Page 1

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, October 12, 2018 • Vol.20, No.41

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

$1.00

50 years and 12 million meals later,

Meals on Wheels of Greenville still needs your help.


A Friend to the Homebound since 1968 1985

1968

On October 16, Meals on Wheels was founded by June Durham. On that day, 20 meals were prepared in the kitchen at Westminster Presbyterian Church and delivered to senior citizens in need.

1981

1970

The Pet Food Program was started to provide dog and cat food to homebound clients who are not able to provide food for their pets.

2003

Federal funding ended and Meals on Wheels began relying solely on community support.

Drop sites were created to allow volunteers to pick up meals for delivery in locations closer to their homes or offices.

2007

County-wide service began after satellite centers were created in Travelers Rest, Mauldin, Simpsonville, Fountain Inn and Piedmont.

Emergency meal kits were distributed for the first time to ensure clients would have something to eat in the case of inclement weather.

2011

1985

The BI-LO Charity Classic was started as a fundraiser for Meals on Wheels of Greenville. The event would later grow to become one of the nation’s largest one-day charity golf tournaments and make a huge economic impact in Greenville.

Meals on Wheels of Greenville’s 10 millionth meal was delivered.

2012

The board of directors changed the eligibility of Meals on Wheels clients to include those below the age of 60 with extreme handicap.

1997 1990

Construction was completed on a brand new 6,000-squarefoot Meals on Wheels facility on Oregon Street.

The supplemental grocery program, which provides shelf-stable food to clients in need, was piloted in Golden Strip.

2016

Meals on Wheels began providing meals to other nonprofit organizations in our community.

2017

The Corporate Route Program was formalized to encourage businesses to adopt a Meals on Wheels route.

Meals on Wheels is celebrating 50 years of service to the homebound in Greenville County and 12 million meals delivered.

2018


Rosemarie Sumerel started delivering Meals on Wheels with her VolunTeen students when she was a teacher Carolina High School. After retirement, she and her husband Bill wanted to continue helping others and began volunteering together every week in Berea. Along with hot meals, they take fresh fruit to the clients on their route—Bill estimates he’s delivered over 14,000 bananas in his nearly two decades volunteering. Whether it’s delivering meals with their eight grandchildren or working with the Pelham Trails Garden Club to make Christmas trees for clients each year, the Sumerels are passionate about sharing the mission of Meals on Wheels. “We’re often the only people the clients see all day. They need the food, but a lot of it is the interaction. I’ve always felt that we get more out of it than the people who receive the food.”

Rosemarie & Bill Sumerel

Are you interested in volunteering? Get started by emailing volunteer@mowgvl.org.

Bob and Lynn Sharp have been involved with Meals on Wheels of Greenville for over 40 years. In those four decades, they’ve served in multiple roles—volunteering their time to deliver meals, sponsoring and attending special events, serving on the board of directors and donating to provide for those in need. Since 2013, the Sharps’ financial commitment has provided over 10,000 meals for homebound individuals in Greenville County. In addition, Bob’s company SEC Equipment Corporation has supported Meals on Wheels since 1985, providing over 7,000 meals. “Meals on Wheels is a big asset to this community. And it is because of the people—the people who work there, the volunteers. We’ve been fortunate and we’ve tried to give back.”

Bob & lYNN ShARP

Just $5.00 provides a meal for someone in need. Donate today at www.MealsonWheelsGreenville.org/donate.

Lillian Parker grew up watching her mother work in the Meals on Wheels of Greenville kitchen. In 1990, Lillian began working for Meals on Wheels when the new facility opened up on Oregon Street. She prepared meals for homebound individuals and seniors, and even volunteered to deliver meals. “I liked working at Meals on Wheels because I had the feeling I was helping somebody. You would see how sick the clients were when you visited them.” Today, Lillian can no longer stand well enough to cook or shop at the grocery store on her own. She relies on Meals on Wheels for her daily nutrition.

LILLIAN PARKER

Do you have a friend or loved one who could benefit from receiving Meals on Wheels? Call 864.233.6565 for more information.


DID YOU KNOW? 1, 5 0 0

1 50

880

AVERAGE NUMBER OF MEALS DELIVERED EVERY WEEKDAY

AVERAGE NUMBER OF VOLUNTEERS NEEDED EVERY DAY

SQUARE MILES COVERED BY MEALS ON WHEELS OF GREENVILLE VOLUNTEERS DAILY TO DELIVER MEALS

I will always be grateful for having the opportunity to work for Meals on Wheels of Greenville. I was (and continue to be) humbled by the selfless acts of kindness shown by those who provide life-saving support each and every day to the homebound of Greenville County. LIZ SEMAN Greenville County Council Member Chief of Staff, Liaison to the Board of Trustees, Furman University Former Executive Director, Meals on Wheels of Greenville

$

0

COST of a meal for someone in need

As a member of Greenville City Council and a volunteer, I see the difference Meals on Wheels is making in our community every day. Greenville is filled with generous people doing what they can to care for those in need, but we need more help. I am glad to be part of the Meals on Wheels team who checks in on homebound seniors in our neighborhoods. Do you have an hour per week to give? Volunteer your time or donate what you can—it’s so easy to get involved and make an impact.

$

5

cost to provide one meal

1 00 % percentage of funding that comes from the community to support daily hot meals

In 1968, we saw a real need in our community that wasn’t being met. There were seniors who were hungry, not only for a warm, nourishing meal, but for companionship. And that need has only grown over the last 50 years. Meals on Wheels of Greenville continues to fight food insecurity and loneliness, and needs the help of the community to accomplish this mission. JUNE DURHAM Founder and Former Executive Director, Meals on Wheels of Greenville

AMY RYBERG DOYLE Greenville City Council Member Meals on Wheels of Greenville Volunteer

THE NEED IS GROWING AND YOUR SUPPORT IS CRITICAL. Nationally, 1 in 6 seniors struggles with hunger. In South Carolina alone, over 205,400 are threatened by hunger.* In 2017, Greenville County had a population of approximately 490,000 residents, making it South Carolina’s most populated county. At that time, the senior population was 107,118, representing 22% of the county’s total population. By 2027, it’s estimated that the senior population will grow to 141,292—a 31.90% increase.**

Your support is vital to ensuring the homebound and seniors in our community receive the support they so desperately need— a hot nutritious meal, a daily well-check and visit from a friendly volunteer, connections to other critical resources, such as transportation and home repairs, and so much more. *Meals on Wheels America **S.C. Revenue and Fiscal Affairs Office, courtesy of the Appalachian Council of Governments

PLEASE CONSIDER GETTING INVOLVED TODAY. Volunteer your time, refer someone who needs help or make a donation to provide the next meal. There’s never been a better time to be a part of Meals on Wheels of Greenville. 15 OREGON STREET • GREENVILLE, SC 29605 • 864.233.6565 • WWW.MEALSONWHEELSGREENVILLE.ORG VOLUNTEER@MOWGVL.ORG • REFER@MOWGVL.ORG • DONATE@MOWGVL.ORG


GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, October 12, 2018 • Vol.20, No.41

FOR HOME DELIVERY CALL 864.679.1200 READ ONLINE AT GREENVILLE JOURNAL.COM

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PAGE 3 The Anchorage serves up a taste of fall. More on Page 8. | Will Crooks / Greenville Journal

THEY SAID IT

“His criminal history tells the story of a vicious, brutal murderer.” GPD Chief Ken Miller – Page 12

“We provide $400,000 to a history museum with stuffed pigs but we can’t fund our bus system.” Rick Roberts, councilman, Greenville County Council – Page 18

“It was a phoenix. It truly rose up out of the process.” City Administrator Ed Driggers on Greer’s $6 million shared street project – Page 21

“Growth is good, but not if you’re not keeping up.” Greenville Fire Chief Steve Kovalcik on the need for a new fire station south of Interstate 85 – Page 16

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4 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Warm weather delays fall colors along Blue Ridge Parkway, experts say ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Upstate residents eager to make their annual fall pilgrimage to the Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina may want to reconsider their travel plans. The fall foliage season in the southern Appalachians generally begins in late September and winds down in early November, according to Don Hagan, an assistant professor in Clemson University's department of forestry and environmental conservation. But the above-average rainfall over the summer months coupled with warm temperatures continuing well into October, could delay the annual display of colors. Hagan, who assesses foliage and makes annual predictions for when the leaves will change color, recently visited Devil’s Courthouse, a mountain in the Pisgah National Forest in Transylvania County, North Carolina, and found the foliage lacking its usual hues of red, yellow, and orange. “There’s not a whole lot of color happening yet,” Hagan said, “but it’s coming soon.” According to the United States National Arboretum, a wet growing season followed by a dry autumn filled with sunny days and cool, frostless nights produce the most brilliant fall colors. In analyzing the region’s temperatures, Dr. Howard Neufeld, a biology professor and fall foliage forecaster at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina,  found that

nighttime temperatures in areas above 2,000 feet elevation have been more than 9 degrees warmer than average this fall, while daytime temperatures have been a little less than 4 degrees warmer than normal. “This means that the current fall weather is unprecedented for as far back as weather measurements have been made. That being said, it also means that the responses of the trees to this unusual weather are also unprecedented, since they have never experienced this before,” Neufeld wrote in his latest Fall Color Report posted on Appalachian State University’s department of biology website. Neufeld added that a warm period during autumn would not only delay the colors but also decrease the intensity of fall foliage. “Some trees, like red maples and tulip poplars, may simply drop their leaves before they develop significant color, resulting in a fall color display somewhat like last year, which also had above-normal fall temperatures,” he wrote. According to the North Carolina Climate Office, the three-month outlook for the southern Appalachian region shows a slight chance for above-average temperatures. October is expected to have upper 60s for the highs and mid- to upper-40s for the lows. On the bright side, however, Hagan said there are few signs that Hurricane Florence damaged leaves in the region, meaning there is still potential for an abundance of autumn hues this fall season. Many forecasts for Florence had called for heavy winds and rain with the potential to dampen fall colors in the western Carolinas, but the majority of severe weather occurred

along the coast, according to Hagan. “We didn’t see the direct impacts here along the southern Blue Ridge Parkway like we could have seen,” he said. “Had we seen a little bit more wind and a little bit more rain, we could have seen leaves getting knocked off before they ever had a chance to turn — and we just fortunately didn’t see that this year.” As for when exactly the leaves will begin to change color, Hagan said that, based on the amount of green foliage still visible above 5,000 feet, the majority of fall color in the southern Appalachians will depend on the weather through the remainder of October. “If it’s warm, moist, and sunny, plants are going to hold onto the leaves as long as they can,” he said. “So if we have a warm fall, like it seems like we’re going to have, we could potentially have a later start to our fall color season and a longer fall color season.” An interactive map created by SmokyMountains.com shows the Upstate and western North Carolina hitting peak foliage during the week of Nov. 5. The tourism website analyzes National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration data on historical and forecast temperatures and precipitation, along with leaf peak trends, to predict when leaves will change across the nation. Hagan said red spruces and other deciduous trees in the range of roughly 4,500 to 5,000 feet of elevation would be the first to change colors in the southern Appalachians. “The species that make New England famous for having such a beautiful fall color season, we have them here, too,” he said. “You’ve just got to be up at this higher elevation to see them.”

