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GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, November 25, 2016 • Vol.18, No.48

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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FAMILY DYNASTY Jamie Wyeth on growing up in the first family of American painting


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

GREENVILLEJOURNAL LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED SINCE 1999 PUBLISHER | Mark B. Johnston mjohnston@communityjournals.com EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com DIGITAL OPERATIONS MANAGER Danielle Car ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emily Pietras | epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS David Dykes | ddykes@communityjournals.com Caroline Hafer | chafer@communityjournals.com Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com Melinda Young | myoung@communityjournals.com OPERATIONS MANAGER | Holly Hardin CLIENT SER VICES MANAGERS Anita Harley | Jane Rogers BILLING INQUIRIES | Shannon Rochester MARKETING REPRESENTATIVES Nicole Greer | Donna Johnston Annie Langston | Emily Yepes

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11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 3

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

They Said It

page three

Photo by Will Crooks

“It was magical. Then I’d go back down the hill to my house where my father was painting a dead crow.” Jamie Wyeth, comparing the inspiration he felt in the studio of his late grandfather, N.C. Wyeth, with the temperament of his father, Andrew Wyeth.

“As this project unfolds, we want all of Greenville to be excited.” Graham W. Rich, executive director of Renewable Water Resources, on plans to bore a 1.3-mile sewer tunnel under downtown Greenville.

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OPINION

FROM THE PUBLISHER

Make shopping local a priority this holiday season

I

MARK B. JOHNSTON | PUBLISHER

mjohnston@communityjournals.com

Drawn Out Loud

f there’s one thing I don’t have to remind any of you, it’s that Greenville is a great place to live. We’ve got firstclass restaurants, unique shopping venues, world-class culture and a downtown that is regularly celebrated by newspapers, magazines and websites across the nation. No matter who you are, Greenville welcomes you. So come here with your wallets open. Our restaurants and shops are more than happy to make your trip to Greenville the best it can possibly be. And I urge my fellow Greenvillians to do the same, to enjoy our many fine local businesses and keep our holiday spending right here in our community. As Black Friday marks the official start to the Christmas shopping season, please keep in mind the importance – and personal value – of shopping locally. By that I mean buying holiday gifts from locally owned, independent business owners who live here, pay taxes here, send their children to school here and want Greenville to prosper as much as

by Kate Salley Palmer

you do. When you shop locally, your dollars have a multiplier effect that touches your life in more ways than you probably ever imagined. A recent landmark study by the firm Civic Economics found that for every $100 spent locally, $68 stays in the community. However – and this is important – the study found that to hold true only if the money’s spent at a homegrown, locally owned business. Spend that same $100 at large-scale online retailers, and none of it stays in the local economy. Independent business owners spend their profits here – not just on goods but also on a wide variety of support services, from architects to accountants, building contractors to computer consultants. They also carry locally made goods that reflect the unique tastes and interests of their communities. Local business owners donate more to local charities, are more likely to serve on local boards and support a variety of community causes and events. I know, because I’m one of them. This is my home. What Greenville becomes affects my family and me personally. Let me encourage you with this idea: Think of three independently owned businesses you know you would miss if they weren’t around anymore.

$100 $68 spent with locally owned businesses

stays in the local economy

OR

$100 ZERO spent with large-scale online retailers

stays in the local economy

Make a point of stopping in to say hello and make a purchase, however small. If we all follow through on that, the impact will be huge. Consider this: According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, if just half the employed U.S. population spent $50 a month in independently owned businesses, their purchases would generate $42.6 billion in revenue. So shop local this Christmas. It matters. You’re creating jobs, promoting community development, funding more city services, supporting a host of local charities and helping keep Greenville the unique and wonderful place we all know it to be.

Think of three independently owned businesses you know you would miss if they weren’t around anymore.

Make a point of stopping in to say hello and make a purchase, however small.

Speak your mind The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


A DVERT ISEM EN T

SAVE FALLS PARK

November 11, 2016

To: Mayor Knox White, Members of the Greenville City Council, Members of the Planning Commission, and Members of the Design Review Board – Urban and Neighborhood Panels Ladies and Gentlemen: Please save Falls Park! This is a follow up to my previous letter to you dated November 3, 2016, which also appeared in the Greenville News on Sunday, November 6, 2016. There is important additional information that you should review and consider. Everyone in Greenville who uses Falls Park rightly believes that the proposed site of this new “glass tower” to be built right up against the Main Street Bridge is part of Falls Park. Why? BECAUSE IT IS! The City’s “Riverplace Plan” connected to the Falls Park Extension Plan ($13.5 million of Greenville taxpayers’ funds alone – not counting private donations) at the Main Street Bridge. Taken together, implementation of these two complementary plans required countless dedicated City officials and private citizens to complete by investing years – many years - of hard work, and they did a wonderful job. According to the Riverplace plans, it is to be noted that on the West side of the Main Street Bridge, on the north bank where the staircase comes up to Main Street beside today’s Coldwell Banker Caine office located at 428 South Main, the city went to great lengths, and considerable EXPENSE to purchase and demolish older buildings that completely blocked the third span of the Bridge on that side. Yes, there were buildings that the City bought and removed in order to complete the plan and open up a view of all spans of the Main Street Bridge from both directions. I have old photographs that show the buildings that were purchased and demolished to open up the view of the river from the Main Street Bridge, and, just as importantly, to open up the view of all three spans of the bridge as seen from the Wyche Pavilion. What about the “Falls Park Extension” plans? The City’s published documents of that plan, including the written landscape plan by the noted landscape designer who prepared them, were executed exactly as promised to the citizens of Greenville. The diagrams provided to the public show exactly what you see today, and recorded documents show this portion of the Park just as you see it today. The City built what it agreed to build on this property: The Liberty Bridge, a plaza, an overlook, and rock and cement walkways that go all the way to the Main Street Bridge.

There is no plan for a multi-story “glass tower” office building between the Bowater Parking garage and the Main Street Bridge. This would have been an absurd use and abuse of that portion of the property. The City and its citizens would never have agreed to that. The City and its citizens must not agree to it now. Ethically and legally the City must not give away what it has built! To summarize: 1) The City has Plans in place; 2) Those plans have been faithfully executed and implemented; 3) Riverplace and Falls Park are the culmination of a well executed public and private effort that created the crown jewel of Greenville. Yes, the City must now act with foresight and dispatch to address the looming pressure to develop a comprehensive plan for the Northern boundary of Falls Park. That Northern boundary has NO PROTECTION - NONE! This requires the City to develop a comprehensive plan to protect the Northern border of Falls Park from the Main Street Bridge to the Liberty Bridge and all the way to Church Street. This brings us back to the much-flawed approval given to the “glass tower” by the Design Review Board. How did this happen? That erroneous decision was based on the simplistic notion that “This is private property, therefore they can build it.” That was an entirely erroneous and

indefensible position for the City’s Planning staff to take. No doubt the developer was in a big, big hurry. He said, “I have to have this decision tonight.” He got it. The City needs to examine its planning set-up. No doubt, the developer’s proposed tenant for the “glass tower” is in a hurry. The developer apparently has the property under contract and/or option to purchase all or some of the land from Camperdown Falls, Ltd. Partnership/ Easlan Capital, which owns the entire Bowater parcel. The proposed tenant is a prominent law firm that already owns significant property nearby on Falls Park. Sources indicate that the law firm covets spectacular conference rooms, executive office suites, and highly visible exposure in the proposed new “glass tower” that would dominate the Main Street Bridge. In urgently pressing his case for the “glass tower,” the developer actually said that the citizens of Greenville would get a great benefit from his plan to cut down nearly all of the trees (many of them quite large) on his proposed building site: “The trees are blocking the view of the Park from the Main Street Bridge. We will cut them down to provide a better view.” My specific request to the Mayor, City Council, Planning Commission, Parks Commission and Design Review Board is this: Please address the important planning issues needed to protect Falls Park now. Commence the process immediately. Suspend consideration of this request (DRB DOCKET CA 16-642) to build a “glass tower” in Falls Park until any and all important planning gaps have been addressed. I respectfully submit this letter to the above-mentioned distinguished parties on Friday, November 11, 2016. David Sweatt 300 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina, 29601 dsweatt22@gmail.com


6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

100 feet down, 1.3 miles long — A look at the largest underground tunnel project in Greenville history CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

months to complete. Without the additional sewer line, the current sewer system for the Reedy River basin, which affects downtown Greenville all the way to Travelers Rest, will run out of capacity and development would grind to a halt, Rich said. In addition to providing capacity for future growth, the project will meet immediate needs by providing an additional buffer against sewer surcharges due to inflow and infiltration during rainy weather. Rich said the tunnel is not the least expensive alternative but the best long-term solution for the community. “Greenville has developed so much that doing an open-cut project would tear up the heart of downtown,” he said. “The tunnel is not the cheapest alternative, but we selected it because it won’t be disruptive. When the

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Renewable Water Resources will soon be diggin’ Greenville – or more precisely, digging under Greenville. ReWa is planning the largest-ever underground tunnel project in Greenville’s history, boring a 1.3 mile-long tunnel through granite rock 100 feet underground for a new sewer line that will run from Cleveland Park near the Greenville Zoo to Hudson Street near downtown. The $46 million project, called Dig Greenville, will meet sewer needs in the Reedy River basin for the next century, said Graham W. Rich, ReWa’s executive director. The underground tunnel will be 10 feet in diameter and house a 7-foot diameter pipe. Construction is not expected to begin until January 2018 and is expected to take 30 THE PATH OF

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tunnel is being drilled, people will never know what’s going on or where it is.” Trenchless technology is becoming more common in urban and suburban areas where infrastructure is buried well below ground and where open-cut projects would mean months or years of disruptions and detours. The gravity sewer tunnel conveys wastewater without the use of mechanical equipment. The wastewater upstream of downtown Greenville will drop down a shaft approximately 100 feet to the pipe in the tunnel, and then flow by gravity to the existing sewer system in Cleveland Park. Access shafts will have to be constructed at each end of the tunnel. The blasting of rock will occur at each end of the tunnel. Officials say the blasting will occur during the first 12 months of the project. People and businesses near the blasting sites will be given plenty of warning, Rich said. The tunnel itself is constructed without blasting by utilizing a tunnel-boring machine that cuts the rock as it moves along the tunnel alignment. Part of the parking lot off Cleveland Park Drive in Cleveland Park will be used as a construction staging area during the project. ReWa will add parking spots on the Washington Street side of the Cleveland Park playground to make up for the loss of those spaces during construction. After the 30-month construction project is completed, ReWa will restore the parking area used for construction staging, resulting in more parking for Cleveland Park/Greenville Zoo.

DIG GREENVILLE BY THE NUMBERS 7 FEET Diameter of sewer pipe

10 FEET

Diameter of tunnel being drilled

18

Alternatives studied by Renewable Water Resources

20 FEET

Distance covered per day of drilling

30 MONTHS

Length of time it will take to complete the project

100 FEET

Average depth below ground level

$46 MILLION

Cost of Dig Greenville project “There’s some benefit to the city in the long term but inconvenience in the short term,” Rich said. Once the boring starts, work will go on 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Wright said it should take about a year to bore the tunnel.

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

CHOOSE A TOP DOCTOR BACKED BY EVEN MORE. CHOOSE A GHS DOCTOR. A boring machine like this one will be lowered 100 feet underground to begin digging a 1.3-mile sewer tunnel underneath downtown Greenville.

The 20,000 to 25,000 cubic yards of rock will be removed by mine rails and dumped in the construction staging area. Trucks will remove the rock. ReWa is working with the city on the truck routes, likely on Washington Street and Laurens Road. Once the access shafts are constructed, Rich said residents won’t feel any vibrations. “They won’t feel it because it’s so far down,” he said. ReWa will use state-of-the-art equipment for geotechnical monitoring during the project. Wright said granite is the perfect type of rock for the tunnel. He said the tunnel would be completely encased in rock. ReWa used historical data from borings made over the years and did about 50 of their own to determine the topography, depth and character of the rock. Samples were sent off to the Colorado School of Mines for testing, Wright said. “We’ve got pretty solid rock,” he said. The contractor likely will advance 20 feet to 30 feet per day during the boring. The tunnel will be 10 feet in diameter, a size dictated by the equipment. A 7-foot reinforced fiberglass resin pipe will be installed and the space in between the pipe and the tunnel wall will be filled with grout. “It won’t be able to shift,” Wright said. The trenchless technology will require the least amount of maintenance of all of the alternatives studied, Wright said. Perhaps the most famous downtown tunnel constructed was the Big Dig in Boston. The Big Dig, officially called the Central Artery and Tunnel and the most expensive highway in U.S. history, moves traffic through 1.5 miles in downtown underground. The project ballooned from $2.6 billion to nearly $15 billion and was eight years behind schedule by the time it was completed in 2006. But Rich said trenchless technology is becoming more common when building infrastructure in urban, developed areas. Charleston, for instance, has many tunnels on the peninsula. “As this project unfolds, we want all of Greenville to be excited,” Rich said. “Our first priority is letting the people of Greenville know what’s happening.”

When you choose a Greenville Health System primary care physician, you get more than just a great family physician, OB/GYN, internist or pediatrician. You get a great doctor and a medical home backed by hundreds of leading specialists, all networked together. And with primary care physicians located at nearly 200 sites across the Upstate, there’s one near you. Find yours today at ghs.org/MyDoctor.


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Joint Replacement GHS to replace Marshall Pickens with new 120-bed psychiatric hospital MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

The Greenville Health System (GHS) and the national psychiatric hospital giant Acadia Healthcare have formed a joint venture to build a $64 million, 120-bed hospital on GHS’ main campus. The new 80,000-square-foot inpatient behavioral health hospital is expected to open in March 2018, replacing Marshall I. Pickens Hospital and its 46 beds. “This $64 million new state-of-the-art hospital will provide greater access to people who need these services,” says Mike Riordan, president and chief executive officer of the Strategic Coordinating Organization (SCO), a new private, nonprofit entity that helped to negotiate the joint venture with Acadia Healthcare. The SCO was formed as part of GHS’ transition to a private organization for the purpose of planning mergers, partnerships and joint ventures. Riordan and other GHS officials emphasized at a Nov. 15 public announcement of the new hospital that the joint venture could not have occurred had GHS remained in its public, nonprofit model instead of transitioning in October to its new private, nonprofit model. “We’re going to start initially with 65 beds,” says Dr. Kenneth Rogers, medical director and chair of the department of psychiatry and behavioral medicine at GHS. The new hospital will expand child and adolescent services, which currently has only six beds. This probably will be tripled, Rogers says. “We’ll also begin to develop alcohol and substance use treatment services, which we currently don’t have in our facility,” Rogers says. “We’ll continue to have general adult inpatient services.” Other services will include geropsychiatry, adolescent psychiatry and intensive outpatient therapy. Acadia Healthcare has 591 hospital facilities in the United States, Puerto Rico and the United Kingdom, and the joint venture with GHS will create its sixth joint venture hospital, says Joey Jacobs, chairman and chief executive officer of the Franklin, Tenn.-based company. The company’s hospitals span 39 states, and it has about 17,800 beds. Its services include behavioral health and addiction services to its patients in inpatient psychiatric hospitals, residential treatment centers, outpatient clinics and therapeutic school-based programs. Acadia is known as a leader in acute services, including helping suicidal patients, Jacobs says. “We’re a leader in addiction services, substance abuse and psychiat-

ric trauma.” Marshall Pickens will be closed after the new hospital opens, and its facility likely will be used for other purposes, such as oncology and outpatient services, says Dr. Spence Taylor, president of the Upstate Affiliate Organization (UAO), which, as a private, nonprofit organization, handles the health system’s operations.

One of the new hospital’s focuses will be on training public first responders on how to handle encounters with people who have behavioral and mental health problems. One of the ongoing issues with meeting a community’s mental health needs is that there often are too few behavioral and mental health professionals, including psychiatrists, to meet the need. This is part of the reason why GHS sought the joint venture with Acadia, GHS officials said. A new hospital for behavioral health will generate excitement and attract physicians, residents and other professionals to the area, Taylor predicts. “We have four psychiatric residents per year,” he says. “This will be an exciting pipeline for the Upstate.” One of the new hospital’s focuses will be on training public first responders, including police and emergency technicians, on how to handle encounters with people who have behavioral and mental health problems, Taylor says. The joint venture announcement falls on the heels of the presidential election and the possible repeal of part of the Affordable Care Act, which has expanded the number of people insured in the U.S. over the past six years. But this change is unlikely to have a big impact on the behavioral health industry, Jacobs notes. “Like everyone else, we’re waiting to see what happens, but the Affordable Care Act didn’t impact our industry like the rest of health care,” he says. “And because South Carolina did not do a Medicaid expansion under the ACA, the change will have less of an impact.”


11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Lead Academy breaks ground on $10.3M school building ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

After years of relocation, Greenville charter school Lead Academy has found home. On Tuesday, school officials broke ground on a $10.3 million school building, which will be constructed on 7.9 acres of land at 804 Mauldin Road. The 47,000-square-foot facility will have 25 classrooms, as well as an art room, cafeteria, media lab, auditorium and science lab, according to principal Rodney Johnson. The facility will allow the school to double its enrollment capacity to 432 students. “With this new school building, we’ll be able to offer kids more opportunities to be agents of change in the community,” Johnson said. Last year, the school began implementing exploratory learning, a curriculum defined by students concluding relationships between their background knowledge and unfamiliar concepts. The school’s approach to exploratory learning focuses on teamwork, community, technology and real-world experiences. The school decided to construct the twostory facility to accommodate the curriculum.

The classrooms will feature walls that can be separated to allow classroom-toclassroom interaction within grade levels. “There’s going to be so much more room for our students to collaborate, whether that be in the classroom or community,” said Lead Academy board member Allison Roach. Since the school implemented an exploratory learning curriculum last year, students have worked with community experts to complete a research project that is presented to family members, teachers and the general public. Students will use the auditorium to present projects if the new school building is approved. Lead Academy used a Series 2016 bond through Chicago-based Ziegler, a privately held specialty investment bank, to purchase the land and construct the building, as well as refinance an existing bridge loan and reimburse for planning and site-work costs previously incurred for the facility. The school plans to use its state funding, $5,780 per student, to pay off the bond. “When we began this process, we only had 136 students and a vision. Most folks told us that a school of our size would never be able to find financing,” Johnson said.

Ard Wood Holcombe & Slate

Lead Academy’s new building will have 25 classrooms, an art room, cafeteria, media lab, auditorium and science lab.

“It’s been a rollercoaster to get here,” he said. Johnson founded and opened Lead Academy at Redemption Outreach Center in 2010. He then moved the school to Upstate Circle of Friends in 2012 and Reedy River Missionary Baptist Church in 2014. The school then placed two portables on 7.9 acres at 804 Mauldin Road and relocated in April. The frequent change in location wasn’t a choice. “There was no place to expand, because the number of students has continued to grow and grow,” Johnson said. “That’s not

including our staff.” The school’s enrollment has increased from 80 to 240 students. It also started enrolling kindergarten through fourth grade this year, expanding staff from 13 to 29 teachers, according to Johnson. The new school building should be complete by August 2017.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, myleadacademy.com

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Friday, November 18th

DECEMBER 10-11 PEACE CENTER CONCERT HALL

Don't miss our Nutcracker Gift Shop in the Peace Center lobby!

