Page 1

Pet Tips, Page 5 Central Valley Motorsports, Page 7 Color Run, Page 8 Dining Guide, Page 9

Let’s Talk Clovis, Page 10 Community Calendar, Page 15 Log of Shame, Page 16 Featured Recipe, Page 20

THE ONLY NEWSPAPER DEDICATED TO SERVING CLOVIS

WWW.CLOVISROUNDUP.COM

& THE SURROUNDING FOOTHILL COMMUNITIES

published every other wednesday and DISTRIBUTED weekly

Clovis Streets to close for Color Run - Oct 13th

Clovis Roundup 2491 Alluvial Ave Ste. 540 Clovis CA, 93611

LOCAL NEWS & ENTERTAINMENT

VOL. 4, NO. 11

September 26, 2013

Up, up and away with Magic Bob By Carol Lawson-Swezey

“Once you have tasted flight, you will walk the earth with your eyes turned skyward for there you have been and there you long to return.”….Leonardo Da Vinci. Close to heaven with the sky as his infinite backdrop and soaring birds as lofty companions, once “Magic” Bob Locklin took his first hot air balloon ride, he was

Shonna & Garrett Color Run, continued on page 8

captivated by the magic. “I always had a love of flying,” Locklin said. “I majored in aeronautics in college. For years on my birthday, I did some kind of flying. When I tried the ballooning, I was hooked. I became a commercial pilot and bought my own balloon.” Away with Magic Bob, continued on page 18


Page 2

September 26, 2013

City kicks off Business Appreciation Month in October

Clovis Roundup

PG&E grant bolsters San Joaquin College of Law

By Carol Lawson-Swezey

The city of Clovis appreciates its business community- every day –year round. As a kickoff to a month long series of events to honor and recognize its businesses, both small and large, the city will proclaim October as Business Appreciation Month at its October 7th City Council meeting. Although the city has previously recognized local businesses with awards for top sales revenue generators, number of employees or a roundtable discussion with business leaders, this is the first year an entire month will be set aside to honor Clovis businesses. “It’s important to recognize businesses in Clovis and the importance of those businesses to the city,” said Clovis Community and Economic Development Director Tina Sumner. “We want everyone to realize how crucial it is to the community to have a variety of good quality, healthy businesses.” A series of events will reaffirm that importance. The city’s “Pioneer Businesses” of more than 50 years will be recognized as well as a Facebook based “Fan Favorites” business. There are approximately 14 long-time Pioneer Businesses in Clovis. “It’s surprising the number of businesses that have been here for more than 50 years,” Sumner said. “We want the community to know who they are.” In addition, an October 21st reception will be held at Clovis City Hall for businesses with top ratings as sales tax producers, number of employees and involvement in our community. Although Sumner and Business Development Manager Shawn Miller do routine business visitations, they will

be accompanied by City Manager Rob Woolley and city council members during their October Business Appreciation visits. “We want to recognize our businesses and show them how much we appreciate them doing business in Clovis,” Woolley said. The overall reaction from the business community, including representatives from the Clovis Chamber of Commerce and the Business Organization of Old Town, has been very positive.. “They appreciate being recognized,” Woolley added. The city has been experiencing substantial growth in the past year, Sumner said. Something that is obviously welcome after several painfully slow growing recession years. “There is obvious new growth, like the Clovis Crossing Shopping Center at Clovis and Herndon avenues,” Sumner said, “but also many where people might not notice. We’ve seen new businesses sprout up in long-term vacant shopping centers like Burlington Coat Factory at Minnewawa and Shaw and the Walmart Neighborhood Market at Shaw and Fowler. It’s very exciting to see these new businesses. What a huge turnaround it is for those centers.” Sumner said that national chain stores look at local demographics of the population, building availability and location, whereas other smaller businesses consider the area’s quality of life, safety and community pride. Clovis provides it all. “They all appreciate our small town feel, and those businesses quickly become a part of our community as a whole and make a place for themselves here,” Sumner said.

Pictured (L to R): Trustee Tony Mendes, Trustee and Founder John Loomis, Trustee Michael Dias, SJCL Dean Jan Pearson, Trustee Dennis Veeh, Trustee and Board Chair Doug Noll, Trustee David Weiland, PG&E Senior Government Relations Representative Jeanette Ishii, Trustee Greg Durbin, Trustee Nick Zinkin, Trustee Lisa Smittcamp, and Trustee Jan Kahn.

San Joaquin College of Law is pleased and grateful to announce a $10,000 grant from PG&E. The money helps the Law School fulfill its Vision of providing legal education and scholarship and service, which in turn, feeds the economic engine of the Central Valley. Jeanette Ishii, PG&E Senior Government Relations Representative, said the grant was another example of PG&E’s continued commitment to education, which has included over 40 million dollars in donations over the past decade. She indicated the money “comes from share holders and employees, not from rate payers.” SJCL Dean Jan Pearson points to the numerous studies which show those holding law degrees in the Valley earn nearly double compared to those who hold only a bachelor’s degree and more than three times as much as those with only a high school diploma. SJCL provides a local option for those seeking to become attorneys, helping staunch the so-called “brain drain” where bright students move elsewhere to seek their

degree and don’t return. Many, in fact, are able to continue working and supporting families while they attend law school locally. In addition, the lower cost of tuition at SJCL means its graduates are not compelled to work simply to service student loan debt; they are able to choose to work with lower income clients or in public service in the area. The Law School even provides hands-on experience for its students working with lower income clients through the New American Legal Clinic and the Mediation Clinic. Dean Pearson says “San Joaquin College of Law is not only a wonderful value for those seeking to become attorneys, but also for the Valley as a whole, which profits from their increased income and increased contributions to the local community.” Others who agree with that statement and have already given major financial support to SJCL include Granville Homes, Baradat & Paboojian, Inc., and Walmart. For more information, contact San Joaquin College of Law at (559) 323-2100.

Voting Ends September 30th!


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Page 3

Info provided by The City of Clovis & The Clovis Tourist Information and Visitors Center at Tarpey Depot. Revised and edited by Peg Bos of the Clovis Museum.


Page 4

September 26, 2013

Clovis Roundup

Dig Yourself Out of Debt in as Little as 6 Months Getting on an even keel financially is difficult for most everybody these days. Bills, rent or mortgage, credit cards – the whole system seems to gobble up almost everything. And then, once you have a little extra cash, something comes along to take it away. If you’re like most people, it’s difficult to do anything because you don’t know where to start. The time is now to take action. With a little self discipline, you really can change your financial picture and make it easier on yourself – in as little as six months. You can literally put time on your side. Our combined debt reduction and saving strategy can lighten the load now, and it will help you feel better about your future. Here are some points to remember: • You may have problems with debt reduction and saving because you don’t have a strategy. A good plan really helps! • Cash-flow control, saving, and debt reduction helps! Then, once your debts are paid off, you’ll be ready to start investing. • If you must use a credit card, move immediately to one that charges the lowest

interest. • Set up faster payment plans on all of your debts. If you need help, talk with a professional. How else do you start? The following four-part strategy may help you control your cash flow, pay off your debt, and help you save so you can anticipate the unexpected expenses that may have gotten you into debt. • Track Spending - Keep track of your typical expenses for one month or so to find out where your money is going. Once you have a record of your spending, compare your monthly outlay with your monthly income. If you have a surplus, this is the amount you can apply each month to paying down debt and building savings. If you have a shortfall, you’ll need to cut expenses. • Pay Off Your Debt - Create a personal balance sheet and list your debts in order of interest rate, from highest to lowest. Add up your liquid assets, including savings and investment accounts, if any. List any major purchases needed in the next year. Subtract this amount from your

liquid assets. What remains is the amount you may have to pay your debts. • Build Savings - Whenever you’re paid, put only what you need to live on for one month (or two weeks, if you get paid every two weeks) into your checking account. Put the rest in savings. When you can, put money equaling one month’s expenses into savings. • Credit Cards – Stop using them immediately. High-interest rate credit cards from the big banks can sink you further into debt when you use them for everyday purchases. If you must, get a low interest credit card, so you won’t be stuck with ballooning interest payments every month. Whether you use these steps or your own, successful money management takes faith in yourself and a little self-discipline. In time – as little as six months – you could be in a very stable position. Remember to set up a realistic payment timetable and stick with it. If you need to readjust your timetable, do so. If you’re looking for more assistance, remember that Fresno County Federal

Credit Union members have access to a full range of vital financial services, including budget management, online and mobile banking, and online bill pay. You’ll receive highly personalized service, checking and savings without monthly fees, and the essential services needed to manage your finances with ease. Visit Fresno County Federal Credit Union at www.FresnoCU. com or call (559) 252-5000.

Therapeutic Facial Pain Management with Botox For many years patients have been dealing with pain in and around the face. The origin of this pain has been associated with muscular t e n s i o n involving the muscles of mastication better known as the muscles we chew with. There are many indicators that steer us to this conclusion. Headaches around the temples, sore jaws, worn teeth, tenderness upon palpation or touch. For years we have tried to manage this with mouth guards, night guards or orthotics which try to reposition the jaw complex. The jaw complex is made up of teeth, bone, muscles, the temporal mandibular joint (TMJ) and all the surrounding tissues. No one moves their jaw in the exact same manner. Everyone thinks that when we open and close our mouths it merely rotates around a hinge joint, the TMJ. In reality, the method of chewing is very complex.