Why do leaves change color? It all starts with photosynthesis. During the spring and summer months, leaves constantly produce chlorophyll — the molecule that converts sunlight and water into the glucose a plant needs to stay healthy. These cells saturate the leaves, making them appear green to the human eye. But when the daylight hours become shorter during the fall and winter months, chlorophyll production slows down and decreases the amount of green pigment in the leaves. This allows other compounds, known as carotenoids and anthocyanins, to become visible. Carotenoids create yellow, orange, and brown colors, while anthocyanins create bright, rich reds.

Photos courtesy of iStock

FALL COLORS

Particular trees tend to produce a distinct palette when Autumn arrives, according to the U.S. Forest Service. Here are a few examples:

Oaks

Red, brown, or russet

Hickories Golden bronze

Yellow poplar Golden yellow

Dogwood Purplish red

Beech Light Tan

Sourwood Crimson

Red maple Brilliant scarlet

Sugar maple Orange-red

Black maple Glowing yellow

Striped maple Almost colorless


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6 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FA L L F O L I A G E D E S T I N AT I O N S IN THE CAROLINAS

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Hooker Falls in DuPont State Forest in Cedar Mountain, North Carolina. Stock

DUPONT STATE FOREST North Carolina’s DuPont State Forest, located past Caesar’s Head in Cedar Mountain, offers waterfalls and fall colors. For an easy hike, go to Hooker Falls. For a little more exercise, hike to Triple Falls, which happened to be featured in the first “Hunger Games” movie.

Because of changes in elevation, Upstate South Carolina and western North Carolina together enjoy one of the longest fall

GRAVEYARD FIELDS

foliage seasons in the country. Here are 10 locations to consider:

CAESAR’S HEAD The overlook at Caesar’s Head State Park has a reputation for being one of the best locations for viewing fall color in the Upstate and in all of South Carolina. If you want something more challenging, hike to the park’s Raven Cliff Falls, which is the highest waterfall in South Carolina at 400 feet. The trail is rated a moderate 2.2 miles.

Graveyard Fields. Photo by Cindy Landrum Photography

Graveyard Fields has some of the best fall color on the Blue Ridge Parkway. It is located at milepost 418.8. If you’re not a hiker, you can view the color right from the side of the road. If you are, the Graveyard Fields Loop will take you to two waterfalls.

LAKE JOCASSEE

Caesar’s Head overlook. Photo courtesy of DiscoverSouthCarolina.com

Falling Waters Scenic Byway is a 13-milelong gateway to the mountains that begins in Walhalla in Oconee County and follows S.C. Highway 107. Going north, it passes Issaqueena Falls, the Stumphouse Tunnel, and Oconee State Park. As you get near the North Carolina line, take Oscar Wigington Highway, or S-37413,  to the overlook that gives a fantastic view of Lake Jocassee. For another view of Lake Jocassee, go to Jumping Off Rock. It's accessible from Horsepasture Road off U.S. Highway 178. You’ll want a four-wheel drive or high-clearance vehicle.

Lake Jocassee. Photo courtesy of DiscoverSouthCarolina.com


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 7

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TABLE ROCK STATE PARK There are two ways to photograph fall foliage at Table Rock. The easiest is to stop along S.C. Highway 11 at Lake Oolenoy. If you want another view, enter the park and hike the Carrick Creek Nature Trail, or take the Table Rock trail to the top. To help determine when color is the best, go to https:// southcarolinaparks.com/webcams/table-rock.

Table Rock State Park. Photo courtesy of DiscoverSouthCaroloina.com

Great Smoky Mountains Railroad. Photo courtesy of the Bryson City/Swain County, North Carolina, Chamber of Commerce

Rough Ridge off the Blue Ridge Parkway. iStock

BRYSON CITY, NC If you don’t want to see fall colors by foot or car, there’s the train. The Great Smoky Mountain Railroad, based in Bryson City, North Carolina, offers a couple of options. The first is its Nantahala Gorge excursion, a 44-mile trip to the Nantahala Gorge and back. The other is a 32-mile round trip along the Tuckasegee River.

ROUGH RIDGE If you can do only one hike on the Blue Ridge Parkway in the fall, this should be your pick. The trail, which is located at milepost 302.8, offers spectacular views of Grandfather Mountain, Linn Cove, and Linville Gorge.

BEACON HEIGHTS

Sunrise at Beacon Heights. iStock

While you’re in the Rough Ridge area, stop at the Beacon Heights Overlook at milepost 305.2. While it doesn’t look like much from the parking lot, that changes once you hike a short but steep Beacon Heights Trail. Once at the top, there are two rocky overlooks. One faces east and the other west, allowing views of sunrises and sunsets.

PARIS MOUNTAIN For a different view of fall color, consider Paris Mountain State Park. Instead of mountain vistas, you’ll see fall colors in the reflections in the park’s Mountain Lake or Lake Placid. The best thing is, unlike some of the other fall color hotspots, it’s just minutes from downtown Greenville.

Lake Placid, Paris Mountain State Park. Photo courtesy of DiscoverSouthCarolina.com

SHADOW OF THE BEAR This seasonal display is viewable from about 5:30 p.m. to 6 p.m. from mid-October through early November from the Rhodes Big View Overlook on U.S. Highway 64 about 4 miles outside Cashiers, North Carolina. Because of how the sun sets behind the mountain, the shadow starts off as a small dark shadow at the bottom of the valley before progressing to a bear.

Shadow of the Bear, near Cashiers, North Carolina. Photo by Cindy Landrum Photography


8 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Fall Flavors WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Geechie Boy farrotto with pumpkin, grilled mushroom, and fresh tendril, hit The Anchorage menu last week. And while this dish may not remain exactly the same on the ever-fresh and rotating menu, it represents the types of produce and flavors Greenville diners should expect to see on fall menus around town. Other restaurants taking advantage of the fall harvest of locally grown gourds and foraged mushrooms, for instance, include Husk, Fork and Plough, Bacon Bros. Public House, Stella’s Southern Brasserie, Roost, Jianna, and Golden Brown & Delicious.


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 9

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L AT E - S E A S O N

Apple Picking

Late-season guide to apple picking around Greenville

ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Photos courtesy of iStock ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Although peak apple-picking season is typi-

cally in September, there are a number of apple varieties still on the trees for anyone hoping to go apple picking when the leaves change colors. While there aren’t many options for picking your own apples in Greenville, there are a number of orchards within a short drive of the city. North Carolina is in the top 10 apple-producing states, according to the United States Apple Association, so it’s no surprise most orchards nearby are just across the state line.

Here's a list of nearby orchards and apple varieties that are still ripe in many of them. SKY TOP ORCHARD In Flat Rock, North Carolina, Sky Top is only a 45-minute drive from Greenville. Activities include: wagon rides, large playground, farm animals. In the shop: apple cider donuts; pumpkin donuts; apple jams and products; pumpkins; and more. STEPP’S HILLCREST ORCHARD In Hendersonville, North Carolina, Stepp’s Orchard is just under an hour from Greenville. Activities include: wagon rides, target shooting with an apple cannon, corn maze, pumpkin patch. In the shop: apple cider donuts; pumpkin donuts; apple jams and products; pumpkins; and more.

JUSTUS ORCHARD In Hendersonville, North Carolina, Justus Orchard is just under an hour from Greenville. Activities include: orchard tours, farm animals, Jumping Pillow for kids, pumpkin patch. In the shop: apple cider donuts; apple jams and products; pumpkins; and more. GRANDAD’S APPLES N’ SUCH In Hendersonville, North Carolina, Grandad’s Apples is just under an hour from Greenville. Activities include: corn maze, Jumping Pillow for kids, farm animals, pumpkin patch. In the shop: apple cider donuts; local crafts; apple jams and products; pumpkins; and more. BRYSON’S APPLE ORCHARD In Mountain Rest, South Carolina, Bryson’s Orchard is about an hour and 20 minutes west of Greenville. Activities include: orchard tours and nearby hiking trails. In the shop: fresh apple ciders; apple jams and products; and more.

RIPE UNTIL

Mid-October Red Delicious apple

Late October These apples are likely still around at many orchards.

Golden Delicious apple

Golden Delicious Blushing Gold Cameo Rome Fuji Cripps Pink/Pink Lady

RIPE UNTIL

November Arkansas Black

RIPE UNTIL

Red Delicious

Ida Red

Mutsu (Crispin)

Stayman

December

Jonathan

Granny Smith

Gold Rush

These apples are likely to go out of season soon.

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12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Murderer in 28-year-old cold case identified through genealogy service ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

The Greenville Police Department has identified a serial killer whose crimes had puzzled investigators for nearly three decades. Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller identified now-deceased Robert Brashers Robert Eugene Brashers as Genevieve Zitricki’s killer at a news conference Friday at Greenville’s City Hall, 28 years after her murder. Brashers was identified through DNA testing, which is the first time the Greenville Police Department has made a breakthrough in a cold case through DNA testing, Miller said. Zitricki, who went by Jenny, was 28 years old and recently divorced when she was found beaten and strangled to death in her bathtub at what was then Hidden

Lake Apartments on Villa Road in 1990. It's taken the span of her life for investigators to finally put her case to rest. Last year, retired police officers and law enforcement agents volunteered to help the Greenville Police Department investigate a list of cold cases that had been shelved for years, including Zitricki's. Friday’s announcement comes as a result of law enforcement's use of Parabon NanoLabs, a DNA technology company based in Virginia. The breakthrough was from tracking the DNA through “genetic genealogy,” which uses advanced DNA testing in combination with genetic analysis to establish relationships between relatives. Parabon NanoLabs was able to match Brashers’ DNA with a relative's who had used GEDmatch, a database that gained recent national attention after law enforcement used it to identify California's notorious Golden State Killer earlier this year. At the time of Zitricki’s death, Greenville police said she was likely murdered in her bedroom before being dragged to her bathtub and submerged in water. A threatening message left on her mirror

Philip Hegedusich, brother of Genevieve Zitricki, talks about his sister's murder at a press conference with Greenville Police Chief Ken Miller at City Hall. Photo by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

said “Don’t [expletive] with my family,” but detectives were never able to determine if the note was legitimate or made to cover the killer’s tracks, until now. Zitricki's brother, Philip Hegedusich, was her only family member at the news

conference, speaking on behalf of their family for their gratitude to each of the law enforcement agencies involved in the case. Their mother, he said, was relieved to finally know the truth. "Twenty-eight years. Twenty. Eight.

