recycling efforts, CLEANING RATED resources APPLIANCES saved all of thePRODUCTS following in 2010: 486 Trees

...ABOUT THE SIZE OF A 13’ HVAC SYSTEM MONITORING LIGHTING RETROFIT CUBE!

image courtesy Green Seal

All BAC facilities useThe methods BAC actively and materials promotes the use of which do not useEnergy toxic substances Star rated appliances and are in all facilities. not harmful to the environment when used. Green Seal certifies these products as greener and healthier.

HVAC SYSTEM MONITORING LIGHTING RETROFIT

All BAC facilities use methods and materials which do not use toxic substances and are not harmful to the environment when used. Green Seal certifies these products as greener and healthier.

HVAC SYSTEM MONITORING

As the BAC’s recycling program has taken effect, the As the amount BAC’s ofrecycling program has taken effect,Asthe theamount BAC’s of recycling program has taken effect, the amount of trash that the BAC does not recycle has been cuttrash by nearly that the 75% BAC does not recycle has been cut trash by that nearly the 75% BAC does not recycle has been cut by nearly 75% over the past four years. over the past four years. over the past four years. image courtesy Philips

image courtesy HVACinstaller.com

All new lighting applications will transition from flourescent T-12 bulbs to Super T-8 bulbs. Super T-8s reduce total kilowatt usage and save on total energy cost.

image courtesy Philips

image courtesy HVACinstaller.comimage courtesy Philips

The BAC Facilities All Department new lighting regularly applications will transition monitors HVAC performance from flourescent in all BAC T-12 bulbs to Super T-8 buildings and implements bulbs. more Superefficient T-8s reduce total kilowatt systems, reducing the usage BAC’s andcarbon save on total energy cost. footprint.

image courtesy HVACinstaller.com

The BAC Facilities All Department new lighting applications regularly will transition monitors HVAC from performance flourescent in allT-12 BAC bulbs to Super T-8 buildings and implements bulbs. Super moreT-8s efficient reduce total kilowatt systems, reducingusage the BAC’s and save carbon on total energy cost. footprint.

The BAC Facilities Department regularly monitors HVAC performance in all BAC buildings and implements more efficient systems, reducing the BAC’s carbon footprint.

by making an officialby commitment making an official to becoming bycommitment making carbon-balanced an official to becoming commitment carbon-balanced to becoming carbon-balanced to know what stepsto theknow BACwhat needs steps to to take the know to BAC limit what needs itssteps emissions to take the BAC to limit needs its emissions to take to limitplanning its emissions several projects planning which several will lower projects planning ourwhich emissions several will projects lower our which emissions will lower our emissions  

 

 

 

 

 

GEOTHERMAL WELL

  As the BAC has grown, the school’s totalBAC has grown, the school’s As the BAC has grown, the school’s total As the total energy consumption  has steadily energy increased. consumption has steadily increased. consumption has steadilyenergy increased.   In 2010 alone, the BAC emitted about 2,500 20102,500 alone, the BAC emitted about 2,500 In 2010 alone, the BAC emittedInabout metric tonnes of eCO2. metric tonnes of eCO2. metric tonnes of eCO2.

18. February 2011 

18. February 2011 

18. February 2011 

To the BAC Community: 

To the BAC Community: 

To the BAC Community: 

(mid - late 2011)

GEOTHERMAL WELL (mid - late 2011)

GREEN ALLEY GEOTHERMAL WELL 2011/early 2012) (mid(late - late 2011)

GREEN ALLEY

GREEN ALLEY

(late 2011/early 2012)

(late 2011/early 2012)

The BAC’s largest emissions cameThe from BAC’s largest emissions came Thefrom BAC’s largest emissions came from approximately electricity usage, totalling approximately 1.8 million kilowatt hours, or enough 1.8 million millionto kilowatt hours, or enough to tokilowatt hours, or 1.8 enough

In 2009, on behalf of the Boston Architectural College (BAC), I signed the American College and  In 2009, on behalf of the Boston Architectural College (BAC), I signed the American College and  In 2009, on behalf of the Boston Architectural College (BAC), I signed the American College and 

University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). This commitment requires the BAC to report its  University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). This commitment requires the BAC to report its  University Presidents’ Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). This commitment requires the BAC to report its  ACUPCC is an effort made by educational institutions ACUPCC with is thean effort made by educational institutions ACUPCC withis the an effort made by educational institutions with the electricity usage, totalling approximately electricity usage, totalling total greenhouse gas emissions from campus‐wide activities and to later determine when a carbon‐ total greenhouse gas emissions from campus‐wide activities and to later determine when a carbon‐ total greenhouse gas emissions from campus‐wide activities and to later determine when a carbon‐ ultimate goal of becoming a carbon-balanced campus. ultimate goal of becoming a carbon-balanced campus. ultimate goal of becoming a carbon-balanced campus. balanced campus will be achieved. The route to achieve that goal involves developing a Climate Action  balanced campus will be achieved. The route to achieve that goal involves developing a Climate Action  balanced campus will be achieved. The route to achieve that goal involves developing a Climate Action  Plan (CAP) by September 2011. The CAP will assess the school’s current energy loads and lay out  Plan (CAP) by September 2011. The CAP will assess the school’s current energy loads and lay out  Plan (CAP) by September 2011. The CAP will assess the school’s current energy loads and lay out  [1] strategies to reduce and offset emissions until the goal of carbon balance is reached. Work on the CAP  strategies to reduce and offset emissions until the goal of carbon balance is reached. Work on the CAP  strategies to reduce and offset emissions until the goal of carbon balance is reached. Work on the CAP  has begun under the auspices of the Sustainable Campus Initiative and the Sustainability Council.  has begun under the auspices of the Sustainable Campus Initiative and the Sustainability Council.  has begun under the auspices of the Sustainable Campus Initiative and the Sustainability Council. 

In 2009, President Ted Landsmark Insigned 2009, President Ted Landsmark In 2009, signed President Ted Landsmark signed power 200 homes for one power year! 200 this commitment on behalf of the this BAC, commitment on behalf of the thisBAC, commitment on behalf of the BAC, making the BAC one of 676 schools making the BAC one of 676 schools makingSustainability is the capacity to endure. With the BAC’s sustainability initiatives, we are seeking to  the BAC one of 676 schools Sustainability is the capacity to endure. With the BAC’s sustainability initiatives, we are seeking to  Sustainability is the capacity to endure. With the BAC’s sustainability initiatives, we are seeking to  sustain today’s resources in order to meet the needs of the future. We already have many projects  sustain today’s resources in order to meet the needs of the future. We already have many projects  nationwide to commit to this pledge. nationwide to commit to this pledge. nationwide to commit to this pledge. sustain today’s resources in order to meet the needs of the future. We already have many projects  [1] - “Electrical Energy,”The New Book of Popular Science, 2000 edition, Groller Incorporated, 1998.

ACUPCC institutions are required to:

ACUPCC institutions are required to:

homes for onepower year![1]200 homes for one year![1]

[1] - “Electrical Energy,”The New Book of Popular Science, 2000 edition, Groller Incorporated, 1998. [1] - “Electrical Energy,”The New Book of Popular Science, 2000 edition, Groller Incorporated, 1998.

underway that will reduce our emissions and improve the sustainability of our operations. A geothermal  underway that will reduce our emissions and improve the sustainability of our operations. A geothermal  underway that will reduce our emissions and improve the sustainability of our operations. A geothermal  well will be installed to help us eliminate the use of natural gas from all owned properties. The Green  well will be installed to help us eliminate the use of natural gas from all owned properties. The Green  well will be installed to help us eliminate the use of natural gas from all owned properties. The Green  Roof and Green Alley project will help replenish the receding Back Bay water table and reduce energy  Roof and Green Alley project will help replenish the receding Back Bay water table and reduce energy  Roof and Green Alley project will help replenish the receding Back Bay water table and reduce energy  loads at 320 Newbury. Currently, for every kilowatt hour purchased, the BAC purchases 20% from  loads at 320 Newbury. Currently, for every kilowatt hour purchased, the BAC purchases 20% from  loads at 320 Newbury. Currently, for every kilowatt hour purchased, the BAC purchases 20% from  renewable energy, a number that could rise to 100% in the future.   Single Stream recycling is already in  renewable energy, a number that could rise to 100% in the future.   Single Stream recycling is already in  renewable energy, a number that could rise to 100% in the future.   Single Stream recycling is already in  place, and the BAC has significantly reduced the amount of waste sent to Mass‐Burn facilities.   place, and the BAC has significantly reduced the amount of waste sent to Mass‐Burn facilities.   place, and the BAC has significantly reduced the amount of waste sent to Mass‐Burn facilities.   ACUPCC institutions are required to: As the BAC continues to grow, it will be critical to incorporate sustainable growth into the College’s  As the BAC continues to grow, it will be critical to incorporate sustainable growth into the College’s  As the BAC continues to grow, it will be critical to incorporate sustainable growth into the College’s 

complete a Greenhouse Gas emissions inventory.............DONE complete a Greenhouse Gas emissions inventory.............DONE complete a Greenhouse Gas emissions inventory.............DONE development. Investment strategies for additional sustainability initiatives will ensure that our energy  development. Investment strategies for additional sustainability initiatives will ensure that our energy  development. Investment strategies for additional sustainability initiatives will ensure that our energy  loads are reduced and that remaining energy needs come from clean and renewable sources.   loads are reduced and that remaining energy needs come from clean and renewable sources.   loads are reduced and that remaining energy needs come from clean and renewable sources.   integrate sustainability into their curriculum......INintegrate PROGRESS sustainability into their curriculum......IN integrate PROGRESS sustainability into their curriculum......IN PROGRESS