It rotates, it translates, it protrudes all while performing a figure eight with one side moving more forward than the other. In lay mans terms, it moves in all kinds of weird ways which most don’t understand. What controls those movements? The muscles, of course. Now that makes the muscles the captain of the chewing ship. They must make the jaws move in a very complex fashion all without even thinking about it. They do it automatically. Now if the muscles get a little out of whack, they can bind up and cause a little disruption which can cause pain. If one side gets out of sync, the other side has to compensate causing more usage of one side. If one side is over-worked, it will cause fatigue and some binding or stiffness. It’s a domino effect in that if one thing is thrown off, the next component gets affected and on down the line. Throw stress into the equation and look out. Stress can cause uncontrollable over-firing of the muscles. This constant firing of the muscles will cause fatigue to the point of pain. Pain is not the only downfall, you can have premature wear of the teeth. Breakage of teeth is not uncommon from over-firing of the jaw muscles. The common name for this phenomenon is grinding or clenching. This can also cause pain in the TMJ to

the point of destruction of the joint itself. There could be joint pain but it can also be translated into headaches or facial pain. All of these situations are related to the chewing muscles or the facial muscle complex. It can even affect the muscles around the temples better known as the temporal muscles. Your dentist specializes in the area of the head and neck. They specifically work in the area from the eyes down to the neck but we do travel up to the scalp area as it is connected to the chewing muscle complex. Every time you go into your dental office they are going to check your TMJ, or at least they should be. They check your facial muscles all the way down to under your chin. There are methods for treating temporal mandibular joint pain and facial pain. The latest way to help relieve this pain is with BOTOX. BOTOX is a neural agent which prevents muscles from firing to their potential, which relaxes them. The nerves still fire but they don’t make the muscles reach their full movement. This is over simplified but you get the picture. If we can relax these muscles then we can prevent hyperactivity of the muscles. If we prevent this activity then it can relax the joint, relieving pressure on the teeth, the joints and the muscles. You

know that over usage of the muscles can cause premature creases in the skin where they contract, less contraction equals less ? If you can throw away that night guard and use BOTOX to relax the muscles and relieve pain and wear, don’t you think it’s worth investigating? This doctor does not know of anyone that has had to return to a night guard after treatment. Does BOTOX last forever? No, it must be re-applied, much like a diabetic requires meds for the rest of their lives. This type of treatment coupled with dermal fillers to treat some tissue defects in and around the mouth, opens up a whole new world of dental therapy. The future is here. Contact your specially trained “certified” dentist for your evaluation. If you have any questions or wish to contact this writer you may do so at: Art of Design Implant, Cosmetic, and Family Dentistry Edward A. Treviño, DDS, FADIA 1040 E. Herndon Ave. #102 Fresno, California 93720 559-230-0809 559-230-0833 fax artofdesigndentistry@gmail.com www.fresnosdentist.com

Shaver Lake Fishing Report By Dick Nichols

Dick Nichols owner of Dicks Fishing Charters

It was a good fishing week on Shaver Lake. Guide Dick Nichols said that his boat had multiple limits this week. The kokanee have moved in location and depth. Nichols is finding pre-spawn kokes in the Eagle Point, Stevenson and Tunnel Creeks

area. The kokanee are at 35 feet deep and the trout 20 to 30 feet deep. Nichols was using Trout Busters, with corn and crawler, behind weighted Mountain Flashers on the side poles and a Trout Buster behind a Mini Mountain Flasher on one down rigger and a Captain Jack’s orange Super Hoochie behind a CJ Dodger on the other down rigger. With the full moon it was a somewhat later bite around 830 am. You have to find the fish and moving to other locations when you do not find them is necessary. The late morning wind plays havoc with the trolling process. Most of the morning bite is over by 1130 am. Anchored Power Bait fishermen have had some success in the Tunnel creek area and around Black Rock. Shore anglers have had success in the road 1 and 2 areas. There has not been a trout plant by DFW since the 1st week of August, but there have been a number of yearlings caught. The surface water temperature is at 68 degrees, much cooler days in the mid 60’s

Judge Harry Papadakis and Dr. Howard Terrell proudly display 10 of 22 mixed fish of kokanee and trout they caught while fishing Shaver Lake with guide Dick Nichols.

and the water capacity is at 64% The Shaver Lake trophy Trout Project’s 3rd Annual Sportsmen’s Dinner is

September 28th at the Shaver Community Center. Some tickets available at Shaver Lake Sports, 559-841-2740.


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Pets and parties don’t always mix Pets have become much more than companion animals. For many people, pets are full-fledged members of the family. People who are proud of their pets may want them to be around when friends and family visit, including those special occasions when hosting a party at home. Yet not all pets enjoy the boisterous nature of parties, and not all guests are excited about being in proximity to animals. Party hosts must keep the safety and comfort of their pets and guests in mind during the party. Certain elements of a party can be hazardous to pets. For example, the ASPCA warns that children’s toys may not be pet-friendly. Furthermore, balloons can frighten animals should they pop, and the remnants can present a serious choking hazard. Pets can swallow other items, including party sandwich toothpicks or even ribbon from gifts, which can get lodged in their digestive tracts and cause injury. Foods served at parties may cause digestive distress for pets. Should a dog or cat consume cake and other sweets he or she may vomit or suffer from diarrhea. Certain foods, including chocolate, raisins, grapes, garlic, and onions, can be toxic to pets in high quantities. Pets that end up lapping up alcoholic beverages can become quite ill. Alcohol poisoning can occur even when a pet consumes a small amount of alcohol. According to author Becky Lundgren, DVM, pets can die from alcohol ingestion, depending on the level of ethanol in the drink. A veterinarian should be contacted if a pet has had an alcoholic beverage. Well-behaved pets may not behave in the same manner when their home is filled with party guests. Animals can be territorial, and when their daily routine is disrupted and people have infiltrated their space, pets can become skittish and defensive. Overwhelmed by sensory overload, a generally docile pet may lash out. Overly excited animals may bite or scratch, especially when in the presence of

children who might not know the proper ways to act around pets. Loud party noises, including music or fireworks, could drive up anxiety levels for pets as well. Having a number of people around makes it difficult for the party host to keep track of a pet while the party is in full swing. A pet frightened by the commotion may end up getting loose and running away from home. Guests entering and exiting the home may not realize they are leaving an escape route for pets. It may be several hours before hosts realize a pet is missing. Even if a pet is well behaved during the party, the sheer number of people around puts him or her at risk for injury. A small dog or cat or another animal could be trampled in a crowd of people. Well-meaning guests may pick up a pet and then drop him should he wiggle around. Children unaccustomed to handling an animal may be rough or squeeze the pet, increasing the risk for internal injuries. While there are many safety hazards for pets at parties, guests may also be at risk. Some people have mild to severe allergies to certain animals. Being in close proximity may cause some people to experience discomfort or even a severe allergic reaction. People who are generally scared of dogs or cats may not be able to relax and have a good time if an animal is nearby. Not everyone shares the same level

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Page 5

About this Publication

Clovis Roundup is a publication that is published every other Wednesday and distributed weekly by Clovis Roundup Inc. throughout Clovis and surrounding areas. Donna Melchor - Publisher/Editor, editor@clovisroundup.com Ken Melchor - Vice President (559) 285-6687 kmelchor@clovisroundup.com Billy Xiong - Ad Design and Production (559) 289-8725 ads@clovisroundup.com Butler Web & Design - Online Coordinator www.ButlerWebAndDesign.com Joaquin Hernandez - Photo Journalist (559) 779-2409 joaquinh@aol.com Contributing Writers Carol Lawson-Sweezey - Featured Articles Peg Bos - Let’s Talk Clovis Don Curlee - Ag at Large April French - Police Log of Shame Paul Hinkle - Central Valley Motorsports Dick Nichols - Fishing Report Dr. Edward Trevino - Featured Articles

of affection for companion animals, so pets should never be thrust upon unwilling guests. A good rule of thumb is to keep pets locked away indoors in a room that is out of the way of the party. The animal can feel safe and secure in a quiet nook until the festivities quiet down. Party hosts should check in on their pets from time to time and reassure the animals. If a pet is prone to extreme anxiety from noises and crowds, speak to the animal’s veterinarian to determine if there is a way to calm the animal. Ensure pets and people have a good time at parties by keeping the comfort of both in mind.

Accounting Services Teresa Stevens - Certified Public Accountant (559) 326-2029 teresa@tmstevenscpa.com The Clovis Roundup is a custom publication. 2491 Alluvial Avenue Suite # 540 Clovis, CA 93611 | (559) 326-2040 www.clovisroundup.com To submit events for the CR Calender, email calendar@clovisroundup.com For Advertising, email kmelchor@clovisroundup.com Reproduction by any means of the entire contents or any portion of this publication without written permission is prohibited. The appearance of any advertisements in this publication does not constitute support or endorsement for any product, person, cause, business or organization named therein, unless specifically noted otherwise in the advertisement.


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September 26, 2013

Clovis Roundup

To Seed or Not To Overseed? That Is the Question It’s hard to believe, but cold weather and dormant bermuda lawns are right around the corner. The lawn will lose its color and turn a light tan color as the frost kicks in. Is that good or bad? The real question is whether or not to over seed the lawn to mask this brown look. Obviously if you hate the look of a dormant lawn you would lean towards overseeding to have a green lawn yearround, but here are a few reasons not to overseed. It’s nice to have a few months off from mowing. Secondly, bermuda will not have to compete next spring and early summer with an aggressive ryegrass lawn for space. Bermuda will green up faster and fill in quicker without ryegrass. The use of pre emergents will help reduce invasion of winter annual weeds to help keep a uniformly clean, brown lawn and need to go down September-October. Overseeding your lawn in early October can give you a beautiful, green lawn this winter. It is especially a smart option when facing a mixed stand lawn or patch stand of grasses. This will help hid and even the uniformity of the lawn. As the trees grow larger and produce more shade the bermuda lawns start thinning out and the ryegrass can provide some much needed cover in those areas, too. On the negative side, overseeding results in mowing the lawn for 3-4 months a year that could have been avoided had you not seeded. Once you start the overseeding process it is difficult to stop in future years as portions of the ryegrass will remain from the previous season through seed or just persistence. The non-over seeded year will often be a mostly brown lawn with numerous clumps

of rye. Also, as stated above, the bermuda stand itself may be thinned somewhat due to the persistent and aggressive nature of ryegrass. If the scales tip in favor of overseeding your lawn, you must then choose the right seed. Without going into all the various improved varieties and their features I will sum it all up by saying DO NOT OVER SEED WITH ANNUAL RYEGRASS. It is a low quality grass used in erosion control and pastures. It grows quickly, its coarse textured, yellow-green in color, and prone to winter diseases. Perennial ryegrass vastly excels annual rye in all categories. Be sure to buy a clean, high quality seed without weedy grass contaminants. Please check the seed bag tags. As for me, I overseed my common bermuda front lawn for the neighbors, but I also love that clean, dormant hybrid bermuda in the back that gives me a break for 4 months.