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Years," Hegedusich emphasized at the news conference. "It's been a long time. It's been time enough for trails to go cold, for memories to fade, and for connections to fray and sever. It’s almost been time enough to give up hope, but the men and women of this outstanding organization in concert with professionals from other far-flung jurisdictions never gave up. They never wavered. They never forgot their promise." Hegedusich spoke about his “firecracker” sister who was a fan of the Cleveland Browns. Jenny Zitricki. Provided by Greenville Police Department. “It's been 28 years since Jenny was taken from us," Hegedusich said. “The intervening years have brought the painful sorrow of loss and the longing for what could have been, but we do well to remember her in life. She was a force of nature, a firecracker, a bundle of infectious energy, an intelligent, vibrant, caring human being. All of the lives she touched, near and far, then and now, should keep her in their hearts not as she left, but as she lived.” Authorities had already linked Zitricki’s killer to several other crimes through what is now known to be Brashers’ DNA — the death of a mother and daughter in Missouri in 1998 as well as the sexual assault of a 14-year-old victim in Memphis, Tennessee, in 1997, along with a series of other crimes he had been arrested for between 1985 and 1999. In 1998, Sherri Scherer and her 12-yearold daughter, Megan, were found dead from gunshot wounds in their Missouri home. The victims were bound and authorities said the girl had been raped. Two hours later, authorities said ballistic evidence showed the same man tried to enter a home in Dyer County, Tennessee, where he shot a woman who struggled with him at the door. In 2006, investigators were able to link DNA evidence taken from Zitricki’s crime scene with the double homicide in Missouri. An FBI sketch of who has now been identified as serial killer Robert Eugene Brashers. Last year, investigators found another link — this time, to the 1997 rape of a 14-yearold victim in Memphis, Tennessee. Miller said the 20-year-old DNA was discovered in 2017 because of a backlog in rape kits at the Memphis Police Department. Each link brought investigators one step closer to discovering a web of interconnected crimes spanning the Southeast. After investigators were able to link Brashers’ DNA with a relative's, his family willingly provided law enforcement swabs of DNA. The case was officially closed when Brashers’ remains were exhumed in Paragould, Arkansas, on Sept. 27 and tested against the DNA samples. Brashers’ address history

Jenny Zitricki. Photo provided by Greenville Police Department.

shows that he lived within short driving distance to each crime when it occurred. Miller said Brashers lived most of his life in Huntsville, Alabama, before moving around and committing brutal assaults and murders across several states. “We now know that Robert Brashers was a violent serial rapist and murderer. His criminal history tells the story of a vicious, brutal murderer,” Miller said. Detective Sgt. Tim Conroy with GPD said Brashers had a wife who said they had married sometime after Brasher attempted to break in a home in Paragould, Arkansas, in 1998, but law enforcement has not been able to confirm they were married. Law enforcement exhumed Robert Eugene Brashers’ body on Sept. 27, 2018, in Paragould, Arkansas. Photo provided by Greenville Police Department. Conroy said law enforcement last spoke with Brashers’ wife Tuesday, and plan to speak with her again. He said Brashers’ wife indicated she was aware of some of his crimes, but not the sexual assaults or murders. Brashers died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound on Jan. 19, 1999, six days after a standoff with police at a Super 8 motel in Kennett, Missouri, where he held his wife, daughter, and two stepdaughters hostage. Miller said Brashers’ crimes were not random attacks, but were likely planned given his residences in relation to each crime. He said Vitricki was likely targeted because she was outgoing and lived right by the complex's pool. “I believe that she was targeted that way, since she was so outgoing. I don't think it was a random attack that he just went into that apartment. He knew who was in that apartment he entered,” Miller said. Miller said it’s possible Brashers committed other crimes not yet known because of the backlog of rape kits at many law enforcement agencies. He encouraged anyone who knew Brashers at the time to contact the police department so law enforcement can build a stronger timeline of the events.

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

MEET THE FINALISTS FOR GREENVILLE CITY MANAGER CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

The three finalists for the Greenville city manager job will be back for another round of interviews on Oct. 18, this time involving elected officials, community stakeholders, and the city’s senior leadership team. The finalists — Debra Campbell, assistant city manager in Charlotte, North Carolina; Jill Silverboard, deputy city manager in Clearwater, Florida; and Bryan Woods, assistant city manager in New Braunfels, Texas — were among 77 applicants for the job. Here’s a look at each of the candidates.

Debra Campbell Current position: Assistant city manager, Charlotte Previous positions: Director of planning, Charlotte-Mecklenberg Planning Department Education: Master’s degree in public administration, Middle Tennessee State University; bachelor’s degree in urban planning, Middle Tennessee State University.

Debra Campbell

Through her work as CharlotteMecklenberg Planning Department director and now an assistant city manager, Campbell has had a role in Charlotte’s transformation into the second fastest growing city

in the country. “Greenville is known as a very progressive place to live and do business but desires to further its position as a wellgoverned, economically diverse, socially conscientious and engaging city,” Campbell wrote in her candidate questionnaire. “Although there is a lot I could do in Charlotte in an assistant city manager role, the opportunity to help further advance the city of Greenville’s vision in a city manager role is extremely exciting.” In the questionnaire, Campbell said she has specific responsibility in Charlotte for the planning and development, and housing and neighborhood services departments. She has managed the approval of

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millions of square feet of commercial and mixed-use development and several thousand residential units. During the past three years, Charlotte has created 5,000 affordable housing opportunities, and recently adopted a 10year strategy for community collaboration to increase the supply of affordable housing, Campbell wrote. Governing Magazine named Campbell one of its Public Officials of the Year in 2007.

Jill Silverboard Current position: Deputy city manager, Clearwater, Florida Previous positions: City manager, Madeira Beach, Florida; city manager, Destin, Florida. Education: Master’s degree in public administration, Western Carolina University; bachelor’s degree in political science and government, Lenoir-Rhyne College. Throughout her career, Jill Silverboard has worked in high-growth communities. “Greenville is a premier city with a strong sense of place,” said Silverboard, who grew up Jill Silverboard in Haywood County in western North Carolina and worked as planning director for the city of Brevard from 1988 to 1990. She said part of Greenville’s success comes from having a plan and sticking to it. However, that doesn’t mean there aren’t challenges, she said. She listed transportation, affordable housing, and infrastructure needs. While she said it is difficult to isolate the challenges, she would pick transportation as the biggest challenge facing Greenville because the city can’t control all aspects of it. Silverboard said she has experience working with the state department of transportation, regional transportation authorities and transit authorities. She said she’s familiar with commuter modeling within a constrained highway and street system, and in Clearwater, she’s working to create multi-model alternatives even in the face of funding limitations. Silverboard said all of the communities in which she has worked have been actively involved, and had tension among residents, development, and employment interests. “Each community must deter-

mine its own threshold and desired outcomes for growth,” she wrote in her candidate questionnaire. “I believe my background and experience are a unique fit in terms of balancing growth and progress without sacrificing quality of life, said Silverboard, who was a finalist for Pinellas County, Florida administrator.

Bryan Woods Current position: Assistant city manager, New Braunfels, Texas Previous positions: Capital programs manager, New Braunfels; vice president and Texas office director for the consulting, engineering and surveying firm CoyleSDA Inc. Education: Master’s degree in public affairs, University of Missouri; bachelor’s degree in construction engineering technology, University of Southern Mississippi. Greenville shares many of the same challenges as New Braunfels, Texas, where Bryan Woods has served as assistant city manager since June 2017. New Braunfels has consistently been Bryan Woods among the fastest growing cities among those with populations over 50,000 residents. “There are only a handful of cities nationally that possess the economic viability, quality of life, and potential for growth that Greenville has,” Woods wrote in his cover letter. “Harnessing and guiding this type of potential along with the opportunities and challenges that come with it demands a different type of leader.” Woods said the vision of the community’s leadership and the ability to execute that vision is Greenville’s biggest strength. Shaping and encouraging growth in a way that maintains or enhances Greenville’s character will be a key to its continued success, Woods said. Woods said New Braunfels was able to begin transitioning from an underperforming on-demand public transportation system to a blended fixed-route system that better serves the community with an almost negligible fiscal impact. He said he oversaw the planning and construction of more than $150 million in facility improvements, and he oversaw the completion of a new 62-acre regional park.


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Chief warns annexation of Lake Conestee Nature Park could impact fire service CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

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Greenville Fire Chief Steve Kovalcik has sounded an alarm — the part of the city south of Interstate 85 is underserved when it comes to fire protection and that could get worse with the proposed annexation of Lake Conestee Nature Park. Kovalcik told members of the Greenville City Council that response-time models show it would take the closest fire truck 9½ minutes to get to Lake Conestee Nature Park, 5 minutes and 30 seconds longer that the standard. When the Lake Conestee Nature Park annexation was proposed, Lake Conestee Foundation executive director Dave Hargett had said the Belmont Fire Department would continue to cover the park. The area south of Interstate 85 was identified as underserved as early as 2012, and the Insurance Services Office voiced concern over the lack of connectivity to areas south of the interstate from the city’s fire stations. Kovalcik said there are only three ways the city’s fire trucks can access the areas southwest of Laurens Road — Laurens Road, Ridge Road, and Mauldin Road. “I-85 acts as a barrier,” he said. Kovalcik said the fire department is concerned about the potential growth the annexation will bring. As land in downtown and the adjacent neighborhoods becomes more scarce and expensive, the area near Mauldin Road and Fairforest Way has attracted more de-

velopment, from commercial facilities to schools, and multifamily and single-family residential. That growth shows in a steep increase in calls for service for the fire department. Since 2010, the fire department has responded to 1,077 calls south of Interstate 85 — 561 fire calls and another 516 medical incidents. From 2014 to 2018, calls for service increased by 79 percent, Kovalcik said. The area has several schools: J.L. Mann High, Christ Church Episcopal School, St. Joseph’s Catholic School, and Lead Academy Charter School. It is also home to the Renewable Water Resources headquarters, Duke Energy’s operations center, the U.S. Postal Service, UPS, FedEx, and the city’s public works facility. Kolvacik said if a new station is not built, it could have a negative impact on fire insurance rates for residents and businesses in the area. The fire department has identified three potential sites for a new fire station that would serve that area. The first is the site of the fire department’s training facility. That location would provide a four-minute travel time to most of the currently underserved area while also providing some additional coverage in the Pleasantburg and Verdae areas. The second site, which is the department’s preferred location, is at the city’s public works facility on Fairforest Way. There is available land at the facility and it would provide a four-minute travel time

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM to most of the currently underserved area, Kovalcik said. The final location is the intersection of Cavalier Drive and Fairforest Way. This location would provide the most coverage for the currently underserved area and additional coverage for Millennium Boulevard and the CU-ICAR campus. No money has been identified for the new station. The city just opened a new fire station on Verdae Boulevard to address the need in the Woodruff Road area. “Growth is good, but not if you’re not keeping up,” Kovalcik told the council.

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18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Greenville County currently provides $451,223 annually for Greenlink, compared to more than $1 million from the city, yet 61 percent of bus routes are outside Greenville’s city limits.

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clandrum@communityjournals.com

Greenville County Councilman Rick Roberts says the money the county provides Greenlink is a “disgrace.” Roberts’ comments came at the end of a Greenville County Council work session where Greenlink director Gary Shepard told council members that by July 2021, the transit system will need an additional $1.5 million annually from the city and county to maintain service at today’s level because of diminishing federal funding. Extending bus service to 11:30 p.m. on weekdays and Saturdays would take $1.4 million more annually. Currently, the county provides $451,223 a year for Greenlink operations. The city’s contribution is $599,098 plus an additional $480,000 in contributed management services. The city also earmarks $260,021 in hospitality tax money for trolleys. Sixty-one percent of Greenlink’s routes are outside the city of Greenville. “We’re not funding it to the point to where we almost ought to say we don’t care,” Roberts said. “We provide $400,000 to a history museum with stuffed pigs but we can’t fund our bus system.” More than half of Greenlink’s funding comes from the federal government. A Piedmont Health Foundation study found that Greenlink receives significantly less money from local sources than its counterparts in comparable cities in the Southeast.