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

The BAC is one of many colleges in the area to sign the ACUPCC and we intend to be a college that leads  The BAC is one of many colleges in the area to sign the ACUPCC and we intend to be a college that leads  The BAC is one of many colleges in the area to sign the ACUPCC and we intend to be a college that leads 

create a Climate Action Plan..................................INcreate PROGRESS a Climate Action Plan..................................IN create PROGRESS a Climate Action Plan..................................IN PROGRESS the way toward clean energy and sustainable solutions. Our goal is to inspire the greater Boston area  the way toward clean energy and sustainable solutions. Our goal is to inspire the greater Boston area  the way toward clean energy and sustainable solutions. Our goal is to inspire the greater Boston area  towards environmentally‐friendly living. 

towards environmentally‐friendly living. 

take immediate steps to reduce GHG emissions.....ONGOING take immediate steps to reduce GHG emissions.....ONGOING take immediate steps to reduce GHG emissions.....ONGOING

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

Please contact members of the BAC staff: Ellen Yee, Art Byers or Lance Fletcher to share your ideas.   Please contact members of the BAC staff: Ellen Yee, Art Byers or Lance Fletcher to share your ideas.   Please contact members of the BAC staff: Ellen Yee, Art Byers or Lance Fletcher to share your ideas.  

publish the progress throughout the campus community..... publish the progress throughout the campus community..... publish the progress throughout the campus community..... As elements of the plan are implemented, we will rely on your help to make them a success.  As elements of the plan are implemented, we will rely on your help to make them a success.  As elements of the plan are implemented, we will rely on your help to make them a success.  ONGOING ONGOING ONGOING Sincerely,  

Sincerely,  

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

The green alley will use permeable asphalt for better The drainage green alley will use permeable asphalt for better The green drainage alley will use permeable asphalt for better drainage The geothermal well will pump water from deep underground The geothermal to well will pump water from deepThe underground geothermal towell willinto pump from deepInunderground tohelp and less runoff thewater Charles River. turn, thisand willless runoff into the Charles River. In turn, this andwill lesshelp runoff into the Charles River. In turn, this will help the connected buildings. The system will providethe heating connected in the buildings. The system will provide theheating connected in thebuildings. The system willbelow provide in the replenish the groundwater level theheating Back Bay, replenish which the groundwater level below the Backreplenish Bay, which the groundwater level below the Back Bay, which winter and cooling during the summer. The water winter is recycled and cooling year- during the summer. The water winter is recycled and cooling yearduring summer. Thestructures water is recycled year-theby.wood pilings that the structures are supports the woodthe pilings that the are supports supported supports supported the by. wood pilings that the structures are supported by. round, thus reducing its total water usage. Geothermal round,technology thus reducing its total water usage. Geothermal round, thus technology reducing its total water Geothermal Without maintaining these usage. groundwater levels, technology theWithout pilings will maintaining these groundwater levels, the Without pilingsmaintaining will these groundwater levels, the pilings will is much more efficient than conventional HVAC systems is muchthat more our efficient than conventional HVACissystems much begin more that our efficient than conventional HVAC systems that our to rot and weaken the entire structure of the begin Back toBay. rot and weaken the entire structure ofbegin the Back to rot Bay.and weaken the entire structure of the Back Bay. current buildings rely on. Installing this system cancurrent potentially buildings rely on. Installing this system can current potentially buildings rely on. Installing this system can potentially The green alley project will not only beautify the campus, The green butalley project will not only beautify theThe campus, greenbut alley project will not only beautify the campus, but cut the BAC’s natural gas usage by 95%. cut the BAC’s natural gas usage by 95%. cuthelp the support BAC’s natural gasBack usage bycommunity, 95%. will the entire Bay will as well. help support the entire Back Bay community, will ashelp well.support the entire Back Bay community, as well.

towards environmentally‐friendly living. 

Each member of the BAC community will have a role in helping the College toward sustainable thinking  Each member of the BAC community will have a role in helping the College toward sustainable thinking  Each member of the BAC community will have a role in helping the College toward sustainable thinking 

set a target date to become carbon-balanced...INset PROGRESS a target date to become carbon-balanced...IN setPROGRESS a target date to become carbon-balanced...IN PROGRESS and practice.  As the CAP is developed, your suggestions for how we might reach our goals are welcome.   and practice.  As the CAP is developed, your suggestions for how we might reach our goals are welcome.   and practice.  As the CAP is developed, your suggestions for how we might reach our goals are welcome.  

Sincerely,  

The BAC’s second largest emitter comes The BAC’s from second largest emitter comes The BAC’s from second largest emitter comes from student commuting. student commuting. student commuting.  

 

 

According to the 2009 BAC Sustainability According Survey, to the 2009 BAC Sustainability According Survey, to the 2009 BAC Sustainability Survey, The BAC Climate Action Plan isThe due BAC for Climate Action Plan is The dueBAC for Climate Action Plan is due for Theodore C. Landsmark M.Env.D., J.D., D.F.A.(Hon.), Ph.D.  Theodore C. Landsmark M.Env.D., J.D., D.F.A.(Hon.), Ph.D.  Theodore C. Landsmark M.Env.D., J.D., D.F.A.(Hon.), Ph.D.  about 32% of the student body drivesabout to school. 32% of the student body drives about to school. 32% of the student body drives to school. submission on September 15, 2011submission on September 15, 2011 submission on September 15, 2011 President, Boston Architectural College  President, Boston Architectural College  President, Boston Architectural College 

Unfortunately, that 32% of theUnfortunately, student that 32% of the Unfortunately, student that 32% of the student body accounts for nearly 90% of body theaccounts for nearly 90%body of the accounts for nearly 90% of the entire student commuting emissions! entire student commuting emissions! entire student commuting emissions!

and by knowing howand weby asknowing humans affect how andwe our byasknowing environment humanshow affectwe our as environment humans affect our environment

In 2009, students driving to school accounted In 2009, students for driving to school accounted In 2009, students for driving to school accounted for 6,525 MMBTUs, enough to supply about 6,525 MMBTUs, 56 enough to supply6,525 about MMBTUs, 56 enough to supply about 56 single-family homes with an entire single-family year’s homes with an entire single-family year’s homes with an entire year’s worth of energy![2] worth of energy![2] worth of energy![2]

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

image courtesy Halvorson Design Partnership

If more students can use public transportaion If more students can use public transportaion If more students can use public transportaion

greenhouse effect: the process that greenhouse occurs when effect: solar radiation the process hitsgreenhouse that the occurs earth, reflects when effect: solar back the radiation into processhits thattheoccurs earth,when reflects solar back radiation hits the earth, reflects backorinto whenever possible, or into use non-emitting whenever methods possible, use non-emitting whenever methods possible, or use non-emitting methods the atmosphere, then is trapped by the greenhouse atmosphere, gases. then Theis trapping trapped of bythe that greenhouse atmosphere, radiationgases. warms thenThe isthe trapped trappingbyofgreenhouse thatofradiation gases. warms The(i.e. the trapping that radiation warms the transportation walking,ofbiking) of wetransportation can easily (i.e. walking, biking) ofwe transportation can easily (i.e. walking, biking) we can easily planet’s surface and alters natural weather planet’s patterns. surface and alters natural planet’s weathersurface patterns. and alters natural weather patterns. reduce our carbon footprint. reduce our carbon footprint. reduce our carbon footprint. [2] - U.S. Energy Information Administration (2008), 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Table US-3, [2] - Total U.S. Energy Consumption Information by Fuels Administration Used, (2008), 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Table [2]US-3, - U.S.Total Energy Consumption Informationby Administration Fuels Used, (2008), 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey. Table US-3, Total Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005. 2005. 2005.

image courtesy News 10 Sacramento

image courtesy News 10 Sacramento

image courtesy News 10 Sacramento

community letting the know BAChow and community letting it can continue theknow BAChow to community doit its canpart continue know how to do it can its part continue to do its part and to plan for a future and of to sustainable plan for a future operations and to of plan sustainable atfor thea future BAC operations of sustainable at the BAC operations atand theletting BAC the BACand

HUMAN ACTIVITIES have a major role in theHUMAN earth’s climate ACTIVITIES have a major role in the HUMAN earth’s climate ACTIVITIES have a major role in the earth’s climate change. Activities such as the burning of fossil fuels change. and the Activities such as the burning of fossil fuels change. and Activities the such as the burning of fossil fuels and the waste of industrial materials all release greenhouse waste gasesofinto industrial the materials all release greenhouse waste gases of industrial into the materials all release greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Everyday things that people do, like using atmosphere. electricity, Everyday things that people do, likeatmosphere. using electricity, Everyday things that people do, like using electricity, driving cars, and dumping trash are having a large driving impact cars, as well. and dumping trash are having a large driving impactcars, as well. and dumping trash are having a large impact as well.