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Page 7

Central Valley Motorsports - SPONSORED BY HEDRICKS CHEVROLET -

By Paul Hinkle

Summer is officially over and with it the triple digit temperatures. As the days get shorter, it is cooling off earlier in the evenings; perfect for taking out your street rod and enjoying the cool breezes. BIOLA 3rd ANNUAL 9/11 MEMORIAL CAR SHOW VFW Post 5845 of Biola held their 3rd Annual 9/11 Memorial Car Show, September 8th. This car show is held in honor of the victims and the families who lost loved ones during the attack on September 11, 2001. They started the ceremonial event at 12:30 with a tribute, taps, the lowering of the flag to half-staff and the singing of the National Anthem. It was a very touching event, your thoughts took you back to where you were and what you were doing as you watched the horrific events unfold. After the tribute ended, the flag was again raised to signify the strength of America. It was a warm day on Sunday with a light breeze blowing through the parking lot of the Community Center where the car show was being held. In the midst of the busy harvest, it was nice to see local

farmers and the community taking time out to show off their hot rods. Street rods, classics, customs, and pick-ups were on display for spectators to admire. Appreciation plaques were given to all that attended. The proceeds from this event go to Toys for Tots, School Scholarship Programs, Food Distribution and local schools Clovis Farmers Market On Friday the 13th a group of local hot rodders merged on Pollasky and Bullard Ave for the Clovis Farmers Market. We parked our rides, took out the lawn chairs, ate local foods and enjoyed a Friday night. The cool evening brought out a large crowd to take in all the venders and local bands. Many people said it was a nice surprise to see our street rods at the farmers market. They took pictures or had their picture taken in front of their favorite car to share with friends and family. They also told us stories about their own street rods or someone they knew with one. These stories are always interesting to hear and you never tire of them. UP COMING EVENTS: Sept. 28th

Spoke & Rods Fresno Fair, Sierra View Elementary Car Show Madera, Calvary Chapel Car Show Visalia, Sept. 29th British Car Roundup Clovis, Oct. 4th Rods on the Bluff, Oct. 5th Fresno National Guard Car Show, Oct. 5th –6th Eagle Field Drags Hot Rod Gathering Pre 74, Oct. 6th Turlock Swap, Biola Raisin Festival Car Show & Parade, Oct. 12th Fall Finale Mopar Car Show Madera, 2nd Annual Autumn Car Show at Clovis Christian Church, Sports Cars in the Park Oakhurst, Oct 18th – 20th 22nd California Hot Rod Reunion, Oct. 19th Mariposa Yosemite Hot Rod & Custom Car Show, Nov. 2nd The Pontiacs of Central California Toys for Tots Car Show, 23rd Annual Cayucos Car Show, Nov. 3rd Turlock Swap, Nov. 9th –10th 24th Autumn Get-Together Pleasanton, Nov. 15 – 17th Motor Trend 2014 Model Car Show Fresno, Nov, 22nd – 24th Goodguys 3rd Fall Del Mar Nationals. If your club or organization is putting on a car show or motorsports

event, please send your information to clovismotorsportsjamboree@gmail.com or call me at (559) 970-2274. I’m also looking for interesting cars and events to share with everyone.


Page 8

Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Color Run Continued from page 1

Elm

Stanford

Purdue Miami

Stanford

Fordham

Portals

Purvis

Beverly Scott

Cole

Scott

Scott

Keats

a Sierra Vist

t

De Wi tt rva rd

Rall

Rall

Miami

Sierra Vista Santa Ana

San Gabriel

Shaw

Alamos

Miami

Twain

Stanford

Keats

Clovis

cen Cres

Rialto

Ha

Lincoln

Fordham

Carey Sunnyside

Hoblitt

San Jose

Santa Ana

Rall

Purdue

Acacia

Cole

Purvis

Miami

Cole

Brookfield

Russell

Robinwood

Alamos

San Gabriel

Browning Wrenwood

Jefferson

Railroad

De Witt

Scott

Fordham

Music

Dennis Beverly San Jose

Dartmouth

Fairmont

t

Celeste

De Witt

Harvard

Keats

Morris

Sunnyside

San Jose

Bullard

Clovis

De Witt

Mitchell

De Witt

Oxford

San Jose

Cherry

Railroad

Mitchell Dennis

Lincoln

Barstow

Beverly

Fairmon

Lincoln

Railroad

De Witt

Harvard

Oxford

Malio

Pollasky

Tenth

Fifth

Roberts

Brookside Ninth

Ninth

y

Cherry

Minnewawa

Lind

err Ch

Fourth

Fifth

Eighth

Poppy

Tenth

Cole

Seventh

Rosebrook

Howard

Escalon Gibson

Music

Woodworth De Witt

Harvard

Oxford

Century

Eighth

Cherry

Fourth Fifth

Bullard

Ninth

Hughes

Harvard

Fourth

Brookhaven

Anita

Baron

Third

De Witt

Scotty

Laurel

and Sunday. On Sunday, flea market attendees should access the flea market by entering on 5th Street from Sunnyside until the roads reopen.

Russell

your thing, we need lots of volunteers too. Volunteers can register at the same website. Some of the proceeds from this event will go to Clovis Area Recreation to help purchase youth sports equipment. There is also a Flea Market at the Rodeo Grounds that weekend on both Saturday Cherry

Ana to 3rd Street. Road closures for the event will start at 7:45am and will remain closed until approximately noon. (See road closure map for times.) East/West travel through Clovis will need to use Herndon or Ashlan. Visit www.TheColorRun.com to register. If running or walking isn’t

Oxford Oxford

The Color Run will be held on Sunday, October 13, 2013 starting at 8:00am. The Color Run is a fun, family 5K (3.1 mile) run/walk event where participants are pelted with colored cornstarch at 4 color stations on the course. The Clovis Color Run course is on Clovis Avenue from Santa

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Clovis Roundup

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September 26, 2013

Ag at Large – citrus south: Citrus sensitivity strong in SoCal By Don Curlee

A law to govern labor r e l a t i o n s activities in agriculture was passed in California 38 years ago. It has become so ragged, so tinkered with, so politically charged and so partial to labor interests that it may be on the verge of falling apart. Notably, Governor Jerry Brown was a staunch proponent of the law, proudly signing the legislative bill that established it in his first term, and he appointed the first five-person board to administer the Agricultural Labor Relations Act(ALRA), answering to the acronym ALRB. Agricultural leaders at the time of its enactment were less than enthusiastic about its establishment. Their efforts to insert, amend or modify language of the law were mostly rejected, and when the

first board was named they believed their industry was not sufficiently represented. Their appreciation for the act has steadily weakened ever since. They were assured by the governor and others working to create the law that it would follow the precedence of the older National Labor Relations Act. That law had helped maintain a stable relationship between management and labor since it was adopted in 1948, and appeared to be a suitable model for the California Law. But it exempted agriculture from its provisions from the outset. Labor activities by the fledgling United Farm Workers union were volatile beginning in 1969. The union had gained significance by maintaining an illegal, but effective, national secondary boycott, first of table grapes, later lettuce, and eventually what was then the state’s largest producer of wine, with several other commodities along the way. Surprisingly, few agricultural enterprises have ever come face to face with a union, even in nearly 40 years since the ALRA was established. And

the predominant union has failed to hold its own or its membership levels. It has barely made an impression. Attracting no more than30,000 members at its peak. That number has dwindled in recent years to 5,000 more or less. Sensing the law’s diminishing appeal to farm workers, some politicians have seemingly dedicated themselves to making it easier and less challenging for workers to select a union as their bargaining agent. The proud anthem of the law originally, secret ballot elections, has been cruelly trampled in the process. Notable among the cheer leaders of this debacle has been Senate President Pro tem Darrell Steinberg. He has written several measures, some of which have passed, making it less demanding for unions to schedule and win elections, and more demanding of agricultural employers to protect faithful workers from union tyranny. The most recent threat to the integrity of the law has come from within the ALRB. Two years ago it hired a firebrand attorney to serve as its general counsel. From the

first day on board Sylvia Torres-Guillen has done everything possible to stretch the meaning of the law in favor of unions. She has even overstepped legal propriety in at least one case, and was severely criticized by the administrative law judge assigned to another case. Whether inside the ALRB or outside, the diehard supporters of the United Farmworkers union seem more than willing, perhaps even dedicated, to scuttling the provisions of the law that require fair, untampered secret ballot elections in which farm workers can either choose or reject union membership. Fairness for both parties served by the labor relations law demands a more objective, more judicious approach and administration. It can work. It has worked, but it’s finding it difficult to withstand the assaults of union favoritism inside the agency and in the legislature. The law should be allowed to project itself in an even handed manner for the benefit of all who are involved. Seems like anybody should be able to vote for that.

New research raises questions on fish oil supplement safety Fish oil, made from the tissue of oily fish like tuna, mackerel, salmon, trout, and sardines, has long been used to reduce the risk of heart disease and heart attacks. Also known as an omega-3 fatty acid, fish oil has a range of other benefits, including fighting depression and reducing inflammation, which has helped to increase the popularity of fish oil supplements. However, new research shows a link between fish oil supplements and an increased risk of prostate disease. Research offered in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute reported a 71 percent higher risk for dangerous high-

grade prostate cancer among men who ate fatty fish or took fish-oil supplements. While researchers are not quite sure why omega-3s are linked to a greater risk of prostate cancer, findings suggest that they are involved in tumor formation. A large study in Europe also found similar evidence of omega-3 fatty acids and a link to prostate cancer risk. Consistent findings indicate that men may want to be conservative with their intake of fatty fish and fish oil supplements. Increased risk could be seen at the equivalent blood concentrations of omega-3s from eating salmon just twice

a week. According to the research, the risk of prostate cancer was roughly 43 percent higher in men with elevated fatty acid levels. Similarly, supplementation with vitamin E was found to raise prostate cancer risk in a trial known as SELECT, the Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial. As with any supplementation, individuals should talk about supplement plans with their doctors and carefully weigh all of the proposed benefits and risks associated with supplementing their diets.