“Second to education, mobility is the equalizer in our society,” Shepard told council members. With its current hours, Greenlink can get somebody with a second-shift job to work depending on where their employer is located, but can’t get them home. It can get third-shift workers home, but not to work, Shepard said. “Are we going to where people want to go? No. Are people going to wait an hour? No,” Shepard said. Ten of Greenlink’s routes are run on 60-minute schedules. The other runs every 30 minutes thanks to subsidies by private partners. The first five years of Greenlink’s longrange plan calls for extending weekday and Saturday service by 2020. The longrange plan calls for eventually adding Sunday service. Greenlink’s long-range plan also calls for opening a new maintenance facility, something for which the bus system received an $11 million federal grant last week. The grant requires a $2.75 million local match. Shepard said donated land could be counted as part of the match. He said proceeds from the sale of the current maintenance facility on Augusta Street would be put toward the project’s $20 million to $25 million total cost. Councilman Joe Dill, who said residents in his northern Greenville County district would love to find a way to work but buses don’t run there, said Greenlink could consolidate its maintenance facility with the


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

HOW GREENLINK OPERATIONS ARE FUNDED $3,203,103 Federal

Source: Greenlink

county’s. “I’m having a hard time spending all that money to build a new facility when we have a facility. We might have to build a new wing, but that wouldn’t cost $11 million.” Roberts said Greenlink doesn’t directly benefit most of the residents of his dis-

$446,951

State

$544,953

City

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Passenger fares

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Trolley (City hos- pitality funds)

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20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Greenville Tech signs credit-transfer agreement with Anderson University

Stretch of Swamp Rabbit Trail closed through late November

ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

ARIEL GILREATH | STAFF

agilreath@communityjournals.com

Students who have completed certain associate degree programs at Greenville Technical College can now transfer to Anderson University through a bridge agreement between the schools. Anderson University officials signed an agreement with the college Oct. 2, making the university one of five schools with bridge agreements with Greenville Tech. The bridge agreement is for first-time college students enrolled in Greenville Tech’s associate of art, associate of science, or certain applied sciences degrees, and it will allow students to use their credits from the college to complete bachelor’s degrees at Anderson University. Students must sign the agreement signifying their intent to transfer to Anderson University before they’ve completed the degree program, and they must maintain at least a 2.5 GPA to be accepted.

Students who meet the requirements will be accepted to Anderson University with their class credit hours. The schools also signed an articulation agreement, allowing students in Greenville Tech’s supply chain management, marketing, and management programs to transfer up to 60-62 credit hours to Anderson University toward a bachelor’s degree in business administration. “This agreement represents an incredible opportunity for college students in our region,” said Dr. Evans P. Whitaker, president of Anderson University, in a news release. “We are so appreciative of our friends at Greenville Technical College, and we look forward to welcoming their students into the AU family.” Greenville Tech also has bridge agreements with the University of South Carolina, Presbyterian College, Lander University, and the University of South Carolina Upstate.

agilreath@communityjournals.com

A section of the Swamp Rabbit Trail closed Monday and won’t reopen until Nov. 23, the city of Greenville announced Tuesday. The closure is a result of the city’s restoration and streambank stabilization project in Cleveland Park. The portion of the trail closed to the public for the project is only about two-tenths of a mile, stretching from the Maj. Rudolf Anderson Jr. Memorial to the Cancer Survivors Park. The city will be planting trees and shrubs along the Reedy River’s banks, replacing invasive plant species with native plants, covering exposed sanitary sewer pipes, and constructing stream enhancement measures. The entire project is expected to be complete by the start of the new year, according to a statement from the city. Additional sections of the trail are also projected to close for different phases of the project: a section of the trail between McDaniel Avenue and shelter No. 3 will be closed from Nov. 5-Nov.16; sections of the trail between Cleveland Park Drive and the Woodland Way bridge along Lakehurst Street will be closed from Nov.19-Jan. 4; and a section of the trail near the Greenville Zoo parking lot will be closed from Nov. 26Dec. 21.

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10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

These renderings show a Greer downtown transformed by the use of colored pavers. The planned look is a break from traditional metropolitan street designs. Renderings by Kimley Horn

GREER’S NEW LOOK Not your traditional downtown streetscape CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

When talk first started about giving Greer Station — Greer’s downtown district — a new look, the thought was that it would keep a traditional downtown look. Wrong. When the $6 million shared-street project gets underway in January, Greer’s Trade Street will have more of a European look. Gone will be the curb and gutters. So will the traditional city center sidewalks, landscaping, and benches. In its place will be one continuous surface made up of different colored pavers that designate areas for vehicle traffic and parking as well as for pedestrian traffic. But when Trade Street is closed for an event, it all becomes one large pedestrian area. “It doesn’t look like a traditional Main Street or Trade Street or Commerce Street,” said City Administrator Ed Driggers, who said the idea came from Greer residents and merchants. “We were look-

ing for places that were doing this and we didn’t find any locations in the United States that were doing it to this degree.” Driggers said they visited Montreal to see how shared streets worked there. “We talked to police and administrators and the answer was always the same, that it works extremely well,” he said. “The public understands where the people go and the vehicles go.” The design, completed by Kimley-Horn

from Charlotte, is unique in the Greenville-Spartanburg marketplace and the Upstate, he said. “It was a phoenix. It truly rose up out of the process,” Driggers said. The deadline to submit bids is Nov. 8. Driggers said he expects the city to award a contract two to three weeks after that. The work should be complete by July 2020. Driggers said access to businesses would be maintained throughout the project.

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22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

What’s in a name? Baby orangutan has a moniker: Adira ANDREW MOORE | STAFF

amoore@communityjournals.com

Greenville Zoo officials announced Thursday that its newest addition — a baby Sumatran orangutan — will be named Adira. Adira is short for Adiratna, an Indonesian name meaning “beautiful jewel,” according to Greenville Zoo administrator Jeff Bullock. The winning name was submitted by Julie Terhune, from Williamsburg, Michigan, and was selected by the zoo staff members who have been caring for the baby since her birth. Nearly 100 names were submitted during the zoo’s baby-naming contest, which raised close to $1,000 in donations, according to Bullock. Those funds will be sent to the Sumatran Orangutan Conservation Programme to help support its efforts to protect orangutans and their habitats in their range countries. Sumatran orangutans are considered one of the world’s 25 most-endangered primates and listed as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation

of Nature. The population is estimated to be under 15,000 in the wild. Adira was born on Aug. 7 to Lana, the zoo's 33-year-old female Sumatran orangutan, and Kumar, a 13-year-old male. She is the first orangutan to be born at the Greenville Zoo in 12 years, according to Bullock. The last orangutan born at the zoo was Bob, a male Bornean orangutan born to parents Mia and Chelsea in 2006. Following the birth of Adira, the zoo provided around-the-clock care for the infant to ensure Lana’s sutures stayed in place, and that she had fully recovered from the stress of the immobilization, anesthesia, and surgery before she was tasked with caring for her baby. Adira was physically introduced to her mother, Lana, for the first time in August. Since then, Lana has been constantly cradling and nursing her baby. Visitors can expect to see the orangutan family on exhibit this fall or next spring, depending on the weather, according to Bullock. For more information, visit greenvillezoo.com.

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WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS

Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com

Dr. Benson “Jerry” Hecker

DEATH NOTICES SEPTEMBER 29, 2018 – OCTOBER 7, 2018 Caroline Lauren Cogdill, 18, of Greenville, passed away September 29, 2018. You may donate online at: www.favorgreenville.org. William Luther Dunn, Jr., 88, of Greenville, passed away September 30, 2018. The family was assisted by Woodlawn Funeral Home and Memorial Park. Alvin H. Rampey, 96, of Greenville, passed away September 30, 2018. The family was assisted by Howze Mortuary, Travelers Rest. George Thomas Berryhill, 88, of Travelers Rest, passed away October 1, 2018. The family was assisted by Mackey Funerals and Cremations. William A. Shuler, III, 66, of Greenville, passed away October 3, 2018. The family was assisted by Landford-Gwinn Mortuary.

Jordane Micheii Bouchillon, 22, of Greenville, passed away October 4, 2018. The family was assisted by Woodlawn Funeral Home and Memorial Park. Nan Carolyn Reed Grobe, 92, of Greenville, passed away October 4, 2018. The family was assisted by First Baptist Church of Columbia, SC. James Reed, 100, of Greenville, passed away October 5, 2018. Mackey Mortuary assisted the family. Kevin Alexander, 50, of Piedmont, passed away October 5, 2018. Gray Mortuary, Inc., assisted the family. Barbara Jameson Gantt, 88, of Easley, passed away October 7. Robinson Funeral Home, Downtown Easley, assisted the family.

Dr. William “Billy” Albert Webster IV February 15, 1947 – October 1, 2018

Dr. William Albert Webster IV (Billy), 71, of Greenville, SC went to be with the Lord on Monday, October 1. He was born on February 15, 1947 in Lake City, SC. He is survived by his loving wife of 47 years, Maree Fann Webster, and sons: Rev. Brent (Katie) Webster of Oakland, CA and Park (Briana) Webster of Greenville, SC. Also surviving is his twin sister, Laura Brown (Grady) of Bishopville, SC. He was the beloved grandfather of William, Lucy, Rosie, Parker and Grace. He is preceded in death by his loving parents, William A. Webster III and Jessie Mae Boyd Webster, as well as his beloved sister, Patsy Matthews (Charles).  Dr. Webster loved his South Carolina roots and was a proud graduate of The Citadel. After earning his doctorate at Florida State, Dr. Webster and family settled in Greenville, where he established South Carolina’s first comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation program, known as HeartLife. He served faithfully with the Greenville Hospital System for 30 years. During that time, he became Chairman of the South Carolina Governor’s Council on Physical Fitness and a Fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine. Above all his many prestigious accomplishments, his greatest love was his patients. In retirement, Dr. Webster continued his

passion for running and spending time with his beloved wife and grandchildren. He maintained a connection with The Citadel and visited as often as possible. Dr. Webster was a strong Christian, loving husband, tremendous father and grandfather, and a dedicated educator whose enthusiasm for health touched so many lives. He will be deeply missed, but would likely encourage all of us to exercise our hearts, by showing love to others and daily physical activity. He fought a courageous battle with Alzheimer’s with strength, dignity, and faith, surrounded by his wife Maree, children, and grandchildren. The family received friends at Mackey Funeral Home on Saturday October 6, 2018 . The memorial service was held Sunday, October 7, 2018 at Mitchell Road Presbyterian Church. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to Resurrection Church, a church in Oakland, CA recently started by his son, Brent. The address is: Resurrection Oakland, 4123 Broadway #816, Oakland, CA 94611. You can read more about Resurrection Oakland at resoakland.com.