Tickets starting at $18 Peace Center Box Office 864--467-3000 or peacecenter.org greenvillesc.gov/207/christmas-parade

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11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Just Kickin’ It Greenville gets USA Karate Junior National Championships and Team Trials ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

The USA Karate Junior National Championships and Team Trials are returning to Greenville July 19-23 at the 15,000-seat Bon Secours Wellness Arena in downtown Greenville. Hosted by VisitGreenvilleSC, the martial arts tournament will feature the USA Karate Junior National Team as they compete for a chance to represent the United States at the World Karate Federation’s Junior World Championships in Spain. According to VisitGreenvilleSC senior sales manager Robin Wright, the 2017 USA Karate Junior National Championships and Team Trials should bring more than 4,000

Hampel and USA Karate board members to promote the Wellness Arena for future tournaments. With millions of dollars in revenue up for grabs, cities across the country were trying to land the event. VisitGreenvilleSC has requested $25,000 from the city and county to help pay hosting costs related to the martial arts tournament. The city approved funding earlier last month, but Greenville County Council is still considering the request. The tournament has the potential to produce 2,200 room nights for hotels in the Greenville area and an economic impact

Good medicine begins with a joyful heart. stfrancishealth.org/heart people — athletes and spectators — to Greenville. “We are excited to be returning to Greenville for a third time, and I know that the city is a great destination for our members,” USA Karate CEO Phil Hampel said. Bon Secours Wellness Arena and Greenville last hosted the martial arts tournament and national team trials in 2013. It was supposed to be held in Salt Lake City, this year, but Hampel and board members had to relocate the tournament after finding out there wasn’t enough hotel space for the team. They chose Greenville because of its previous bidding efforts. Wright has worked closely with Hampel for the last two years to bring the tournament back to Greenville. “We originally bid on 2016 but unfortunately lost it to Pittsburgh,” she said. Wright and Beth Paul, the general manager of the Bon Secours Wellness Arena, then traveled to Colorado Springs, Colo., in January 2015 to deliver their bid for the 2017 USA Karate Junior National Championships and Team Trials. Wright also attended last year’s championship and team trials in Florida to “show support and help boost our future commitment to hosting.” While there, she met with

of $1.9 million dollars, according to VisitGreenvilleSC president Chris Stone. Wright added that winning the bid to host the 2017 martial arts tournament could lead to more successes in the future. “Greenville is definitely making a name for itself in the sports industry. We will continue to go after and bid on any and all sports that makes sense for the destination,” she said. One of those events could be the Olympic qualifier for the USA Karate National Team. In August, the International Olympic Committee unanimously approved the decision to include karate in the 2020 Olympics in Japan. The U.S. team will include a male and female athlete in the Kata division as well as three male and female athletes in the Kumite division, according to the USA National Karate-do Federation. USA Karate will release the official athlete selection procedures once they are available. “We would definitely welcome discussions to potentially hosting this. We look forward to a long-term partnership with USA Karate,” Wright said.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, teamusa.org


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Pickens County declares state of emergency as Pinnacle Mountain fire grows to more than 3,000 acres ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Pickens County Council has declared a state of emergency to help pay for the firefighting costs at Pinnacle Mountain, where a single campfire has apparently grown to more than 3,000 acres in just two weeks, according to the S.C. Forestry Commission. Last Wednesday, councilmembers called a special meeting to consider the declaration. Councilwoman Jennifer Willis said the fire at Pinnacle Mountain would likely disrupt communications, interfere with the use of roadways, pose threats to public order and threaten the life, health and safety of residents throughout the county. The declaration allows the county to apply for both state and federal aid that should help reimburse some of the funds spent on the fire. It also allows the county administrator to use money from other county funds to pay for firerelated expenses as well as mandate an evacuation if needed, according to county attorney Ken Roper.

Currently, the county does not have a cost estimate for its firefighting efforts. Last week, the Pinnacle Mountain fire grew from 2,312 acres on Monday to 3,283 acres on Wednesday, becoming the largest mountain fire recorded in South Carolina, said Forestry Commission spokesman Russell Hubright. The fire was just 35 percent contained as of last Wednesday. There are 170 firefighters on Pinnacle Mountain, according to the Forestry Commission. They spent most the day last Wednesday building break lines on the east side of the fire and north of Highway 11. The S.C. National Guard also used helicopters to drop water from the upper and lower Table Rock lakes on hot spots between Pinnacle Mountain and Table Rock, said Chief Warrant Officer Lester Furr. “They have a strategy on the ground,” he said. “They’re telling us where they need us to drop the water.” That ground strategy has included burnouts, fire lines and more. Last week, the Forestry Commission evacuated about 70 families from the affected area

Last week, the Pinnacle Mountain fire grew from 2,312 acres to 3,283 acres.

and conducted a large burn of more than 2,000 acres. The burnout was an effort to get ahead of a cold front that would fuel the fire with high winds and drier air, according to Hubright. There is no estimate on when the fire might end. “The ongoing drought, combined with leaf fall, low humidity and high winds is making conditions ripe for a wildfire,” said Forest-

ry Commission Fire Chief Darryl Jones. Some Upstate counties have received less than 10 percent of normal rainfall in the last 60 days, according to Hope Mizzell, a climatologist with the S.C. Department of Natural Resources. The S.C. Drought Response Committee recently updated several Upstate counties, including Oconee and Pickens, to severe

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NEWS drought status. On Nov. 19, the Forestry Commission extended a burning ban from the Piedmont region to the entire state. The ban prohibits yard debris burning and burning for agriculture, forestry or wildlife purposes. Campfires and open-fire cooking are not in the ban. However, the Forestry Commission encourages people in the affected area to refrain from unnecessary burning. “The intent of this burning ban is to help us avoid the number and severity of wildfires that we’re seeing,” Jones said. He added that the smoke is going to remain in the area until the wildfires are controlled

or South Carolina receives significant rainfall. The National Climate Prediction Center recently forecasted below-normal winter rainfall. The Forestry Commission is urging people to be mindful of the lingering smoke and particulate matter in the air. “Wildfires occurring in the mountains and Piedmont are exhibiting aggressive fire behavior, therefore increasing safety concerns,” Forestry Commission Fire Staff Forester Brad Bramlett said. The S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control is encouraging residents with asthma and other respiratory illnesses to stay

inside and keep windows and air intakes closed as well as replace air filters when needed. “Smoke from these fires can irritate the eyes and respiratory system, as well as aggravate or exacerbate chronic heart and lung diseases,” said Rhonda Thompson, the chief of DHEC’s Bureau of Air Quality. She added, “Currently, the Upstate counties are most affected. However, areas of the state north of I-20 and west of I-77 are at risk.” The national air quality standard for particulate matter is 35 micrograms per cubic meter averaged over 24 hours, according to DHEC. Air quality monitors throughout the state have

exceeded that standard in some locations for much of the past week. DHEC previously issued two air quality alerts for the Upstate. “If you observe low visibility due to smoke, then the air is probably unhealthy to breathe, and you should limit your time outdoors,” added Mike Abraczinskas, deputy director of the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality’s Air Quality division.

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UP BY SEVEN

It doesn’t matter if you’re a Tiger or a Gamecock — these are the defining moments in Clemson-Carolina history CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

W

hat’s the better college, Clemson or Carolina? If an argument that has been waged around family dinner tables, workplace break rooms and at sports bars and keggers were a divorce case, it would cite irreconcilable differences. The argument is long-lived, with Clemson-Carolina (or CarolinaClemson for Gamecock fans) being the second longest-running rivalry in major college football, behind only Wisconsin-Minnesota. The ClemsonCarolina game, which has been played each year since 1909, would have been the longest-running if not for a near-riot leading to the suspension of the series from 1903 through 1908. (By the way, Lafayette and Lehigh have the longest-running rivalry in all of college football, having played each year since 1897). Not that it matters. Sports Illustrated has called Clemson-Carolina the most underrated rivalry in college football. And as expected, the rivalry has produced its fair share of never-forget games and plays. In keeping with the pigskin theme, here are seven of the most memorable moments for each side (a touchdown and an extra point). And for good measure, we’ll throw in three more. Consider that a game-ending field goal. Will Saturday’s game produce the next memorable moment? Who knows, but we’ll all be watching. Clemson receiver Deon Cain makes a catch in the 2015 game.

1950: THE RUNNER

1975: THE PROMISE

1961: THE PRANK

1977: THE CATCH

Clemson was nationally ranked and undefeated going into the 1950 rivalry game. Carolina had lost to The Citadel. But nobody told Steve “The Cadillac” Wadiak that the Gamecocks were huge underdogs. Wadiak, who set a Southern Conference rushing record that year with 998 yards and was considered Carolina’s first real star, rambled for 256 yards on 19 carries in a 14-14 tie. Wadiak was the first Gamecock football player to have his number retired.

When 30 men dressed in orange ran onto the field at Williams-Brice stadium, the Clemson band fired up “Tiger Rag.” The east side of the stadium, filled with Clemson fans, started cheering. The Carolina contingent in the west stands booed. The players began doing jumping jacks and calisthenics. When the players started “milking” each other’s hands and dancing “The Twist,” the prank was revealed. The men in those uniforms (borrowed from Orangeburg High School) weren’t Clemson players, but members of the Carolina chapter of Sigma Nu.

Steve “The Cadillac” Wadiak

The night before the game, which Carolina had to win to go to a bowl game, Gamecock quarterback Jeff Grantz told a teammate they’d score every time they had the ball. The Gamecocks scored a touchdown every time they had the ball on their way to their decisive win in the series, 56-20. The last touchdown came with 54 seconds on a fourth-and-goal from the 20. Carolina racked up 458 yards on the ground and 626 yards in total offense.

Clemson held a 24-0 lead in the third quarter and looked well on its way to its best season since 1959. But Carolina rallied and took a 27-24 lead with less than three minutes to play. Quarterback Steve Fuller led the Tigers down the field. At the Carolina 20 with 49 seconds to play, receiver Jerry Butler ran a corner route. When he saw Fuller was in trouble, he broke back toward his quarterback. Fuller, rolling to his left, launched a pass. Butler leaped and made a diving backward grab that is known in Clemson as “The Catch.”


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Clemson was 5-5 going into the game, and coach Danny Ford was on the hot seat. The Tigers had lost to Maryland 34-7 and Carolina, ranked 17th and Gator Bowl-bound, was coming to town. The Gamecocks’ offense featured Heisman Trophy-winning running back George Rogers. Ford found his spark in orange football pants. The Tigers wore their traditional white pants for pre-game warm-ups before changing into their all-orange uniforms. The Tigers won 27-6 behind a two-interception game by Willie Underwood.

1984: BLACK MAGIC

It was the year of Black Magic for Carolina. Coming off a 5-6 season, the Gamecocks started the season with eight consecutive wins, including those against 11th-ranked Florida State, 12th-ranked Georgia and on the road against Notre Dame. Carolina rose to No. 2 before being upset by Navy. In the Clemson game, Carolina scored 19 unanswered points to take a 22-21 win. Quarterback Mike Hold scored the game-tying touchdown. Gamecock kicker Scott Hagler missed the extra point but got another chance when Clemson was flagged for having 12 men on the field. He nailed his second chance, and the Gamecocks had their first 10-win season ever.

1987: THE RANKED

The 1987 game was once of the most anticipated games in series history, with Carolina ranked 12th and Clemson eighth. Clemson led 7-6 at halftime. Carolina took the lead in the second half, and defensive back Brad Edwards picked off two Rodney Williams passes in the fourth quarter, including a game-clinching touchdown with 5:37 to play. The 20-7 win was Carolina’s first over Clemson in Columbia since 1979.

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1980: ORANGE PANTS

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Clemson defenders stuff running back Demetris Summers in 2003. Jerry Butler hauls in “The Catch.”

1992: THE AUTOGRAPH

Cocky longhaired freshman quarterback Steve Taneyhill rescued the Gamecocks from a 0-5 start, leading Carolina to four wins in his first five starts. Clemson needed a win at home to become bowleligible. The teams were tied 10-10 at halftime before Taneyhill led the Gamecocks to a 24-13 victory. After the game, Taneyhill “autographed” the Tiger Paw at midfield.

2000: THE CATCH II

Rod Gardner’s game-changing catch is arguably one of the most controversial plays in the rivalry. Carolina led 14-13 and was less than a minute away from snapping a three-game losing streak in the series. Clemson had the ball deep in its own territory. Quarterback

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Woody Dantzler called “Lion 70 X-Go,” and Gardner got behind the defense. The two battled for the ball and Gardner came up with a 50yard reception known to Clemson fans as “The Catch II.” Gamecock fans refer to the play as “The Push,” although the referee did not throw a flag for pass interference. Tiger kicker Aaron Hunt kicked a 25-yard field goal to give Clemson the win.

2003: THE ANNIHILATION

With Clemson Coach Tommy Bowden on the hot seat, the Tigers blew out the Gamecocks 63-17 in a game that left the stands at Williams-Brice Stadium half-filled at halftime. The Tigers scored touchdowns on each of their first three offensive possessions on the way to handing Lou Holtz the worst defeat in his Hall of Fame coaching career.

2005: THE UNDEFEATED QUARTERBACK

Quarterback Charlie Whitehurst became the first Clemson quarterback to earn four wins against the Gamecocks when the Tigers won the game 13-9. Before the game, the fierce rivals met at midfield and shook hands in an effort to put the brawl of the year before behind them.

2007: THE FINAL PLAY

Soccer player turned Clemson placekicker Mark Buchholz missed two field goals in the 2007 rivalry game. The game before, in a loss to Boston College, he missed a potential game-tying field goal. The Tigers had squandered a 10-point halftime lead and trailed by 21-20 with 2:09 to play. Clemson drove down the field to set up Buchholz’s redemption. With three seconds left, Buchholz drilled a 35-yarder to give the Tigers a 23-21 win. It was the first time in the rivalry that the winning points were scored on the game’s final play.

USC’s 19 unanswered points kept the Black Magic alive in the 1984 game.


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Two Gamecocks celebrate USC’s five consecutive wins.

2013: THE HIGH FIVE

Carolina defeated Clemson 31-17, or more precisely, Clemson defeated itself with six turnovers. The win gave the Gamecocks five wins in a row in the series for the first time.

2015: THE UNDEFEATED

The No. 1-ranked Tigers defeated the Gamecocks 37-32 last year in Columbia for their first undefeated regular season since 1981, the year Clemson won the national championship. The Tigers went on to lose in the national championship game to Alabama.

Steve Taneyhill led Carolina to a 1992 win.

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Two New Yorkers decided to make an easy buck by selling counterfeit tickets to the 1946 game. When the 26,000-seat Municipal Stadium reached capacity, the gates were shut. Holders of legitimate tickets demanded admittance. Those with bogus tickets wanted in, too. Two huge wooden gates at one end of the stadium couldn’t withhold the pushing and shoving of the angry mob and gave way in the middle of the first quarter. Thousands of fans gathered on the sidelines. South Carolina won the game 26-14.

1800s: BIG THURSDAY Waterstone on Augusta is a premier senior living community offering assisted living and memory care. Downtown Location Continuous Licensed Nurse Coverage Private and Companion Suite Offerings Onsite Dietician and Community Chef Organized Programs, Events, and Activities

In the late 1800s, South Carolina and Clemson played football on “Big Thursday” as a way to attract more people to the S.C. State Fair. All state offices and schools were closed on the third Thursday in October and the game, well before the Thursday night games that are now common on ESPN, was the only one in the nation played on that day. They played 57 of them before Clemson Coach and Athletic Director Frank Howard decided the game was too big and too important to always be played on his rival’s home field.

2004: THE BRAWL

One of the ugliest moments in the series came during Clemson’s 29-7 victory in 2004 when the teams brawled on national television. Tensions were high even before Carolina quarterback Syvelle Newton was knocked to the ground after a hit to the helmet on an incomplete fourth-and-11 pass with less than six minutes to play. It was the last game Lou Holtz coached. It wasn’t the first brawl in the series — another happened in 1983 — but it was definitely the worst.

PALMETTO BOWL FACTS First meeting Nov. 12, 1896 South Carolina 12, Clemson 6

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Latest meeting Nov. 30, 2015 Clemson 37, Carolina 32 Largest win Clemson 51-0 in 1900 Longest win streak Clemson, 7 (1934-1940) Current win steak Clemson, 2 (2014-2015) Series record Clemson leads the series 67-42-4

STATE LAW The General Assembly passed a resolution in February 1952 ordering the game to be played after the Southern Conference ordered Clemson to play no other league team other than Maryland as punishment for both schools accepting bowl bids against conference rules.


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Debutantes Assemble The Assembly presented eight young women at its 92nd annual ball on Nov. 19 at The Poinsett Club Elizabeth Pearce Armstrong, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Murphy Armstrong, Jr. of Greenville, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Murphy Armstrong of Spartanburg and Mrs. Christopher Columbus Pearce III of Greenville and the late Mr. Pearce. Her grandmother, Mrs. Christopher Columbus Pearce III, is a member of The Assembly, and her great-grandmothers, the late Mrs. George Pinckney McClenaghan and the late Mrs. Christopher Columbus Pearce, Jr., were both members of The Assembly. Miss Armstrong, a student at University of South Carolina, was escorted by Mr. John Murphy Armstrong III of Greenville.

McLean McKissick Coen, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Huguenin Coen of Mount Pleasant, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Edward Coen of Charleston and the late Mr. and Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick II. Her grandmother, the late Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick II was a member of The Assembly. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Ellison Smyth McKissick, her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Anthony Foster McKissick, and her great-great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Ellison Adger Smyth, were all Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss Coen, a student at Texas Christian University, was escorted by Mr. George Daniel Grice IV of Greenville.

Elsie Haynsworth Bickmann, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heinrich Gregor Bickmann of Greenville, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Walter Bickmann of Florida and the late Honorable Harry John Haynsworth III and the late Mrs. Richard Blanton Osborne Jr., both of Greenville. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Clement Furman Haynsworth, and her great-greatgrandmother, the late Mrs. Harry John Haynsworth, were both Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss Bickmann, a student at Wofford College, was escorted by Mr. Jackson Graves Taylor of Greenville.

Lillian Gower Fant, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Patrick Cleburne Fant III of Greenville, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. Patrick Cleburne Fant, Jr. and Ms. Sarah Lowe Fant, both of Greenville, and Reverend and Mrs. James Franklin Bray of Augusta, Ga. Her grandmother, Ms. Sarah Lowe Fant, is a member of the Assembly as was her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. John Fletcher Lowe. Her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. William Priestly Conyers, was a Charter Member of The Assembly. Miss Fant, a student at Wofford College, was escorted by Mr. Patrick Cleburne Fant IV of Greenville.