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September 26, 2013

Clovis Roundup

“Let’s Talk Clovis” Clovis High’s First Football Team, 1922 By Peg Bos, Clovis Museum

We are sharing the article written in the 1922 Argus (now Cavalcade annual) that reviews the first year of football at Clovis High. “The 1922 softball season saw the game of American football for the first time at the Clovis High School. This was made possible through the efforts of Coach Newman (teaching staff) and Mr. McKesson (Principal), and the cooperation of the Board of trustees. At the first call for candidates it was very evident that the community and students in general had the wrong impression of football and what it means to the players and to the school. However, after the first practice game with a team from the Fresno Technical High School, when our boys in spite of their scant knowledge of the game came out victorious over their opponents, a new

spirit for the game was developed. The town team was then taken into camp. On October 15, we met Fowler, the strongest team in our division, for the first league game. The outcome was as well as could be expected. Fowler was unable to score on line plays. Clovis was able to break through the Fowler line for yardage. The 32-0 score was made possible by our visitor’s forward passing game, which our inexperienced team was unable to solve. But in straight football and aggressive fight, Clovis had the edge. Then on October 27, our team journeyed to Parlier for the second league game. Although we were out weighted the line charged harder than the Parlier line and the backs played a smashing game. Captain Mishler and Magatagan made the most yardage. Miller played a good defensive game at guard and Mishler and

Wamsley did stellar work in the secondary defense. The final score was Clovis 14, Parlier, 0. Our hardest game to lose was that with Madera, November 5. Outweighed and out experienced cost Clovis the game, 14-7. However considering that the opponents were playing their fourth year of football as against our first the result was a great credit to the hard fighting Clovis team. Williams furnished the thrill of the game by dashing 70 yards for our score. The climax to our football season occurred on our home grounds November 10, when Clovis defeated Easton13-6. Easton had previously defeated Madera and held Fowler to a close score. Both Kosich and Landers played a smashing game in the line, while Captain Mishler, Wamsley and Morgan ruled the yardage. Morgan especially deserves credit as a ground gainer. Thus our season ended with Clovis tied with Madera for second place in our division. The team owes much of its success to the coaching of “Darkhorse” Newman, whose experience as a football player has enabled him to develop a hard fighting

year. Much credit must be given the members of the team for their fighting spirit and sportsmanship. Captain Galen Mishler, was the outstanding star of the team. He hits hard on the offense and was our best ground gainer. On the defense he was a sure tackle and backed up the line well. Captain Elect Wamsley, although rather diminutive in size for a football player well deserves the honor of being elected captain for his fighting spirit. Tom Magatagan, Claude Morgan and George Shimamoto were the other backfield men, and all performed creditably. On the line Monroe Landers played the most consistent game. Louis Kosich and Hubert Nevins were two good smashing tackles and Bill Miller and Carl Williams held down the guard berths. The pivot positions were held down well by Claude Morgan, Gordon Wilson and Milton Reyburn. Considering their size and newness to the game, these ends are deserving of much credit.” Clovis High’s first football team is a part of our rich heritage.


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September 26, 2013

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Clovis Roundup

Clovis Blood Drives

Upcoming Events ROCKTOBER FEST: RocktoberFest (Wednesday, October 9th from 10:00am1:00pm) is the largest event that Willow International puts on each year. There are three aspects to it: 1.) Transfer/four year Universities will attend to speak with and recruit our students looking to transfer 2.) We will be holding a JOB FAIR open to the public! So far, both Jem Management and Target will be looking to hire (we will have plenty more by the event). Veteran’s Employment Services will be out as well. 3.) We also use that day to market our Student Educational Plans (SEP’s), which assist our students with completing their educational goals in a timely manner. A car show (I will send you the flyer tomorrowplease do the best you can to advertise it), commercial vendors, live music, food and college programs and services will play a prominent part in the event as well.

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September 26, 2013

GREAT PUMPKIN BLOOD DRIVE The Great Pumpkin Blood Drive, though it is in Fresno, will be the big event of October and Clovis residents are encouraged to participate. Donors at the blood centers will receive a voucher for a pumpkin throughout the month. Sunday donors at the Pumpkin Patch at Shaw and Blackstone will receive a pumpkin plus treats such as hot dogs and shaved ice, plus fun for children. Fresno donor centers are at 1196 E. Shaw Avenue, #102, 1010 E. Perrin Avenue, 4343 W. Herndon and the Visalia center is at 1515 S. Mooney Blvd. The centers operate from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Friday and 9 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. on Saturday, except that Visalia closes at 1 p.m. on Saturday. One pint of blood and help save up to three lives. They can also join the National Marrow Donor Program Registry. For additional information,

Auberry Branch Library Read to a Dog: Sunshine Stop by and meet Sunshine! She is a beautiful Loenberger dog who loves children and stories, but she can’t read! Come read a story to this great registered therapy dog. At the Auberry Branch Library every Wednesday 4-5pm beginning September 4. Storytime at the Library Join us every Tuesday at 10:30am for the preschool storytime at the Auberry Branch Library. We will read stories, sing songs, and have fun! Begins Tuesday, September 10. TAG! Teen Activity Group Join the Auberry Library Teen Activity Group! Open to anyone 7th-12th grades. Earn volunteer hours, do crafts, plan programs, meet new people and more! Join us on any Thursday 4-5pm beginning September 12 at the Auberry Branch Library. TAG you’re it!

please call (559) 389-LIFE (5433) or visit www.donateblood.org . Blood Drives in Clovis through 10/10 Madyn Frazier Replacement – Saturday, September 28, 11:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m., SaveMart Grocery/Chase Bank, 2179 Shaw Avenue, Clovis. Clovis Night Out – Saturday, September 28, 5:00 – 9:00 p.m., Sierra Meadow Park, 101 N. Temperance, Clovis. All donors will receive a variety of discounts from Valley businesses for dining, recreation, Institute of Technology – Tuesday, October 8, 11:00 a.m.– 2:00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m., 564 W. Herndon, Clovis. All donors will receive a variety of discounts from Valley businesses for dining, recreation, entertainment, and services.

Saturday, August 31 2013 Whitney Campbell of the Fresno Grizzles presented a check to the USO and Clovis Veterans Post 3225 for their fundraising projects. The funds were raised on Friday July 5th, military night, at the ballpark by the auctioning off jerseys after the game.

2013 -SEPTEMBEROld Town Clovis Farmer’s Market Friday Night, September 27th Friday Night Farmer’s Market is in full swing in the heart of Old Town Clovis through September 12. Sample a cornucopia of fresh, delicious fruits and vegetables, grown here in the nation’s finest agricultural region, each in the peak of season! This weekly event also offers live entertainment and special activities for kids. Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Place: Old Town Clovis, Pollasky Avenue, between Third and Fifth Streets Free Admission Contact: Business Organization of Old Town (BOOT) at (559) 298-5774. www.oldtownclovis.org Old Town Clovis Pistachio Party at Farmers’ Market Friday, September 27th If you like Pistachios, head to Old Town Clovis as the Old Town Clovis Farmers Market presents “A Pistachio Party”, Sponsored by American Pistachio Growers. A celebration of all things Pistachio wouldn’t be complete without pistachio samplings and pistachio specialties. From pistachio flavored ice cream to pistachio flavored drinks. Pistachio funnel cakes to pistachio jellies and jams and a huge assortment of mouthwatering pistachio deserts. Time: 5:30 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Place: Old Town Clovis, Pollasky Avenue, between Third and Fifth Streets Free Admission Contact: Business Organization of Old

CLOVIS

CALENDAR

Town (BOOT) at (559) 298-5774. www.oldtownclovis.org Memorial United Methodist Church “Show and Tell the Gospel” Saturday, September 28th from 10am1pm Memorial United Methodist Church, 1726 Pollasky Ave A Blessing of the Animals and Adoption Event Memorial United Methodist Church. The public is invited with no admission charge. All animals must be on a leash or an enclosed pet carrier. Refreshments will be served. For more information: Becky Posey 559299-4615 or mailto:memumc@mem-umc. org Old Town Antique & Collectible Fair Sunday, September 29th Old Town Clovis’ one-of-a-kind Antique & Collectible Fair boasts cobblestone streets brimming with antique and collectible treasures. Time: 8:00 am to 4:00 pm Place: Old Town Clovis, Pollasky Avenue, between Bullard Avenue and Third Street Free Admission Contact: Business Organization of Old Town (BOOT) (559) 298-5774 www. oldtownclovis.org British Car Roundup Sunday, September 29th Dozens of owners of beautifully restored British automobiles converge on Old Town Clovis to show off their prized cars and compete for prizes. This unique car show is always held adjacent to the

October installment of the Old Town Clovis Antique and Collectible Fair. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Place: Old Town Clovis, Pollasky Avenue and Seventh Street Free Admission Contact: Valley British Auto Club (559) 297-0102 www.valleybritish.org -OCTOBEROld Town Clovis Wine Walk Saturday, Oct 5th Stroll the streets of Old Town Clovis and enjoy wine tastings from over 20 wineries as well as food tastings and entertainment. Time: 4:00 pm to 8:00 pm Place: Old Town Clovis For additional information, including ticket prices as well as specific merchants and wineries, please contact: Business Organization of Old Town (BOOT) (559) 298-5774 www.oldtownclovis.org Let’s Talk Clovis Tuesday, Oct 8th at 7pm 120 years of ministry, Clovis United Methodist Church and their families by Peg Bos.

Veterans Memorial Building, 453 Hughes/ Fifth, 7:00 pm. Free to public. Clovis High 40 year class-reunion Saturday, Oct 12th 6 to 11pm The Clovis High School Class of 1973 will celebrate its 40 year class reunion at The Belmont Country Club, 8253 East Belmont Ave There will be a no-host bar starting at 6 p.m. with buffet dinner at 7 p.m. and dancing to follow. The cost is $30 per person. Deadline for making reservations is Oct. 4th. For more details contact Rhonda at rdickins@hotmail.com for tickets. Escape to Brazil with Rio Grill Saturday, October 12th Shows start at 6:30pm Rio Grill Brazilian Steakhouse 1240 Shaw Ave.- Sierra Vista Mall Join us for an authentic Brazilian Steakhouse Dinner & Live performances from Brazilian Samba Dancers 559-322-6300 $30 per person


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September 26, 2013

Clovis Roundup

Log of Shame by April French-Naten

September 04, 2013 A man on the 700 block of Bush called police after he found his car window smashed in and his wallet stolen out of his center console. Apparently, he was most upset about the $500 in cash he was carrying around, “just because you never know when you will need it,” he exclaimed. Call me crazy, but that’s exactly why I carry my Visa card, baller!