September 15, 1933 ~ October 8, 2018

Dr. Benson “Jerry” Hecker, 85, gifted with an extraordinary sense of humor and ability to tell and re-tell stories that kept family and friends laughing and wishing for more, died on Monday, October 8, 2018 of complications related to congestive heart failure. A long-time resident of Greenville, he was born in New York City on September 15, 1933 to Ralph and Betty Lazar Hecker. In addition to his parents, he was preceded in death by sisters Mildred and Susan Hecker. Jerry enlisted in the United States Navy during the Korean War and served his country proudly from 1951-59. The nickname “Jerry”, a reminder of a prankster/ comedian of the time, alluded to his dive from the deck of the USS Mississippi – a 40feet jump – to retrieve a baseball needed to finish a Sunday afternoon ball game. The “man overboard” situation did not amuse the battleship’s captain but the nickname stuck. A graduate from Springfield College (B.S., Recreation & Youth Leadership, 1964) and Michigan State University (M.A., Rehabilitation Counseling, 1967), Jerry completed a doctoral degree at the University of Maryland (Ph.D., Rehabilitation Counseling, 1972) and post-doctoral studies at the University of Florida (Life Care Planning Certification, 1996). An American Board of Vocational Experts Diplomat, Certified Vocational Evaluation Specialist, and Vocational Expert, he consulted for military, civilian, and legal agencies on international, national, and local levels. Jerry was an avid reader who also enjoyed listening to recordings and watching films of famous comedians and fictional characters, especially those featuring the spoken New York vernacular that never really left him. He was entertained by the Rodney Dangerfields, the cast of the Happy Days, and the Jackie Masons of this world and amused others with absurd word puns and stories that had a critical edge. He poked fun at authoritarian figures; ridiculed arrogance; and his humor affirmed his belief in the worth and dignity of all. He was a member of Temple of Israel where he served as president of the Temple Brotherhood (1987-1993), a group constituted by “expat” New Yorkers and

New Jerseyans who gathered to reminisce, o r g a n i z e activities that brought together m e m b e r s of Upstate congregations, and enjoy one another’s company during Sunday lox and bagels breakfasts or summer picnics in the park. Above all else, Jerry cherished his family and the many childhood and college friends with whom he kept in touch over the years. He is survived by Nelly Jeifez Hecker, his wife of 52 years; two daughters and sons-in-law, Jessica Hecker Marke and her husband David Marke of Greenville, and Rachel Hecker Bretler and her husband Marc Bretler of Lutry, Switzerland; three grandsons, Jacob Marke, Joshua Marke, and Joseph Bretler; and caring friends that were like family. Jerry loved animals. In recent years, he enjoyed the company of Bella, the family’s very spoiled German shepherd; Tibbie, the calico cat of many purrs; and the numerous well-fed wild birds that visited him daily. Jerry brought joy to many, laughed with many, and would want us to remember him with a smile. After all, as he said countless times, “I have a story to tell you.” The family wishes to express its gratitude to the outstanding medical and nursing teams who shared responsibility for Jerry’s care during his illness. Funeral Services took place on Tuesday, October 9, 2018 at the Temple of Israel. Burial was at Beth Israel Cemetery in Graceland Cemetery West, 4814 White Horse Rd, Greenville, SC 29611. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorials be made to the Temple of Israel General Fund, 400 Spring Forest Road, Greenville, SC 29615; or United Ministries, 606 Pendleton Street, Greenville, SC 29601; or a charity of choice. Thomas McAfee Funeral Home, Downtown, assisted the family.

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24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

GRANT APPLICATION

Partnership for Tomorrow announces the Make Greer Great Grant Accepting applications for funding until Nov. 2, the Partnership for Tomorrow’s Make Greer Great Grant program offers a maximum award of $3,000. Organizations, civic clubs, neighborhood associations, and community residents with innovative and creative projects are eligible to apply for funds. The projects seeking funding must help make Greer a better place to live, work, visit, and raise a family. “The generosity of our business and individual contributors in Greer provides a unique opportunity for PFT to turn the best of these ideas into new programs that will help Greer continue to be one of the most-outstanding communities in South Carolina and one that attracts proud new residents, frequent visitors, and world-class companies,” PFT chairman Jack Lucas said in a news release. Grant applications may be submitted online at greerchamber.com/make-greer-great-grant. “PFT has been an important catalyst for some of the more-interesting and innovative programs in Greer throughout the years,” Mayor Rick Danner said in the release. “Providing a forum for the city of Greer, the Greer Commission of Public Works, the Greer Chamber, the Greer Development Corporation, and our private sector partners to collaborate has not only helped to plan collectively, it has given us the resources to work together to implement great ideas.” CONFERENCE

Women’s Rights and Empowerment Network to host inaugural Upstate Summit Women’s Rights and Empowerment Network will host its first Upstate Summit on Nov. 9 at Furman University. The conference will feature specialized content and collaborative opportunities for Upstate business and nonprofit leaders, policymakers, advocates, and students. Focusing on women’s economic empowerment, the summit will provide networking, presentations by regional experts, panel discussions, and interactive development of solutions to improve the

economic well-being of women. Institute for Women’s Policy Research and Center for American Progress will inform attendants of trends in South Carolina in comparison with national trends. Tickets and additional information can be found at scwren.org. Registration is $35. FUNDRAISER

Public Education Partners is awarded over $225,000 by Greenville High School students Greenville High School raised over $225,000 for Public Education Partners and the Make Summer Count program during its Spirit Week. “Because of what [GHS students] did this week, thousands of young children across Greenville will have access to books in their homes,” PEP president and CEO Ansel Sanders said in a news release. “Future Red Raiders will now have home libraries and engage in family reading to eliminate the summer reading slide.” Greenville High has an annual fundraising competition with J.L. Mann High School during its Spirit Week, which brings the community together to support an organization. J.L. Mann raised $184,000 for the Meyer Center for Special Children. The two schools combined raised over $400,000 that will directly impact students and their educations. This year marks the first time since 2015 that Greenville High has won the event. “I am amazed each year at what is done this week to bring awareness to a cause and how much money can be raised through students’ efforts,” Greenville High principal Jason Warren said in the release. “I am thankful for the opportunity it provides our students to develop the leadership skills they will need after high school.”

Susan McMillen

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This Week

Luster

Copper vessels are perfect in the kitchen, and on point for fall decorating

words by Lynn Greenlaw | photo by Eli Warren There’s nothing quite as brilliantly pleasing as a gleaming copper vessel. Whether sitting on your stove, hanging from a pot hook, or used as a decorative accent for a favored plant, copper vessels — from antique to vintage to new — have a perfect place in the fall home. They are useful in cooking your favorite fall recipes, serving your guests, and enhancing areas of your home with a sense of shining warmth. Cooks have been using copper cookware for centuries because of its ability to warm quickly and stay warm, leading to an even distribution of heat and a uniform cooking of food. All copper is safe to cook in as long as it is lined in a nonreactive metal (as most copper cookware is). Most of these linings are made of nickel, tin, or stainless steel (after 1990). These lined pans can be used for almost any type of food. Unlined copper cookware is a better choice for whipping egg whites or making jams. It’s the acid in some food ingredients that will make the difference in the type of vessel you choose. If you’re looking to purchase your first copper vessel or wanting to add to your collection, we offer these inspiring finds from private collections, many of which were found at The Rock House Antiques. Some copper lovers allow their pieces to achieve a beautiful aged patina on the exterior, even allowing them to show verdigris — a green or bluish patina. Others want them always to shine as if new. The one thing you never want to do with your copper is scrub it with an overly abrasive cleaner or cleaning pads.


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market North Main • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Augusta Walk - West End Gville • Open Sat. 12-2 & Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Thornblade • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Chestnut Pond • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

4 W. Earle Street · $1,275,000 · MLS# 1374976

6 Augusta Walk Ave · $899,000 · MLS# 1366337

400 Father Hugo Drive · $699,900 · MLS# 1375785

405 Southern Beech Ct · $667,500 · MLS# 1377170

6BR/5.5BA Gorgeous rebuilt estate in the Historic Earle Street neighborhood, sits atop the hill with amazing views of downtown Greenville. Take a left on West Earle Street. Home on Right.

3BR/3f2fBA CUSTOM MODEL HOME TOUR, LOTS AVAILABLE Near intersection of August St and Dunbar ST

4BR/3.5BA All-brick traditional stunner featuring 2-story foyer with beautiful circular staircase. Quality touches abound and open floor plan perfect for entertaining. Left on Thornblade Boulevard. Right onto Father Hugo.

4BR/4.5BA Exceptional home, designed for entertaining, by Woodland Builders that showcases all the luxury touches you’d expect from a top-notch builder! Woodruff Road, pass Five Forks Plantation, Chestnut Pond on Right.

Contact: Ashley Swann 593-0188 Wilson Associates

Contact: Rhett Brown 915-9393 The Marchant Company

Bridgewater • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Middleton Place • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Adams Run • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

14 Copperdale Drive · $350,000 · MLS# 1378159

318 Bridge Crossing Dr · $283,500 · MLS# 1378005

311 W Earle Street Units 30 & 31 B · $275,000 · MLS# 1375011

306 Spring Lake Loop · $274,500 · MLS# 1363997

6BR/4BA Incredibly spacious home with main level in law suite complete with seperate entrance, kitchen, living room, bedroom, & full bath. Woodruff Rd to left in subdivision, first left past pool.

4BR/3BA Beautiful move in condition & professionally decorated home. Wonderful covered back porch. A Must See! E Georgia Rd, Left into subdivision, home on right.

3BR/2BA LOCATION! Great investment opportunity close to downtown Greenville. Two units were combined to make one unit. Two assigned parking spaces. North Main. Left on West Earle Street. Home on left.

4BR/3.5BA Victornia-Approx 3000 Sq Ft-4 Bd/3.5 Ba + Bonus. Bedroom On Main-New Carpet Plus More- Large Front Porch + Screen Porch Woodruff Rd-Right Scuffletown -Right Adams MillLeft Into Adams Run-1St Right

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: MARCIA HANCOCK 270-1878 COLDWELL BANKER CAINE

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Ravenwood • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Contact: Charlotte Faulk 270-4341 Marchant Real Estate

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

OCTOBER 12–14 & 19–21, 2018 The Home Builders Association of Greenville is bringing back the popular Upstate Parade of Homes after a ten-year hiatus, redesigned to appeal to the new home buyer market. Hartness, a walkable mixed-use village located in Greenville, has joined the Home Builders Association of Greenville as the signature community of the parade, and Hartness will serve as the starting point for guests who attend the Upstate Parade of Homes, as well as the host location for special events. Eighteen homes, built by several Approved Professional Builders, will be scattered throughout the Upstate in a variety of new home communities. Photo courtesy of Hartness

Produced By

UpstateParadeOfHomes.com UpstateParadeOfHomes.com

Signature Community

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10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Home

Cypress Pointe

515 Cypress Links Way, Taylors, SC 29687

Home Info Price: $620,000 MLS: 1376706 Bedrooms: 4 Baths: 3 Sq. Ft: 3879 Lot Size: 1/2 Acre Schools: Paris Elementary, Sevier Middle, and Wade Hampton High Agent: Melissa Morrell | 864.918.1734 mmorrell@cdanjoyner.com

This custom home combines luxurious interior details with stunning outdoor living including a gorgeous in-ground 16x34 Gunite saltwater pool overlooking the 18th green of Creekside Golf Course, part of Pebble Creek Country Club! The kitchen is the heart of this home with a large island/bar with granite countertops, and a large keeping room or eat-in kitchen area, depending on your lifestyle and preference! Enjoy the formal dining room with views of both the kitchen and the Great Room with its custom built-ins and center gas log fireplace. The main level owner’s retreat showcases French doors, hardwoods floors, private access to the porch, and a

spa-like bathroom complete with his and her vanity and makeup table, a door-less shower, toilet & bidet not to mention graciously appointed his & here walk-in closets. There’s also a guest suite on the main level with access to a full bathroom. This space could also make for an ideal main level office/ study as the owners included a large closet and a functional built-in bookcase. There’s a large laundry room on the main level with a sink and boundless storage. Upstairs you’ll find two bedrooms and a true Jack and Jill bathroom. One of the bedrooms could serve as a bonus or recreational space as it affords a wet bar with sink, microwave and storage.