Helen Haynsworth Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Christopher Campbell of Greenville, was presented by The Assembly. She is the granddaughter of Mr. and Mrs. Donald Durant Campbell and the late Honorable Harry John Haynsworth III and the late Mrs. Richard Blanton Osborne Jr., both of Greenville. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Clement Furman Haynsworth, and her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Harry John Haynsworth, were both Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss Campbell, a student at University of South Carolina, was escorted by Mr. Andrew David Copeland of Greenville.

Lila Mayes Kilby, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. William Thomas Kilby III of Greenville, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mrs. William Thomas Kilby II and the late Mr. Kilby II of Greenville and the late Honorable Harry John Haynsworth III and the late Mrs. Richard Blanton Osborne Jr., both of Greenville. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Clement Furman Haynsworth, and her greatgreat-grandmother, the late Mrs. Harry John Haynsworth, were both Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss Kilby, a graduate of Clemson University, was escorted by Mr. William Clark Little IV of Greenville.

Ryan Mattison Carpenter, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Schaefer McSwain Carpenter of Greenville, was presented by her mother. She is the granddaughter of Mr. William McNeill Carpenter III and the late Mrs. Ryan Daniels Carpenter of Greenville and Mr. and Mrs. Harvard Keith Riddle of Greenville. Her grandmother, the late Mrs. Ryan Daniels Carpenter, and her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Edgar Manly Norris, were both members of The Assembly. Miss Carpenter, who attended Palmetto Dental School and is now a Dental Assistant at Greer Pediatrics, was escorted by Mr. Neill Coates Carpenter of Greenville.

Sarah Nash Taylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Walter Taylor, Jr. of Columbia, was presented by The Assembly. She is the granddaughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Walter Taylor of Columbia and Mrs. John Snowden Wilson and the late Mr. Wilson of Sumter. Her great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Clement Furman Haynsworth, and her great-great-grandmother, the late Mrs. Harry John Haynsworth, were both Charter Members of The Assembly. Miss Taylor, a student at Southern Methodist University, was escorted by Mr. Baxter Timmons Williams of Greenville.

Mrs. Andrew Jackson White, Jr. is President of The Assembly. Other officers are Mrs. John Phillip Roper, First Vice President; Mrs. John Murphy Armstrong, Jr., Second Vice President; Mrs. Joe Timothy Allen, Secretary; Mrs. Stephen Randell Ridgeway, Assistant Secretary; and Mrs. Walter Clark Gallivan, Treasurer.

Board Members are Mrs. John Edward Cebe, Mrs. Ladson Arthur Stover, Mrs. David Matthew Chambers, Mrs. Zane Johnson Meadors, Mrs. Walter Winn Gayle III, Mrs. Ellis Murray Johnston II, Mrs. Laurens Chisolm Nicholson II, Mrs. James Caldwell Johnston, Ms. Mary Marguerite Burnett, Mrs. Brandon Troy Hilton, Mrs. William Bernard DuPree, and Mrs. Knox Haynsworth White.


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events and happenings

FUNDRAISER

Activity vans are $25 and buses are $50. Multicar passes for three visits are available for $25.

Roper Mountain Holiday Lights lights up the Upstate through Dec. 30

Roper Mountain Holiday Lights is a partnership between the Upstate community, sponsoring organizations, the Rotary Club of Greenville and the Roper Mountain Science Center Association. More than 900 volunteers dedicate 7,000 hours to plan and execute the month-long event. Rotary and RMSCA board volunteers begin setting up displays in September, and the last bulb will be packed away in March. For more information and a schedule of events, visit ropermountainholidaylights.com.

FUNDRAISER

Set Free Alliance raises funds to end child slavery in India Locally run nonprofit Set Free Alliance will partner with #GivingTuesday on Nov. 29, the annual post-Black Friday and Cyber Monday social media charitable giving event. From midnight through 11:59 p.m. on Nov. 29, those interested in donating to Set Free Alliance can text givingfreedom to 91999. Every gift to Set Free Alliance goes directly to the children. For the 25th year, Roper Mountain Holiday Lights will light up the Upstate now through Dec. 30. Holiday Lights is open nightly from 6–10 p.m., and Winter Wonderland is open nightly from 6–9 p.m. The light display showcases a 1.5-mile drive through large displays including Candy Cane Lane, Santa’s Sleigh and many other family favorites. Attendees have the opportunity to park and stroll through Winter Wonderland, which will have a laser show for the first time this year. It also features lighted walking trails, giant holiday greeting cards created by local schools, a balloon artist, concessions and nightly visits with Santa at the North Pole Trading Post from Thanksgiving until Christmas Eve. On select nights, performances from local school choirs will fill the amphitheater with Christmas music. The professional Greenville Light Opera Works “GLOW” Lyric Theatre Christmas Carolers will also sing Christmas carols along the mountain pathways. The cost is $10 per vehicle Monday through Thursday and $15 per vehicle Friday through Sunday.

Set Free Alliance’s mission is to end child slavery in India. Its funding rescues children; reunites them with their families; and feeds, clothes, educates, houses and trains them if they don’t have anyone to go home to. They’ve rescued more than 14,000 children so far. For more information on Set Free Alliance’s #GivingTuesday movement, visit setfreealliance.org, on Facebook or follow @SetFreeAlliance on Twitter and the #GivingTuesday hashtag on social media.

RECOGNITION

Duke Energy named Chapman Cultural Center’s 2016 Cultural Champion Chapman Cultural Center recognized Duke Energy as its 2016 Cultural Champion at their annual business luncheon on Nov. 4. Jennifer Evins, president and CEO of Chapman Cultural Center, said, “Duke Energy has been

«


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«

supporting the arts and science in Spartanburg County for over 30 years. They’ve been a valuable partner for Chapman Cultural Center during that time, from providing their expertise on the design and construction of our building to most recently partnering with us for the Seeing Spartanburg in a New Light project.” Each year, Chapman Cultural Center honors its corporate donors with a business luncheon at which the Cultural Champion is announced. Last year, the recipient was Milliken & Company. As part of that recognition, the recipient this year received a custom-made wood sculpture award made by local artist Brian Swift. Linda Hannon, government and community relations manager for Duke Energy, said, “We want to be a part of seeing our communities grow and prosper. As a result, we understand the importance of the arts in that role and look forward to partnering with Chapman Cultural Center for many years to come.”

DONATION

Events that make our community better

DONATION

CommunityWorks receives $700,000 from US Department of the Treasury CommunityWorks (CW) received a $700,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI) Fund. The CDFI Fund awarded more than $185 million to 196 organizations that serve low-income families and economically distressed communities across the nation. CW was the only organization in South Carolina to receive this highly competitive federal grant. CommunityWorks will use the award to provide low-rate and flexible loans that finance affordable housing and small-business development throughout South Carolina. CW will focus its affordable housing efforts to increase the availability of affordable housing in Greenville, Spartanburg and surrounding areas and will continue its statewide expansion of its small-business lending with a targeted focus on markets where underserved businesses cannot access financing from traditional sources.

Graham Foundation grants $30,000 to Center for Developmental Services The Center for Developmental Services (CDS) was recently awarded a $30,000 grant from the Graham Foundation to fund a pool pack that stabilizes the humidity and temperature of the children’s therapy pool. This critical piece of equipment will replace a 16-year-old unit that had significant repair issues and was taken out of service over the summer.

Deborah McKetty, president and CEO of CommunityWorks, says, “Our goal is to provide access to affordable capital that will help foster local economic development through job creation, affordable housing development and improving the financial well-being for low wealth families and communities.” Submit good news items to community@communityjournals.com

“We are grateful to the Graham Foundation for helping us with this unexpected need,” said Dana McConnell, CDS executive director. The Graham Foundation is a private family foundation based in Greenville.

The Good

Better Tie Productions

Submit community news items to community@communityjournals.com.

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COMMUNITY Our Schools

Activities, awards and accomplishments

GREENVILLE TECHNICAL COLLEGE

Pharmacy technician program holds open house Greenville Technical College’s Pharmacy Technician program is hosting a pharmacy technician open house Dec. 1 at 6 p.m. for those considering a career in the profession. It will be held at Greenville Technical College - Benson Campus, 2522 Locust Hill Road, Taylors. This is an opportunity to speak to faculty one on one about GTC’s diploma and certificate program options, see the classroom and pharmacy lab and learn more about employment opportunities. For more information, call 2503073 or visit gvltec.edu/pharmtech. RSVP at pharmtech-gtc.eventbrite.com

ST. JOSEPH’S CATHOLIC, CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL & GREENVILLE HIGH SCHOOLS

Three teams win state championships St. Joseph’s volleyball

ST. FRANCIS FOUNDATION

Martinis & Mistletoe THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1

7:00-9:00

Christ Church tennis

Hyatt Regency Greenville, Studio 220

$50 PER PERSON

All proceeds from the 2016 Festival of Trees will benefit the St. Francis Chest Pain Center. Tickets available at stfrancisfoundation.com or Eventbrite For more information, call 864-255-1040

Greenville High tennis

St. Joseph’s girls volleyball team won its sixth consecutive state championship at Dutch Fork High School. This is their first year in class AA. Christ Church beat Academic Magnet in the class AA girls tennis state final 7-0 to win its 14th state championship. The Greenville High girls tennis team beat Hilton Head Island 6-0 to in the class AAAA state championship. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.


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11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

CULTURE

Jamie Wyeth adds his own color to his family’s artistic tradition

Words by Ariel Turner | Photos by Will Crooks


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A painter the caliber of Jamie Wyeth doesn’t often make an appearance for a show opening in Greenville. Even more unexpected from an internationally known artist who has painted dignitaries, befriended the likes of Arnold Schwarzenegger and spent weeks with the Kennedys might be his aversion to attending his own show. “I’m so embarrassed,” Jamie says. “I hate openings. As a friend who’s a writer says, it’s like standing around watching people read your novel.” His modesty shouldn’t, however, be confused with shyness. Of the five Wyeth family painters – grandfather N.C, father Andrew and aunts Henriette and Carolyn – Jamie, born James Browning Wyeth in 1946, is known to be the most social, living for many years in a New York City apartment overlooking Central Park and en- Jamie Wyeth arrived at a Greenville County Museum of Art reception in his own unique style, sporting pantaloons and joying the celebrity status and its one patterned sock. tangential benefits. trouser socks. Indigo paint remained around Over the course of his career, the painter has hung out with Andy Warhol, his cuticles and under his fingernails from whom Wyeth says always sat in the corner at projects in process, the nature of which he parties, and was invited to paint the White has not yet revealed. “I’ve never seen so many of our paintings in House from the front lawn for its 200th anniversary. The latter incident included snip- one place,” Wyeth exclaimed, almost tongueers accosting him on the front lawn of 1600 in-cheek while scanning one of the galleries. Pennsylvania Ave. after a security mix-up. “There’s more here than in the Brandywine.” He was quick to qualify. His mother, Betsy, Sounds exciting, yes? Wyeth doesn’t see it this way. “I have a very 95, who also lives on the family farm, likely has a larger collection in her home because boring personal life,” he says. she went through a stage, as he describes it, during which she would buy up any of her late Today, Wyeth lives part of the year on the husband’s paintings up for sale or auction. He says she surrounds herself with AnChadds Ford, Pa., farm his father made fadrew’s paintings because she really loves mous in his paintings, and where the Branthem. dywine River Art Museum is located. Brandy“You know, when they were going for $14 wine is known for its Wyeth family holdings. million apiece, we had to tell her to stop,” he Two days prior to Greenville County Musays. seum of Art’s opening for “Wyeth Dynasty,” a Jamie recalls one particular painting — a yearlong celebration of the family’s contribuportrait of his brother Nicholas, an art dealer tion to American art, Jamie Wyeth visited our — his mother just had to have when it was Upstate town. The purpose of his less-than being auctioned off at Sotheby’s in New York 24-hour visit on Nov. 14 – the second time he City. has visited the museum – was to see the new “She stopped bidding at $11 million,” he exhibit and meet with media during the day says. “It drove her over the top.” and select GCMA patrons at a special dinner

Colorful inside and out

that evening. The visit’s brevity was simply so Wyeth didn’t have to break from painting for longer than necessary. “I hate to say it this way, but I’m a workaholic,” Wyeth says. “I love to paint. It’s limitless. You can create another world with rudimentary tools.” He arrived in style, wearing a tailored navy sport jacket with white pinstripes and fiery red accents atop a pair of voluminous graphite-colored pantaloons cinched under the knee and two coordinating, but not identical,

The family business

Painting for the Wyeths was and still is a family affair. Wyeth says the creative energy when he and his father and aunts were all painting together was unsurpassed. Art for the Wyeths was like politics for the Kennedys – it wasn’t a hobby. “Painting was taken very seriously,” Wyeth says. By late elementary, Wyeth was brought back home for school so he’d have more


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time in the art studio. His father certainly influenced and guided him — Wyeth says he was “the best teacher” by example — but at one point Andrew decided his son needed to spend time on the rudimentary skills and placed him under his aunt Carolyn’s tutelage. Wyeth describes his aunt as a lover of animals who always kept them around, including two bear cubs she donated to a zoo when she could no longer keep them. But she was a strict teacher. “For a year I slaved away drawing cubes and black-and-white figures,” he says. Well-known for his oil portraits of people and animals, which he calls his friends just as much as any human, Wyeth says he was influenced greatly by his grandfather whom he never met. Instead, Wyeth painted in his grandfather’s studio, which was full of period costumes, guns and props N.C. had used for his illustrations. “It was magical,” Wyeth says. “Then I’d go back down the hill to my house where my father was painting a dead crow.”

Unseen undercurrents Speaking of his father’s style, Wyeth laughs at Andrew’s frequent designation as “America’s Realist.” “He’s hardly a realist,” Wyeth says, as only

CULTURE

the son of one of America’s most celebrated 21st-century artists could say. “It sure is strange. He has legions of admirers, and they pick out the worst qualities to imitate.” Jamie says he thinks his father’s work has an edgy and disturbing quality that people don’t necessarily recognize. For instance, Wyeth says Andrew’s most famous painting, “Christina’s World” displayed at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, is actually not the romantic scene many people imagine it to be. “Here you have this lone figure crawling across a field,” he says. But he says neither he nor his father had any desire to impose their views on what people should see when looking at their paintings, and the public perception of paintings often changes drastically over the years. For instance, following the release of Jamie Wyeth’s portrait of John F. Kennedy in 1967, he received thousands of hate letters because he chose to paint the former president in a more serious way and not in the blue-eyed, blond and grinning way the general public wanted to see him at the time. In 1988, however, the painting was chosen as the image for the national stamp of Ireland. Wyeth says in contrast to his father, whom he describes as “seeing things in brown and

white,” he sees things in much more vibrant colors. “Color choice is purely personal,” he says. This is especially evident in his more recent pieces, such as the oranges in “Smashing Pumpkins,” the neon greens in “Sister Parish and Mr. Universe” (which features a rearview nude portrait of Schwarzenegger while he was the reigning Mr. Universe) and the almost white-hot glowing background of “The Coop – Fourth in a Suite of Untoward Occurrences on Monhegan Island,” which, as the title states, focuses on strange occurrences on the small Maine island where the Wyeths spent the warmer months. This particular odd instance involved a seagull that somehow managed to live covertly with the chickens for weeks before being discovered. “Painting is the most individual of the fine arts,” Wyeth says. “I really get deeper by painting oddities.”

Wyeth Dynasty

Through Sept. 10, 2017 Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St., Greenville gcma.org

Rejoice in the Glory of Birth Birth Rejoice in the Glory ofChrist’s Christ’s

Hanging of the Greens

Sunday, November 27 - 11:00 AM (Traditional - Sanctuary)

Advent “Message and Music” Series

12:00 Noon (Memorial Chapel) with childcare provided. A “Take and Go or Stay and Eat Lunch” will be available following the service for $5.

Wednesday, November 30 - Rev. Dr. Justin Gilreath, Adam Layne Fisher, and Rosemary Hughes Wednesday, December 7 - Rev. Dr. Robert Howell, Cody Puck, Rosemary Hughes, and Catie Moyer Wednesday, December 14 - Rev. Jerry Hill, Katy Davidson, Judy Mulkey, and Catie Moyer

A Garland of Carols

Sunday, December 4 - 8:45 AM and 11:00 AM (Traditional - Sanctuary)

Christmas Eve Services 945 E. Main Street, Spartanburg, SC 29302

26 Rushmore Drive, Greenville, SC 29615

864-573-2353

864-268-8993

12:00 Noon (Traditional - Memorial Chapel) 3:00 PM (Contemporary -Sisk Hall) 5:30 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary) 11:00 PM (Traditional - Sanctuary)

Communion will be served as part of each Christmas Eve service. Childcare (ages 2 and under) will be provided during the 3:00 PM and 5:30 PM services.

Christmas Day Service 11:00 AM (Traditional – Sanctuary)

Buncombe Street United Methodist Church To Be and To Make Disciples of Christ www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016

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Nick Spangler, Garen Scribner and Etai Benson in “An American in Paris.”

Matthew Murphy / Contributing

Globetrotting and Gershwin Former ‘Amazing Race’ winner starts a new cross-country journey as star of ‘An American in Paris’ CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

During their winning sprint around the globe for the 13th season of “The Amazing Race” in 2008, actor Nick Spangler and his ex-Dallas Cowboys cheerleader sister, Starr, covered eight countries in 23 days. While his current trip — as Henri Baurel in the North American tour of “An American in Paris” — won’t be as much of a whirlwind, he says it is every bit as exciting. “With ‘The Amazing Race,’ you wanted to pack as minimally as humanly possible. I had a backpack and that was it,” he said. “For this trip, I’m traveling with my wife and my 14-month-old son in a car loaded to the brim, and we’ll spend 12 months on the road. It’s a much longer haul this time.” “An American in Paris” will be in Greenville for eight performances from Nov. 29 to Dec. 4. Inspired by the 1951 Academy Award-winning film, “An American in Paris” is the romantic story of an American soldier, a mysterious French girl and an indomitable European city, each yearning for a new beginning in the aftermath of war. “The show is incredible. The role is incredible,” said Spangler, who was in the original Broadway casts of “The Book of Mormon,” Rodgers + Hammerstein’s “Cinderella” and “It Should Have Been You.” “I’ve never been

happier in my life.” The role of Henri, the soldier’s romantic rival and a Parisian aristocrat, is bigger on stage than it was in the 1951 movie starring Gene Kelly. Henri gets engaged to the French girl, Lise, but winds up realizing she’s not truly in love with him. “Henri is really like a gallant gentleman, even though it breaks his heart to let her go and he knows it’s the right thing to do,” Spangler said. Spangler said landing a role in “American in Paris” was daunting because the show’s choreography is heavily influenced by ballet and the majority of the members of the company are ballerinas. “The early days of rehearsal were terrifying,” he said. “But at the same time, because a lot are dancers, they may not have sung or acted on stage, so I was somebody they could turn to in that regard. It really was a great sharing of talents. We all were able to grow and learn together.” The stage show, directed by 2015 Tony Award-winner Christopher Wheeldon, features the same George and Ira Gershwin music as the movie did. “One of the real cool things is that if you saw the movie and loved the movie, you’ll love the show. If you haven’t seen the movie, you’ll still love the show,” said Spangler, who also drew rave reviews for his Off-Broadway performance as Matt in “The Fantasticks.” “We deliver a classic story with classic music in a contemporary way.”