September 07, 2013 Officers received a 911 call about a subject running around with a knife over on Antonio Drive. When they arrived, they saw a woman waving a butcher knife around and screaming at her husband. Apparently, she had found a pair of woman’s lacey unmentionables in his glove box that did not belong to her! Unfortunately, cheating on your wife is not illegal, but brandishing a weapon is. So she was arrested and given the opportunity to calm down in a jail cell! September 08, 2013 A non-injury traffic accident occurred at the stoplight on Armstrong and Ashlan. A young man accidently let his foot slip off his break and bumped into the car in front of him. His parents were called to the scene, seeing as it was their car and he was a minor. When asked how this happened, the driver who called in the accident stepped up to explain that the young man’s pretty little girlfriend had distracted his neck while at the stop. Apparently those butterfly kisses caused him to let his guard down and his foot rolled right off the break! September 09, 2013 An unknown subject broke into a house in the 800 block of West Ashcroft and stole a L-HTC cell phone, a container with money it, a pack of smokes, and a red baseball cap. Is it just me, or does it seem like this burglar stole pretty much everything he needed to have a good time out on the town tonight?

LAST ISSUE’S ANSWERS

September 06, 2013 In the 1700 block of Jordan, a young married couple reported that an unknown suspect had burglarized their vehicle by smashing in the rear driver’s side window, and had stolen their Acer laptop. Devastated, the woman explained that all of her homework for college was on the computer. Good luck trying to convince your teachers that a thief stole your homework!

CROSSWORD

September 05, 2013 An officer pulled over to do a vehicle check on an SUV parked with the windows down and the headlights on. While searching the car, he found a man hiding on the floorboards of the back seat. The man had 5, count them, 5 warrants for his arrest. I would be hiding too!

September 10, 2013 Near Clovis and 5th, an older man was arrested for driving under the influence. An officer driving by noticed him riding his bicycle on the sidewalk, hardly able to keep the bike upright. When they stopped him, he was 3 sheets to the wind and very proud of himself that he rode his bike to the bar and didn’t drive. Sorry pal, operating any vehicle, including a bicycle, while intoxicated will get you a DUI! Off to the drunk tank you go! September 11, 2013 Two back flow devices/valves were stolen in the same day. Unfortunately, this is becoming quite the common crime. Just a word of caution to the geniuses who continue to steal these from our city, our local businesses, and citizens: STOP IT! If you think its okay to rob your own neighbors, businesses, and local authorities, please, do us all a favor and move out of town! September 12, 2013 A man was arrested for grand theft auto when an officer found a vehicle near 4th and Osmun. The man had pulled over because he blew a tire. When the officer noticed, he stopped to help him. Little did he know, until after he ran the plates, that the vehicle was stolen. Minus the blown out tire, the car was returned to the registered owner undamaged! September 13, 2013 You know, Christmas is just around the corner, and I am pretty sure Santa is still in the business of knowing if you are naughty or nice. Kids nowadays don’t seem to be concerned with the naughty list like they used to! Especially this 13-year-old kid who was arrested for smoking behind a gas station and having a pair of illegal brass knuckles in his pocket! September 14, 2013 A man in the 1000 block of North Carolina was arrested after neighbors heard yelling coming from out in the street and called police. They arrived at the disturbance and found a man at a yard sale trying to get his money back for something he had purchased earlier that morning. When he had gotten home, he found that it did not work and the seller was absolute about no refunds. September 15, 2013 A young girl from a neighboring city was headed home from her boyfriend’s house when she got into a minor, non-injury traffic accident near Armstrong and Herndon. She had only had her license for two months, so she was not an experienced driver. A car pulled into her lane, resulting in the collision. Her parents, the legal registered owners of the car, were called. The girl waited silently for her mother to arrive. When she did, the wrath began. Turns out, the girl was not supposed to be in our town at all. She was supposed to be at a friend’s house 30 minutes away! Looks like it will be a LONG time before she sees her boyfriend again, because officers heard her mother ground her for the next 99 years! *The above Police Logs are loosely based on actual events. The names have been changed to protect the innocent. The circumstances have been created and embellished for your entertainment.

ACROSS 1. Cape near Lisbon 5. Chew the fat 9. Time of the 90th meridian 12. 1982 planned city in Israel 13. Vehicle carrying passengers 14. Expression of surprise 15. Long range nuclear weapon 16. 2nd largest Muslim denomination 17. Mad Men’s Draper 18. Spanish artist Salvador 19. S.F. murdered mayor 20. Baby talk fathers 22. Religious discourse 24. Poet Dickinson 25. Emblem stamps 26. Competes 27. 40th state 28. Expects 31. In an ageless way 33. A person in religious orders 34. Pa’s partner 35. Two considered as a unit 36. NE 68770

10. Large school of fish 39. Duple time dance 11. Tanacetum vulgare 40. Greek myth’s 1st woman 13. Lower jaw fronts 42. Word element meaning 16. Burn without a flame right 21. Cordiality 43. Point that is one point E 23. PBS drama theater of SE 44. Common teen skin disease 28. Mandela’s party 29. 42nd state 46. 4th Caliph of Islam 30. One who distributes alms 47. Oblong cream puff 31. 20th C. playwright T.S. 49. Phoned 32. Smallest state 50. Very low frequency 33. Turn into lime 51. Guild Wars creatures 35. Spanish seafood dish 52. Cozy 36. Language synonym Bura 53. Hooray! 37. Large-grained or rough to 54. Work units the touch 55. Soft-finned fishes 38. Understood by only a few 39. Thickened meat juices DOWN 40. Anjou and bartlett 1. Foray 41. Declare invalid 2 Killer whales 43. Molten metals surface 3. Television systems scum 4. Marvel at 45. Bird reproductive bodies 5. Connected spirals 48. Chronicles (abbr.) 6. Moroccan outer garment 7. Play a role *See our next issue for Crossword 8. ____ Daniel Webster Answers* 9. Golf attendants


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Clovis Fire Department Welcomes New Deputy Fire Chief On October 1, 2013, The Clovis Fire Department will welcome John Binaski as the new Deputy Fire Chief. Chief Binaski comes to Clovis from the City of Tulare Fire Department having served since 2002, rising through the ranks to the position of Division Chief in 2011. Chief Binaski has over 22 years of fire service experience counting his prior work involvement with the Kingsburg Fire Department and the Orange County Fire Department. He comes with a well-rounded work history in Operations, Fire Prevention, Training, Investigations, and EMS. In addition to his duties with the Tulare Fire Department, Chief Binaski has also been coordinating the Fire Technology program for the College of the Sequoias since 2007. Chief Binaski graduated from California State University, Long Beach with a Master of Science Degree in Emergency Services Administration, and completed the Executive Fire Officer (EFO) program through the U.S. Fire Administration. He is certified by the State Fire Marshal as a Chief Officer and Master Instructor. He has also attainted his Chief Fire Officer

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Clovis Police Arrest Man Wanted for 7 Warrants & Several Pursuits Clovis PD is asking for your help in identifying this theft suspect. He’s suspected of stealing 2 coffee makers from Starbucks at Willow/Herndon

on 8/29. This is the best photo available. Message us on FB, call 324-2556, or leave a tip on our City website. You can remain anonymous. Case 13-12547.

(CFO) designation from the Center for Public Safety Excellence. Chief Binaski will be filling a position vacated with the promotion of Chief Despain to Fire Chief in March 2013.

Building Evacuated as a Precaution for Carbon Monoxide Exposure

At 1:32pm, Clovis Fire Department responded to a call regarding employees complaining of respiratory and nausea from fumes at 90 W. Ashlan Ave. Upon arrival, firefighters determined that there were elevated levels of carbon monoxide present in the building. While the levels were not immediately life-threatening, all occupants were evacuated as a precaution. In total over 40 employees were evacuated

and evaluated with six transported to local hospitals for minor complaints of headaches and nausea. With all occupants accounted for, firefighters were able to take air samples and found that the source of the fumes most likely came from construction equipment fumes circulating through the air conditioning units on the building. Firefighters were successful in bringing the carbon monoxide levels down

to acceptable limits by opening all doors and windows and ventilating the structure. Thanks to a coordinated effort between Clovis Fire, Clovis Police, Fresno County EMS and American Ambulance no additional injuries to firefighters or personnel were sustained. As of 3:30pm, employees had been allowed back into the facility and were preparing to open for the balance of the day.

This incident is a good example of the importance in making your business fire/ disaster resilient. The rapid response of on-site management ensured the safety of personnel and patrons, minimized damages and allowed firefighters to do their job effectively. For more information on how you can prepare your business and develop a recovery plan, please visit www. ready.gov/business.


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Clovis Roundup

Away with Magic Bob Continued from page 1

Locklin has been hot air ballooning since 1997. “Ballooning is as close to barn storm flying as you can get,” said Locklin. “You’re at the mercy of the wind. You never know where you are going to land. When you land in someone’s yard, everyone comes out to see you. I’ve been told friendships have developed between neighbors who’ve never spoken until we landed in their neighborhood.” Hot air balloons were a mainstay in Clovis for years as a liftoff on Labor Day Weekend. After many years at Sierra Vista

Mall, the ballooning took a year’s hiatus and then started again, lifting off from the Clovis Rodeo Grounds. It was the local balloonist’s and Locklin’s hard work that made the balloons soar once again, starting with about 16 or 17. It is strictly a “fun fly”, for pleasure with no competition. He has personally owned four balloons, has a commercial pilot’s license and flies nearly every weekend, dependent on the weather. Hot air ballooning doesn’t often mesh well with the Valley’s intense heat. Locklin, who moved here from the Bay Area, has lived in Clovis since 1991

but has always felt like a native and very involved in the community since 1985. “We all have a responsibility to the community to make it as good as it can be,” Locklin said. I’ve gotten a lot from the community- I’ve made my living here, established friendships and my kids went to school here. I like to give back.” For years Locklin was a businessman, heavily involved in the local Clovis Kiwanis and Old Town Clovis Kiwanis. He served on the Clovis Tourism Advisory Committee for six years and now teaches business at the Institute of Technology in Clovis. “I’ve realized that Clovis really is a way of life,” he said. “It has a special feeling. When we go out to eat, I tell my friends we don’t go out of state- across Willow Avenue.” Locklin has flown balloons throughout the nation, adrift in a sea of sky with 1,000 other balloonists in Albuquerque, New Mexico or on a solo voyage at the break of dawn to watch the sunrise peak over the mountains. He joins a local band of frequent flyers who get together to glide and ride and then feast at tailgates after their adventures. Locklin occasionally

takes paid customers out for a flight- flyers who arrive as first timers and disembark as aeronauts. “I call it a full morning adventure,” Locklin said. “They help us set up, fly for an hour or so and then pack up. We get them involved; it’s part of the fun.” Each trip is a new adventure. They can land in a cow pasture or someone’s backyard by a pool. Often the landing is gentle and seamless, others a bit rocky, what Locklin calls a “cowboy landing.” He only takes two or three passengers at a time, unlike the larger Northern California balloon companies which can take up to 16 passengers. “It’s the difference between riding in a sports car or a school bus,” he said. Although Locklin has drifted toward the heavens hundreds of times, it never loses its thrill. “I’ve been a professional magician since 1967,” said Locklin, whose nickname is Magic Bob. “The correlation between that and ballooning is that they are both magic.” For more information about hot air balloon adventures- contact Locklin at magicbob4u@hotmail.com