Real Estate News

Tessa Childs joins Wilson Associates Real Estate of Greenville Wilson Associates Real Estate of Greenville is pleased to announce the addition of Tessa Childs to their team of select real estate professionals. Born and raised in Greenville, Tessa knows the ins and outs of the city and its ever-growing communities. Childs She believes in providing a fresh perspective in real estate with a high level of personalized service, tailored to each client’s individual needs. With a strong background in sales and management, Tessa considers customer satisfaction of the utmost impor-

tance in each and every real estate transaction. Tessa’s primary focus is residential real estate and aims to serve both buyers and sellers across the Upstate. Contact her today if you are looking to buy, sell or build!

Stephanie Szkolnicki Joins the Greer Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors is pleased to announce that Stephanie Szkolnicki has joined the company’s Greer office as a sales associate. Born and raised in the Upstate, Szkolnicki is a highly motivated individual with a strong attention to detail.

“I am honest, diligent, and professional with a hint of fun! My goal is to build strong and lasting relationships with all of my clients, based on integrity and professionalism,” she commented. In her free time, Szkolnicki can be found trekking in the mounSzkolnicki tains, plant whispering in the garden, or tackling home projects. “I am delighted to welcome Stephanie to our office. Her knowledge of the area will certainly serve as an advantage to her home buying and selling clients,” said Matthew Thrift, Broker-In-Charge of the Greer office.


28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

On the market Forrester Woods • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Forrester Heights • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Stoneledges • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Shelburne Farms • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

113 Loblolly Lane · $273,000 · MLS# 1375954

221 Barbours Lane · $264,000 · MLS# 1369237

308 Wittrock Court · $254,900 · MLS# 1375081

244 Highgate Circle · $220,000 · MLS# 1377920

4BR/2.5BA Beautiful traditional home in sought after neighborhood with 4 bedrooms and 2.5 baths. Great screened porch for relaxing or entertaining. Right onto Miller Rd. Left onto Loblolly Lane.

4BR/2.5BA Fabulous, traditional home offered in the desirable Forrester Heights subdivision. Well-maintained home with a great open floor plan. Woodruff Road to Miller Road. Right on Hamby.

4BR/2.5BA Beautiful 4 Bedroom Home on 3/4 acre in Exclusive Blue Ridge Neighborhood near Lake Robinson! From TaylorsRutherford Road, Milford Church Road. Stoneledges in 2miles.

3BR/2.5BA Move in condition home! 3 bedrooms plus bonus room. Large deck & separate patio in fenced backyard. Batesville Rd towards Greer, Left into subdivision

Contact: Susan Burch 346-3864 Wilson Associates

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Kathy Slayter 982-7772 The Marchant Company

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Devenger Place • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact: Caroline

Spivey | 864-679-1229

cspivey@communityjournals.com 220 Hedgewood Terrace · · MLS# 1374965 3BR/2.5BA Fantastic home in great neighborhood. Over 2200 SF. Devenger Rd, Left on Hudson Farm, Right on Hedgewood Terrace

Contact: Tim Keagy 905-3304 BHHS C Dan Joyner

Join us as we participate in the 11th annual Run4Life on Saturday, November 3. Since it’s inception, Run4Life has raised over $1.2 million for cancer research and patient support programs, including benefiting the Caine Halter Lung fund.

Visit Run4LifeSC.org for more information and to sign up!


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 29

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

Featured Community

Braxton Ridge Simpsonville, SC

Community Info Price: High $400’s Amenities: Swimming Pool Cabana Walking Trails Nearby Fishing Pond Common Areas Schools: Bryson Elementary, Bryson Middle, and Hillcrest High Agent: Brianna McCluskey 864-655-7702 Sissy Finger 864-303-3118 www.BraxtonRidge.com

Braxton Ridge welcomes you home to Simpsonville, SC. This custom home community encourages the southern hospitality and values that has allowed Simpsonville to be recognized as one of the 10 Best Towns by Family Circle Magazine and one of the 25 Best Affordable Towns by Money Magazine. Spread across 100 acres, the 122 lot Braxton Ridge community boasts wooded views, a community pool, and close proximity to Fox Run Golf Course. Conveniently located minutes from Heritage Park and downtown Simpsonville and 15 miles from downtown Greenville, this community has much to offer. With 1/3 acre+ home sites, carefully crafted community covenants and building standards,

Braxton Ridge is becoming one of Simpsonville’s most sought after custom home communities. As the tagline states, it is the intention for residents to “Love Where You Live”. In addition to a fabulous location, Braxton Ridge features a host of amenities designed to encourage a sense of community among residents. Come walk our trails, enjoy masterfully planned common areas and green spaces and fish in the nearby fishing pond. Come explore Braxton Ridge so you too, can “Love Where You Live”. Come visit our fully decorated model in The Parade of Homes October 12-14 and October 19-21!

Visit our Parade of Homes Model – the Cambridge October 12-14 and Model October 19-21 Visit our Parade of Homes – the Cambridge Open Monday-Saturday 10am - 6pm and Sunday 12pm - 6pm

Love Where You Live LoveatWhere YouRidge Live Braxton at Braxton Ridge

October 12-14 andDrive, October 19-21 102 Braxton Meadow Simpsonville

Open Monday-Saturday 10am - 6pm and Sunday 12pm - 6pm

For more information on building in Braxton Ridge contact:

102 Braxton Meadow Drive, Simpsonville

Brianna McCluskey • 864-655-7702

Sissy Finger • 864-303-3118

For more information on building in Braxton Ridge contact: sissyfinger@jfrancisbuilders.com

BMcCluskey@arhomes.com

Brianna McCluskey • 864-655-7702 BMcCluskey@arhomes.com ARHUpstateSC.com

Sissy Finger • 864-303-3118

Proud to partner with

sissyfinger@jfrancisbuilders.com JFrancisBuilders.com

BraxtonRidge.comProud • Marketing by American Eagle Realty to partner with ARHUpstateSC.com

JFrancisBuilders.com

BraxtonRidge.com • Marketing by American Eagle Realty


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Outdoor Illumination LED revolutionizes al fresco incandescence by Kathleen Nalley Not too long ago, residential outdoor lighting consisted of floodlights and the occasional lantern, both primarily used as safety measures: to illuminate dark spaces around homes or yards or to light up walking paths. Of course, times and tastes have changed. Homeowners now want to create ambiance with softer lighting; they wish to showcase architectural or landscape features in addition to providing safety. And manufacturers have responded to that demand with beautiful lighting solutions that illuminate home and landscape without making it look like a prison yard (or perhaps worse, the Griswold’s from “Christmas Vacation”). One of the ways they’ve done this is through LEDs, the hottest lighting trend in decades. LEDs consume 85 percent less energy and have a much longer lifespan than incandescent bulbs. While traditional incandescent and compact fluorescent bulbs emit light in all directions, LEDs emit light in a specific direction, making them the perfect solution for illuminating only those areas you desire. LEDs do not radiate heat nor give off infrared or UV rays, which means they don’t attract mosquitoes or other bugs (which is especially important in these parts). And LEDs can be programmed to emit light in a variety of colors, so gone are the days when yards were flooded in a glaring white or yellow light. So, whether you wish to create a dramatic effect by showcasing architectural features of your home or landscape; or you’re primarily concerned with safety and wish to illuminate dark spaces around your home or light walkways and paths, there’s an LED lighting solution for your needs.

WALL LANTERNS

The Endorse wall lantern features a classic style, while the East Haven (pictured in antique bronze) glows from within a seeded glass shade. We particularly love the District, which adds an industrial flair through its throwback shape. For a sleek, modern look, go with the Anson flush mount in stainless steel.

ENTRANCE LIGHTING

Whether you choose a flush mount, like the Derby with its Craftsman detailing, or a hanging lantern, like the Pier 33 with coastal undertones, your front entrance will offer both function and style.

LANTERNS

Available in antique bronze or black, the Wish lantern features nautical and industrial undertones. The Arrive showcases heavily textured glass and clean lines, while the Westport, shown in antique bronze, is classically styled with clear, seeded glass.

LANDSCAPE LIGHTS

Illuminate walkways and garden paths with these path lights, available in a classic black lantern shape or in a sleek, modern style.

Keep safety in check on staircases and steps. Available in several finishes, these step lights can be configured for vertical or horizontal installation. While these well lights look simple, that’s the point. The best landscape lighting focuses your attention on the object being illuminated, not on the lighting source itself.

Hubbell Inc., headquartered in Greenville, showcases a variety of LED lighting trends through its Progress Lighting line.

WE WANT YOUR BLOOD Thursday, Oct. 25th 10:30-5:00

Pace Jewelers parking lot (1250 Pendleton St.) Join the Village people in an afternoon of life-saving and fun! All donors will receive a Village Goodie Bag and a Walmart gift card. Schedule your time online to guarantee quicker service – otherwise, walk-ins will be

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK

served on a first-come, first-served basis.

SPONSORED BY

Reserve your spot today: http://bit.ly/2xLcxye TBC Donor ID Card (preferred) or photo ID required to donate.

Share your opinion and you could win a $250 Table 301 or $100 Growler Haus gift card!

Please take a minute to complete a brief survey about what you enjoy about the Greenville Journal and what topics you would like to see us cover in the future. We’ll use your confidential feedback to help us produce a publication that is a true reflection of the interests of our community.