“An American in Paris” When: Nov. 29–Dec. 4 Where: Peace Center Tickets: $25 to $85 Information: 467-3100 or peacecenter.org


HARVEST HOME

Andrew Wyeth, born (1917-2009) Jacklight, 1980 egg tempera on panel ©2016 Andrew Wyeth / Artists Rights Society (ARS) New York

In celebration of the centennial of Andrew Wyeth’s birth, the Museum presents Wyeth Dynasty, a retrospective of Andrew Wyeth’s art complemented by works of his father, N.C., his son Jamie, and his sisters Carolyn and Henriette. More than 70 examples are featured in this exhibition of works by the first family of American painting. Gallery Tour of Wyeth Dynasty Sunday, December 11 2 pm free As we celebrate the holiday season, join us for a guided tour and discover the inspiration the artist found where he felt most at home.

Exhibition presented by

Journal Wyeth Jacklight.indd 2

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street Greenville, SC 29601 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1pm - 5 pm Museum closed Thanksgiving Day & Friday, Nov. 25

admission free

11/17/16 11:41 AM


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Christmastime Is Here

A GREENVILLE TRADITION

Roper Mountain

Science Center Association

Real-life brother and sister star as siblings in ‘A Charlie Brown Christmas’ ARIEL TURNER | CONTRIBUTOR

aturner@communityjournals.com

An iconic family television tradition is coming to life on the Gunter Theatre stage this holiday season with help from a brother and sister pair. The S.C. Children’s Theatre’s first ever production of “A Charlie Brown Christmas” runs Dec. 2-4 and 9-11 with Charlie Brown and his sister, Sally, being played by real-life siblings Julia and Jack Higginbotham. Julia, 10, and Jack, 11, who get asked “all the time” (said in perfect sibling unison) if they are twins, are regular performers in productions around the Upstate. They have both made it to the final cut for some Broadway productions, as well. But “A Charlie Brown Christmas” gave them a singular opportunity: They’ve been cast in the same show before, but they’ve never interacted on stage together. “We are super excited,” says their mother, Suzanne, whose husband, Brandon, has also performed with his children. “It never crossed my mind when we got the cast list that they’d get brother and sister.” Suzanne says the two are very similar to their stage characters. Jack is much more serious and protective of his downtime, much like Charlie, and Julia is peppy and outgoing like Sally. The SCCT production will feature two entirely separate casts who will perform alternating shows. The “Green” cast is comprised of seventh- to 12th-graders, and the “Red” cast members range from fifth to seventh grade. Director Mia Phillips says she employs the multicast method to allow more students to be involved and also to help alleviate some of the fatigue from performing back-to-back shows. Julia and Jack are part of the Red cast. Phillips says their casting was purely coincidental. “I did not even think about Charlie Brown and Sally being brother and sister when I was casting them, but these are the parts they got,” Phillips says. Julia says it’s really fun for the two of them to act with each other, because even though they do have their typical sibling moments of disagreement, and are fiercely competitive when it comes to their grades, they are great friends. Jack says his favorite scenes in the whole

Will Crooks / Staff

Julia and Jack Higginbotham star as Charlie and Sally Brown in SCCT’s “A Charlie Brown Christmas.”

show are the ones he and Julia do together. “It’s something you don’t get to do all the time,” Jack says. “It’s basically what we do all day but in front of a million people.” Julia and Jack have grown accustomed to theater life, juggling voice lessons, acting classes at SCCT and play rehearsal. Julia says she’s often tired because of the late evenings on school nights, but the experience is so fun and rewarding that it’s worth it. And she’s figured out how to combat the fatigue. “Sometimes I have some coffee in the morning, so that might change my perspective on the day,” Julia says, speaking much more like a professional actress accustomed to dealing with the press than a typical fourth-grader. The original “A Charlie Brown Christmas” special made its debut on CBS on Dec. 9, 1965, but the stage version wasn’t licensed and released until 2013. It follows the television special, including all of Vince Guaraldi’s memorable music and the opening ice-skating scene, for which the children’s theatre cast members will wear Heely tennis shoes to “skate” around the stage. All of the songs are performed on stage by the cast and a three-piece band – keyboard, upright bass and drums. “It’s such a classic,” says Phillips. “We’re so excited.”

“A Charlie Brown Christmas” When: Dec. 2-11 Where: Gunter Theatre, Peace Center Tickets: Start at $18 Information: 467-3100 or peacecenter.org


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Chapter: SOUL puts a new spin on old-school Big Easy funk VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

On “Oh Yeah,” the opening track of Chapter: SOUL’s new EP, “The Bible, Book 1,” the New Orleans band makes their home city proud, launching into a horn-heavy funksoul bounce designed to get people moving. Band founder and leader Calvin Johnson Jr. sends a soaring tenor sax solo over keyboardist Kashonda Bailey’s gritty organ while the rhythm section pounds out a heads-down funk groove, the kind you wish could go on forever. The next two tracks, however, prove that Johnson has more on his mind than the typical New Orleans groove. Johnson has played with everyone from the Dirty Dozen Brass Band to rapper Mystikal, and his multigenre musical vision takes shape on the futuristic electro-jazz-fusion of “James Joint” and the hip-hop/jam-band hybrid “Freakish.” For Johnson, he’s just drawing from the music he grew up with. “Just from the sheer disparity in generations between Dirty Dozen and Chapter: SOUL, you’re going to have differences in the music,” Johnson says. “It’s like we learned from different textbooks.

They learned from the book of the postwar baby-boomer generation. And we’re reading from the book of the millennials. We have a totally different perspective on the music.” He adds, “We’re all speaking the same language of music, but the music has to evolve.” That being said, Johnson owes a lot to his former band. While touring with the group a few years back, Johnson and Dirty Dozen sousaphone player Kirk Joseph talked a lot about melding traditional New Orleans second-line funk and jazz with a more modern perspective. Those conversations gave Johnson the courage to explore his own musical interests and try to figure out how to create a unique sound. “When I started the band, I knew I had something to say. The problem was I had so much to say I didn’t know where to start from,” Johnson says. “And what I had to say changed and evolved as I opened up the band to other people and asked others to be a part of it. They brought their different vocabulary to the conversation. So then we had our musical conversations, and when that happened, we blended and compromised. That’s how we found unique ground. That’s how you find something different.

That’s how evolution takes place.” When he began recruiting other members for Chapter: SOUL, Johnson says he actually wasn’t looking for the most technically gifted players. “It’s not about the best musicians. That’s a misconception that a lot of people have,” he says. “Sometimes the best musicians bring a closed-mindedness, so to speak. We’re not trying to reinvent the wheel, so we don’t necessarily need the best musicians. We’re trying to spin the wheel. I needed musicians who are creative and open to creating.” He came up with a group that was just

about perfect for his vision, and his enthusiasm when he talks about them is palpable. “Sousaphone is the backbone instrument of the city of New Orleans,” he says. “It’s the foundation of the second line. And [former Dirty Dozen player] Julius McKee understands it on a whole different level. That cat is bad. Kashonda Bailey, I call her ‘The Deaconess,’ because she is stone church. She reminds you of that old Baptist church where there’s no A/C and everyone’s sitting there with the hand fans and reading the hymnals; she brings an organic element and a spirit to the music. And [drummer] Terry Scott brings an energy and excitement to the music that I find very refreshing. He listens to everything. It’s exciting to build and create with different aspects of time and beat and rhythm to the table. Having a band like this expands the palette, so to speak.”

Chapter: SOUL When: Thursday, Dec. 1, 8 p.m. Where: Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive Information: 235-5519, gottrocksgreenville.com

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30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016

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CULTURE

Amped Up Folk fave Johnny Irion plugs into his rock side VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Greenville, in your inbox.

Johnny Irion is probably best known as part of a duo with his wife, Sarah Lee Guthrie. They’ve spent most of the last decade releasing a series of melodic country-folk albums that spotlighted their yearning vocal harmonies and soothing acoustic melodies. But it was during the recording of their most recent studio album, 2013’s “Wassaic Way” (produced by Wilco’s Jeff Tweedy and Patrick Sansone), that a friend of Irion’s noticed some of the fierce electric guitar that was popping up throughout the record and gave Irion some advice. “He said I should probably think about putting my rock stuff somewhere else and not fusing too much of the rock stuff with the folk,” Irion says, “which is what we’d been doing. He’d always known that I had music like that in my head. Even though the Sarah Lee and Johnny stuff would fall

«

Johnny Irion

Christmas Chorale with the

Friday, December 9, 2016 • 7:30PM McAlister Auditorium, Furman University BING VICK, JR., CONDUCTOR

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Johnny Irion w/ Niel Brooks When: Wednesday, Nov. 30, 7 p.m. Where: Horizon Records, 2-A W. Stone Ave. Tickets: Free Information: 235-7922, horizonrecords.net

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into a more digestible folk platter, I’ve always loved electric guitars. But those kinds of things would’ve never made it on a Sarah Lee and Johnny record.” And thus, after four records of bittersweet folk introspection, Irion formed a band called U.S. Elevator and recorded an album of rough-hewn roots-rock in the Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers mode, heavy on wiry riffs and upbeat rhythms. The songs are catchy and full of layered harmonies, but the swaggering heaviness of songs like “Dangerous Love” and “Cry for Help” will surprise anyone who only knows Irion from his records with Guthrie. “It was fun to take on those ideas,” he says. “It ended up not feeling as weird as I thought it was going to be. I had the sound of U.S. Elevator in my head, and it was an opportunity to explore the rock side of things. And at the same time, I met a bunch of dudes in Santa Barbara who were willing to set up and record to this two-inch tape machine with my buddy [producer] Tim Bluhm. I had a vision that I wanted to play some rock ‘n’ roll and have the songs to back it up. And we did it. It all worked out. It’s just creating a whole other movie to be an actor in.” Irion is currently touring with U.S. Elevator, but he’s taking a break from those shows to play an acoustic in-store performance at Horizon Records with local singer/guitarist Niel Brooks on Wednesday. He’s planning to do songs from the new album in that acoustic format, but he says he’s not worried about the lack of amplifiers. “If you have to have amplification or any other tricks to make a song sound like a good song, it’s probably not worth playing in any form or fashion,” he says. “That’s always been the deal with any record I’m a part of. I have to be able to unplug the electric guitar and play it sitting in a room with friends or family. It has to be up to snuff to play it that way. If I don’t feel comfortable sitting in that circle and playing it, I probably won’t record it.” In fact, Irion might be playing some even newer songs at Horizon, because he’s got two more albums planned out. “I have a solo record coming out in the spring that I made with Dawes as the backing band,” he says. “And I have more songs for the project I’m doing after the solo album. I love stockpiling and constantly nesting songs and hopefully they have a home. I don’t like the pressure of having to go write a record all at once. I like touring, coming home, writing and then doing a record after that whole process.”


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Carisbrooke

401 Ladykirk Lane, Greer, SC 29650

Home Info Price: $549,900 Bedrooms: 3 Baths: 3.5 Year Built 1996

MLS#: 1331883 Sq. Ft: 3400-3599

Schools: Mitchell Road Elementary, Greenville Middle, and Eastside High Agent: Kathryn Curtis | 864-238-3879 kathryn@wilsonassociates.net wilsonassociates.net

Highly sought after and rarely available, this beautiful waterfront home with gleaming lakeside heated salt water pool is sure to please. Whether you choose to enjoy your coffee on the upper or lower screen porches or just sit on the pool deck and watch the herons fly by, you will surely feel like you are on vacation. This lovely home features a master on main, a study/office, a formal dining room, and a large family room with a wall of windows to enjoy the view of the lake and the pool. Upstairs features 2 bedrooms, a bath, and a large bonus room.

The finished basement is perfect for entertaining with a bar area and den/card room. Also included is a full bathroom for your pool guests - so those wet swimsuits won’t have to get the whole house wet. Only 10 minutes from downtown, Carisbrooke has excellent schools and is known for its paved walkways, amenities, and southern hospitality – you’ll notice all the waves from your future neighbors as you drive in. Only a few of these lakefront homes have sold in the last decade! Come see this one fast because it won’t last!


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market Huntington

Willow Creek

Carisbrooke

4 Huntington Court · $1,575,000 · MLS# 1329275

364 Crepe Myrtle Drive · $525,000 · MLS# 1327461

400 Ladykirk Lane · $369,900 · MLS# 1331331

5BR/5.5BA Private, urban oasis. 10 minutes to Downtown. Quick access to 385. Situated on 2.3 lush acres. Tennis, pool, cabana, outdoor kitchen, fire pit. Must see!

5BR/3.5BA Gorgeous golf course home backing to the 2nd tee box! Master on main level, updated kitchen, set on .63 acres, 10 mins from shopping! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com for more details!

4BR/2.5BA Nearly 3,000sf on a 1/3 acre lot with a fenced yard, this home sits on a culde-sac and features a screened porch! Visit GreenvilleMoves.com for more details!

Contact: Tom Marchant 449-1658 The Marchant Company

Contact: Cameron Keegan 238-7109 RE/MAX Moves

Contact: Debbie Dujardin 884-2588 RE/MAX Moves

Advertise your home with us Contact: Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com

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12 Sevier Street 864.282.8600

www.embassy-flowers.com

For complete information call 864-679-1205 or e-mail aharley@communityjournals.com


OPEN SUNDAY, NOV. 27 from 2-4PM BROWNSTONE MEADOWS

ALSO OPEN

PREFERRED BUILDERS

DRUID HILLS NORTH MAIN

Arthur Rutenberg Homes

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/4V58SL/201-W-Hillcrest-Drive-Greenville-SC-1328030

201 W. Hillcrest Drive • 3BR/3BA $300,000 · MLS# 1328030 CODE 3828243 Kacey McCall-Hagin · 325-3737

2 Kirklen Ln • 3BR/3BA • open 1-5 p.m. $288,900 · MLS# Model Home Jordan Doss · 915-1468

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

Mon.-Sat. 9 am-5pm Sun. 12-5 pm ARHUpstateSC.com For further info, call 655-7702

thanks

A Time To Give

At this time of year especially, we are grateful for the families who have trusted us with their real estate dreams this year and in years past. We wish you all the comforts of home and happiness this Thanksgiving season.

Bringing Quality Home Since 1964. www.cdanjoyner.com RESIDENTIAL · COMMERCIAL · RELOCATION · PROPERTY MANAGEMENT · SENIOR SERVICES · CAREER CENTER

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Agents on call this weekend

C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS ®

Michelle Roach 640-2556 Easley

Linda Bobo 982-8322 Simpsonville

Ellis Crigler 616-1348 Augusta Road

Jane Ellefson 979-4415 N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Vicki Given 879-4239 Greer

Keith Boling 419-6903 Downtown

Bryan DeYoung 230-8284 Pelham Road

Kimberly Arnold 616-7310 Garlington Road

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Featured Neighborhood

The Retreat Residences at Keowee Falls THE OAKMONT

Home Info Price: Starting at $495,000 Included With Purchase Of Property: Waterfront boat slip access and golf cart direct access to a new, $3.5mm Sports, Activity and Wellness Park including: resort style pool, fully equipped & staffed fitness/wellness center, tennis complex, activity park, property owner pavilions, integrated community trail system, and more. Agents: Justin Winter | 864-506-6387 | Justin@JustinWinter.com Trip Agerton | 404-281-0475 Lin Cannon | 770-845-4700 Kim Crowe | 864-888-7053

Nestled in a private enclave of The Cliffs at Keowee Falls, The Retreat Residences have a pedigree to match their unparalleled surroundings. Residents will enjoy a suite of amenities included with purchase and maintenance free ownership. Four meticulous plans are available by Shockley Design | Meritus Signature Homes offering Energy Star Certified, 3-5 bedroom residences ranging from 2,153-4,800 sq. ft. including quality features such as Lennox HVAC, stainless steel Kitchen

Aid appliances, Jeld-Wen windows and doors, screened porches, open floor plans, walk-in pantries, architectural ceilings, large open kitchens, 2 ½ car garages, all complimented by warm and inviting interiors and craftsman style architecture. Only 14 of 28 sites remain. Contact us now to discover affordable, quality, maintenance free living in an active lifestyle community at Keowee Falls.

Real Estate News

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in October 2016 As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 30 agents that is consistently a top performer in Greenville. The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTORS® for outstanding performance in October 2016: Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Barb Riggs – Top Unit Listing Leader and Volume Listing Leader of the Month Tom Marchant – Top Unit Sales Leader of the Month Mikel-Ann Scott – Top Unit Sales Leader and Top Volume Sales Leader of the Month Anne Marchant & Brian Marchant –Top Unit Sales Team, Top Unit Listing Team, and Top Volume Listing Team of the Month

Valerie Miller Properties (Valerie Miller, Chuck Miller, & Clint Miller) –Top Volume Sales Team of the Month Agents at The Marchant Company are dedicated to providing Riggs T. Marchant Scott unsurpassed service and are committed to meeting clients’ needs. With over 350 years of combined real estate experience, The Marchant Company prides itself on their knowledge of the Greenville area real estate markets and their Valerie Miller Properties commitment to excellence to A. Marchant & B. Marchant


11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

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HOME Featured Home

Chatsworth

120 Pentland Court, Greer, SC 29651

Home Info Price: $875,000 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 4.5 Lot Size: 1.96 Acre

MLS: 1326372 Sq. Ft: 4900 Built: 1994

Schools: Oakview Elementary, Riverside Middle, and JL Mann High Agent: Becky Orders | 864.270.0743 borders@cdanjoyner.com

This is the best kept secret you will find! Nestled on just under 2 acres overlooking Big Rocky Creek you will wake up to the beauty and sounds of two waterfalls with the occasional wildlife. Surrounded by trees for total privacy this home offers ultimate outdoor living! Extensive decking overlooking blue slate walkways and patio, including a hot tub. The stone walkway leads you to a stone patio and firepit by the river. This truly feels like a mountain retreat with your own private river - all within minutes of the conveniences of living in town!

Amazing views from every room with walls of windows along the rear of this beautifully maintained home. Graciously sized rooms feature tall and vaulted ceilings. Granite kitchen with separate wet bar. The large master bedroom and guest quarters are on the main level. Downstairs features an enormous rec room with a wet bar, two bedrooms, two baths and ample storage. New paint on the entire exterior. Truly move in ready! A three acre lot next door is offered as a separate purchase. This is not a drive by!