PUT RECYCLABLE ITEMS IN ITEMS IN TAKEPUT THERECYCLABLE STAIRS INSTEAD IF THE BAC CONTINUES TO GROW IF THEAT BAC CONTINUES TO GROW IF THE BAC AT CONTINUES TO GROW AT ON THE OTHER HAND, WITH A THE OTHER ON THE OTHER HAND, WITH A HAND, WITH DESIGNATED BINSON DESIGNATED BINSA OF THE ELEVATOR THE SAME RATE AS THE PAST 10 THE YEARS, SAME RATE AS THE PASTTHE 10 YEARS, SAME RATE AS THE PASTCLIMATE 10 YEARS,ACTION PLAN IN PLACE, CLIMATE THEACTION PLAN IN PLACE, THE THE ACTION PLAN IN PLACE, CLIMATE THE SCHOOL WILL DOUBLETHE ITS SCHOOL WILL DOUBLETHE ITSSCHOOL WILL DOUBLE ITS BAC BAC WILL BE WELL ON ITS WAY TOWILL BE WELL ON ITS WAY BACTO WILL BE WELL ON ITS WAY TO CARBON THAN EMISSIONS IN LESS CARBON THANEMISSIONS IN LESS THANA CARBON-BALANCED Human activities have become highly unsustainableHuman since activities have become highly unsustainable Human sinceactivities have become highly unsustainable sinceCARBON EMISSIONS IN LESS BECOMING A CARBON-BALANCED BECOMING BECOMING A CARBON-BALANCED the Industrial Revolution, and because of those actions, the Industrial the Revolution, and because of those actions, the Industrial the Revolution, and because of those actions, the 30 YEARS. 30 YEARS. 30 YEARS. INSTITUTION. INSTITUTION. INSTITUTION. consequences are being felt by the earth. Large-scale consequences natural are being felt by the earth. Large-scale consequences natural are being felt by the earth. Large-scale natural image courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

image courtesy Ralph Lee Hopkins, Lindblad Expeditions

image courtesy Reuters image courtesy National Oceanicthe and Atmospheric Association disasters, the melting of worldwide ice shelves, and disasters, changing melting of worldwide ice shelves, and disasters, changing the melting of worldwide ice shelves, and changing weather patterns can all be attributed to increased weather global warming patterns can all be attributed to increased weather globalpatterns warmingcan all be attributed to increased global warming and climate change. and climate change. and climate change.

image courtesy National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

It is very important that institutions nationwide take It isavery leadimportant role in that institutions nationwideIttake is very a lead important role in that institutions nationwide take a lead role in educating the public and providing real solutions to educating mitigatethe climate public and providing real solutionseducating to mitigate theclimate public and providing real solutions to mitigate climate change. It is also important that the BAC, as a design change. institution, It is also important that the BAC, as a design change.institution, It is also important that the BAC, as a design institution, lead the way in sustainability in the built environment. lead the Through way in sustainability in the built environment. lead theThrough way in sustainability in the built environment. Through efforts like the Sustainable Campus Initiative, the BAC efforts is like taking thea Sustainable Campus Initiative, theefforts BAC is like taking the Sustainable a Campus Initiative, the BAC is taking a very active role in becoming a regional and national very leader active in role the in becoming a regional and national very leader active in role thein becoming a regional and national leader in the effort to limit climate change. effort to limit climate change. effort to limit climate change. image courtesy Ralph Lee Hopkins, Lindblad Expeditions image courtesy Ralph Lee Hopkins, Lindblad Expeditions image courtesy Save Environ Group

image courtesy Reuters

image courtesy Save Environ Group

image courtesy Reuters

The phases of the Climate Action Plan include projection data from the emissions of the buildings that the BAC currently owns and/or occupies. This data is shown by the darker shaded area. The lighter shaded area includes projections coming from potential campus expansion into other buildings and future buildings.

The phases of the Climate Action Plan include projection data from the emissions of the buildings that the BAC currently owns and/or occupies. This data It reduces is shown by the darker shaded our trash output and increases area. The lighter shaded area our recycling efforts includes projections coming from potential campus expansion into other buildings and future buildings.

output and Not onlyIt isreduces it goodour for trash your health, our recycling but itincreases saves electricity usage. efforts

TURN OFF COMPUTER PRINT DOUBLE-SIDED MONITORS WHEN NOT IN USE WHENEVER POSSIBLE

PRINT DOUBLE-SIDED WHENEVER POSSIBLE

It reduces our trash trees, reduces It savesNot valuable only isenergy it good and for limits youroutput health,and saves Not valuable onlythat is itenergy and for your limitshealth,It saves It saves valuable energy and limits LimitingItthe power isgood consumed Limiting theand power that is consumed increases our recycling effortskeeps costswasted trash buildup wasted but heating it saves output. electricity usage. but itand heating saves electricity output. wasted heating output.the down benefits the usage. unnecessary keeps costs down and benefits environment environment

ItLimiting saves trees, and reduces the power that is consumed unnecessary buildup keeps coststrash down and benefits the

It saves trees, and reduces unnecessary trash buildup

environment

image courtesy Save Environ Group

Climate change isClimate very real change and itClimate isisvery up to real change usand as ais itcommunity is very up real to usand to as limit it a community is up to us as toalimit community to limit its effects on ouritsenvironment effects on our now itsenvironment effects and foronthe our now future. environment and for thenow future. and for the future.

In addition to developing the data for the Climate Action Plan, the team was also charged with publicizing the plan to the general BAC community. School-wide blog posts, posterboards, and regular presentations were held to accomplish this task.

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The phases of the Climate Action Plan include projection data from the emissions of the buildings that the BAC currently owns and/or occupies. This data is shown by the darker shaded area. The lighter shaded area includes projections coming from potential campus expansion into other buildings and future buildings.

TURN LIGHTS OFF ININSTEAD OFF COMPUTER LIGHTS OFF IN TURN OFFLIGHTS COMPUTER OFF IN PUT RECYCLABLE ITEMS INTURNTURN DOUBLE-SIDED TAKE THE STAIRS TAKE THE STAIRS INSTEADPRINTTURN UNUSED ROOMS UNUSED NOT ROOMS IN USE MONITORS UNUSED WHEN NOT ROOMS IN USE DESIGNATED BINS MONITORS WHEN WHENEVER POSSIBLE OF THE ELEVATOR OF THE ELEVATOR

Thank you for continuing Thank youtofor play continuing Thank a role you in helping tofor play continuing atorole make in to helping theplay BAC atorole a make in helping the BAC to amake the BAC a GREEN campus.GREEN campus. GREEN campus.

Above are presentation boards that were on display during Earth Week 2011. I created the format and layout for the display using InDesign and Photoshop. These boards were on display in the 320 Newbury Street lobby during BAC Earth Week festivities. The original size of the display was 90” x 66”


Conclusion

Projected start date: 2013 Projected total cost: $1,264,760

Building Envelope Thermal Properties Wall assembly R value: R-8 Roof R Value: R-15 Single pane glazing assembly U value: 1.04 Btu/h.ft2.F Single pane glazing assembly shading coefficient (SC): 1.0 Double pane glazing assembly U value : 0.6 Btu/h.ft2.F Double pane glazing assembly shading coefficient (SC): 0.88 Building 322 Sky light assembly U valve: 0.6 Btu/h.ft2.F

Image courtesy of Clean Air- Cool Planet

Building 322 Sky light assembly shading coefficient (SC): 0.88

 Phase 1: GREEN PROJECTS  Phase 2: PASSIVE STRATEGIES  Phase 3: OFFSETS

$5-10 Sustainability Fee per student

CFL lighting

vs.

 Introducing BAC sustainability initiatives to new students  installing signage on campus to promote sustainable decision making (i.e. trash/recycling bins, “did you know” facts, “don’t forget to…” reminders)  Having on-campus sustainability events (lectures, workshops, films, etc.)

With approx. 2,000 students, the fee will generate $10,000-20,000 to go directly to student-needed sustainability efforts The fee can be used to fund:  monthly T passes  additional bike racks  Community Supported Agriculture monthly dinners  accessibility to the green roof  student recycling rewards program

Outreach opportunities

LED lighting

Pros:

Cons:

$20 saving per bulb more widely available varying light colors

contains mercury wait time to reach full brightness

lasts 10x longer than CFL bulbs run cooler very high energy efficiency

very high initial cost light quality concerns not widely available

Overall, I feel that this experience was extremely beneficial to my career. I was able to develop my ability to communicate with key institutional officials and lay out plans that will be implemented for the school’s future.

Performance contracting?

Purchasing 100% renewable energy

Purchasing TerraPass offsets for remaining emissions

Either from Nstar or a local energy supplier

Having this experience was a key factor in my decision to pursue urban planning as a career path in the design field. I enjoyed analyzing data, developing plans for projects, and interacting with officials at the institutional level, and it only whet my appetite to have the same interactions at a city or state level.