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September 26, 2013

Faith in God-love for others - that’s who Ron Sundquist is By Carol Lawson-Swezey

Historian, artist, poet, photographer. Ron Sundquist is all of these and much more. But what he wants to be known for is his faith in God and his love for others. Evidence of his passion for art is prominent throughout the local area. He has painted the murals at all of the local Yosemite Falls cafes and the newly opened High Sierra Grill House at the Pavillion West Shopping Center. His window art has embellished Old Town businesses like the 4th and 5th Street Antique Malls and Quilter’s Paradise. A huge garden mural, nearly 40 feet long and 14 feet high, graces the On the Edge coffee house and a wall around the building displays a reproduction of the cornstalk fence on Bourbon Street in New Orleans. At Old Town’s Clovis Big Dry Creek Museum, Sundquist’s influence is both outside and within. Above the museum’s doors are three panels painted by the artist depicting historical buildings, Clovis Cole, the Wheat King the city is named for, and the Fresno Plume which carried lumber for the 45 mile trip from Shaver Lake to Clovis. The plume was the third longest in the country and operated for about 20 years. Within the museum, Sundquist’s influence is deep but not so apparent. He served as the museum’s first director and curator from when it opened in 1987 to 2001. Many of the museum’s artifacts were procured or catalogued by Sundquist. The museum, originally the First State Bank Building, was built in 1912 and was owned by the County of Fresno. Under the guidance of the Clovis Historical Society, a 99 year lease was secured and the building converted to a museum. “We were all volunteers,” Sundquist said. “I gave most of the tours and had to have a crash course in the history of Clovis

and California, including the origin of Dinkey Creek and the history of the lumber industry. I interviewed the old-timers and incorporated their stories into the tours. I came here from Minnesota and didn’t know a thing about Clovis until I arrived in 1987. But I was always interested in history and I was willing to be educated.” Sundquist is also the Clovis Chamber of Commerce’s official photographer and can be seen around town in his trademark cowboy hat, bolo tie and boots. Some people call him Mr. Clovis. “I am proud to represent Old Town Clovis,” Sundquist said. He was honored in 1993 with the city’s Historical Award for his work with the museum. In 2007, he was awarded the Spirit of Clovis Award at the Clovis Hall of Fame awards. “The Clovis Chamber has always enjoyed working with Ron,” said Fran Blackney, the chamber’s communication’s director. “He has taken some terrific photos of our events and milestones and “decorates” the city with his bright artwork on store windows. He is a kind, considerate person who always has nice things to say about people.” “Ron’s a walking encyclopedia who seems to know as much about the social history of Clovis as the main events,” said Ellie Huston, of the Business Organization of Old Town. “For years he was the curator of the Clovis Big Dry Creek Museum where he collected and catalogued much of the city’s memorabilia. He took great pride in presenting it in an interesting manner.” Huston said that Sundquist is also a talented photographer, artist and writer. “His talents are all self-taught - he’s had no professional training,” she added. Sundquist is humble about his art and says simply that he “observes great artists and absorbs the good.”

What gratifies him most is his legacy in sharing the history of the city. “I am most proud of the influence I had on the young people who came through the museum and who were encouraged to be part of history,” Sundquist said. “I was

involved with the chamber, the American Legion and the museum. When I become a member, I want to be involved. I always had my eye on the people and helped make the museum what the community wanted it to be.”

Bronze Statue to Commemorate Centennial By Kim Stephens KMPH News

Rodeo fans throughout the community will notice something new along Clovis Avenue. A fourteen (14’) foot bronze statue now stands at the head of the Old Town Trail at the entrance to the rodeo grounds to commemorate the Clovis Rodeo’s Centennial year in 2014. The bronze statue is of legendary, world-champion bull rider Lane Frost’s 1988 ride on the equally legendary and un-ridden bull Red Rock during the Challenge of Champions held at the Clovis Rodeo. As a part of the plans for their historic celebration in 2014 the Clovis Rodeo Association commissioned Central Coast artist and Fresno State graduate, Jim Stuckenberg to develop the piece. There are fifty (50) smaller numbered bronze likenesses of the larger statue commemorating the Clovis Rodeo’s 100th Anniversary available for purchase by rodeo fans along with bronze plaques to be installed on the statue’s base. The bronze will be officially dedicated prior to Clovis’ Centennial Rodeo to be held April 24-27, 2014. The Challenge of Champions was a competition where 1987 World Champion bull rider Lane Frost was to attempt to ride the legendary Red Rock, a bull that had never been ridden in 309 attempts during his professional rodeo career. The event matched the two champion athletes in seven exhibition matches at different rodeos throughout the Western United States. Frost did not successfully ride Red Rock at the April 1988 Clovis Rodeo, but he eventually rode him for the

full 8-seconds at the Redding Rodeo in May of that year for the first time. Lane successfully rode Red Rock in four out of the seven tries that made up the Challenge of Champions. Bronze artist Jim Stuckenberg lives to create the lore, legend, and legacy of the West. He learned the art of bronze making from western artist Mel Lawson and combined it with his artistic vision and meticulous attention to detail to create beautiful pieces that have been sought after by art collectors throughout the world including the White House, Reagan Library and savvy horsemen. Born deaf in 1943 the artist grew up on a ranch with horses in Santa Barbara, California and graduated from Fresno State University with a degree in Animal Science. While at Fresno State he participated in the college rodeo team. The statue, entitled “Challenge of Champions” was completed at the fine art foundry Genesis Bronze in Paso Robles, California. Founded in 2004 by John Kemple the foundry focuses on fine art with an emphasis on quality. Since their first public installation in the Cayman Islands for Dale Evers Studios, Genesis Bronze has cast built and installed a variety of notable public projects. In addition Genesis casts bronze for a number of internationally known artists and corporate clients. The Clovis Rodeo will celebrate their Centennial year and 100 years of an American Cowboy Tradition at a Cowboy Gala on Saturday, September 14. A sport

with deep roots in American history and the community of Clovis, the Rodeo Association will kick-off the festivities leading up to their Centennial year in 2014 with the gala to be attended by members, friends and fans of the Clovis Rodeo. The Clovis Rodeo Association hosts events throughout the year that culminate

with the rodeo always held the last weekend of April. For more about the Clovis Rodeo and Centennial events visit www.clovisrodeo.com or friend them on Facebook. Tickets for the 100th Annual Clovis Rodeo to be held April 24-27, 2014 will go on sale again in January 2014.


Page 20

Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Family Features

G

reen beans are no longer a plain side dish for dinner. Here are some fun, kid-friendly recipes to try at home to help encourage your kids to eat a healthy serv­ing of green beans. “Florida green beans are great with a dip. Try them with hummus, ranch or any of your favorite dressings,” suggested Justin Timineri, Executive Chef and Culinary Ambassador, Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. You can find more delicious recipes for Florida green beans at http://bit.ly/flsnapbeans.

The Power of Green Green beans are a flavorful way to eat healthy all year around. n They are a good source of dietary fiber. n Green beans contain vitamin C and folic acid. n They are also an important source of potassium and many micronutrients. n One cup of cooked, fresh green beans has only 30 calories and no fat, sodium or cholesterol.

Chef Justin Timineri

When choosing beans, look for plump, crisp beans that are reason­ ably well shaped. The beans should have even color with fresh blossom ends and snap readily when broken. Many people prefer smaller beans, which are usually more tender.

Green Bean Poufs Yield: 4 servings 1/2 pound green beans, trimmed 1 can prepared crescent roll dough Fill large sized stock pot 3/4 of the way full and lightly salt water. Bring lightly salted water to rolling boil over medium-high heat. Fill medium-sized mixing bowl halfway with ice and water. Add trimmed and cut green beans to boiling water and let cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Using hand strainer, remove green beans from boiling water and place them into ice water to stop cooking. The green beans should be crisp-tender and vibrant green. After green beans have cooled down, remove from ice water and set aside. Dry blanched green beans with paper towel. Open tube of prepared crescent roll dough. Cut each dough roll into strips. Wrap bunches of 3 green beans in spiral manner and place on cookie sheet. Continue process until all dough and green beans are used. Bake wrapped green beans until the dough is cooked and golden brown. Let cool and serve. Mini Green Bean Casserole Yield: 4 servings 1 pound green beans, ends trimmed 2 cups cheddar cheese, grated 1/2 cup panko bread crumbs 1 tablespoon olive oil Fill large sized stock pot 3/4 of the way full and lightly salt water. Bring lightly salted water to rolling boil over medium-high heat. Fill medium-sized mixing bowl halfway with ice and water. Add trimmed and cut green beans to boiling water and let cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Using hand strainer, remove green beans from boil­ing water and place them into ice water to stop cooking. The green beans should be crisp-tender and vibrant green. After green beans have cooled down, remove from ice water and set aside. Preheat oven to 370°F. Divide blanched green beans evenly into four mini casserole dishes. Add an even amount of cheese on top of green beans. In small bowl, combine panko bread crumbs and olive oil. Mix ingre­ dients to combine. Sprinkle bread crumb mix­ture on top of green beans and cheese. Place mini green bean casseroles in oven and bake until bubbly and golden brown. Let cool before serving.