Real Estate News give their clients the edge on the Greenville area markets. The Marchant Company services closed units include: the greater Greenville, SC area including Easley, Fountain Inn, Taylors, Mauldin, Travelers • Berry Gower • Jane McCutcheon • Pat Loftis Rest, Greer and Simpsonville. The Marchant Company is dedicated to serving Greenville • Carolyn Dowling • Jere duBois • Spencer Ashby and Upstate South Carolina with “Decades of Trust. Confidence in the Future.” • Charlene Panek • Kiersten Bell • Susan Reid • Donna Morrow • Kristi Moon • Victor Lester • Faith Ross • Lori Thompson • Virginia Abrams Coldwell Banker Caine Names • Francie Little • Marcia Hancock • Virginia Hayes October 2016 Circle of Excellence Recipients • Holly West • Marshall Jordan Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales • Jacob Mann • Mike Dassel and listings from October through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volCircle of Excellence Teams (4+ agents) achieving $2 million in listing/closing volume or ume, or four units listed or closed. The distinction also celebrates Coldwell Banker Caine’s eight units listed/closed include: Team efforts listed below. • Lewis and Company Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1 million in listing/closing volume or four listed/ • Cheves Mussman Ouzts Group


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME Soil Therapy

with Will Morin

A Gardener’s Letter to Santa Dear Santa, I know it has been probably 35 years since I last wrote you, but with your bright and cheery “Ho Ho Ho” about to surround our homes and neighborhoods with Christmas splendor, I thought I would write you my own wish list for the holiday. Please bring me a Click and Grow Smart Herb Garden (ClickandGrow.com, $60). It’s far too cold to grow anything outside, so I’d love to be able to grow smart with this intelligent “smart” herb garden that only takes up a small footprint on your counter or desk. The device constantly monitors your plants, stores a month’s worth of water, utilizes LED technology for lighting and only consumes $3 worth of electricity a year. The Haws copper watering can (Williams-Sonoma.com, $90), made from bright and gleaming copper, dates back to 1886 London, when it was first produced by John Haws, who patented the “watering pot with perfect balance.” These classics are a fixture in English gardens. A gift certificate to Roots on Augusta would be a fun and welcoming surprise gift (RootsOfGreenville.com). Roots is known for their indoor garden inspirations, outdoor specialties, a flock of chickens and a handy potting service. In the spring and fall, a Roots gardener will come to your home and repot or replant your containers with fresh, seasonal color and amazing designs all painted with nature’s splendor. Fatwood from Orvis, at Main and Washington streets downtown (Orvis.com, 14-lb. wooden crate, $69). A sustainable product, “fatwood” is the resin-saturated heartwood from pine tree stumps. It lights a roaring crackling fire in minutes, fills the air with the scent of a pine forest and lets you sit back to enjoy time with the family or your favorite football team. It’s 5 o’clock somewhere – grow your own cocktail garden with the Cocktail Grow Kit (UncommonGoods.com, $12). Six-seed packets for thyme, lavender, Thai basil, mint, lemon balm and blue borage get their tasty starts in the included recycled egg carton. Everything sourced from within the USA. I have a lot planned for my garden next spring. I truly only wish for a healthy garden and a bountiful harvest. It is the time I get to spend in the soil – among the green leaves, colorful blossoms, beneficial insects, birds, butterflies and whatever else Mother Nature has planned – that is the important, rewarding part of life. This is all I really want for Christmas this year. The rest is just gravy. Thank you, Will Will Morin is an avid gardener and food enthusiast. Follow him on Twitter and Instagram @ DrinkNEats.


11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Tucker Branch

37 Donemere Way, Fountain Inn 29644

Home Info Price: Starting in the high $180’s Schools: Fountain Inn Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Contact Info: Jessika Poole | 540-226-6830 jessikapoole@greatsouthernhomes.com

Builder Great Southern Homes is excited to now be a part of the Greenville community, with one of their premier communities being Tucker Branch. Tucker Branch is an upscale community, conveniently located near downtown Fountain Inn and less than two miles from I-385. These Great Southern Homes have been tested by the Green Smart Homes program, to ensure maximum energy efficiency for optimal energy use. Honeywell’s Tuxedo Touch Home automation system is also a feature in the homes at

Tucker Branch, which allows you to control your homes lights and security while away, at no extra cost. Great Southern Homes is also building homes in the following neighborhoods: Whispering Oaks, Rolands Crossing (Spartanburg), Victoria Park and Weatherstone. For more information please visit our website at www.greatsouthernhomes.com.

JULY 8 , 2016 | VOL. 5 ISSUE 28

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HOME

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of October 24 – 28, 2016 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$2,921,040 $2,896,275 $1,790,000 $1,675,000 $1,300,000 $1,250,000 CHAUNESSY $1,000,000 $905,000 $800,000 STEWART PARK $655,000 THE OAKS AT ROPER MOUNTAIN $610,000 $575,000 $525,000 HAMMETT’S GLEN $495,000 FIVE FORKS PLANTATION $492,770 $490,000 WOODLAND HILLS $488,000 WATERS RUN $479,095 LAUREL GROVE $469,000 KILGORE FARMS $460,257 SPAULDING FARMS $451,500 LONGLEAF $445,500 $445,000 GARDENS AT THORNBLADE $445,000 CARILION $437,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $427,507 VALLEY AT TANNER ESTATES $427,000 KILGORE FARMS $403,909 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $403,875 $400,000 $399,000 SUGAR CREEK $397,900 GOWAN’S FORT $397,500 GLEN MEADOWS $383,500 CLEAR SPRINGS $375,000 $359,500 HARTS COVE $358,208 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $346,900 TUSCANY FALLS $345,000 WESTHAVEN $340,275 SUGAR CREEK $336,000 LATOSCA $335,000 CARILION $334,000 FOREST COVE $330,000 WEST FARM $329,528 CARILION $324,984 CYPRESS RUN $318,000 KILGORE FARMS $315,000 WATERS RUN $310,190 KILGORE FARMS $300,910 WATSON CROSSING $296,000 CAMDEN COURT $295,000 ELLETSON ACRES $295,000 KILGORE FARMS $293,500 COOPER RIDGE $292,016 $290,000 BOTANY WOODS $290,000 VERDMONT $289,000 THORNHILL PLANTATION $288,000 BRIDGEWATER $287,160 KELSEY GLEN $284,365 BRIDGEWATER $283,098 BELSHIRE $280,125 COTTAGES@HARRISON BRIDGE $276,550 MOUNT VERNON ESTATES $270,000 SUMMERWALK $265,000 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $265,000 $265,000 LONGLEAF $249,484 VERDMONT $246,000 THE OAKS $245,000 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $245,000 $245,000 ENCLAVE AT LEXINGTON PLACE $243,900 HOWARD’S PARK $242,945 $241,000 $240,000 TOWNES AT RIVERWOOD FARM $238,500 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $237,900 SHARON RIDGE $235,000 EDWARDS FOREST $235,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $233,500 LAKE FOREST $233,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $230,460 CHICORA CREST $230,000 ROBINSON LANDING $229,829 SUMMERFIELD $227,250

CO A LLC SMITH ROAD INVESTMENTS L MCCALL WILLIAM DODD FLORIDA LA-CO INC ESSO PROPERTIES LLC LULLWATER SYNDICATE INC BURGESS J TYLER (JTWROS) STONE FRANCES OWINGS TRU X & H REALTY INC LADEAN HOLDINGS LLC SIACHOS MARSHA GREGORY CENTER LLC HOOVER BRADLEY G & JENNI GUSHUE JOHN F NVR INC CAR INVESTMENTS LLC JOHNSON GARY F NVR INC DSR BUILDERS INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH VAUGHAN GREGORY P MARK III PROPERTIES INC MEADOWS DANIEL C (JTWROS YOUNG LINDA D DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH NVR INC MANTEN AMEI C (JTWROS) MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN NVR INC CHILDES HOLDINGS 1 LLC BRILES TIMOTHY C FORTHAUS LINDA M WHITE JUSTIN P (JTWROS) KAY AMY N ROBB RON (JTWROS) CROUCH PHOEBE M RELIANT SC LLC MCHENRY EDGAR RONALD TRU SAVINO LAUREN E D R HORTON-CROWN LLC PURVIS APRIL SOURIA (JTW MCRAE TERESA (JTWROS) HARRIS ALICE T LIDDELL CAROLYN A MUNGO HOMES INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL LENTINI ANNA L MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN WYATT LINDA K TSENG PHILIP C RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN D R HORTON INC PITT RHONDA H FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG MADDEN KEVIN R GALLOWAY DANIEL W MARK III PROPERTIES INC NVR INC MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH NVR INC DWELLING GROUP LLC PILLER FAMILY REVOCABLE HECKMAN BRADEN (JTWROS) ADAMSON JOHN DAVID JR REID DAPHNE MAXWELL D R HORTON INC BROWN KELLY LAUREN SHERR CONN LARRY H REVOCABLE T BCAT 20144TT LONG EVELYN G CORBIN JEAN Q D R HORTON-CROWN LLC WILLMOT KEVIN DYER HOLDINGS LLC BLOOMQUIST JOHN HARMON ANGELA D TRADITIONAL HOMES CORPOR DAVIS ROGER A KOOYMAN NICHOLAS L HUDSON LINDSEY A NVR INC DYAL STEVEN A (JTWROS) ENCHANTED CONSTRUCTION L VALENCIA JUAN CARLOS

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MARK III PROPERTIES INC HARTNESS DEVELOPMENT INC MILL VILLAGE LLC TCC VENTURE LLC WRECKED DAWG LLC CENTRAL REALTY HOLDINGS COGDILL IRREVOCABLE TRUS WORLEY LIVING TRUST J&H REALTY INC 222 LADEAN LLC LEA CARLA R F&F REALTY INVESTMENTS L HORNE JOSEPH A JR (JTWRO JAMES CECELIA S (JTWROS) HERRERA PATRICIA (JTWROS FARM PRODUCTS LLC CUTTONARO NICHOLAS GOLEC AL (JTWROS) BARTSCH BONITA L FREUND WESLEY HAZELHURST DAVID T (JTWR D R HORTON INC PISOR SARAH W D DYAL ASHLEY B (JTWROS) ALEXANDER LINDA C (JTWRO EMERSON ADAM (JTWROS) WAGNER JAMES TODD DANIELSEN ANGELA (JTWROS TORRES ANDREA L TWO SOUTH MAIN LLC LI PING ZANE PROPERTIES LLC JOHNSON FRED C (JTWROS) HANCOCK BROOKE G (JTWROS GOULDING SHAWN M BLAKE JESSICA L (JTWROS) CIUFREDDA MICHAEL (SURV) FIELDS ALFRED R MENDOLA PATRICK C (JTWRO GELONI LAURA M PURVIS APRIL SOURIA (JTW HERDERICK TODD SAMUELS BRETT HELEN (JTW ST MARK UNITED METHODIST JENKINS GAELYN A (JTWROS BARTLETT DALE R (JTWROS) ATKINS JANICE E (JTWROS) BOWLES MARTI G (JTWROS) TUTEN VIRGINIA K (JTWROS LAWTON PATRICK DILWORTH STACEY H (JTWRO PURICA BARBARA I VARGHESE MARY LAUREL (JT PETERSON DEBRA (JTWROS) ROBINSON DOUGLAS W (JTWR RICHARDS CATHERINE I (JT HUDSON CYNTHIA C (JTWROS SILVER CHARLES EDWARD YANG MEI MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WINECOFF ROBERT M HUNTER ROGER SAIDI HASSAN (JTWROS) GARCEAU LEO K (JTWROS) LANDER CHARLES PRUSA JULIANNE (SURV) HARVEY LARAE (JTWROS) 12 GEER LLC BALFOUR ROSS HAWTHORNE ERICA L (JTWRO KRIEGER DAVID A LUSSIER ROBERT CLAUDE JR HEROLD LINDSAY M (JTWROS BARNES GLENN T KROSCHEL ALMAZA (JTWROS) YARBROUGH AARON A SURFACE PRODUCTS INC YOUNG LINDA DIANNE BATES CALVIN JENE (JTWRO SAFFER DAVID M (JTWROS) EICH BRANDON S (JTWROS) GRSW STEWART REAL ESTATE STEVENS RICHARD A (JTWRO YU YONG (JTWROS) DUGGAN MEGAN L VANMUYDEN KAREN MARIE HAWKINS STEPHEN RAYMOND

PO BOX 170248 500 HARTNESS DR 101 W COURT ST STE A 18 FOUR MILE BRANCH LN 400 W BROAD ST STE 500 400 E STONE AVE 213 WEATHERLY DR 312 CRESCENT AVE 6124 WHITE HORSE RD 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 5 CHARLESTON OAK LN 101 E WASHINGTON ST STE 400 100 DELLWOOD DR 204 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 507 N MAIN ST 1 WOODLAND HILLS LN 309 WATERS RUN LN 23 MEADOW RESERVE PL 212 FORT DR 5 CALUMET CT 1371 DOGWOOD DR SW 1519 E NORTH ST 54 LATOUR WAY 544 PALLADIO DR 320 ALGONQUIN TRL 504 ADELINE CT 229 PETERS GLENN CT 326 ALGONQUIN TRL 2 S MAIN ST 105 JONES AVE 112 SUGAR CANE CT 609 ARLEDGE RD 111 PINEHAVEN WAY 1 ANGELINE WAY 104 HUFF DR 14 LAURELHART LN 107 SHAPTON LN 6 VERSILIA LN 213 MANSFIELD LN 106 SUGAR CREEK LN 24 WILD EVE WAY 66 PALLADIO DR 911 SAINT MARK RD 200 BRAHMAN WAY 520 PALLADIO DR 8 HUMMERS CT 206 PETERS GLENN CT 225 WATERS RUN LN 226 PETERS GLENN CT 2 NEWKIRK WAY 14 BENTLEY WAY 204 LOWNDES AVE 8800 E RAINTREE DR STE 300 316 COOPER OAKS CT 322 HAWKINS CREEK RD 115 FORESTDALE DR 8 CAITLIN CT 2 KATES CT 8800 E RAINTREE DR STE 300 30 BARLOW CT 439 BRIDGE CROSSING DR 151 BELSHIRE DR 351 BELLE OAKS DR 104 PARK HILL CT 314 SUMMERWALK PL 101 RED OAK CT 101 E WASHINGTON ST 507 BELLGREEN AVE 11 VALCOURT CIR 7 OAK BROOK WAY 107 WATERS REACH LN 19 CROFT ST 207 LEXINGTON PLACE WAY 312 RAMBLING HILLS WAY 307 CARY ST 82 HERON DR 44 REDDINGTON DR 302 BLUE SAGE PL 1112 EDWARDS RD 27 RANDY DR 1980 POST OAK BLVD STE 350 205 ROCKMONT RD 235 SANDUSKY LN 19 MCHAN ST 1 AZURE LN 22 CANSO ST

HOWARDS PARK $226,000 AIRPORT VILLAGE FARMS $225,000 $225,000 $225,000 THE RESERVES AT RAVENWOOD $225,000 BRYSON MEADOWS $224,900 FOREST LAKE $219,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $218,000 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $217,000 $215,000 ROSEDALE $214,900 HUNTERS WOODS $214,000 GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM $212,000 CASTLE ROCK $208,900 WATERTON $207,000 $204,900 $204,712 SKYLAND SPRINGS $204,000 MORNING MIST FARM $200,000 LAKEVIEW PLANTATION $199,945 COACH HILLS $199,000 PLANTERS ROW $196,000 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $193,500 MEADOW@BLUE RIDGE PLANTATION $192,750 THE VILLAGE AT REDFEARN $191,763 RIVERBEND $188,000 GREENS AT ROCKY CREEK $187,500 THE HOLLOWS $185,980 THE VILLAGE AT REDFEARN $185,870 VICTORIA PARK $184,900 $184,860 HERITAGE CLUB VILLAS $181,895 MILLER HEIGHTS $180,000 LONG CREEK PLANTATION $180,000 KNOLLWOOD HEIGHTS $180,000 WYNDHAM PLACE $176,000 SPARROWS POINT $176,000 $175,000 INGLESIDE CONDO $174,900 $174,777 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $173,769 D C & D L JONES $173,000 DEL NORTE ESTATES $172,000 ONEAL ACRES $170,000 SUMMER WOOD $170,000 REID VALLEY $169,000 FOX TRACE $166,900 CANEBRAKE $166,000 MORNINGSIDE $165,000 TWIN CREEKS $165,000 GLENDALE $164,000 HAMMETT CROSSING $163,000 WOODHEDGE $160,000 NORTHWOOD $158,200 MAPLE GROVE $158,000 SHELBURNE FARMS $158,000 EL REE ESTATES $157,000 ANNACEY PARK $156,600 $155,000 BALLENGER RIDGE $152,000 DEL NORTE ESTATES $150,000 VINEYARD AT PLANTERS ROW $150,000 ANNACEY PARK $148,824 MORROW PARK $148,000 $145,000 SPRING HAVEN $145,000 FAIR HEIGHTS $145,000 OAK KNOLL $145,000 BROOKS AT AUTUMN WOODS $144,900 $140,000 SUNSET HEIGHTS $139,000 PINE GATE $139,000 DEER RIDGE $138,000 VILLAGE COURT $137,500 $132,000 LISMORE VILLAGE $132,000 MAYFIELD ESTATES $131,000 WEDGEFIELD $130,000 CARDINAL POINTE $129,000 FOREST LAKE $127,500 FAIRVIEW MEADOWS $125,200 TIMBERLAKE $125,101 $125,000 WEDGEFIELD $122,100 LEWIS VILLAGE $122,000 BROOKFIELD TOWNES $121,500 $120,000

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON-CROWN LLC TRANSIT PROPERTIES FORD DONNA M (JTWROS) HODUT CONSTANTA (JTWROS) COX GEOFFREY D (JTWROS) VOGLER NICOLE R (JTWROS) FITZMORRIS M PHYLLIS SLIZEWSKI ADAM LANE (JTW GRSW STEWART REAL ESTATE ARTHUR STATE BANK TRAMMELL ELIZABETH-KELLY LOVELL BARBARA P WAGER MARY COLLEEN BREITIGAN CHRISTOPHER A CONYERS REVOCABLE TRUST MANGRUM JOHN DAVID (JTWR HAM CHARLES H JR SNELLING CAROL J LOONEY MARY KAY BAILEY JOHN W PEDZIMAZ KATARZYNA HOWARD DEBBIE C ZUBOR JOHN P (JTWROS) LSF9 MASTER PARTICIPATIO DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL SMITH DONALD (JTWROS) HAMMONDS FREDERICK T2 DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH COLLINS DANA M SHOREY GREGORY D TRUST YOUNG STEPHEN PATRICK HANCOX GREG L CRICK ALAN W TINSLEY LINDA M FELTES ERIC CUMMINGS BARBARA AUSTIN SANDRA BEAUDOIN GENDLIN HOMES LLC ARLP SECURITIZATION TRUS WINEGAR ELIZABETH A MANHOOD JONATHAN P METCALF STEPHANIE M HOPPER DONNA MILLS COLEEN A ADAMS HOMES AEC LLC CHILDS ELIZABETH R OMEGA HOMES USA LLC OSMOND TIFFANY JOHNSON MAUREEN A PERKINS ROBERT L GRAHAM PATRICIA A DUTTON SHANNON L UHRINEK JASON HENRICHS JUERGEN BURKE BRANDON S ALADE ADEYEMI E WILLIMON MARVIN W MTGLQ INVESTORS LP ROWLEY CLAYTON BROOKS JONES MONIQUE H GRAEBEL RELOCATION SERVI CORONA CARLOS A (JTWROS) FRONT DOOR PROPERTIES LL GEORGE OLIVIA SUSAN BARGERON ANNA H (JTWROS) MAHLER RONALD MOUNTROSE JANE GILBERT SHIRLEY A COPPLE MICHELLE L CROWE CHAD T GIDDINGS LAWRENCE L VILLAGE COURT TOWNES LLC KERSEY KAREN FORTIN FERNANDO O MORGAN CHRISTOPHER G MORTON CATHERINE GREEN FRANCES HERIOT STYLES DONNA E BANK OF AMERICA N A RAM PROPERTIES LLC BURDETTE LELAND C ROBINSON GREGORY MCKISSICK JULIA SMYTH SCOTT SHARON R REVOCABLE MERCK GAIL E