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SUSTAINABLE DESIGN COURSES DESCRIPTION: Elective coursework taken in pursuit of the Bachelor of Design Studies degree through the Fall 2010 semester. COURSES: Sustainable Design as a Way of Thinking Green Practice: Energy & Air Quality Environmental Systems I: HVAC

Sustainable Design as a Way of Thinking Carbon footprint in America What I have come to find as I’ve studied the concepts from this class is that every piece of my environment has an effect on my personal footprint. We are linked to so many resources directly and indirectly. I was confused initially that just because I live in America, that automatically means I take on a greater personal share of the Earth’s carbon footprint than if I lived my same lifestyle in Italy. I learned that this is because of the extensive patterning of infrastructure that exists in America that it takes to support me. I wouldn’t be able to make the same footprint in Italy as I do here because the systems are different, the patterns are different, and the environment around me is different. A footprint is actually measuring you and your system’s impact on your environment. The systems that you operate within have as much of an effect on the environment as you do yourself.

DURATION: Fall 2010 semester SKILLS USED: Microsoft Excel to develop data spreadsheets AutoCAD drafting for building measurements Adobe Creative Suite to produce visual presentation of climate data SKILLS GAINED: Effective visual communication of complex, multi-level energy data Energy modeling for sustainable design Coordination with institution heads to plan future beneficial projects

Future energy demand & efficiency Fundamentally altering our methods of demand for energy is the only way The diagram below illustrates the discrete parts that make up the electricity-generating features wetowers. will beThe able to provide of the dam. The river flows up to the dam and enters through several intake water flows for reach a sustainable down the towers through passageways, called penstocks, where the flow can the power- future. Conserving resources generating turbines. The towers enable the water to flow at a maximum speed of 85mph, providingand the limiting our energy use energy for the water to hit the 17 turbines as fast as possible to produce the most energy. As the wil help project a healthy massive flow of the river hits the turbines, they spin and rotate a series of magnets past copper coils, future for our world.

which produces the actual electricity. Yearly, on average, the Hoover Dam system produces 4.2 billion kilowatt hours of power. That power is then split up and distributed among 15 different energy municipalities. The largest portion of the power (28.5%) of the generated power goes to the Metropolitan Water District of Southern California.

Hydroelectric power process

This course very depends informative helping me to The amount of powerwas generated on thein speed of the river flowlearn as it hits the turbines. the principles of why we need to design sustainably. The faster the flow hits the turbine, the faster the generator moves, producing more Ielectric current was The ablehighest to learn about construction building across the system. amount of power produced byefficiency, the system was recorded in 1984, when quality, environmental processes from a holistic the system produced 10.3and billion kilowatt hours. Weather patterns and seismic activity have been main approach. Thisorcourse meRiver gain a through very good factors that determine how much how fast helped the Colorado flows the dam and generators.

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approach to sustainable design in general.

Each component on its own (the dam, and the power plant) would not work nearly as well without each other. Without the dam, the power plant would be highly susceptible to flooding and overflows, eventually shutting down the system. Because the dam is in place, the system can harness


Green Practice

Environmental Systems: HVAC

Sunpath Diagramming

Factors that determine mechanical equipment

Building Type Air Flow Rate Cooling Capacity Heating Capacity __________________________________________________________________

Plotting the path of the sun allows the designer to plan how shadows from other structures affect the building

Office

1.1 CFM/ft2

300 ft2/ton

40 BTU/hr/ft2

Lab/Hospital

1.8 CFM/ft2

175 ft2/ton

60 BTU/hr/ft2

Computer Room 15 CFM/ft2

50 ft2/ton 0

Vapor-compression cycle Thermal Expansion Valve

Evaporator

Condenser

Modes of Heat Transfer Conduction requires contact between two or more surfaces (either solid or fluid). Convection requires fluid contact. Radiation needs neither, butinvolves the transfer of energy thorugh electromagnetic waves. Fundamental heat Transfer: Q = U x (specific heat) (overall heat transfer coefficient)

A x temperature difference (surface area)

Psychrometrics - human comfort in the built environment The properties of air that are manipulated by air conditioning equipment are temperature, moisture content and enthalpy or heat content. These three properties are interrelated, so that any two completely define the state point or condition of the air.

In Green Practice I gained a sense of what makes us comfortable in the built environment. I was able to learn a great deal about heating, cooling, and heat transfer, and how they relate to siting a building within the environment. I was able to get a good approach to designing buildings so that we are comfortable.

Compressor

Direct expansion refrigeration vs. chilled water system A direct expansuon system uses the evaporator to directly cool a space, whereas a chilled water system transports water from the evaporator to a separate refrigeration system and back again to cool a space. One might use a chilled system over a direct expansion system because a chilled system only needs 1� pipe to transport energy, while a direct expansion system needs 18 square inches of ducts to transport the same amount of energy

In the Environmental Systerms course, I was able to learn a great deal about the mechanical specifics that make up the heating and cooling components of buildings. I gained a sense of heat transfer specifics, boilers, chillers, and the energy it takes to provide comfort for our buildings. I also learned ways of collaborating with engineers to accomplish our building comfort goals.

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74

PRACTICE


Wilson Architects

Division of Capital Asset Management (DCAM)

15 67

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WILSON ARCHITECTS LOCATION: 374 Congress Street - Boston, MA POSITION: Office Administrator

CLIENT: SCOPE: TEAM: SIZE: ROLE:

UMass Lowell Wannalancit Mills Conference Center Renovation of egress stairs, initial stakeholder meeting 3 designers Less than 1000 SF Develop site plan for stakeholder orientation at initial meeting

DUTIES: Manage, edit and check CAD files for design projects Update project presentation display packets Assist designers with preliminary project studies FIRM SIZE: Approx. 40 people DURATION: 2 weeks - July 2011 - August 2011

image courtesy Google SketchUp

The position was a temporary job to fill the role until the firm was able to secure a permanent Office Administrator. I was hired in this position because of my amount of prior office experience, and my ability to assist designers because of my background as a design student. SKILLS USED: AutoCAD drafting for building measurements Adobe Creative Suite to produce visual presentation of data Microsoft Office for document editing and management SKILLS GAINED: Effective time management under real-world deadlines Understanding of the workings of an architectural firm Collaboration with professional designers

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The Wannalancit Mills project was in preliminary study phase and stakeholders were to being met with to determine the full scope of renovation for this project. My task was to create a rendered site plan to orient the viewers of the presentation and give an accurate representation of what was proposed on site.


CLIENT: SCOPE: TEAM: SIZE: ROLE:

UMass Lowell Department of Chemistry initial study for fit-up renovation of new chemistry lab 4 designers 15,000 SF Develop study of building components; prepare CAD drawings of existing site elevations

For this project, I took on a role to develop initial study elements for wall renovations to an existing building. I was tasked with researching building envelope types, and accurate fit-out measurements, which were to be developed for future consideration. I also produced base drawings for the existing elevations.

Although my time at Wilson was short, I gained a good feel for daily life in an architecture firm. Information sharing, timely decisions and the ability to wear many hats all go into making a design firm successful. I was able to use my skills to fit in with the team and provide needed resources to advance the projects on hand. This experience helped me to see where I could potentially fit in the field as my career advances.

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DIVISION OF CAPITAL ASSET MANAGEMENT (DCAM) J. MICHAEL RUANE JUDICIAL CENTER & SALEM TRIAL COURTS

LOCATION: One Ashburton Place - Boston, MA

PROJECT # TRC9910-DC1

®

LEED SILVER CERTIFICATION

POSITION: Intern - Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Buildings Group

This project consolidates five court departments into two adjacent buildings, offering opportunities for shared resources and building efficiencies. The new building will house the Superior Court, District Court, Juvenile Court, Housing Court, and Probate & Family Court.

DUTIES: Research state-owned facilities for energy project feasibility Prepare presentation material relating to LEED projects and completed energy projects Participate in weekly design and project planning meetings FIRM SIZE: Approx. 100 people DURATION: September 2011 - current SKILLS USED: Microsoft Office to develop and present project data Database management to accurately update project information Understanding of sustainable means and methods to contribute to project discussions SKILLS GAINED: Knowledge of large-scale project development and collaboration Understanding of applicable sustainable strategies Interacting with planners, architects, and engineers to complete design tasks

VITAL STATISTICS LOCATION:

56 Federal Street Salem, MA

PROJECT SIZE:

194,000 S.F.

ARCHITECT:

Goody Clancy & Associates

DCAM MANAGER:

William Rafuse

CONTRACTOR:

Daniel O’Connell Sons

SCOPE OF WORK:

renovation & new construction

PROJECT COST:

$93.8 million

COMPLETION DATE:

October 2011

A total of 11 new courtrooms will provide fully-accessible judicial facilities that meet current national court standards. As part of the project, the historic First Baptist Church was relocated and will be renovated to serve as a new Law Library. In addition to the building upgrades, the traffic patterns along North & Bridge Streets were reconfigured to accommodate the increased vehicular and pedestrian flow.

SUSTAINABLE FEATURES 

Adaptive reuse of existing Baptist Church

Variable volume hot water piping

Optimized lighting controls

Upgraded central chillers

DCAM took great strides to preserve the historical character of the courts, as well. DCAM signed an MOA (Memorandum of Agreement) with the Massachusetts Historical Commission in 2008, and created a Citizens Steering Committee to keep the Salem community informed on the project’s progress.

The Salem Trial Court exists within two historical districts and houses a remarkable collection of early 20th century civic architecture.

Division of Capital Asset Management One Ashburton Place - Boston, MA 02108 - (617) 727-4030 www.mass.gov/dcam

© 2011 Commonwealth of Massachusetts

During my time at DCAM, I have been able to gather information on several state projects that are gaining LEED certification. I have learned a great deal about the way the state owns and maintains these projects, and different approaches to energy conservation.