Green Bean Stir-Fry Yield: 4 servings 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 cups fresh green beans, ends trimmed 2 cups sweet bell peppers, sliced 2 cups zucchini, sliced thin 1 cup carrot, sliced thin 2 tablespoons honey 1/4 cup low sodium soy sauce 1 tablespoon black and white sesame seeds Preheat large sauté pan or wok over medium high heat. Add olive oil to preheated pan. Care­fully add all vegetables to preheated pan. Cook vegetables for 4 to 7 min­utes or until desired doneness. Add honey and soy sauce to pan and stir to combine. Serve stir-fry with rice and garnish with sesame seeds.

Green Bean and Potato Salad with Yogurt Dressing Yield: 8 to 10 servings 1/2 pound fresh green beans, washed, ends trimmed and cut into thirds 2 pounds potatoes, washed, peeled and diced large 1/2 cup low-fat yogurt 2 lemons, juiced 1 cup fresh parsley, chopped fine 1/4 cup olive oil Sea salt to taste Fresh ground pepper to taste Fill large sized stock pot 3/4 of the way full and lightly salt water. Bring lightly salted water to rolling boil over medium-high heat. Fill mediumsized mixing bowl halfway with ice and water. Add trimmed and cut green beans to boiling water and let cook for 2 to 3 minutes. Using hand strainer, remove green beans from boiling water and place them into ice water to stop cooking. The green beans should be crisp-tender and vibrant green. After green beans have cooled down, remove from ice water and set aside. Carefully add cut potatoes to same boiling water greens beans were cooked in. Cook potatoes in boiling water for around 15 min­utes depending on size. The potatoes should be slightly firm, yet tender to the bite. Using colander placed in the sink, drain potatoes and run cold water over them to cool off and stop cooking. In large mixing bowl, combine yogurt, lemon juice, parsley and olive oil. Stir yogurt mixture to combine. Taste potato salad and adjust seasoning with salt and pepper. Keep potato salad cold in refrigerator and stir before serving.

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Clovis Roundup

Page 21

September 26, 2013

Press Release for CHS Cougar Choirs Yard Sale, Car Wash, Bake Sale and BBQ New York, New York, the city that never sleeps; home of the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, Times Square, Broadway, Central Park, Carnegie Hall, and so much more. Two of the six choirs at Clovis High School are preparing to perform in New York’s Carnegie Hall. With a cost of around $1200 per student, they have begun a rigorous fund-raising campaign to raise the needed funds. The first of these many fund-raisers is being held on Saturday, September 28th, 8:00 a.m-2:00 p.m. They are holding a multi-family yard sale in the student parking lot at Clovis High School. “But wait! There’s more!” as all infomercials tell us. They will wash your car for a donation, you can buy baked goods in the morning, and around the lunch hour you can purchase a BBQ hot dog off the grill! The prospective customer can have their car washed while wandering the aisles of countless items for sale while munching on a muffin or hot dog. Amazingly good deals can be found at yard sales, and with 150+ families possibly participating, this promises to be huge. All funds raised go to support the choir program and various activities throughout the year, such as the New York trip, but also music, sound equipment, festivals, and uniforms.

With a long tradition of representing the Clovis community in service projects throughout the community and traveling in and out of state with outstanding performing groups, the Clovis High Choirs have received national recognition when they were crowned National champions in 1995 at a Florida competition; also receiving Festival Sweepstakes in Anaheim, the Adjudicators trophy and First Place Gold in New York at the Heritage Festival in 2009, they were the featured High School choir in a performance in New York on the famed Carnegie Hall stage in 2004. These outstanding choristers are asking for support from the community they serve. As an example of their service, the choirs are dedicating their first concert of the year, on October 22nd, to the Marjorie Mason Center. Performing music from around the globe, the concert is entitled “Sounds of Joy, Worlds of Hope”; the audience and students will be asked to bring donations for the center to the concert. Look for more information in the next issue of the Round Up. Hoping to see a big turnout for the September 28th yard sale, these students need the community’s help in making their dreams become reality.

Masumoto kicks off Osher program fall ’13 lecture series September 12 Author and organic peach farmer David “Mas” Masumoto of Del Rey returns to Fresno State to kick off the fall 2013 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) Lecture Series, 4 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12 in the Satellite Student Union. He will be joined by wife Marci and daughter Nikiko Masumoto to discuss “The Perfect Peach: Recipes & Stories from the Masumoto Family Farm,” a literary cookbook that seasons recipes with stories that provide a taste of a working family farm. Housed within the Continuing and Global Education program, OLLI provides lectures, short courses and field trips for people 50 and older who want to explore

a broad spectrum of intellectual interests. It is the second OLLI appearance for Masumoto and it’s the first of five presentations this semester. The Masumotos will share personal insights with stories of their farm, their work and their lives that add to the flavor of their 50 favorite peach recipes. A food demonstration from their new cookbook will be part of the program. Masumoto, whose organic farming techniques have been employed by farmers across the nation, is the winner of the 2003 UC Davis “Award of Distinction” from the College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences . Also in the fall lecture series lineup:

• Sept. 26 -- Gerald Lee Tahajian, an attorney specializing in wills, trusts, taxation and probate, discussing Estate Planning in a Dynamic Environment: Coping With the Unpredictable Future.” • Oct. 17 -- Shirley McWilliams, California licensed acupuncturist, discussing “The History & Benefits of Acupuncture.” • Nov. 7 -- Fresno County Genealogical Society presentation on “The Study of Genealogy: America’s Hobby.” • Dec. 19 -- Scott Barton, executive director of Fresno Chaffee Zoo, discussing “Fresno Chaffee Zoo & Measure Z.” Seating is limited and available on a first come, first serve basis. Enrollment

for fall general sessions is $40 per person. There are nominal additional charges for short courses and field trips, including a tour of Gold Rush Town in Columbia and of the Los Angeles Holocaust Museum. Included with all memberships are access to the Henry Madden Library and free parking pass for all Osher classes and trips. Fresno State’s Osher program, operated by the Division of Continuing and Global Education, is partly funded by the Bernard Osher Foundation. For more information and to register for OLLI, visit www.csufresno.edu/olli or contact Craig Rebello at 559.278.0008.

National Philanthropy Day

Bulldogs Enter National

Honorees announced

Rankings at No. 25

To commemorate the 25th annual National Philanthropy Day, AFP Central Valley Chapter will recognize outstanding local philanthropists at an awards luncheon: Outstanding Philanthropists: Emmett & Desiree Castro Outstanding Volunteer Fundraiser: Marvin Smith Outstanding Fundraising Professional: Dana Lucka Outstanding Philanthropic Organization (large corporation): Pacific Gas & Electric Co. Outstanding Youth in Philanthropy

(small corporation): Price, Paige & Company Distinguished Achievement Special Award for Excellence in Fundraising: Gary Pigg Spirit of Philanthropy Awards: Ralph Goldbeck, and Guilds of Children’s Hospital Central California When: Thursday, November 7, 2013; 11:30am – 1:30pm Where: Pardini’s Banquet Facility, 2257 W Shaw Ave., Fresno, CA 93711 The awards luncheon will be preceded by a workshop by keynote speakers, Claudia and James Looney: Creating a High Performing Fundraising Program, from 8:30am – 11:30am. Registration is available online for both the awards luncheon and workshop at www.afpcavalley.afpnet.org.

By Jason Clay jaclay@csufresno.edu
GoBulldogs.com

The Fresno State football team is nationally ranked for the first time since 2008, entering this week’s USA Today Coaches Poll at No. 25. Fresno State (2-0) received 75 points in the USA Today Coaches Poll to climb into the top 25. The Bulldogs were last nationally ranked in the Sept. 28 poll back in 2008 following a 3-1 start to the season. The ‘Dogs were No. 21 in the Coaches Poll that week and No. 22 in the Associated Press poll, which are considered the two official top 25 polls in the FBS. The Bulldogs trail No. 24 Michigan State (131 points) and No. 23 Arizona State (176 points) as the two teams closest to Fresno State. Just outside of the top 25 was Nebraska (55 points), Wisconsin (53 points) and Texas Tech (49 points).

Fresno State hosts Boise State, who received five points in the Coaches Poll, on Friday at 6 p.m. in a game televised nationally on ESPN. This is the first season since 2005 that the Bulldogs enter the game against Boise State with a better record and a higher national ranking than the Broncos. That coincidentally is also the last time Fresno State defeated Boise State, winning 27-7 at home. The game is the Mountain West opener for the Bulldogs and matches the leagues two preseason divisional favorites up against one another. Tickets for the showdown are still available through the Bulldog Ticket office.


Clovis Roundup

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September 26, 2013

Carr Fuels Bulldogs in Comeback Win vs. Broncos Coming back from six-point fourth-quarter deficit to win 41-40

FRESNO, Calif. - No. 25 Fresno State finally got over the Boise State hump, snapping a seven-game losing streak to the Broncos with a come-from-behind victory led by quarterback Derek Carr in Friday’s 41-40 win in front of a sold-out Bulldog Stadium on ESPN. Down 40-34 with 7:04 left in the game, Carr engineered a 13-play, 87-yard drive over four minutes and 50 seconds to get the Bulldogs in the end zone. He completed 8-of-11 passes on the drive for 63 yards and running back Josh Quezada finished it with a one-yard game-winning touchdown run. “It means a lot because of just how good of a program they are,” Carr said of the meaning of beating Boise State. “What a great win for our school, what a great win for our community. It was phenomenal.” With the win, Fresno State improves to 3-0 for the first time since 2004 and starts out 1-0 in Mountain West play. The Bulldogs did so by grinding out a hard fought game, similar to the seasonopening victory over Rutgers when the ‘Dogs came back from two fourth-quarter deficits before winning in overtime. “I can’t say enough about the resolve of the guys in that locker room,” head coach Tim DeRuyter said. “They never lose faith in each other, they trust each other, they love each other and when you do that you can do some tremendous things. We’ve got some tremendous athletes, but that glue that we have is special.” Carr threw for 460 yards and four touchdowns with no interceptions. With his fifth career 400-yard passing game, he set new school and Mountain West records for 400-yard passing games in a career. He also extended his nation-leading streak of consecutive games with a touchdown pass to 23. Fresno State had 522 yards of total offense and scored 40 or more points for the eighth time in their last nine games.