BUYER

ADDRESS

CHILDS KATRINA GOMEZ CONSUELO (JTWROS) BENNETT CEDRIC A ANDERSON ANGELA F (JTWRO RIVENBARK JACK V (JTWROS SMITH CHRISTOPHER C (JTW BENSON VICKIE L MARTIN BRIAN L REYES JOAQUIN M HILL C DAVID JR (JTWROS) UHRINEK JASON J (JTWROS) FITTS MATTHEW O PATEL DIPAK (JTWROS) ANDERSON SELENA N (JTWRO OMEARA JACQUELINE J POLK PAMELA P ALLEN 310 BCD LLC LEMIEUX BRANDON S (JTWRO BROCKWAY KIMBERLY (JTWRO HUNT NATHANAEL S OLDFIELD KELLY R (JTWROS HENDERSON BRIAN K (JTWRO KATKUM MANOJ KUMAR (JTWR GIL JAIME SISSON FONDA B CURLEE PAUL WILLIAMS SR ELROD CHASTITY (JTWROS) KALLAM LORETTA B (L-EST) LASKOWSKI JULIANE R GRIFFITH SARAH E MARK III PROPERTIES INC MCGEE LOUISE B ARMENTROUT GREGOR D HEFFERNAN CHRISTINA C (J RIGSBY ANGELA (JTWROS) DOUGAN BARBARA B CULBERTSON DEE ANN (SURV MARK III PROPERTIES INC JEWELL AMY R SMITH KENT E (JTWROS) CALKOEN ERICA M (JTWROS) SCHUSTER PAUL L (JTWROS) FLOWER ANISHA L (JTWROS) BREITIGAN BETTY K (JTWRO ZUBOR JOHN P (JTWROS) KEEL JAMES PHILIP CHRIST CARDONA-CORREA KIMBERLY IRMITER JENNIFER L HACKIM GEORGE E MCMILLAN HOLLY RENEE MURRAY DANIELLE KRYSTAL 2ND FAIRWAY LLC GALLMAN WILLIE YOUNG ROY ERNEST A III BLACK BRITTANY E (JTWROS SCHMITT MANFRED GUENTER MILES LYNDA J (JTWROS) GRAEBEL RELOCATION SERVI ASGA LP MACGREGOR DAVID J COUNTY OF GREENVILLE THE MCBRIDE CHRISTINE A VAUGHAN CHRISTINA M HUTCHINSON LISE K MARIGNY PROPERTIES LLC CARDENAS COLLEEN M (JTWR RILEY JOSHUA F HAWTHORNE JASMINE D JORDAN LEEVI R GARDNER HOPE NOELLE (JTW PEDEN MATTHEW A (JTWROS) LI JIANQIANG IBRAHIM RAAFAT G EGAN BEATRICE (JTWROS) ARENAS LUZ E D’AMICO LUCIANO DAVIS JOSEPH HENDRIX DAVID A KIDWELL CHRISTOPHER D (J BIRTON MURIEL G HAF FAMILY TRUST STEVE & JEN LLC CAMPBELL CHRISTOPHER DAL KISER TONY L JR HOWARD MILFORD O III RAAD CLEDA F MARTINEZ VICTORIO PACHEC

118 ELMHAVEN DR 6 ALLWOOD CT 36 HENDERSON AVE 215 PONDER LN 54 COPPERDALE DR 320 GIBBY LN 143 FOREST LAKE DR 39 LADY MARION LN 100 SAINT JOHNS ST 1201 W FARIS RD 3 ROSEMARY LN 1006 WILLOW BRANCH DR 118 CROWN EMPIRE CT 62 JADEN CT 103 STONEWATER DR 9 ELM ST 725 QUAIL RUN 2 JUDE CT 813 BINDON LN 7 MELISA CT 4933 COACH HILL DR 14 CROFTSTONE CT 24 IRVINGTON DR 35 HURSHFIELD CT 44 RECESS WAY 925 CLEVELAND ST UNIT 231 104 MISTY MEADOW DR 22 SHADY HOLLOW LN 42 RECESS WAY 313 BARRETT CHASE DR PO BOX 170248 1500 HERITAGE CLUB DR 5 SOUTHERN HEIGHT DR 29 CROSSVINE WAY 113 DEVON DR 104 HIGH CREST CT 2379 ROPER MOUNTAIN RD 617 MOSSWOOD LN 225 INGLESIDE WAY 22 MONTICELLO AVE 202 CHESTNUT OAKS CIR 3704 BALLENGER RD 610 DEL NORTE RD 35 CANTRELL DR 5 WYMAN CT 114 HICKORY VALLEY WAY 218 SCOTTISH AVE 312 SARATOGA DR 906 EDWARDS RD 23 PFEIFFER CT 925 FARGO ST 47 LATOUR WAY 6 BRIARSTONE CT 102 WOODVIEW DR 9 WATCH HILL CT 816 SHADOW CREEK DR 105 ELCON DR 30000 MILL CREEK AVE 620 HERNDON PKWY STE 110 28 RED QUAIL LN 301 UNIVERSITY RDG STE 200 17 COLOMBARD CT 30000 MILL CREEK AVE 502 W POINSETT ST PO BOX 536 10 SPRING FELLOW LN 206 BROOKDALE AVE 402 TANACROSS WAY 595 VIA MIRA VALLE 10 LEGACY LN 203 LOONEYBROOK DR 130 PINE GATE DR 5 CROSSBOW WAY PO BOX 2882 208 LIONS CLUB RD 104 XANDER DR 102 DIANNE AVE 204 BROWN RD 8 RED CARDINAL CT 24 FOREST LAKE DR 1 ASHFIELD CT 29 COLLIER LN 2 LELAND CIR 418 LAUREL TREE LN 8 OAKVIEW DR 103 BROOKHILL PL 217 FAIRFAX DR


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HOME Featured Neighborhood

Cottages at Riverbirch Elderberry Way, Seneca

Home Info Price: Starting in the low $400’s Sq. Ft: 2070, 2588, 2705 Sq Ft Lots: 31 wooded, waterfront homesites Schools: Keowee Elementary, Walhalla Middle, and Walhalla High Contact Info: Lake Keowee Real Estate | 864.886.0098 lakekeoweerealestate.com | lakekeoweeoffice@gmail.com 896 N. Walnut Street, Seneca, SC 29678

Buyers from all over the country have been asking for it, so Crescent Communities and Lake Keowee Real Estate are here to deliver! We are introducing a new cottage concept for Lake Keo wee Living called The Cottages at Riverbirch. This gated, planned community consists of 31 wooded, waterfront home sites in a low-maintenance community. Craftsman-style cottages with exposed beams and stone entry are now being offered in three attractive models, all with open floor plans and beautiful outdoor living spaces. Buyers have recently been saying that “less is SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

DUNEAN MILLS $119,000 GRACE POINT $117,500 OAK CREST $117,000 DELLVISTA HEIGHTS $115,500 EAST LAKE $115,000 $115,000 DUNEAN MILLS $115,000 FLEMING HEIGHTS $115,000 WESTCLIFFE $115,000 $112,500 HILL PLACE $112,141 SAN SOUCI HEIGHTS $112,000 PINEHURST $112,000 SUPER HWY HOMESITES $111,000 BISHOP HEIGHTS $110,000 $110,000 WESTWOOD $110,000 $107,800 BRUTONTOWN REDEVELOPMENT $105,900 MONAGHAN BLUFF $102,000 WHITE OAK HILLS $100,001 WILLIAMSBURG AT BOTANY $100,000 MAYFIELD ESTATES $100,000

31 DUKE STREET LLC HABITAT FOR HUMANITY OF CRAVATTA BRENDA LOU JONES MILDRED B RITTER BIGI B MURPHY JOHN M BLACK JOSEPH R MOSES ADAM (JTWROS) BRAY MILDRED G (L-EST) TUTMAN KIMBERLY CLARK HAYES TIMOTHY L HARRIS STACEY LYNN MERCK T CRAIG (INDIVIDUA WINCHESTER JODIE D BCAT 2014-4TT THURMAN DWIGHT DECKER SHAWN M LAM JASON GREENVILLE COUNTY REDEVE SMITH WILLIAM A LATTA AMANDA WYLIE FREDERICK M III HENSLEY MINNIE MAE (LIFE

more” and so this community will offer floor plans of 2070, 2588 and 2705 finished square feet, rather than the traditional larger home sizes found in our lakefront communities. In order to make it easy for our buyers, lot surveys are already done, dock permits have been obtained, septic permits are on file with SC DHEC, and financial institutions are prepared to start lending money for this construction project. And if you aren’t ready to build yet, you can buy the lot now and build at a later date.

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

MCGRANAHAN ANNIE L DELANUEZ DALIA KARINA (J EVANS CHARLOTTE SPENCER FREDERICK S AND SANDERS ABRAHAM B SMITH DAVID WELDON FAIST KIMBERLY WILSON PARICHART WILLIS ALAN D MACLEAN BRENT (JTWROS) FEDERAL NATIONAL MORTGAG COUCH CALEB A (JTWROS) FOWLER BENJAMIN J NAY JOSEPH EDWARD JR LIGON JERRY HARRIS BONNIE L (JTWROS) DUCOS CARLOS MERCADO KINGSTON SCOTT RICHARD DAVIS CASEY D DAVIS JANICE H (JTWROS) NEIGHBORHOOD HOUSING COR HENDRIX LAUREN B HENSLEY MATTHEW DILLON

31 DUKE ST PO BOX 1206 304 WELCOME AVE 34 CLAREMORE AVE 30 ASHBURN PL 501 W ARLINGTON AVE 7 DUKE ST 108 DRAYTON DR 100 EASTBOURNE RD 102 BRUCE FARM RD 14523 SW MILLIKAN WAY STE 200 109 CALLAHAN AVE 10 LINDEN DR 23 SHADOW LN 317 SCENIC LAKE CT 1 ALDEN CT 504 TEBBLEWOOD DR 350 MOHAWK DR STE 404 301 OCONNER CT 828 SWYGERT RD 310 MILLS AVE STE 105 815 EDWARDS RD UNIT 62 210 HIPPS AVE

$100,000 RIVERBEND $100,000 ARCADIA HILLS $98,723 MCDANIEL HEIGHTS $98,000 $96,200 $95,000 $95,000 $95,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $92,000 WILLIAMSBURG AT BOTANY $90,500 $90,000 RIVER RUN $90,000 $90,000 STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES $90,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE AT HOLLINGSWORTH $89,440 WESTWOOD $88,000 FARIS RIDGE CONDO $87,000 BEREA FOREST $85,340 DUNEAN MILL VILLAGE $85,000 MOUNTAIN SHADOWS $84,944 SEDGEFIELD VILLAS $82,000 GLASSY MOUNTAIN $80,850 $80,820

PRICE SELLER KKC & G LLC OUR TREE HOUSE LLC DIPLOMAT PROPERTY MANAGE SHARKEY MARA A S M JONES PROPERTIES LLC H CALLAWAY LLC CRESCENT VALLEY PROPERTI MEED RUTH E O’NEAL CDSF LLC BRADLEY E CROFT PD HOLDINGS LLC STEVENSON MARGO L M J 2 TRUST THE STOUDENMIRE JAMES MICHAE SHF VERDAE LLC MADDOX RICK L COX SUE M WATERS REBECCA C JORKEN LLC ACE SECURITIES CORP HOME HALL SEAN W PALMER ROBERT D ROUSE SAMUEL B

BUYER

ADDRESS

RANDALL PROPERTIES LLC CULBERTSON H MICHAEL HAMBRIGHT MARY E SHOFFNER REAL ESTATE LLC WATSON REAL ESTATE TRUST HAPPINESS HOME LLC CROWDER RANDALL W HESTON LORI K DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL HODGES KATHRYN E DEZEN ANDREW V MORTGAGE REO 2 LLC GENDLIN HOMES LLC V MORTGAGE REO 2 LLC NVR INC EDG RENTALS LLC PERRY ELIZABETH CARSON ( HALL JESSICA L NAVARRO CAMDEN HINES ROBERT EDWARD MCBRYDE LAURIE CLIFFS LAND PARTNERS LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC

20 RAYFORD LN 522 WEMBLEY RD 212 ALDE ST 10 LONGVIEW TER 722 S PIEDMONT HWY 205 WEMBERLY LN 230 RIVER BEND RD 307 PIEDMONT AVE 211 CENTURY DR STE 100C 815 EDWARDS RD UNIT 34 7 S MEMMINGER ST 15 S MAIN ST STE 700 119 CLEVEIRVINE AVE 5 TWIN FALLS DR 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 203 W TRADE ST 4 BLENHEIM CT 22 RIVERWOOD CIR 8 FRIARTUCK RD 26 CULLEN CT 100 BUTTERCUP WAY APT 28 3851 HIGHWAY 11 1213 SUNSET LN


www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Charlotte Faulk (864) 270-4341 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • Marchantpm.com (864) 527-4505 sis Oa ille! e t va nv Pri Gree n i

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4 Huntington Court - Huntington

12 Highland Drive - Augusta Road

279 Ridge Way - Harrison Hills

225 Foot Hills Road - Green Valley

$1,575,000 • 1329275 • 5BR/5BA/1Hf BA

$788,000 • 1310557 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

$545,000 • 1322465 • 4BR/3BA

$499,900 • 1331706 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

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Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

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Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

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Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

do on wn! C l o t eve n 1 L r Dow a Ne

0 N Avondale Dr, Lots 1 & 2 - North Main 204 Weatherstone Lane - Weatherstone 34 Douglas Drive - Country Club Estates 400 Mills Ave., Unit 112 - Lofts at Mills Mill $498,000 • 1307117 • Residential Lot

Gordon D. Seay • (864) 444-4359 • gordonDseay@gmail.com

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$424,875 • 1329892 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

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$327,900 • 1333346 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

y wa eta ce! G e i l rab Pr Ado t New a

$306,000 • 1327602 • 2BR/2BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

me Ho rhood l u f uti hbo Bea t Neig a Gre

214 Kennedy Lane - Cely Acres

501 Farming Creek Drive - Neely Farm

110 Conifer Falls Road - Cliff Ridge

200 Wateree Way - River Shoals

$270,000 • 1330504 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$264,800 • 1327495 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$249,000 • 1322057 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$244,900 • 1329329 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Justin Ruzicka • (864) 527-4516 • Justin@HouseGuy.org

l tia en d i s Re es! 10 Acr

0 Jackson Drive - Piedmont $219,000 • 1329841 • Residential Lot

Joey Beeson • (864) 660-9689 • joeymbeeson@gmail.com

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

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Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

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203 Sonoma Drive - Vineyard at Planters Row 40 Wood Pointe Dr., Unit 7 - Scottswood $174,900 • 1333267 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

$139,900 • 1330433 • 3BR/3BA

Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nmmccrory@aol.com

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

le on! dib ocati e r Inc me L o nh Tow

2808 E North Street - Oak Forest $124,900 • 1333259 • 2BR/1BA/1Hf BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

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CONCERT

NOV. 25

CALENDAR NOW THRU

25

ARTS EVENT

CONCERT

CONCERT

New Exhibition: “Syd Solomon Retrospective”

Jamie Wright Band

Robby The Elf

Aloft Downtown WXYZ Lounge 5 N. Laurens St.

Independent Public Ale House 110 Poinsett Highway

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. FREE Make plans to see the vibrant and beguiling abstract expressionist paintings in the “Syd Solomon Retrospective” on view in Gallery 5. 271-7570 gcma.org media@gcma.org

FRI

Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 9 p.m. | $15 (in advance)/$18 (door) There’s nothing wrong with a healthy sense of competition, whether in sports or music. And that compulsion to win might be why country singer Chris Lane’s star is rising so quickly. The former college baseball player has a drive to succeed in music that’s fueled his ascent. “I think everybody wants to go out there and give it everything they have,” he says. “And I think most bands are going to do that. No one wants to get outperformed by anybody. There’s certainly that competitive edge that most artists are going to have; you don’t want to get outshined.” Lane, whose recent single, “Fix,” was a big hit on the charts, is one of many country artists who performs both his own songs and outside material. “The music’s all about what you feel,” he says. “I write about a lot of things in my life, or stuff that I feel sure people can relate to. When it comes down to choosing songs, I just go with what I know is ‘me’ and my style. Whatever it says in the song, I make sure it’s something that I would want to talk about.” —Vincent Harris

Equally adept at soulful grit and jazzy improvisation, Jamie Wright has built a solid “allaround entertainer”-type reputation around the Upstate, and her tight, polished combo can match her genre-hopping every step of the way. 297-6100 aloftgreenvilledowntown.com

Denver Downs Farm Kickoff to Christmas; Drive-In Movie: “The Polar Express”

CONCERT

Denver Downs Farm Corn Maze 1515 Denver Road

8 p.m. $5 (plus $10 food/drink minimum)

7 p.m. $25/car Come kick off the holiday season at Denver Downs Farm. Enjoy the holiday classic “The Polar Express” on our three-story tall big screen. Enjoy the movie from the comfort of your own car. Concession include s’mores, kettle corn, hot chocolate and pizza. Gates open at 5:30 p.m. 992-1856 denverdownsfarm.com

Shane Ericks Blues Boulevard 300 River St., Ste. 203

Bit of a curveball here from the normally jazzand-blues heavy lineup at the Boulevard. Shane Ericks is an acoustic guitar-strumming folkie who recently placed highly on the Philippines’ “Singing Idol.” 242-2583 bluesboulevardjazzgreenville.com

9 p.m. Nothing says the holidays are upon us quite like a gangsta-rapper in the guise of a streetwise Santa’s Little Helper, does it? 552-1265 | ipagreenville.com

WED

30

FAMILY

Wednesday Night Pickleball

Sterling Community Center 113 Minus St. 6-8 p.m. | Wednesdays thru Dec. 28 $3 Pickleball is the fastest growing sport in America. The game combines elements of tennis, ping-pong and badminton. It is easy for beginners to learn and is a challenging, fast-paced, competitive game for more experienced players. There are hundreds of Pickleball players in the Upstate. New players are always welcome. We play every Wednesday night at Sterling Community Center (113 Minus St., Greenville, SC 29601) starting at 6 p.m. No paddle, no problem. We have loaner paddles. Cost is $3 with the money going to Sterling. 603-3558 Upstatepickleball.com

THE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF THE UPSTATE FAMILY

Chris Lane

25

FAMILY

8 p.m. FREE

All museum events and activities are free with admission.