Complete survey at GreenvilleJournal.com/survey or at our office at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville, SC 


Luxury Service at Every Price Point 360° VIEWS

45 Falling Star Way, Cliffs at Glassy $2,999,999 MLS#1346484 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

WINE CELLAR

119 Snap Dragon Way, Cliffs at Glassy $1,595,500 MLS#1346051 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

SOLD

106 Fire Pink Way, Cliffs at Glassy $895,000 MLS#1356127 Spencer Ashby 864-344-0333

HUMMINGBIRD HILL 12+ ACRES

180 Night Lark Lane, Golden Hills of Fairview Farms $1,400,000 MLS#1370718 Damian Hall 864-561-7942

WALKING DISTANCE TO DOWNTOWN

317 Hampton Avenue, Hampton Pinckney Historic District $1,090,000 MLS#1377474 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

TO BE BUILT

29 Cliffs Parkway, Cliffs at Glassy $$675,000 MLS#1347249 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918 Cynthia Cole Jenkins 843-696-7891

63 Blacks Drive, Greenville $669,999 MLS#1377636 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

123 Greybridge Road, Lake Trollingwood $644,900 MLS#1368180 Holly May 864-640-1959

2810 Augusta Street, Augusta Road $449,900 MLS#1371217 Alex Kessler 864-414-2174

110 Oakview Drive, Augusta Road $439,900 MLS#1377877 Michael Mumma 864-238-2542

416 Santa Cruz Way, Courtyards on West Georgia $425,000 MLS#1377681 Holly May 864-640-1959

4 HOMES TO BE BUILT

915 Rutherford Road, Greenville $515,000 MLS#1365988 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

UNDER CONTRACT

203 Millstone Way, Stonehaven $379,500 MLS#1369899 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

1024 Pine Grove Church Road, Sunset $349,000 MLS#1376303 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580

111 Middleby Way, Riverside Commons $239,900 MLS#1377384 Robyn Nelson 631-839-7341

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303

25 Mill Park Court, Monaghan Bluff $150,000 MLS#1377842 A. Denise Franklin 864-313-1566


32 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Sept. 10 – 14 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$30,750,000 $14,000,000 R.F REID $12,250,000 $2,970,000 $2,846,350 $2,585,000 WEST STONE AVENUE $1,760,000 $1,747,360 121 RHETT STREET $1,350,000 PARK PLACE ON HUDSON $715,277 HOLLY TREE PLANTATION $650,000 CHESTNUT POND $635,000 SUNSET HILLS $600,000 CLAREMONT $591,628 VALLEY OAKS $555,000 WALDEN POND $539,000 QUAIL CREEK $532,000 KILGORE FARMS $514,069 BRAYDON@HOLLINGSWORTH PARK $510,000 $475,000 SUMMERSET PLACE $470,000 CRESCENT TERRACE $470,000 CHANITCLEER $465,000 VALLEY VIEW “GOLF COMMUNITY” $460,000 PALAZZO DI MONTEBELLO $458,000 SILVER MEADOWS $444,978 $434,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE @ HOLLINGSWORTH $432,500 $410,000 EASTON RIDGE $390,000 LOST RIVER $384,500 LOST RIVER $384,500 $375,000 PELHAM FALLS $370,000 EASTON RIDGE $358,360 $350,000 CARILION $349,000 WEST FARM $348,000 CYPRESS RUN $347,000 SADDLE CREEK $342,000 TREYBERN $335,000 VILLAS @ WEST GEORGIA $326,865 SUMMIT AT CHEROKEE VALLEY $326,000 $325,000 COVE AT SAVANNAH POINTE $324,900 $318,000 GRANDVIEW TOWNES $316,000 SQUIRES CREEK $310,000 MEADOW BREEZE $309,900 BRUSHY MEADOWS $306,600 THE RIDGE AT SUNSET $301,500 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $299,999 $299,900 GROVE PARK $292,500 HIGHVIEW TOWNES $291,100 PELHAM FALLS $290,000 PELHAM FALLS $290,000 HUDSON FOREST $290,000 SUGAR CREEK $287,000 WINDY RIDGE $279,990 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $279,500 AMBER OAKS FARM $279,000 MONTEBELLO $275,000 PARK RIDGE $270,000 HIGHLAND CREEK $270,000

UVH GREENVILLE LLC JPCR LLC LEGACY GREENVILLE LLC COLONIAL COMMERCIAL GROU WILLIAMS JANET RUCKER RALLIS HOLDINGS LLC SOUTHERN INVESTMENT AND CENTURY APARTMENT HOLDIN 121 RHETT STREET HOLDING ASTERISK LAND PARTNERS L WESSINGER PHILLIP H GALLOWAY CUSTOM HOMES LL KNAPP AUSTIN PARTI NAVEEN N FINN DORSEY L JR (JTWROS UPSTATE CUSTOM BUILDERS WIKE ANN A (JTWROS) MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH GREER AMY A GLOBAL HOUSING INVESTMEN BREWER PATRICIA K & ROBE ELLEFSON ANNE S PAR 3 REAL ESTATE LLC VINES JOSEPH J (JTWROS) KIRK MARI DEALONNA COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC LIVINGSTON B CLAYTON JR HOSKINSON CHASE A (JTWRO HAUBENREICH JANICE TERRY EASTON RIDGE ASSOCIATES WILSON CRAIG (JTWROS) CARMAX AUTO SUPERSTORES 101 BROADUS AVENUE LLC SCHWARTZKOPF TRUST THE MUNGO HOMES INC LINDSEY D BRYAN HANNON BRITTANY (JTWROS) HOSEY BRIAN (JTWROS) TAYLOR ANNE H (JTWROS) TURNER CECIL R SALDIVAR REBECCA DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL BREHM SUZANNE B KNIGHT ANGIE D (JTWROS) HAAG REBECCA J (JTWROS) MACHIA BUILDERS INC MARK III PROPERTIES INC SMITH JUDITH A FREIBERG WILLIAM A (JTWR BARNETT CLAIRE B NAPIER DIANNE M GONZALEZ EVELYN JULIA ZA SMITH G MICHAEL WEBB COLIN B (JTWROS) NVR INC HODGE CARRIE DUNLAP COLE ELIZABETH GUTHRIE JENNIFER M SPEIRS SUSAN HINEBAUGH ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN SMITH KELLY R (JTWROS) SK BUILDERS INC HOOPER DAVID LEE KELLEY APRIL (JTWROS) SALUSTRO GARY A (JTWROS)

12 Hemingford Circle

$725,000

MLS 1368303

119 Parkwood Drive

$450,000 MLS 1373230

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

45 WEST ORCHARD PARK DRI ROY METAL FINISHING COMP ESA P PORTFOLIO L L C MOB-MAULDIN I LLC IBI FORRESTER LLC JCMOHAWK LLC WESTONE STATION LLC CENTURY GREENVILLE ASSOC GIGUERE NANCY P DORAN MARK J (JTWROS) LESHER AMMON (JTWROS) CUSHING ROBERT R (JTWROS MESSMANN JANNA (JTWROS) PARTI RAMNI GILLILAND DAWN (JTWROS) BECK INEKE K (JTWROS) OSGOOD JENNIFER LYNN (JT GALLAGHER BRIAN (JTWROS) CATOE SARA (JTWROS) FREEDOM CHURCH UPSTATE I BRITT CHERYL A PRICE PATRICIA D WENZELL JOHN (JTWROS) LEWIS STEPHEN C (JTWROS) BARKER JERRY ANN BROWN PEGGY A (JTWROS) PETRIE DAVID (JTWROS) KREMP PATRICK J (JTWROS) TALBERT ADRIENNE WHITTAK MUNGO HOMES INC CARMAX AUTO SUPERSTORES SMITH ANTHONY P CHRIST CHURCH EPISCOPAL HODGE CARRIE D (JTWROS) BAILLEY PAUL CRAVEN KELBY L FUNNELL JEANNE M TITA DAVID MCWHORTER MARTHA L JONES MICHAEL W (JTWROS) BAIRD DON T (JTWROS) ROHLEDER JACK CARLTON JR SHARP JOHN E (JTWROS) LAYE CHARLES M (JTWROS) DALRYMPLE JEREMY CHU KIMBERLY (JTWROS) ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN SMITH GREGORY RANDAL WOLOSZYN RYAN M (JTWROS) DOUGLAS JANICE R (JTWROS LOCK MARY P (JTWROS) CHESLOCK AARON (JTWROS) BURLINGHAM JAMES A MOREL JOANNA MCDANIEL JOHN DUPREL MARYELLEN R PARKER SCOTT C (JTWROS) COVER JONATHAN M SOBOLEWSKI ADAM (JTWROS) WIDEMAN ADRIAN E (JTWROS COLON MONICA (JTWROS) MILLER ELIZABETH J (JTWR BREZENSKI MARK PETRIC JEFFREY A (JTWROS SNIDER CHERYL (JTWROS)

140 BROADWAY FL 41 PO BOX 38 11525 N COMMUNITY HOUSE RD S-1 504 RHETT ST STE 200 220 N MAIN ST STE 500 101 W EARLE ST 96 BROOKFIELD OAKS DR 11111 CARMEL COMMONS BLVD #207 121 RHETT ST UNIT 703 100 S HUDSON ST UNIT B14 403 HOLLY TREE LN 121 CHESTNUT POND LN 20 SUNSET DR 10 SABLE GLEN DR 203 VALLEY OAK DR 103 WALDEN WAY 208 QUAIL CREEK LN 409 PLACID FOREST CT 439 ROCKY SLOPE RD 103 POPLAR RIDGE RD 312 OLD ROCKHOUSE RD 134 CAPERS ST 6 HUMINGFORD CIR 677 PAWLEY RD 701 MONTEBELLO DR UNIT 103 100 BROCKTON CT 2615 TIGERVILLE RD 333 ALGONQUIN TRL 371 ALVERSON RD 441 WESTERN LN 14 FOXMOOR CT 14 FOXMOOR CT 10 N CHURCH ST 26 SHADETREE CT 111 EASTON MEADOW WAY 33 RABBIT RD 18 GILLRAY DR 121 BELGIAN BLUE WAY 100 AUDREY LN 2 JORDAN OAK WAY 212 HADDINGTON LN 106 RAVENCREST CT 300 WEDGE WAY 175 SCOTT ROAD EXT 412 SABIN CT 1427 GEER HWY 120 CROMER RD 107 ROBERTS FARM RD 62 RISING MEADOW LN 411 MEADOW HILL WAY 2 SETTING SUN LN 210 RIO GRANDE PL 108 FIVE FORKS RD 328 GROVE RD 14 ITASCA DR 240 ROCK RD 105 RIVER WAY DR 12 S ANTIGO CT 100 CLIFFWOOD CT 1 FOWLER OAKS LN 204 SANDUSKY LN 437 GOLDEN AMBER LN 308 HAMMETTS GLEN WAY 301 BRENLEIGH CT 203 DUNROBIN LN

EAGLES GLEN AT KIMBRELL $269,900 POPLAR RIDGE $266,500 SALUDA ACRES $265,500 BRYSON MEADOWS $265,000 WINDY RIDGE $262,750 HIGHVIEW TOWNES $261,565 HERITAGE LAKES $261,000 INN VILLAGE $260,000 RESERVE@PLANTATION GREENE $260,000 BRIAR OAKS $258,820 FOXGLOVE $255,000 MEADOWS@GILDER CREEK FARM $254,500 AVALON ESTATES $253,500 VILLAGE AT GREEN MEADOWS $251,600 HAVEN AT RIVER SHOALS $250,000 $250,000 VISTA HILLS $250,000 NORTHCLIFF $244,500 FOX TRACE $243,000 SUMMERFIELD $235,000 BOTANY WOODS $235,000 PARKINS LAKE DEVELOPMENT $235,000 ANNANDALE ESTATES $234,990 KINGSFIELD $233,319 ANNANDALE ESTATES $233,255 $230,000 $230,000 FORRESTER WOODS $230,000 HAMMETT CROSSING $230,000 $230,000 WOODRUFF LAKE $229,000 HOWARDS PARK $228,900 SAVANNAH POINTE $228,500 ANNANDALE ESTATES $228,255 WHITEHALL PLANTATION $225,000 ONEAL VILLAGE $224,000 MORNING MIST FARM $223,000 OAK FOREST ESTATES $221,000 GRESHAM WOODS $220,000 REMINGTON $219,900 IVYBROOKE $217,500 GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM $215,000 COLONIAL MANOR $214,900 LANSDOWNE AT REMINGTON $214,900 STALLINGS HEIGHTS $214,900 CARRIAGE ESTATES $214,000 WOODLANDS AT WALNUT COVE $212,000 SHADOW CREEK $211,500 BROOKHAVEN $211,000 $210,000 FOX TRACE $210,000 SUMMERWALK $209,480 AUTUMN HILLS $208,000 BROOKWOOD COMMONS $206,244 BLUESTONE COTTAGES $205,000 STALLINGS HEIGHTS $205,000 GLEN AT GILDER CREEK FARM $205,000 BROOKWOOD COMMONS $203,675 THE RESERVE AT RIVERSIDE $203,000 ROSEWOOD MEADOWS $200,500 $200,000 WILLOW GROVE $199,900 MARTINS GROVE $199,900 DELLBROOK ESTATES $196,000 LAEL $195,900