Photo credit: Keith Kountz

Boise State’s offensive numbers were better on this night, going for 561 yards on 100 plays. “I did not know they ran 100 plays, but I guess that explains why I am so exhausted,” said free safety Derron Smith, who had six tackles and an interception

Bulldogs Continue Strong Play in Singles

in the game. “With the offense that we run, the defense is going to have to keep playing a lot of snaps on the field.” The most important snap was Boise State’s last of the game. Facing a fourthand-six on the Bulldog 49-yard line with a minute to go, Fresno State senior Jonathan

Cross Country Opens Season Strong

By Jason Clay
 jaclay@csufresno.edu
GoBulldogs.com

NAPA, Calif. - The Fresno State men’s tennis team won 3-of-4 singles matches at the Silverado Resort and Spa up in Napa, Calif. on day two of the 2013 Silverado College Tennis Invitational. In their first of six fall tournaments, the Bulldogs faced the University of San Francisco in singles action and head coach Evan Austin’s young squad had another successful day out on the courts. Austin was pleased with how his team came back against the Dons after opening up the day by losing both of its doubles matches to Idaho. “We got off to a slow start today in the doubles matches, which is something we’re going to improve on tomorrow morning,” Austin said. “I was very happy with the effort and energy level of our new guys and Ethan [Lopez] did a great job of finding a way to get a close three-set win.” Austin’s freshman, John Darmstaedter and Ethan Lopez both came away with wins while sophomore Adriaan DuToit was the third Bulldog to pick up a win on Saturday. Darmstaedter made quick work of the Dons’ Nils Skajaa, winning in straightsets for the second day in a row, this time 6-2, 6-3 over Skajaa. DuToit also won in straight sets for the second day in a row, taking down Thomas Takemoto 6-2, 6-1. In the match of the day, Lopez rebounded after losing the first set 6-1 to win sets two and three 6-1, 6-4 to defeat Germain Bahri. Sophomore Felipe Fritz was defeated by Bernardo Saraiva 6-1, 6-1 in the fourth

singles match on Saturday. In doubles play, which the Bulldogs started the day with, Fritz and Darmstaedter fell 8-3 to Idaho’s Odon Barta and Artemiy Nikitin. DuToit and Lopez fell 8-6 to Cesar Torres and Andrew Zedde. The Bulldogs conclude the 2013 Silverado College Tennis Invitational on Sunday when they face Oklahoma State at 8:30 a.m. in doubles play and later Arizona in singles action. “We really want to finish up strong in both singles and doubles tomorrow,” Austin said. Singles Results vs. San Francisco John Darmstaedter (FS) def. Nils Skajaa (USF), 6-2, 6-3 Adriaan Du Toit (FS) def. Thomas Takemoto, 6-2, 6-1 Ethan Lopez (FS) def. Germain Bahri (USF) 1-6, 6-1, 6-4 Bernardo Saraiva (USF)def. Felipe Fritz (FS), 6-1, 6-1 Doubles Results vs. Idaho
Nikitin/Barta (UI) def. Fritz/Darmstaedter, 8-3
Torres/ Zedde (UI) def. Du Toit/Lopez (FS), 8-6

Norton knocked the ball out of Kirby Moore’s hands for the fourth-down stop to preserve the victory. “We were playing a coverage that bringing John Norton in as our nickel guy - you know he is such a competitor and just earned a scholarship this summer and is a great guy on and off the field, one of those glue guys and people outside of this team probably don’t realize that he is one of the reasons this team is so close,” DeRuyter said. “To see him make that play, it was huge. I was just really happy for him.” Bulldog junior linebacker Karl Mickelsen had a team-high 16 tackles, the most by a Bulldog since Ben Jacobs had 16 stops in a triple overtime loss at Texas A&M in 2007. Fresno State forced two turnovers in the game - Smith’s pick and Mickelsen also recovered a fumble that was forced by L.J. Jones when the Broncos had the ball on the Fresno State 15-yard line. Fresno State then took the ball after that recovered fumble and Carr hit Davante Adams on a three-yard touchdown pass to extend Adams’ nation-leading streak to 11-straight games with a TD catch. That gave Fresno State a 34-19 lead with 58 seconds left in the third quarter. Boise State, led by quarterback Joe Southwick who threw for 313 yards but no touchdowns in the game, proceeded to score 21 unanswered points to put Boise State on top 40-34. But Fresno State, behind its first sellout crowd since 2008, persevered with the win in its conference opener. “I don’t know what more can be said about it,” DeRuyter said of the comeback. “Our guys were all in. You talk about being at the poker table and throwing every chip in and we were all in. To win it in the fashion we did where you are up and down, to finish it the way we did I couldn’t be more proud of my team.”

Fresno State’s men’s and women’s cross country teams kicked off their 2013 campaign with strong overall team finishes at the Fresno State Invitational at Woodward Park, the first home meet since the 2006 WAC Championships. The men put three runners in the top ten to finish second overall and the women placed three in the top 11 to finish third overall. The men were led by Danny Vartanian’s fourth-place finish. The senior out of Buchanan High finished the four-mile race in 19:58.7. He was joined in the top ten by Chriss Grimble and Kevin Poythress. Grimble ran a 20:12.3 to finish seventh and Poythress finished in 20:15.8 to take tenth. Their performances were key to helping the ‘Dogs hold off Cal State Fullerton 61 total points to 63 for second overall. Cal Poly took home the men’s team title with a total of 18 points. “We knew Cal Poly would be a tough challenge and they are a highly ranked team in the West Region and you can expect them to be at the national meet,” head coach Sean McManus said. “We were focused on winning the rest of the meet because Cal State Fullerton is a team that is neck and neck with us and San José State is a conference rival.” Vartanian’s strong finish saw him go toe-to-toe with the top Cal Poly runners for the first two loops around the fourmile course at Woodward Park. By the

third and final loop, the senior was running to hold off Cal State Fullerton’s Gilbert Solorza who he eventually beat by four seconds. “The two first guys (from Cal Poly) were national qualifiers and really good guys,” Vartanian said. “Running against them at races like this is really going to help us in the long run.” Schwanz, a sophomore from Germany, finished the 5K women’s race in 18:19.3 to finish fourth. After the first loop, she was right on the tails of the leaders before finishing ten seconds behind Cal Poly’s Ashley Bergstrom. Saylah Baserian (19:00.7) and Julianne Jacques (19:15.4) finished 10th and 11th, respectively. Fresno State placed five runners in the top 21. “For the first race it was alright,” Schwanz said. “We went out for the first two miles really fast and I was dying in the end, but for the first time this season it was okay.” Senior Carina Mendoza, who is redshirting this season, ran unattached and finished in third with a time of 18:18.5. The meet helped serve as a practice run for next season when the ‘Dogs will host the Mountain West Championships at Woodward. “We haven’t hosted a meet in a few years so I think this was important for our coaches and our facilities crew and for everybody to say ‘okay, now we know how to lay it out and how to tweak things to make it a little better’,” McManus said. “It was great to have a home event and to preview what we think will be the Mountain West course and give our kids a chance to race on it.”


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Page 23

Flood Control District Accepting Applications for Annual Clean Stormwater Grants By Carol Lawson-Swezey

The Fresno Metropolitan Flood Control District is again offering its Clean Stormwater Grant Program to increase public involvement on environmental education and improvement projects to promote stormwater quality. Successful applicants can receive up to $4,000 to assist in project funding. The total funding available is $30,000. Grants include 5th grade field trip grants to the San Joaquin

River, public information and education grants with up to $2,000 in funding, and targeted grants with up to $4,000 in funding. The deadline to apply is November 15, 2013, with an anticipated award date of December 11, 2013. Call Kristine Johnson at (559) 456-3292 for more detailed information, or for an application packet. Applications and instructions

may also be downloaded from www. fresnofloodcontrol.org on the Clean Storm Water Program page, under Community Services. The grant program creates and maintains District partnerships with local residents and community groups by funding projects that preserve, protect, or educate citizens about our water resources – local storm water ponding basins, canals, creeks, the

San Joaquin River and groundwater. Volunteer groups, environmental organizations, schools, neighborhood improvement groups and other not-forprofit associations are encouraged to apply. Fresno Metropolitan Flood Control District 5469 E. Olive Ave., Fresno CA 93727 · Tel. (559) 456-3292 · Fax (559) 456-3292 · www.fresnofloodcontrol.org

Streamlined Planning Process Announced for Forest Plan Revision in Region 5 By Carol Lawson-Swezey

Clovis, CA – In an effort to streamline the Forest Plan Revision Process for Early Adopter Forests in the Pacific Southwest Region, all three Early Adopter Forests will have a shared Environmental Impact Statement (EIS).

The Sierra National Forest (SNF) along with the Sequoia and the Inyo National Forests, will develop one EIS – an efficient and cost effective pooling of resources, along with three Records of Decisions (RODs) and three separate plans under the 2012 Planning Rule. A combined EIS will provide efficiencies in a number of areas: completing one EIS will be more efficient due to shared landscapes, similar issues and common stakeholders. Public review and comment periods held during the planning process will be combined for the three forests, allowing the public to consolidate comments applicable to all forests, or to submit comments for individual forests. In addition, a consolidated team will conduct the planning process for the forests simultaneously. While each unit has shared similarities,

different challenges and opportunities also exist on each forest; these have been and continue to be addressed at the forest level. As Forest Supervisor, Dean Gould will maintain responsibility for oversight of the process and approval of the final plan for the SNF. The SNF conducted public meetings throughout the year to collaborate with stakeholders/interested parties on the Forest Plan Revision process. August meetings introduced the Draft Sierra National Forest Assessment Report which will be finalized in December. The Assessment Report represents the NF’s assessment stage of Forest Plan Revision and is designed to more rapidly evaluate existing information on current ecological, economic, social conditions, trends, and sustainability and their relationship to the current land resource

management plan within the context of the broader landscape. This Assessment Report is not a decision-making document. It will be used for planning purposes and to inform the need to change the existing forest plan. The next step in collaboration with interested stakeholders will involve a series of public meetings centered on identifying areas of the existing forest plan in need of change. For more information about Forest Plan Revision on the Sierra National Forest, please call Judi Tapia at: 559-297-0706 ext. 4938 or email comments: commentspacificsouthwest-sierra@fs.fed.us. Comments can also be hard copy mailed to: Sierra National Forest (Draft Sierra Assessment), 1600 Tollhouse Rd., Clovis, CA. 93611.


Clovis Roundup

September 26, 2013

Page 24

CR 9.26.13  

CR 9.26.13

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