Science + You, the traveling exhibit, is open. Stop by to learn about the science of health and nutrition, human anatomy and more. Stop by for our weekend programs, Random Acts of Science and special art projects in Off the Wall.

Weekend Activities

Off the Wall

Weekend activities take place at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. on Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays unless otherwise posted. • 11/26 & 27 – Holiday Traditions: Holiday Traditions is open. Join us for a special lesson in holiday traditions.

• Week 4 (11/22–27): Do you know how useful feathers are for birds? Join us in Off the Wall to learn why feathers are so helpful and use feathers in your art projects. • Week 5 (11/29–12/4): Even if it doesn’t snow this December, we are creating our own snowy scenes in Off the Wall this week.

«


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR «

DEC

THU

01

CONCERT

A Celtic Christmas

Flat Rock Playhouse Playhouse Downtown 125 S Main St., Hendersonville Thursday (2 and 7:30 p.m.), Friday (8 p.m.), Saturday (2 and 8 p.m.), Sunday (2 p.m.) Seats from $28 Complete your holiday season with Flat Rock Playhouse’s Celtic Christmas. Featuring the vocal stylings of Guy Lemonnier and Katherine Taylor complete with a full band, this concert will run at the playhouse downtown. Experience a night full of traditional Celtic music just in time for Christmas. 826-693-0731 | flatrockplayhouse.org info@flatrockplayhouse.org

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 10:30 a.m. FREE Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Waiting for Snow” by Marsha Diane Arnold and illustrated by Renata Liwska. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

Pharmacy Technician Open House Greenville Technical College - Benson Campus 2522 Locust Hill Road, Taylors 6 p.m. Greenville Technical College’s Pharmacy Technician program is hosting an Open House for those considering a career in the profession. This is your opportunity to speak to faculty one on one about GTC’s diploma and certificate program op-

CONCERT

Ticket Alert: The Community Tap 5th Annual Craft Beer Festival $55 -$95 The Fifth Annual Craft Beer Festival presented by The Community Tap features more than 110 fun and funky beers from more than 50 breweries around the U.S. and beyond. The festival will be held April 29, 2017, from 2-6 p.m., at Fluor Field in the West End. bit.ly/2g3OvaK

THU-SAT

01-03

is open to the public and free of charge, but donations are appreciated and encouraged. gtc-christmascarol.eventbrite.com

THU-MON

CULINARY

HOLIDAY

46th Annual Holiday Fair

1 Exposition Drive

01-12

HOLIDAY

Indie Craft Holiday Pop Up Shop

Monday-Saturday 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sunday 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Methodical Coffee roasting facility 3 McBeth St. This pop up shop will feature the work of 55 artists. A curated mix of giftable art, home goods, jewelry and children’s items will be available in conjunction with a Methodical Coffee brew bar (open limited hours). makerscollective.org/holiday2016

THU-SAT

01-17

THEATER

“Let Nothing You Dismay”

10 a.m.-8 p.m. Friday-Saturday; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sunday $6 for adults, $5 for senior citizens. Children younger than 12 are free. Parking is $5 per vehicle.

01-04

Centre Stage | 501 River St.

Escobar Photography

Greenville Technical College Theatre presents director Dan Robbins’ adaption of Charles Dickens’ beloved masterpiece. The production

It’s Christmas in Ohio, and Kevin and Allie are a young couple about to become parents to an adopted child — they’re just waiting for a

Singer/songwriter Brooks Dixon grew up within a solid musical community, provided by his family. “I grew up singing in choir with my brother and my sister,” he says. “My parents weren’t musicians, per se, but they loved music and they could sing and that’s what I grew up around. They forced me to start taking piano lessons when I was in second grade or so, then I picked up the guitar around seventh grade.” That background helped Dixon develop a back-porch acoustic playing style, and his sweet-and-sour vocals are perfect vehicles for his infectiously melodic, lyrically incisive slice-of-life songs. He’s got a keen eye for small details and a solid sense of songwriting that make the songs so pleasant that it’s easy to miss some of the darker, more turbulent emotions he expresses, as his newest EP, “Weather the Storm,” displays. “Most of my lyrics are personal,” he says. “It’s me diving deep into myself.” —Vincent Harris

Pelzer Auditorium 214 Lebby St., Pelzer 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m. on Sunday. $10 general, $8 for seniors (age 65+), $8 for military, $7 for students (18 and under) Milltown Players presents this holiday show that includes 10 performers and a full band on stage. Tickets can be purchased online at the box office one hour before the show starts. Online sales close two hours before the show starts. Tickets will still be available at the box office. Doors to the auditorium open 30 minutes before the show starts. milltownplayers.org

CONCERT

8 p.m. | $12/adults, $10/seniors, $5/students

Thurs.-Sat., 8 p.m. and Sun., 3 p.m. $15-$30

Smiley’s Acoustic Cafe, 111 Augusta St. | 10 p.m. | Free

Christmas in Dixie

Furman University | McAlister Auditorium 3300 Poinsett Highway

FREE

Brooks Dixon Band

01-18

THEATER

Sound Quality Series Presents Christmas at Furman

“A Christmas Carol”

7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday

THU-SUN

02

THEATER

Technical Resource Center Auditorium (Building 102) on the Barton Campus 506 S. Pleasantburg Drive

phone call. Although they’ve asked their families to keep their distance until they bring the baby home, their funny and fearsome relatives have vastly different plans in mind. This comedy is rated PG-13. centrestage.org

FRI

The 46th annual Holiday Fair, one of the largest arts, crafts and gift fairs in the Southeast, features more than 350 crafters and commercial vendors from 15 states showcasing their unique merchandise for a three-day shopping extravaganza. HolidayFairGreenville.com

THU-SUN

COMMUNITY

NOV. 25

tions, see our classroom and pharmacy lab and learn more about employment opportunities. 250-3073 | gvltec.edu/pharmtech RSVP at pharmtech-gtc.eventbrite.com

The Furman University Symphony Orchestra, the Furman Singers and Furman Men’s and Women’s Chorales will present “Christmas at Furman” featuring Benjamin Britten’s cantata, St. Nicholas and Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker.” In St. Nicholas, conducted by Hugh Floyd, faculty tenor Grant Knox plays the title role and tells the story of the historic fourth-century Christian saint whose secret gift-giving led to the traditional role of Santa Claus. For the second half of the concert, Tom Joiner leads the FSO in extended excerpts from “The Nutcracker” including “Decorating the Christmas Tree,” “The Battle of the Mouse King,” “Transformation of the Nutcracker” and more. 294-2086 bit.ly/2fAGYhl furmanmusic@furman.edu

CONCERT

Chicora Voices Holiday Concert Chicora Voices, The Children’s Choir of Greenville First Baptist Church of Greenville 847 Cleveland St. 7:30 p.m. $15/GA, free to students and music teachers 238-5058 chicoravoices.org

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CALENDAR Mason Jar Menagerie, w/ Gods of Mars & Sweat Lodge

CONCERT

NOV. 25

Radio Room, 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive | 9 p.m. | $5 (21+)/$7 (under 21) The Fountain Inn trio Mason Jar Menagerie is part of a growing trend of bands taking the energy of power-trio rock and applying them to classic acoustic blues music – think Them Crooked Vultures or Dead Meadow. But the band, led by singer/songwriter/guitarist Jake Garrett, isn’t quite the acoustic-guitar-and-washboard combo that some might expect, given their influences. Garrett has a theory about why many modern musicians are combining seemingly incongruous sounds. “I think a lot of it is that kids grow up on the more aggressive punk music, and then when they get to a certain age, they start learning about Appalachian, bluegrass and folk,” he says. “So they take the roots of what they loved and apply that aggression to those other forms of music. It’s hard to take the punk out of a punk kid.” Garrett says that if you trace the history of rock ‘n’ roll and the history of older forms of music, they share similar roots. “If you keep going back, it all comes from the same place,” he says. “All you’re doing is making it more aggressive, a little more emotional than people were into at that time.” — Vincent Harris

« CONCERT Tyler Farr

Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 8 p.m. | $15 in advance or $18 at the door Bolstered by its hit leadoff single, “C.O.U.N.T.R.Y.,” the new album by country singer Tyler Farr, “Suffer In Peace,” is burning up the charts right now, and the odds are this show will be packed with new fans. Farr’s sound is a great example of the mix of pop, country twang and rock muscle that rules country radio these days. 233-1381 | blind-horse.com

CONCERT

Allegaeon with Battlecross and Necromancing The Stone Ground Zero | 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg 8 p.m. Allegaeon combines the brutal volume and raw power of death metal with the precision of prog-rock. You’re just as likely to sustain hearing damage from one of their songs as you are to find a guitar riff that sends you back to your old Rush records. 948-1661 reverbnation.com/venue/groundzero2

CONCERT

Headcell with Broken Testimony and Decibel Effect Soundbox Tavern 507 W. Georgia Road, Simpsonville 9 p.m. Seneca’s Headcell is a metal quartet whose vocalist is just as comfortable rapping as he is singing or screaming, whatever the song requires. Their third-ever gig was opening for (hed) pe at Ground Zero, which meant they had to develop a tight, professional sound quickly. 228-7763

VISUAL ART

Opening reception for Meredith Piper Knack 580 Perry Ave. 6-9 p.m. Knack will be having an opening reception for new local artist Meredith Piper. They will also have a few other vendors there with pop-up shops that same weekend.

«

11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45


Let’s lay a foundation of healing and hope

TOGETHER

Help Us Grow

Donate today at www.Rmhc-Carolinas.org/CapitalCampaign

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10/26/16 1:16 PM


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CALENDAR « CULINARY

Upstate International’s GlŸhwein Party Riverwood Farms Clubhouse 74 Reddington Drive, Greer 6:30-10 p.m. Members: $20, non-members: $25, children 5-12 years: $5 Celebrate the start of the holiday season in traditional German style at Upstate International’s GlŸhwein Party. Enjoy traditional NŸrnberger bratwurst (grilled sausage), sweet stollen (Christmas bread), other German treats, GlŸhwein, German beer, hot apple cider and other nonalcoholic drinks. Space is limited, and tickets sell out, so register early to confirm your place. Reservations are required. A portion of each ticket will benefit Safe Harbor. conta.cc/2gnK0sq

HOLIDAY

FRI-SUN

02-11

THEATER

LITERARY

“A Charlie Brown Christmas”

Book signing with Melinda Long and Kate Salley Palmer

7 p.m. Friday; 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Saturday; 1:30 and 5:30 p.m. Sunday Peace Center Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. $18-27 Christmas time is here! Tis the season for Charlie Brown, Snoopy and all of the Peanuts gang to bring the holiday season back to life. Discover the real meaning of Christmas in this musical adaptation of the classic animated television special that is fun for the whole family. 467-3000 peacecenter.org

FRI-SUN

02-18

Christmas Celebration

THEATER

“In the Next Room” (or the vibrator play)

Bob Jones University 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd.

FRI-SAT

02-03

THEATER

Furman Presents Mask Artist, Physical Comedian and Storyteller Doug Berky

Furman University, The Playhouse 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. $10/adults and $5/students. Furman Theatre Season ticket holders admitted free. For more than 35 years, Doug Berky has toured his performance work of physical comedy, mask theatre and storytelling for audiences of all ages. Hosted by the Furman Theatre Department, artist-in-residence Berky presents a range of performance styles from his physical comedy schtick to heartwarming world tales told with masks hand-crafted by Berky in Foibles and Fables, A Puppet and Clowning Performance. Berky’s art draws inspiration from commedia dell’arte, vaudeville, mask and mime theatre and the influence of such theatre greats as Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, Carol Burnette, Red Skelton, Marcel Marceau and Tony Montanaro. 294-2125 bit.ly/2ePJxxc

South Carolina children’s authors Melinda Long and Kate Salley Palmer will be signing copies of their Christmas books, “The Twelve Days of Christmas in South Carolina” (Long, Sterling, board book, $7.95) and “I Know Santa Very Well” (Palmer, Warbranch, paperback, $6.95), at a book signing on Take Your Child to a Bookstore Day. This event is free and open to the public. Books may be purchased online, at the store or by calling Fiction Addiction. 675-0540 | bit.ly/2fMmYYq

SAT-SUN

03-18

FAMILY

Free Santa Photos at Cabela’s

Cabela’s | 1025 Woodruff Road, Ste. H101

SUN

04

Love Your Carpet…

Again!

IKE’S

128 Poinsett Hwy., Greenville

864-232-9015

Noon-3 p.m. | Saturdays and Sundays Santa is making a special stop at Cabela’s this year! Please visit us for free pictures with Santa. 516-8100

FREE Join the university community for an outdoor carol sing around the University’s front-campus fountains where thousands of sparkling lights will be illuminated. bju.edu

Fiction Addiction 11 a.m.-noon

FREE

4:30 p.m.11 p.m.

11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

www.ikescarpet.com

CARPET • RUG • UPHOLSTERY CLEANING – RESIDENTIAL • COMMERCIAL –

VISUAL ARTS

Sundays at 2: Family Art Adventure

The Warehouse Theatre 37 Augusta St. 8 p.m.except Sundays at 3 p.m. | $30/$35 A Finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Sarah Ruhl’s comedy about marriage, motherhood and communication is set in the 1880s at the dawn of electricity where an innocent and gentlemanly scientist named Dr. Givings invents a new device to treat hysteria in women and men. It’s called a vibrator. When his latest patient brings her own complicated marriage and sufferings to the Givings’ home, Dr. and Mrs. Givings confront the fragility of their own union and discover the truth depths of real love. 235-6948 warehousetheatre.com

SAT

03

FAMILY

Kid’s Holiday FudgeMaking Class at Cabela’s

Cabela’s 1025 Woodruff Road, Ste. H101

Crossword puzzle: page 50

Greenville County Museum of Art 420 College St. 2 p.m. Experiment with color, movement and rhythm in a fun pastels activity inspired by the Grainger McKoy exhibition. Bring the whole family! 271-7570 | gcma.org

FAMILY

11 a.m.

Nutcracker Tea

You and your children can become fudge-making experts just in time for the holiday season. Bring your kids in today and learn the Cabela’s secrets to fudge making success. 516-8100

International Ballet | Cascades Verdae 10 Fountainview Terrace 3–5 p.m. | $20 All the little ladies and gentlemen will love this holiday-themed tea party, a beloved

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Sudoku puzzle: page 50


48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CALENDAR «

tradition and perfect “date” with parents, grandparents and friends. Attendees will enjoy treats to sip and eat and holiday-themed games and prizes in the elegant hall at the Cascades Verdae. They’ll be mesmerized by the live preview performance of “The Nutcracker” and narrated storytime, and the fabulous experience includes pictures with the Dew Drop Fairy. 879-9404 internationalballetsc.org/nutcracker-tea

Prokofiev and other orchestral works from the standard repertoire. The Wind Ensemble will share the program performing works by Percy Grainger, Ralph Vaughan Williams and others. The concert is free and open to the public. 282-3945

CONCERT

Centre Stage | 501 River St.

Tidings of Comfort and Joy

7 p.m. | Tuesdays and Wednesdays $10 & $15

Chapman Cultural Center theater 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg 7 p.m. | $15 First Presbyterian Church Spartanburg’s Chamber Singers presents their annual Christmas Concert. The 30-member choir will sing 13 holiday songs, many without accompaniment and all without any electronic amplification. Because of the 500-seat theater’s unique and excellent acoustics, there is no need for amplification. As a result, many of the songs will be heard as they were originally written to be performed in small and intimate concert halls. Tickets are available through the church and through Mobile Meals, which will be the recipient of concert’s proceeds. 583-4531 or 573-7684

SUN-FRI

04-16

CONCERT

Greenville Concert Band presents “Sounds for the Season”

Dec. 4 at 6 p.m. at Powdersville First Baptist Church Dec. 11 at 6 p.m. at White Oak Baptist Church Dec. 16 at 7:15 p.m. at Fellowship Greenville Church FREE These concerts feature a wide selection of music for the Christmas season. greenvilleconcertband.org

TUE

06

TUE-WED

06-14

THEATER

“In the Middle of Nowhere”

Rebecca Pender peeks out her bedroom window in rural Nebraska and sees a vision of the end of the world. The next day, she and her husband, Lucas, stand transfixed as they witness the collapse of the World Trade Center, unlocking within Rebecca’s psyche a Pandora’s box of repressed fears. “In the Middle of Nowhere” examines how fear poisons the soul like a virus, ravaging all who come in contact with it. This drama is rated PG-13. centrestage.org

THU

08

CONCERT

Cantus Chamber Choir and the Governor’s School Choir Concert

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Buncombe Street United Methodist Church 200 Buncombe St. 7:30 p.m. The holiday season is often about children. SCGSAH December Choral Concert is a program based on music about children. From the Christchild, to children who celebrate the holidays, to children in crisis around the world, the music presented will focus our attention on children. 282-3945

FAMILY

12/8-12/10, 7:30 p.m. and 12/11, 2 p.m. Drama seniors bring to life Shakespeare’s enigmatic prince in all his passion, contemplation and contradiction and discover themselves in the embodiment of this mythic story. 282-3737

THRU FRI

09

Furman University Presents Art by Greenville Native Kate Roberts

9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-FridayReception and Talk: Monday, Nov. 14, 6-7:30 p.m. FREE Work by ceramic artist and Greenville native Kate Roberts will be on display in Furman University’s Thompson Gallery, Roe Art Building Nov. 14-Dec. 9. Thompson Gallery hours are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Roberts’ exhibition, Indigo Curtain, is an extension of her philosophy, which says, “My practice is a meditation on time and its role in the decay of objects and memories. Inspiration is drawn from historical objects, the architecture around me, or a personal relationship. My processes are repetitive and labor intensive; I draw, construct and weave using materials to depict fleeting, fragile moments and to examine the temporary physicality of an object or idea.” bit.ly/2evIUsz

09

TICKET ALERT

Ticket Alert: Casting Crowns at the Bon Secours Wellness Arena

Storytime Thursday

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St.

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5

10 a.m.