78


Project information sheets MASSACHUSETTS FIREFIGHTING ACADEMY PHASE II EXPANSION

GREENFIELD COMMUNITY COLLEGE CAMPUS CORE MODERNIZATION

PROJECT # DFS991-DC1

PROJECT # GCC0601-DC1

®

LEED GOLD CERTIFICATION

®

LEED GOLD CERTIFICATION

Phase II of the renovation project culminates a three-year expansion and renovation of the existing facility to house the 175-person Department of Fire Services (DFS). The expansion included construction of a new administration building, training facility, as well as renovation of the existing academic building.

This project is the culmination of a complete, multi-phase renovation and addition to the Core Section of the Main Building at Greenfield Community College. The renovated core includes an enrollment center, multicultural center, and administrative spaces. The 16,000 SF addition includes a cafeteria, expanded library commons, and a new accessible entry for the college. The new campus core is intended to serve as a gathering place for the commuter students.

VITAL STATISTICS LOCATION:

Once College Drive Greenfield, MA

PROJECT SIZE:

80,000 S.F. renovation, plus 16,000 S.F. addition

ARCHITECT:

Gensler

CONST. MANAGER:

Barr & Barr, Inc.

CONTRACTOR:

Daniel O’Connell Sons

DCAM MANAGER:

Steve O’Connor

SCOPE OF WORK:

renovation & new construction

PROJECT COST:

$31 million

COMPLETION DATE:

March 2011

As part of the renovation, a new landscape will create a series of terraces and a plaza adjacent to the new campus quad, which will include low maintenance native plants.

SUSTAINABLE FEATURES 

Installation of a geothermal system to supplement the existing campus system

Implementation of a fully accessible entry with a central elevator to connect all floors

Efficient shading to increase natural light while decreasing heat gain

Replaced electric heating system with more efficient hydronic system.

“The new building is built for the long term,” Greenfield Community College President Robert Pura states, “It is designed to positively impact our natural environment with sustainability and energy conservation and self-generation being a key expression of the college's values.”

77,000 SF of Phase II is new construction, while 38,000 SF of the project is renovations. In Phase I, a storage building, new parking lot and septic tanks were completed, which are currently in use by DFS.

SUSTAINABLE FEATURES VITAL STATISTICS LOCATION:

1 State Road Stow, MA

PROJECT SIZE:

115,000 S.F.

ARCHITECT:

DiMella Shaffer Associates

DCAM MANAGER:

Ronald Ferrara

ENGINEER:

RDK Engineers

CONTRACTOR:

Consigli Construction Co.

SCOPE OF WORK:

renovation & expansion of existing facility

PROJECT COST:

$43.5 million

COMPLETION DATE:

November 2010

7% of building’s energy use derived from solar energy (PV panels)

Water treatment system that captures and recycles up to 75% of water used for training

Overall energy reduction of 28% below existing building

The completed facility will be one of the most state-of-theart firefighting training facilities in the country. The new complex will accommodate training and maintenance needs, as well as provide much needed assembly space for graduations and conferences. In addition to being one of the more advanced facilities, the new renovations will greatly reduce the carbon footprint for the facility.

The newly renovated Academy building will use significantly less energy than the previous building, despite being 150% larger.

The new campus core is modeled to save 30% over current energy costs, and more than 40% over current water costs.

Photo courtesy RDK Engineers

Division of Capital Asset Management One Ashburton Place - Boston, MA 02108 - (617) 727-4030 www.mass.gov/dcam

© 2011 Commonwealth of Massachusetts

Division of Capital Asset Management One Ashburton Place - Boston, MA 02108 - (617) 727-4030 www.mass.gov/dcam

By doing these promotional info sheets, I have been able to learn that a big part of state energy savings comes from solar technology and water conservation measures. I’ve been able to learn about specific technological components, as well, such as wind turbines, high-efficiency boilers, and photovoltaics. The learning I have gained from the Environmental Systems course has been greatly influential in my understanding of these processes.

© 2011 Commonwealth of Massachusetts

79


DCAM Project coordination meetings Executive Office of Education - State and Community Colleges - updated by C. McIntosh 11/21/11, E.Ransom review 11/24/11

GENERAL NOTES: Agencies include Dept. of Education (DOE), Dept. of Higher Education, State Colleges (BSC, FRC, FSC, MCA, MMA, NAC, SSA or SSC, WOR, and WSC) and Community Colleges (BCC, BHC, BRC, 1. RED text indicates a new entry. CCC, GCC, HCC, MAS, MBC, MCC, MWC, NEC, NCS, QCC, RCC, and STC) - See separate tab for UMass projects Office of Programming: Elayne Campos is Deputy Director; Antonio Leite is Planning Assistant Energy Team: Tony Ransom is Program Manager Black Text = OPDC projects; Blue Text = newly added OPDC projects; Green Text = Energy Team projects; Gray text is ON HOLD or completed (to be taken off list) LEGEND: Primary 'Project Support Staff Project Number City Comments User Agency Project Name Manager (OPDC or E(E-Team or OPDC) Team) BHE0501 ST1 Elayne Campos T. Ransom / M. Bridgewater and E-Team persuing preliminary energy study at WSC BSU Master Plan for Bridgewater State University (update to 2007 plan) Reinhardt Westfield Elayne Campos heading up master plan for Bridgewater. MEP master plan, programming, accessibility S. Callisti to contact D. Carey about adding utility study. Complete utility survey needed (money not available). Emergency work done to get dining hall operational Wrapping up comments. No utility survey yet (money not available) BRC

BRC 1001

ST1

BRC Fall River - Technology and Learning Center - New Facility

Duncan Grant

(Mike Reinhardt Fall River completed Energy Project here in 2009)

BRC

BRC1101

ES1

Bristol Comm. College Wind Turbine

BSC0401

DC1

Construction of Marshall Conant Science Building Modernization and Expansion Bridgewater Community College

Tony Dover/ T. Ransom Barry Heidke (was Altaf Mulla for Study Phase)

Dulong

BSC

varies

DCP1006

EC1

Solar PV West (Berkshire Community College; Fitchburg State College; Tony Dover Framingham State College; Greenfield Community College; Westfield State College; DEP site in Springfield)

John Lemay

various

Greenfield in construction received

varies

DCP1007

EC1

Solar PV East (DCR site at Chickatawbet; Massasoit Community College; North Shore CC, Salem State College, UMass Boston, UMass Lowell, UMass Dartmouth)

Tony Dover

Doug Davis

various

SSC- delayed, roof project underway UMB completed SRECS received

FRC

FRC0802

ST1

Study of Science and Academic Facilities at Hemenway Hall at Framingham State College (renovation of existing, and addition - new Science wing)

Schuyler G. Larrabee/ Jack Tony Dover McDermott

FRC

FRC1001

ES1

Framingham State College - comprehensive Energy Performance Contracting project Tony Dover

Judiciary -

updated

Mike R. /Tony D.

Electric

Natural Gas

NGrid

NE Gas

Accessibility review not completed. Geotech and haz-mat completed. Additional funding required to complete, study top be certified within a year.

Fall River

Feasibility Study completed by Facility SOW for DCAM study issued BRIDGEWATER Project is registered with LEED online (LEED NCv2009) Design submitted to LEED (check with Krista)

NGrid NGrid

Bay State

SRECS

NGrid

FRAMINGHAM Project is now on the spending plan; Study will be certified end of November. Advanced projects in design. Certify study in a week John Lemay FRAMINGHAM Phase I ESA signed 7/11/11 construction delayed, lighting started in Nov. '11 2 Audit by submitted by Chris McIntosh 09/30/2011,Phase reviewed E. Ransom 11/7/11

NSTAR

NSTAR

NSTAR

NSTAR

GENERAL NOTES: 1. Meet with Ann regarding any updates on other courts projects 2. RED text indicates new entry

Agencies include Counsel of govenments (COG) and Trial Court / Office Chief Administration of Justice (TRC)

TBD

TBD

TBD

Framingham State Univ. Master Plan Project

Schuyler G. Larrabee

T. Ransom

Framingham

FSC

FSC0501

DC1

Science Facility Modernization at Fitchburg State College

Michael Reinhardt

FITCHBURG

Project is registered w/LEED online (LEED NCv2.2)

FSC

FSC

FSCTBD

MichaelName Reinhardt Campus Center Study (MSCBA contributing some funds) - Fitchburg State College David Lynch (just Project Number Project Agencyconsulting) MSCBA Project (renovation)

FITCHBURG

Not a DCAM project

Office of Programming: Liz Minnis is Acting Deputy Director Energy Team: Shirin Karanfiloglu is Program Manager

H:\DCAM WORK\OPDC and OFM Project List, CM 11-21-1, ER 11-24

Bill Dulong

User

UNITIL

Support Primary Staff UNITIL UNITIL City 'Project Manager Comments (E-Team or (OPDC or E-Team) OPDC) Mike FALL John MacMillan 12/14/2011]Complete; Project has undergone Design Reinhardt RIVER Application review by GBCI; is attempting LEED Gold (LEED NCv2.2) - Energy Star?