CONCERT

10:30 a.m. | FREE

Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra Concert

Bring your preschool children to Fiction Addiction for a storytime reading of the picture book “Little Big Girl” by Claire Keane. 675-0540 | fiction-addiction.com

Multi-platinum selling and Grammy-winning group Casting Crowns will hit the road again this spring for the second leg of “The Very Next Thing” Tour, featuring K-LOVE Radio’s Male Artist of the Year Danny Gokey and special guests Unspoken. Presented by Compassion International and Museum of the Bible, the 40-city arena tour kicks off Feb. 16. The tour will stop in Greenville on March 9. Tickets go on sale Dec. 9 at 10 a.m. 241-3800 bonsecoursarena.com

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities First Baptist Church | 847 Cleveland St. 7:30 p.m. | FREE The Sinfonia Chamber Orchestra and the Wind Ensemble of the S.C. Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities will combine for their last concert of the semester year. The program will include the “Overture to the Magic Flute” by Mozart, “Lieutenant Kiji Suite” by Serge

THU-SUN

08-11

THEATER

Main Stage Production: “Hamlet”

South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities Sakas Theatre at SCGSAH

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE?

10-11

VISUAL ARTS

Furman University Thompson Art Gallery, Roe Art Building 3300 Poinsett Highway

FRI

SAT-SUN

BALLET

“The Nutcracker” presented by International Ballet with Greenville Symphony Orchestra

International Ballet | Peace Center Concert Hall 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $18-$55 Starring Veronika Part, principal dancer of American Ballet Theatre (NYC). Join International Ballet for this beloved holiday production with the classical beauty of talented local dancers under artistic director Vlada Kysselova, showcasing the traditional story of young Clara and her journey with a magical Nutcracker Prince. Experience her adventurous dream with an exciting battle of toy soldiers and mice, the flurry of dazzling snowflakes and an impressive parade of nations and treats in the Land of the Sweet. With the Greenville Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Conductor Edvard Tchivzhel, bringing Tchaikovsky’s grand score to life, and featuring a live “Snowflake Choir” under the direction of Arlen Clarke, you won’t want to miss this Nutcracker. Use promo code FamilyPack to buy three tickets and get one free. 467-3000 peacecenter.org/events/detail/the-nutcracker-2

THRU SUN

11

VISUAL ART

Exhibition: Drawn South

Greenville Technical College’s RIVERWORKS Gallery 300 River St., Ste. 202 1-6 p.m. FREE Carly Drew, Katelyn Chapman and Kolton Miller are all Drawn South through their childhood immersion in and reverence for South Carolina’s culture and landscape. Their images explore and narrate their home landscape with layers of media that present a compression of history and multiple perspectives. Miller says, “It is important that the work questions the time, place and realness of your standard landscape, pushing something normally thought of as concrete into an unearthly event.” While studying together at Clemson, the three became friends and colleagues. A reception will be held First Friday, Nov. 4, 6-9 p.m. gvltec.edu/riverworks/

Send your event information and images to calendar@communityjournals.com by Friday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the next week’s Journal.


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF GREENVILLE COUNTY FY2017-2018 ACCOMMODATIONS TAX FUNDING APPLICATION PROCESS NOW OPEN GREENVILLE COUNTY IS NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR FY2017-2018 ACCOMMODATIONS TAX FUNDING. APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT http:// www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/; BY CALLING 864-467-7200, OR AT THE FOLLOWING ADDRESS: 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, SUITE 100, GREENVILLE, SC 29601. DEADLINE FOR SUBMITTING APPLICATIONS IS 5:00 PM, E.S.T, THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 2017.

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE Cellco Partnership and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon) are proposing to build a New 59-foot Monopole Communications Tower near 2404 Laurens Road, Greenville, Greenville County, SC 29607; N 34° 49’ 51.3” W 82° 20’ 58.8”. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30 days from the date of this publication to: Jackson Mueller, Wireless Projects, Environmental Resources Management, 3200 Windy Hill Road SE, Suite 1500W, Atlanta, GA 30339, email: vzwnepa@erm.com, tele#: 1-678-486-2700.

SOLICITATIONS NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: Bridge Parts for Greenville County by December 15, 2016, 3:00 P.M. Solicitations can be found at http://www.greenvillecounty. org/Procurement/ or by calling 864-467-7200.

ESTADO DE CAROLINA DEL SUR CONDADO DE GREENVILLE EN LA CORTE DE FAMILIA C.A. No.:2016-DR-23-3932 NOTA DE ACTOS A: ELIECER J. MARTINEZ Usted ha sido notificado de acuerdo al Código de Carolina del Sur Ann Sec. 15-9-710. Que actos de custodia han sido iniciados bajo el caso arriba mencionado por Hilda Espinal Reyes. USTED HA SIDO NOTIFICADO COMO SIGUE : 1. Que dentro de treinta (30) días de haber recibido la notificación usted responderá la clasificación por escrito a la Corte del Tribunal que se encuentra localizada en el 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29602 la nota y las razones para refutar intervenir ó de otro modo responder: 2. Que el Tribunal debe ser informado de su dirección actual y cualquier cambio de domicilio durante el proceso legal de custodia. 3. Que si no presenta una respuesta dentro de (30) días de recivir el edicto constituye juicio de manera predeterminada rendido contra usted para el alivio demandado en el reclamo. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) Nathalie M. Morgan, LLC 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile)

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices

$165

All others

$1.20 per line

864.679.1205 864.679.1305 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

Santa Paws Workshop ‘Tis the season... Join us for photos with Santa, spoil your pets at Rudolph’s Retail Shop, make treats for homeless pets, satisfy your sweet tooth with Mrs. Clause’s Bakery silent auction & more!

PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a PUBLIC HEARING before the GREENVILLE COUNTY BOARD OF ZONING APPEALS ON WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 14, 2016 AT 3:00 P.M. in CONFERENCE ROOM –D at GREENVILLE COUNTY SQUARE, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, S.C., for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the petitions listed below. PERSONS HAVING AN INTEREST IN THESE PETITIONS MAY BECOME PARTIES OF RECORD BY FILING WITH THE BOARD, AT LEAST THREE (3) DAYS PRIOR TO THE SCHEDULED DATE SET FOR HEARING, BY WRITING THEIR ADDRESS, A STATEMENT OF THEIR POSITION AND THE REASONS WHY THE RELIEF SOUGHT WITH RESPECT TO SUCH PROPERTY SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT BE GRANTED. CB-16-37 APPLICANT: OPERATION RENEWED HOPE/Guy Altizer TAX MAP#: 0583.01-01-013.03 LOCATION: 59 RIDDLE ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to allow construction and operation of a worship/ training center and office on R-S zoned property. CB-16-40 APPLICANT: CHRISTOPHER BRANGMAN & BERNICE WILLIAMS/Oakwood Homes TAX MAP#: 0562.08-01-007.00 LOCATION: 512 CROSSGATE WAY, FOUNTAIN INN SC REQUEST: VARIANCE from front setback requirement for existing single family dwelling CB-16-41 APPLICANT: HOPE ACADEMY/ ADVENT UNITED METHODIST CHURCH TAX MAP#: 0539.03-01-019.03 LOCATION: 2258 WOODRUFF ROAD, SIMPSONVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception for existing primary school on R-S zoned property CB-16-42 APPLICANT: HOPE ACADEMY/ THE TEMPLE of ISRAEL TAX MAP#: 0543.03-01-011.04 LOCATION: 400 SPRING FOREST ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Use by Special Exception to operate a primary school on R-20 zoned property CB-16-43 APPLICANT: GREENVILLE COUNTY SCHOOLS/Craig Gaulden & Davis. TAX MAP#: 0248.00-02-007.01 LOCATION: 2725 ANDERSON ROAD, GREENVILLE SC REQUEST: Variance from Right Side setback and Use by Special Exception for construction of a new building at the Softball stadium. CB-16-44 APPLICANT: GUARDIAN BUILDING SERVICES/Anchor Sign, Inc. TAX MAP#: 0530.01-01-009.03 LOCATION: 979 BATESVILLE ROAD, GREER SC REQUEST: Variance from Setback Requirement for a New Sign.

COMPLAINT NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO: 2015-CP-23-04807 County of Greenville, Plaintiff, vs. Tonya L. Cummings (Owner), and James Paul Hamby, III, (Driver), Defendant(s). In re: 1995 Toyota Camry VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590 Plaintiff, County of Greenville, complaining of the Defendants, would respectfully show unto this Honorable Court: 1. Plaintiff, County of Greenville, is a body politic and political subdivision of the State of South Carolina and is authorized by SC Code Ann.§ 56-5-6240, as amended, to initiate this Complaint for the forfeiture of that certain, 1995 Toyota Camry, VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590, which is the subject of this action. 2. Upon information and belief, Tonya L. Cummings and James Paul Hamby, III, are citizens and residents of the County of Greenville, State of South Carolina. 3. On or about June 17, 2013, Defendant James Paul Hamby, III, was arrested and charged in Greenville County, South Carolina with, among other charges, Driving Under Suspension (“DUS”), 4th offense. 4. At the time of the arrest, III, was driving an automobile,

more particularly described as a 1995 Toyota Camry, VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590. 5. According to the records maintained by the South Carolina Department of Motor Vehicles (“DMV”), Defendant Tonya L. Cummings is the registered owner of the 1995 Toyota Camry, VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590. 6. At the time of Defendant James Paul Hamby, III, arrest for DUS 4th offense, Defendants Tonya L. Cummings and James Paul Hamby, III, lived together at 202 Cook Street, Greenville, SC 29601. 7. According to the records maintained by DMV, there are no lienholders. 8. The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, pursuant to the provisions of S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-6240, as amended, seized the subject automobile at the time Defendant James Paul Hamby, III, was arrested. The subject automobile has been in the care, custody, and control of the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office since June 17, 2013. 9. Defendant James Paul Hamby, III, was convicted of Driving Under Suspension on June 3, 2015. 10. The subject automobile was seized and confiscated by the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office in accordance with the provisions of S.C. Code Ann. §56-5-6240, as amended, in that Defendant James Paul Hamby, III, at the time of the offense: (A) Had either been convicted,

pled guilty or nolo contendere to the offense of Driving Under Suspension on at least three prior occasions within the last five years, (B) Was driving the subject automobile with the express or implied authorization of Defendant Tonya L. Cummings, and (C) Lived in the same household with Defendant Tonya L. Cummings, the registered owner of the subject automobile. WHEREFORE, Plaintiff prays: 1. That this Court order the 1995 Toyota Camry, VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590, be forfeited to Plaintiff pursuant to the provisions of S.C. Code Ann. § 56-5-6240, as amended; 2. That this Court order the subject automobile be sold by Plaintiff by way of public auction; 3. That this Court order the net proceeds of the sale, after payment of any liens, be paid to Plaintiff, and 4. For such other and further relief as this Court may deem just and proper. Jeffrey D. Wile (SC Bar # 6102) Assistant County Attorney 301 University Ridge, Suite 2400 Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-7111 Attorney for Plaintiff

SUMMONS NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CASE NO: 2015-CP-23-04807 County of Greenville, Plaintiff, vs. Tonya L. Cummings (Owner), and James Paul Hamby, III, (Driver),Defendant(s). In re: 1995 Toyota Camry VIN: 4T1GK12E7SU069590 TO THE ABOVE NAMED DEFENDANTS: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint on the undersigned at his office at 301 University Ridge, Suite 2400, Greenville, SC 29601 within thirty (30) days of the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Jeffrey D. Wile (S.C. Bar #6102) Assistant County Attorney 301 University Ridge, Suite 2400 Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 467-7110 Attorney for Plaintiff

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that White Duck Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1320 Hampton Avenue Ext., Bay 12B, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 11, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Terrace Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 654 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than December 11, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that NORTH HIGHWAY 14, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 5600 N. HIGHWAY 14, LANDRUM, SC 29356. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 27, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that CHP Greenville SC Tenant Corp intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1004 Augusta Street, Greenville, SC 29605. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 27, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that The Greenville Bistro, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 805 Frontage Road, Greenville, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 27, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Vault & Valor intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 655 S. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than November 27, 2016. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11.25.2016 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

23rd Amendment ACROSS 1 Tussle (with) 8 Hindu chant 14 Robotic floor vacuum 20 Predicted 21 Daisy types 22 Relatives of 21-Across 23 Pounding one’s shawl? 25 Like sacred statues 26 Step up or down 27 Instant, for short 28 Santa — College 29 In history 30 Book parts 34 What aviator Orville or Wilbur was called? 37 Found on these pages 38 Kitty treater 39 Fill up fully 40 Celtics rival 41 “What the Butler Saw” dramatist Joe 42 Does penance 45 Sprinter Bolt 47 Small songbird with a cartoon cat? 50 60-min. units 51 “Rockaria!” band, in brief 54 Singer Clay 55 San — (Italian resort) 57 Poet W.H. — 59 Fusion 64 Old laundry machine that’s totally on the fritz? 66 Raving sort

67 People debating 70 Bistro, e.g. 71 “Goodbye, Columbus” author when he’s very angry? 73 Throw from a steed 74 Tea garnish 75 Apple debut of 1998 76 Mini-serving 79 Prior to 80 Flan need 82 Damage done to a periodical? 89 Pub buys 91 Find a new place for, as a pet 92 Islamic equivalent of kosher 93 Trial attire 96 Siestas 98 “Mazel —!” 99 Hereditary sequence 100 Declaration upon pulling your valise forcefully? 103 Many a handcuffed person 105 — -Jo (’80s track star) 106 That guy’s 107 Certain Wall St. trader 108 Paradigm 109 Hereditary 111 Actress Fay who was always cheerful? 117 Get free of 118 Silky goat or rabbit

By Frank Longo 119 Helm handler 120 Beaches 121 Observed in the vicinity of 122 Actor Erik DOWN 1 Yackety-yak 2 Lament 3 — Khan 4 Impose 5 Capital of Kosovo 6 Like the pre-Easter period 7 — Allan Poe 8 Comic Jay 9 Bunyan’s tool 10 Story for an anchor 11 Radials for a Rolls, say 12 Fails to stay poker-faced 13 Viper variety 14 Slickers and galoshes 15 Wilde with wit 16 Bison-hunting tribe 17 Household 18 Intelligent 19 Fancy ties 24 “— the season!” 28 Gallery gala 30 Grub 31 Berlin man 32 Funnyman Johnson 33 Hireling 34 “... three — a tub” 35 Océan liquid 36 Hotel relative 38 Cast a ballot

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42 Take — view of 43 “Bad!” sound 44 Shopping jag 46 Old Testament book 48 Racial equality gp. 49 Part of YTD 51 Lawn gadget 52 Dirty looks 53 Ham — (deli classic) 56 Rx signers 58 Golden rule’s second word 59 Plenteous 60 Bill of “Real Time” 61 Japanese film genre 62 Stitch’s cartoon pal 63 Dive variety 64 “Yeah, no kidding!” 65 Taylor of “The Nanny” 67 Chair part 68 Traipse 69 Sporty auto 72 Tepees’ kin 73 — Reader (alternative digest) 76 Sierra Nevada lake 77 Sea of — (waters off Ukraine) 78 Gaming “City” dweller 81 Non-Jews 83 Somehow manages with 84 Pair attached to an axle 85 Also- — (losers) 86 Scores 87 Arose (from) 88 Painter Paul 89 Nectar lover 90 CIA worker 93 Searches and robs

94 Wise-looking 95 Bucking one 97 Card game expert John 99 Bestows 101 Triangle, e.g. 102 Fly into — (get furious) 103 Madison Ave. output 104 Find a new purpose for 108 “— first you don’t succeed ...”

Sudoku

Hard

110 Corn spike 111 Once existed 112 — pro nobis 113 That gal’s 114 Levin or Glass 115 TV neighbor of Homer 116 Time of note

Crossword answers: page 47

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 47


11.25.2016 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

The Classroom Window with Trevor Barton

I Am Because We Are I am a public school teacher in a highpoverty elementary school. My students are colorful and creative, wise and wonderful, beautiful and brave, and I love each and every one of them. Sheniece was one of my students a few years ago. She had colorful beads in her hair that clicked and clacked as she bounced down the hall. She had a face like the sun. On good days, it shined like the sun, bright and warm and ready to do the best she could do and be the best she could be. On bad days, though, it darkened like a storm cloud, tough and mean and ready to take on other students, her teacher and the world. One day she had a bad day. She rolled into the classroom, loud and belligerent, bothering other students and ignoring the morning procedures. “Sheniece,” I said sternly, “Park it and turn off your engine.” She put one hand on her hip, waved the other in front of me, and said, “Mr. Barton, who do you think you are?” I could have said, “Sheniece, I’m your teacher. I’m here to help you learn and to help you stay safe. The school says I’m ‘in parentis loci.’ Do you know what that means? It’s Latin for ‘I’m your parent at school!’ It means you have to listen to me and do what I say. So park it and turn off your engine.” Instead I looked into her big brown eyes and asked, “What about you? Who do you think you are?” She answered, “I think I want to be the first woman high school football coach in South Carolina.” I said, “Come on, let’s go and have a talk with Coach Burns. She can tell us how you can become a teacher and a coach.” We walked off together down the hallway toward the gym. Who do I think I am? To answer this question, the first place I go is to my feet. Maria was an immigrant student at my school. She was a secondgrader, with mischievous eyes and an infectious giggle. She was small in stature but big in heart. On special days, she dressed in bright and beautiful Mexican dresses and wore high-heeled shoes on her tiny feet. Once I stopped by Greenville Water on the way home from school. As I stood in line, I heard a little voice. “Mr. Barton! Oh, Mr. Barton! It’s so good to see you!” I looked around then down and there was Maria. She wrapped her arms around me and gave me a big hug. A baby stroller was beside her holding a toddler. Her mother was behind her holding an infant. “Maria,” I asked, “What are you doing here?” She answered, “I’m

here to help my mom pay our bill.” I hope my feet take me where Maria’s feet took her: to help someone. The second place I go is to my hands. Momadu was one of my best friends when my wife and I lived in Mali in West Africa. He was a cook at the mission station where we worked. The main food staples for us were rice and peanut sauce. “We’re having rice and peanut sauce for breakfast,” said my friends there. “We’re having peanut sauce over rice for lunch,” they said. “We’re going to put some tasty rice in a bowl and cover it with delicious peanut sauce for supper tonight!” they exclaimed. It was called tigadiga-na. I loved it and was thankful for it, but when you have it meal after meal, day after day and month after month, your taste buds cry out for something different. On my birthday, I walked up to the door of the little community house. Of course, I was expecting rice and peanut sauce with a candle in the middle of it for my birthday meal. Momadu met me at the door. “I have a surprise for you,” he said in his broken English that always made my heart whole. I sat down at the table. “Close your eyes,” he said. I closed them and he placed two trays on the table. “Open your eyes now,” he said. In front of me, in one of the most rural and remote places on the world, was a cheddar cheese meatloaf and a French apple pie. This was my favorite meal. He found the recipes in some old Southern Living magazines and went out into the surrounding villages and markets to find the ingredients that would work for the meal. I hope my hands create what Momadu created: something beautiful for someone else.

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Who do I think I am? I am where my feet take me. I am what my hands build. I am who my heart holds. I am Sheniece and Maria and Momadu. I am because we are. How about you? Who do you think you are? Trevor Barton is a reading intervention teacher at Berea Elementary School. He believes we all have stories to tell and loves to listen.

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Nov. 25, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

Nov. 25, 2016 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.