TRC

J9810

TRC

TRC 0802

ECI Trial Court #1 - Suffolk, Bristol, Plymouth & Middlesex Counties

Shirin/John Crisley

TRC

TRC0902

FS1 Exterior Envelope Invest. at Fenton Center, Suffolk County High -Rise and Brighton D.C.

Ann Schiro/ Tom Tagan

TRC

TRC0105 ST1 Lowell Trial Court Facilities Study

DC1 New Fall River Trial Court

Jenn Campbell

TRC

TRC0303 SC1 ADA Self Assessment,Transition - Statewide TRC Facilities

Ann Schiro

TRC

TRC0602 DC1 New Taunton Trial Court - Construction

Catherine Walsh

TRC

TRC0606 ST2 Greenfield Trial Court Study

Ann Schiro

Ann Schiro

Various

Installation contract to be signed on 8/16 Phase 1 Complete Phase 2 Amendments signed in March; in construction Phase 3 in Audit - update cost per bldg. $ investments per bldg. Study has been certified in Fenton; construction is complete. Brighton exterior envelope investigation and Suffolk not certified Current work includes utitlity relocation John Crisley LOWELL project; will have several phases of construction work Finalization of the audit reports are ongoing. Jim Freeley TAUNTON Design Application is under review by GBCI (LEED NCv2.2); attempting LEED Silver John Crisley Study is complete awaiting certification.

Part of my duties includes attending regularly scheduledproject coordination meetings NCv2.2) TRC Ann Schiro / Altaf TRC1001 Northampton Site Feasibility Study Ongoing site feasibility study where the energy planners outline their projects andMullawhat (assisting) milestones they are TRC John Lemay Various RFP issued for Equipment design-build TRC0802 EC2 Trial Court 2 @ Western part of the state John Crisley Al Weis project;to Evaluating responses to RFP approaching. Compiling that information into these sheets allows me and Facilities the team AnnShiro note project progress and keep the planners on schedule to complete their projects. Time management is key to this process, and I can definitely say that my experiences with client deadlnes in Gateway projects and past experiences has helped me be successful in this position. TRC

80

UNITIL

OPDC projects; Green Text = Energy Team projects; Gray text is ON HOLD LEGEND Black Text = OPDC projects; Blue Text = newly added Finishing CDs, in construction or completed (to be taken off list) :

TRC9910 DC1 J. Michael Ruane Judicial Center DC1

Bill Rafuse

Shirin

SALEM

Project is registered w/LEED online (LEED

Electric

Natural Gas

Upcoming Major Milestone


ENERGY PROJECTS Energy project boards & conclusion

DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES: HOGAN REGIONAL CENTER - DANVERS, MA & WRENTHAM DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER - WRENTHAM, MA ENERGY, EQUIPMENT, DESIGN & INSTALLATION PROJECTS At the Hogan facility, DCAM will decommission an oil burning power plant and install high-efficiency, natural gas boilers in each of the campus buildings.

Carole Cornelison, Commissioner

At the Wrentham facility, DCAM will upgrade an inefficient oil consuming power plant with natural gas burning high-pressure boilers.

ENERGY PROJECTS DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENTAL SERVICES: HOGAN REGIONAL CENTER - DANVERS, MA & WRENTHAM DEVELOPMENTAL CENTER - WRENTHAM, MA ENERGY, EQUIPMENT, DESIGN & INSTALLATION PROJECTS At the Hogan facility, DCAM will decommission an oil burning power plant and install high-efficiency, natural gas boilers in each of the campus buildings.

The existing power plant (in red), which will be demolished, serves the Hogan facility (in green).

At the Wrentham facility, DCAM will upgrade an inefficient oil consuming power plant with natural gas burning high-pressure boilers.

The existing Wrentham facility power plant will be renovated.

The 100-year-old power plant inefficiently distributes steam underground to the Hogan facility.

HOGAN & WRENTHAM PROJECTS:

The existing power plant (in red), which will be demolished, serves the Hogan facility (in green).

 Total contract value:

$22.5 million $2.4 million  Estimated completion date: December 2012  Annual energy savings:

The existing Wrentham facility power plant will be renovated.

Building Information Model (BIM) images displaying proposed boilers

UMASS DARTMOUTH - DARTMOUTH, MA COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY, WATER CONSERVATION & RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS The 100-year-old power plant inefficiently distributes steam underground to the Hogan facility.

DCAM is implementing campus-wide energy projects.  Energy Conservation Measures include HVAC upgrades, building

HOGAN & WRENTHAM PROJECTS: $22.5 million  Annual energy savings: $2.4 million  Estimated completion date: December 2012

control upgrades, and water conservation.

 Total contract value:

 $52 million investment toward energy projects will result in

Building Information Model (BIM) images displaying proposed boilers

$3.1 million in annual cost savings.  Renewable projects include a 1.9 megawatt gas turbine, a

600 kW wind turbine, and 275 kW roof-mounted solar panels.  The energy projects fit with the university’s curriculum and will

UMASS DARTMOUTH - DARTMOUTH, MA

serve as teaching tools.

COMPREHENSIVE ENERGY, WATER CONSERVATION & RENEWABLE ENERGY PROJECTS DCAM is implementing campus-wide energy projects.  Energy Conservation Measures include HVAC upgrades, building

control upgrades, and water conservation.  $52 million investment toward energy projects will result in

A campus map detailing locations of energy projects: Wind turbine location Roof-mounted solar panels

$3.1 million in annual cost savings.  Renewable projects include a 1.9 megawatt gas turbine, a 600 kW wind turbine, and 275 kW roof-mounted solar panels.  The energy projects fit with the university’s curriculum and will serve as teaching tools.

Campus power plant

Wind turbine:  244 feet overall height  157 foot diameter rotor  730 MWh of electricity generated yearly

Replacement of air handling unit (AHU)

Roof-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) panels

UMASS DARTMOUTH PROJECTS:  Total contract value: A campus map detailing locations of energy projects: Wind turbine location Roof-mounted solar panels

 Annual energy savings: Campus power plant

Wind turbine:  244 feet overall height  157 foot diameter rotor  730 MWh of electricity generated yearly

Elecon’s Turbowinds model T600-48 will be constructed.

Replacement of air handling unit (AHU)

Roof-mounted solar photovoltaic (PV) panels

UMASS DARTMOUTH PROJECTS:

Using my visual presentation skills, I have made myself Total contract value: available $52.4 million  Annual savings: $3.1 million to do promotional boards that display theenergy energy team’s  Estimated completion date: Summer 2013 accomplishments in completed projects. I am able to take project images and information and display them graphically for the entire department to see. This helps promote the energy team’s work to the entire administration, as well.

Elecon’s Turbowinds model T600-48 will be constructed.

Photo simulation of wind turbine on campus

Photo simulation of wind turbine on campus

$52.4 million $3.1 million

 Estimated completion date: Summer 2013

In the future, I hope to take on more of a role as a planning assistant, which involves financial and legal analysis of energy projects. In learning much about the nuts and bolts about sustainable design from the courses I have taken, I feel like my position at DCAM is a great start on my path to becoming a career planner and designer.

81


82

COMPETITION


2011 NOMA Student Design Competition

84

83


2011 NOMA COMPETITION PROJECT: National Organization of Minority Architects (NOMA) Student Design Competition DESCRIPTION: The design competition calls for the development of a new Ashby MARTA Transit Village (Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority), creating a node of local services and community-supporting activities centered on the existing Ashby Train Station. The new development is intended to serve as an economic catalyst for the Washington Park/Vine City community PROGRAM SIZE: Approx. 110,000 S.F. TEAM: 4 BAC students - members of NOMA DURATION: June 2011 - October 2011 ROLE: Project Manager SKILLS USED: Team leadership and practical communication skills Complete presentation development and organization Adobe Creative Suite to develop presentation materials SKILLS GAINED: Confidence in team organization and leadership skills Ability to develop advanced schematic design skills independent from daily critics Mock firm organization experience and team-based design

84

Martin Luther King Jr Dr

For this competition, I was elected project manager to lead my team’s entry into this national competition. We started by familiarizing ourselves with the project site, which is a historically rich neighborhood west of Downtown Atlanta. Leading a team in designing a transit-oriented development would be a great opportunity to test my interests in planning and give me great experience in team-based design.


Concept development

In the beginning stages of the competition, our team focused on developing a scheme based around weaving community issues and opportunities. We see the site as a melting pot of potential development, yet there are so many issues holding it back.

We looked for ways to merge these ideas to create a cohesive design which celebrates the inner workings of the Ashby neighborhood and Greater Atlanta. We focused on weaving the physical, emotional, and social aspects of community development to begin to design the project.

85


2011 NOMA Student Design Competition

Programming & thesis development THESIS STATEMENT: weave activities and movement of all types through the Ashby site to create a physical, emotional, social, and historical bridge between Washington Park and greater Atlanta Staff

Parking

Gallery Retail Staff

Gallery

Employee Grocery

Retail

Gallery / Visitor

Grand Entry / Lobby

PROGRAM LEG 1

LOBBY

2

WASHINGTO

3

MLK JR. GAL

4

SUNSET AVEN

5

TEMPORARY

6

STAFF (10 EM

7

VOLUNTEER

8

BUILDING SU

9

EXHIBIT WOR

10 SUSTAINABLE

11 RETAIL / REST

MARTA

12 MARTA ENTR

MARTA

13 PARKING

14 OUTDOOR S

15 GROSS AREA

MOVEMENT

to

WEAVE

forming a

movements... PHYSICAL train

drive

skating

walk

bus

shopping

bike

sit

waiting

run

gardening dance

SOCIAL

86

EMOTIONAL community pride empowerment happiness energize

HISTORICAL

providing for loved ones

Native American paths

resource sharing

Civil Rights

jobus creation Civil War Further concept development led to focus on the extensive CIvil Rights history of the neighborhood. By incorporating idea exchange slavery elements which celebrated and recognized this history, we felt we could come up with a scheme that is inclusive and representative of the project’s considerations. We sought to weave the program elements to give our thesis added strength.

BRIDGE

to create

HUMAN CONNECTION


Initial presentation Ashby Station Redevelopment - building community through “the movement” HISTORY

1860s - Civil War & Jim Crow era

800-1500 AD

growth

early 1900s

1950s-60s

TODAY

FUTURE

WEAVING MOVEMENT creates SOCIAL INTERACTION

With Atlanta’s comes physical, economic, and social

divisions BLACK neighborhood west of Lowery Blvd. WHITE neighborhood east of Lowery Blvd.

Etowah Indian paths establish Atlanta’s

transit connections

wealth concentrated north of city poverty concentrated in south of city

Civil Rights

movement seeks to unify all people new programs and activities

iSSUES + OPPORTUNITIES

extend the beltline greening streetscapes promoting alternative transportation

fix dead ends physical limitations & neighborhood misconceptions

PHYSICAL

create synergy between neighborhoods

SOCIAL

utilize redevelopment to mend the urban fabric

SUS

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES

EMOTIONAL

S

G S

NEIGHBORHOOD SCALE

LIGHT WELL - DOWN

LIGHT WELL - UP

fully connect to meaning of Civil Rights Movement promote Atlanta’s historical value NATURAL LIGHT natural light

break down historical divisions Lowery Blvd as division between black and white neighborhoods

PV PANNELS pv panels WIND TURBINES wind turbines GEOTHERMAL geothermal SHADING shading

improve functionality by sharing resources

CROSS VENTILATION cross ventilation RAIN WATER HARVESTING rainwater harvesting RAIN GARDEN rain garden

LENA STREET ACTIVITY

ROOF GARDEN green roof

EXTRAPOLATING THE VINE

LENA STREET LOOKING EAST

GROCERY STORE

reconnect the site to greater Atlanta

The goal is to weave activities and movement of all types through the Ashby site to create a physical, emotional, social, and historical bridge between Washington Park and greater Atlanta.

PLAN - FIRST FLOOR

MLK GALLERY

PARKING

RESTAURANT

MARTA

TEMPORARY GALLERY/LOBBY

RETAIL

THE VILLAGE WALK

SUNSET AVENUE GALLERY

MARTA

OFFICE RETAIL

COMMUNITY GARDENS

MARTA

CAFE

PARKING

WASHINGTON PARK GALLERY

SUPPORTMECAHNICAL

“OPPRESSION WALL” The escalators from the MARTA platforms pull visitors upwards towards the Oppression Wall. As they reach the light of the main entrance they are released from their proximity.

VILLAGE WALK COMPLEX NOMA STUDENT DESIGN COMPETITION 2011

They ascend to the Martin Luther King Jr. Gallery they journey above the wall and rise over it.

Above is representative of the board that was presented in the initial phase of the competition. Four teams from the BAC competed internally to potentially present at the NOMA Conference in October. Our team’s proposal was chosen to represent the BAC, and further development ensued.

87


y MARTA Transit Village Building Community Through The Movement 2011 NOMA Student Design Competition Presentation development

s not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it... -Chief Seattle, 1854 und together. All things connect.”

community through f our design stems who will make up y commuter who es MARTA to work, efit from the goods d the tourists who anta’s Civil Rights eds and purposes. eriences together te the community pawn new growth opel the Ashby self into the future.

ment for the users on which attracts to the site. The porting community from this ‘stem’. the needs of all various forms of while connecting able revitalization, ne development.

A sustainable economic and environmental plan will be put into place using our site’s capabilities, as well. •

Restaurant owners and grocery managers can sell food they produce onsite from an extensive roof garden.

This roof garden will set a precedent for future community gardens. Neighborhood residents can maintain this garden, creating a culture of collective ownership.

Conveniently locating a vegetable collection center at the station will provide financial incentives for urban agriculture.

Students from KIPP WAYS can use the gardens as outdoor learning environments, enhancing their educational opportunities.

Neighborhood artisans can use local resources to produce and sell their crafts onsite.

The physical configuration of the building provides natural light, incorporates passive cooling, and mitigates greenhouse gas production, which greatly reduces potential energy costs. This encourages pedestrian flow and fosters human connections throughout the entire site.

WASHINGTON PARK

ENERGY PRODUCTION / WATER COLLECTION

SUNSET AVENUE HISTORIC AREA

JOSEPH E. LOWERY BLVD.

BELTL IN

E

conomic and social tinues to separate ese divisions, there nect between the y site and what is g part of the Atlanta divisions, our design hysical, emotional, ment, creating a d greater Atlanta.

Our design looks to preserve the existing patterns of movement and incorporate new patterns. We will enhance them through our methods of weaving structure, program, and accessibility through the site. As our development begins to foster strong connections with the neighborhood and city, the influence our program has can grow exponentially.

RTA MA

of various types of ment times, Native much of what would m. The city itself was ub in 1873. Atlanta r upward mobility ment in the mid 20th in a state of motion oks to harness and ers to experience.

P LONG TERM TRANSIT PARKING

CARTER STREET

LENA STREET

MARTA

LIONEL E. MARTA HAMPTON TRAIL

OUTDOOR AMPITHEATER

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN TRAIL TOWARD DOWNTOWN ATLANTA MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DRIVE HISTORIC AREA

MLK JR. GALLERY GROCERY TEMPORARY EXHIBIT GALLERY CAFE

N

CIVIC / ENTRY PLAZA

SITE PLAN 1” = 300’

Our site will weave The Living Principles’ four streams of sustainability - environment, people, economy, and culture - and become a catalyst for community incubation.

MARTA ENTRY “OPPRESSION WALL”

borhood context as the root, our site can become the stem evelopment, historical reflection and economic stimulation.

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES

BLACK WHITE

increase the Beltline’s impact fix dead ends - physical limitations & neighborhood misconceptions

PHYSICAL

hs establish ons

SOCIAL

With Atlanta’s growth comes physical, emotional and social divisions

1837

88

EMOTIONAL

promote neighborhood connection to the Civil Rights Movement break down historical divisions by creating welcoming civic spaces

Civil Rights Movement establishes roots in Atlanta

nta is founded on the strength he interstate railroad system

early 1900s

GROCERY / TRANSIT PARKING

ISSUES & OPPORTUNITIES

Y OF MOVEMENT

1950s-60s

create synergy with all community members

DAILY COMMUTER

REGULAR USER NATURAL

• MEMBER OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY LIGHT • USES ASHBY COMMUNITY GARDENS

PV PANNELS WIND TURBINES OCCASIONAL VISITORS

GEOTHERMAL DAILY COMMUTER

improve area’s economic and sustainable well-being

SHADING

utilize redevelopment to mend the urban fabric

CROSS VENTILATION

• LIVES IN THE ATLANTA SUBURBS • PARKS AT ASHBY STATION AND RIDES MARTA

RAIN WATER HARVESTING

TODAY... issues and opportunities surround Ashby site redevelopment

A goal of mine as project manager was to make sure we incorporated all the requirements of the brief, while keeping an eye on having reasons for all our design moves. Our team focused on developing the program sustainably, while keeping in tune with our original concept of weaving the community together.

RAIN GARDEN

FUTURE...

OCCASIONAL VISITORS • TOURISTS FROM OUT OF TOWN

ROOF GARDEN • LEARNING ABOUT CIVIL RIGHTS HISTORY

a new community is developed around the connectivity of movement...

I made sure that our project linked to the historical and physical features of the neighborhood, such as the nearby historic areas, main transportation outlets, and the transit lines. I felt that by deciding to link our project to the neighborhood, it shows our project as being a part of the neighborhood rather than an object in it.

L


KING JR. DRIVE AREA Project community HISTORIC focus

MLK JR. GALLERY GROCERY

E G

TEMPORARY EXHIBIT GALLERY

LOW

ERY

CAFE

N

SITE PLAN 1” = 300’

A LEN

CIVIC / ENTRY PLAZA

ST.

BLVD

.

MARTA ENTRY “OPPRESSION WALL”

GROCERY / TRANSIT PARKING

ES

eltline’s impact

physical ighborhood s

borhood the Civil Rights

DAILY COMMUTER

REGULAR USER • MEMBER OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY • USES ASHBY COMMUNITY GARDENS

torical divisions lcoming civic

with all mbers

economic e well-being

OCCASIONAL VISITORS

DAILY COMMUTER • LIVES IN THE ATLANTA SUBURBS • PARKS AT ASHBY STATION AND RIDES MARTA

pment to n fabric

FUTURE...

OCCASIONAL VISITORS

• TOURISTS FROM OUT OF TOWN • LEARNING ABOUT CIVIL RIGHTS HISTORY

a new community is developed around the connectivity of movement...

To give our presentation an even greater sense of community, we chose to design our experience of the program based on who the actual users of the program would be (the neighborhood member, daily commuter, and visiting tourist).

“OPPRESSION WALL”

The escalators from the MARTA platforms pull v up toward the light of the main entrance, the e Visitors then ascend toward the Martin Luther K

Our images focused on the community experience and how our defined users fit into that experience. We wanted to show the users feeling the oppression of the Civil Rights Movement, and how the community can rise into the light and come together in the central plaza.

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2011 NOMA Student Design Competition

Final presentation

Ashby MARTA Transit Village Building Community Through The Movement “Humankind has not woven the web of life. We are but one thread within it... All things are bound together. All things connect.” -Chief Seattle, 1854

Since the goal is to “build a community through the movement,” the focus of our design stems from the unique set of users who will make up the community. The daily commuter who parks at the station and takes MARTA to work, the local residents who benefit from the goods and services at the site, and the tourists who come to learn about Atlanta’s Civil Rights history all have specific needs and purposes. Weaving these unique experiences together at the Ashby site to stimulate the community is our goal. We hope to spawn new growth opportunities that will propel the Ashby neighborhood and Atlanta itself into the future. The common stem of movement for the users is the Ashby MARTA station which attracts the necessary resources into the site. The programs and activities supporting community development will branch from this ‘stem’. We plan to respond to the needs of all users by encouraging various forms of sustainable transportation while connecting to the city’s plans for sustainable revitalization, including the nearby Beltline development.

Restaurant owners and grocery managers can sell food they produce onsite from an extensive roof garden.

This roof garden will set a precedent for future community gardens. Neighborhood residents can maintain this garden, creating a culture of collective ownership.

Conveniently locating a vegetable collection center at the station will provide financial incentives for urban agriculture.

Students from KIPP WAYS can use the gardens as outdoor learning environments, enhancing their educational opportunities.

Neighborhood artisans can use local resources to produce and sell their crafts onsite.

The physical configuration of the building provides natural light, incorporates passive cooling, and mitigates greenhouse gas production, which greatly reduces potential energy costs. This encourages pedestrian flow and fosters human connections throughout the entire site.

NE

JOSEPH E. LOWERY BLVD.

A sustainable economic and environmental plan will be put into place using our site’s capabilities, as well.

BELTLI

TA

Unfortunately, much of the economic and social division from long ago continues to separate Atlanta today. Due to these divisions, there has been a growing disconnect between the area surrounding the Ashby site and what is commonly regarded as being part of the Atlanta experience. To mend these divisions, our design looks to weave ideas of physical, emotional, social, and historical movement, creating a bridge between our site and greater Atlanta.

Our design looks to preserve the existing patterns of movement and incorporate new patterns. We will enhance them through our methods of weaving structure, program, and accessibility through the site. As our development begins to foster strong connections with the neighborhood and city, the influence our program has can grow exponentially.

R MA

Atlanta is built on a history of various types of movement; in early settlement times, Native American paths established much of what would become Atlanta’s street system. The city itself was founded as a major railway hub in 1873. Atlanta then became a center for upward mobility during the Civil Rights Movement in the mid 20th century. Atlanta is constantly in a state of motion and growth. Our program looks to harness and reflect this motion for all users to experience.

WASHINGTON PARK

PROGRAM

SUSTAINABLE STRATEGIES HARVEST COLLECTION CENTER

ENERGY PRODUCTION / WATER COLLECTION

SUNSET AVENUE HISTORIC AREA

GREEN ROOF / COMMUNITY GARDEN

LONG TERM TRANSIT PARKING

NATURAL LIGHT

GEOTHERMAL

STORMWATER COLLECTION

PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

SHADING

RAIN GARDEN

WIND TURBINES

NATURAL VENTILATION

GREEN ROOF / COMMUNITY GARDEN

+ 60’ - 0” + 50’ - 0” + 40’ - 0” + 30’ - 0” + 20’ - 0”

RESTAURANT 0’ - 0”

SHORT TERM PARKING (RETAIL / GALLERY)

CARTER STREET

LENA STREET

MARTA

LIONEL E. MARTA HAMPTON TRAIL

PROPOSED PEDESTRIAN TRAIL TOWARD DOWNTOWN ATLANTA MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. DRIVE HISTORIC AREA

EMPLOYEE AREA / STAFF OFFICES

A

WASHINGTON PARK GALLERY MLK JR. GALLERY GROCERY

CAFE

N

CIVIC / ENTRY PLAZA

SITE PLAN 1” = 300’

VOLUNTEER SPACE

OUTDOOR AMPITHEATER

TEMPORARY EXHIBIT GALLERY

Our site will weave The Living Principles’ four streams of sustainability - environment, people, economy, and culture - and become a catalyst for community incubation.

- 15’ - 0” - 30’ - 0”

EXHIBIT WORKSHOPS / GALLERY LOADING

A LEN

LOW

ERY

ST.

BLVD

.

MARTA ENTRY “OPPRESSION WALL”

RETAIL SUNSET AVE. GALLERY

MARTA

By using the Ashby neighborhood context as the root, our site can become the stem that feeds community development, historical reflection and economic stimulation.

GROCERY / TRANSIT PARKING

ISSUES & OPPORTUNITIES

HISTORY OF MOVEMENT

BLACK WHITE

increase the Beltline’s impact fix dead ends - physical limitations & neighborhood misconceptions

PHYSICAL

SOCIAL

With Atlanta’s growth comes physical, emotional and social divisions

1837

early 1900s

final presentation model

create synergy with all community members improve area’s economic and sustainable well-being

Civil Rights Movement establishes roots in Atlanta

Atlanta is founded on the strength of the interstate railroad system

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promote neighborhood connection to the Civil Rights Movement

DAILY COMMUTER

REGULAR USER • MEMBER OF THE LOCAL COMMUNITY • USES ASHBY COMMUNITY GARDENS

+ 35

break down historical divisions by creating welcoming civic spaces

Native American paths establish early transit connections

800-1500 AD

EMOTIONAL

1950s-60s

+ 25

+ 15

OCCASIONAL VISITORS

DAILY COMMUTER • LIVES IN THE ATLANTA SUBURBS • PARKS AT ASHBY STATION AND RIDES MARTA

utilize redevelopment to mend the urban fabric

TODAY... issues and opportunities surround Ashby site redevelopment

FUTURE...

OCCASIONAL VISITORS

• TOURISTS FROM OUT OF TOWN • LEARNING ABOUT CIVIL RIGHTS HISTORY

a new community is developed around the connectivity of movement...

“OPPRESSION WALL”

The escalators from the MARTA platforms pull visitors up to the plaza against the “oppression wall”. As they journey up toward the light of the main entrance, the experience evokes the feeling of African-American historical hardship. Visitors then ascend toward the Martin Luther King Jr. Gallery as they figuratively and literally rise above their situation.

Louver facade model

Final preparations for submittal were made when the team arrived in Atlanta. As we finalized and submitted our presentation boards, we included a louver design for the Lowery Street facade, featuring an iconic image of Martin Luther KIng, Jr. The facade is made up of individually shaded vertical louvers to hide the parking structure on that edge, and attract users to the transit center. Deciding to include this piece in our presentation would be a major factor in us presenting to the judges.

SECTION A-A 1/16” = 1’- 0 CIRCULATION DIAGRAM


Presentation award & conclusion

TEGIES

WEAVING A COMMUNITY...

STORMWATER COLLECTION

+ 60’ - 0”

RAIN GARDEN

+ 50’ - 0”

GREEN ROOF / COMMUNITY GARDEN

+ 40’ - 0”

+ 35’ - 0”

+ 30’ - 0”

+ 25’ - 0”

+ 20’ - 0”

0’ - 0”

ROOF

- 15’ - 0” - 30’ - 0”

OUTDOOR AMPITHEATER

SECTION B-B 1/16” = 1’- 0” B A

A

N

B

GROUND

GROUND FLOOR PLAN 1” = 40’

LIGHT WELL

GROUND

CIVIC / ENTRY PLAZA

LENA STREET

GROUND

+ 35’ - 0”

FINANCIAL

HISTORICAL

+ 25’ - 0” + 15’ - 0”

LEVEL -1

“OPPRESSION WALL” SECTION A-A 1/16” = 1’- 0” CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

LEVEL 3

SUSTAINABLE

RESTAURANT

Weaving history, issues and opportunities creates a sustainable connectivity and transforms space into place.

BAC presentation to jury including AIA President Jeffrey Potter

Final preparations for submittal were made when the team arrived in Atlanta. Above are images that document our team’s hard work as we prepared for the final presentation day. Our presentation was a big success as the judges noted our attention to historic details, and effective use of scale to design the project.

ROOF

COMMUNITY GARDEN

BAC Team on stage receiving Third Place award

For our efforts, we earned 3rd place out of the 16 schools that presented. This represented a very proud moment for myself and my team, not only as I took the main leadership role for the team, but that we represented ourselves and the school on a national stage. Throughout this process I have gained a lot of confidence in my ability to drive a project through to completion and manage a team. This experience has been so valuable and I will surely be looking to apply all the skills I have learned from this process to future competitions.

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BAC Segment 1 Portfolio