2646 Augusta Street

PRICE SELLER D R HORTON INC RHODES MICHAEL CKC DEVELOPMENT INC EE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIE ESSEX HOMES SOUTHEAST IN NVR INC JAMES ALVA J (SURV) MCKELVEY KAREN GOWAN KROLAK FAMILY REVOCABLE NVR INC FETTEROLF DANIEL P BROAD MELISSA H REPENNING DAVID R PALMETTO MILLER LLC BALDWIN JOHN K III MARK THOENNES BUILDERS L PAPKE RAYMOND JOHN JR FIELDER MARION HILLS SIDE PROPERTIES LL MCLAUGHLIN BRIAN P (JTWR MULLEN ANN S WELLS WALTER M NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC NVR INC MORGAN MADELON ALFORD MORRO MADELEINE G (ESTAT WILSON JANICE P TREAS APRIL U HOLLANDER HEATHER WILLIAMS LINDA D R HORTON-CROWN LLC THOMPSON JEFFREY S NVR INC CZARNECKI RONALD F (LIFE SPRINGFIELD GLENN T JR ( BUCHANAN JOHN L MILLWOOD DEBORAH C COLEMAN CHAD D GARY CASSANDRA R WORTHINGTON KARMA (JTWRO JOHNSON JAY L SK BUILDERS INC WILLIAMS ALAN REVOCABLE GEDIKOGLU YAMAN STOPINSKI BARBARA (L-EST COLE SHANNON DUNN EVERS ELIANE SAM PROPERTIES LLC STEFFENSMEIER JASON P (J GEDIKOGLU YAMAN SHI YINGYING CAIN SETH C NVR INC KENNETTE ERNESTINE LYNN COTRONE HELEN COLLINS ANDREW J (JTWROS NVR INC SIPE HUNTER R KRALICK AMANDA N FULLER MATTHEW C D R HORTON INC FREDERICK DONALD J &MARY TATE DORIS H WILSON DANIEL MARK (JTWR

$650,000 MLS 1370051

bit.ly/JacobMann 864.325.6266 102 Kingsridge Drive $425,000

MLS 1372417

BUYER

ADDRESS

FRITZ KEVIN A (JTWROS) CHRISTIAN WARREN HAROLD HOWE DANA P GILLIAM TIFFANY A SAMUEL JASON ANTHONY MASTERS DARREN (JTWROS) KOVACH DAWN J (JTWROS) PERRY ALINA (JTWROS) LEE CLAUDIA BROCK ABNEY GRADY JR (JTWROS) SPEARMAN DERRICK OWEN JAYESON B (JTWROS) BALDOCK MARY ELIZABETH DAN RYAN BUILDERS SOUTH BALDWIN ANITA N BAGWELL BRENT ANDERSON DRIGGER KENNETH D SCHEIDLY MARY E SIVILLI ARIELLE HASAN RAED OEHMEN JEFFREY (JTWROS) LARI HASSAN HOLMAN HAROLD (JTWROS) EDLIN KENNETH (JTWROS) SWANK SANDRA M RYMOCA LLC TANGO ALPHA MANAGEMENT C TUTEN KEVIN (JTWROS) MUNAWAR RAJA BAIRAM RAY MARYLOU B (JTWROS) DUQUE ALVARO MUNOZ GREEN MILLION A SINDELAR STACY LYNN WOOD DENISE WOOTEN MARY N SMITH VICKIE C MASON THOMAS PETERS JOHN B (JTWROS) LOGUE CHARLES LEE (JTWRO KEESAER RICHARD WAYNE (J MACK ALAN J (JTWROS) MENEFEE JEFFREY T (JTWRO WELLS TRACY (JTWROS) NEWTON GEORGE W (JTWROS) SWAFFR JOHN D (JTWROS) NGUYEN TAI C (JTWROS) WILLARD JEFFREY SMITH ANDREA L CARLSON JAMES LEE BRANDO FREEMAN JENNIFER S BROMELL GWENDY A CARTER ASHLEY NICOLE (JT MOLONY MELISSA PLACITO MATTHEW (JTWROS) BREWTON MARTHA ANNE JOE MOZELL L DOYLE ERIC MITCHELL JONES BRITTANY KHADDAM ADNAN FAKHRUDDIN BEARD PHILLIP J (JTWROS) SCHOOL DIST OF GVILLE REEDER KISIEN R JENNINGS JEFFREY OMARRA CORNELIUS V (JTWR FIGUEROA HYRO

36 NOBLE WING LN 207 YELLOW POPLAR CT 1605 E SALUDA LAKE RD 10 WITHINGTON BLVD 7 FOWLER OAKS LN 18 ITASCA DR 110 STEEPLECHASE CT 110 INN CIR 3929 BRECKRIDGE CIR 5 FAWN HILL DR 215 AMBERJACK CT 1710 KEOWEE LAKESHORE DR 416 COLLINGSWORTH LN 64 THOMAS JOHNSON DR STE 110 168 N MOORE RD 119 PROSPERITY AVE 333 RIDGECREST DR 301 NORTHCLIFF WAY 120 SCOTTISH AVE 106 TAGUS CT 106 BOTANY RD 201 RED FERN TRL 644 LYNNDALE CT 208 ROYAL HILL LN 637 LYNNDALE CT 4436 RICHMOND HILL DR 4436 RICHMOND HILL DR 103 BURNING BUSH LN 123 COTTER LN 120 N OLD MILL RD 8 SHADOWROCK CT 1008 LOUVALE CT 309 DUCKTRAP CT 2209 LILY CT 204 WYNTERHALL DR 101 MERITAGE ST 7 FROSTWEED CT 39 THUNDERBIRD DR 105 S BIRKENSTOCK DR 18 PHAETON AVE 8 WOODSFORD DR 1450 SHERIDAN ST STE E6 112 S GLASSY MOUNTAIN RD 103 SHEFLEYS RD 404 TERILYN CT 1214 BRUSHY CREEK RD 102 BURL HOLLOW LN 204 APPLEHILL WAY 136 CLARK AVE 116 RIDGEWAY DR 503 AIRDALE LN 106 MORTON RD 47 PERKINS CT 116 ROSERIDGE DR 10 DOLERITE DR 416 TERILYN CT 7 CROWN EMPIRE CT 110 ROSERIDGE DR 15 SUNFIELD CT 207 BITTERNUT LN 2 SPACE DR 720 STREAMSIDE DR 101 ARBORDALE LN 2 BEECH ST 4 LAEL CT


www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Selena Riddle (864) 787-2834 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • MarchantPm.com (864) 527-4505 ek Gre e t ! i l uis iva Exq Rev

e om s lt H View i u B g tom nin Cus Stun w/

103 Tuscany Way - Thornblade

328 Sorono Drive - Montebello

$2,125,000 • 1368995 • 6BR/5BA/2Hf BA

$979,000 • 1374558 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

w/ ! me ches o u at H s To Gre riou u Lux

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karen@marchantco.com

e om ! s H Pond u o t rge tnu Go Ches in

e! ly ute n Hom l o s Ab s Tow ou e g r Go

100 S. Hudson St Unit B16 - Park Place on Hudson 111 E. McBee Ave Unit #208 - The Bookends $729,900 • 1377192 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

e om l H rove! u f ht G lig el De Laur in

407 Southern Beech Court - Chestnut Pond 405 Southern Beech Court - Chestnut Pond 18 Meadow Reserve Place - Laurel Grove $668,000 • 1377171 • 4BR/3BA

Rhett Brown (864) 915-9393 rhett@rhettbrown.net

/ ew om orch! H P s u d ulo un Fabap-Aro Wr

$667,500 • 1377170 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

Rhett Brown (864) 915-9393 rhett@rhettbrown.net

t w/ d Loiews! e z i -S V ate us Est rgeo Go

W NE

! ICE PR

$569,900 • 1377283 • 4BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Rhett Brown (864) 915-9393 rhett@rhettbrown.net

ate s! riv Acre P at 1.6 Gre t on a e tr Re

$745,000 • 1365718 • 3BR/3BA

Mary Praytor • (864) 593-0366 • marypraytor@gmail.com

cre ! .6 A Farm 2 2 se r Ho

216 Morrow Drive - Landrum $559,900 • 1369130 • 4BR/3BA

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

SE OU2-4 H EN AY OP UND S

204 Hidden Hills Drive - Chanticleer Towns

00 View Point Drive - Greenville

1102 Roe Ford Road - Stratford Forest

308 Wittrock Court - Stoneledges

$549,000 • 1362287 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$495,000 • 1369703 • Lot

$327,500 • 1377003 • 4BR/4BA

$254,900 • 1375081 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

! d in rea Fin ad A e r Ra ta Ro us g Au

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karen@marchantco.com

e in om tion! H ct ca rfe Lo Pe rfect Pe

Bo Matheny • (864) 605-7578 • bo@marchantco.com

e om s! te H date a l acu y Up Immh man wit

4F Amherst Avenue - Augusta Road

104 Heavenly Way - The Townes at Pelham

108 Wateree Way - River Shoals

$259,500 • 1377585 • 3BR/2BA

$229,504 • 1378034 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$212,000 • 1375900 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

Bo Matheny • (864) 605-7578 • bo@marchantco.com

Justin Ruzicka • (864) 527-4516 • justin@houseguy.org Celeste Purdie (843) 345-4720 • celeste@marchantco.com

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karen@marchantco.com

Kathy Slayter • (864) 982-7772 • kslayter@charter.net

am ! Dre iews r u V yo n ild Mt Bu e w/ m Ho

19 Old Altamont Ridge - Stoneridge $59,900 • 1329407 • Lot

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


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OCTOBER 12, 13 & 14 Friday 10 am – 5 pm • Saturday 10 am – 5 pm • Sunday 1 pm – 5 pm at the Greenville County Museum of Art Featuring 27 dealers from across the country exhibiting the best antiques, fine and folk art, and design in the Southeast! n Meet designer and stylemaker Danielle Rollins! n $10 admission, good for all three days n To learn more, visit gcma.org/antiques n

Greenville County Museum of Art Greenville, South Carolina

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ARTS & CULTURE

WORKINGCLASS AMERICA

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The lowdown on Fall for Greenville tunes 36

• Ruby Velle & the Soulphonics... Page 38 • The Jerry Douglas Band... Page 39 • King Tuff... Page 41 10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 35


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“Sweat” includes performances by, from left, Anne Tromsness, Martin Damien Wilkins, and Jayce Tromsness. Photos by Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

‘Sweat’ doesn’t back down from harsh realities of working-class America SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

“Sweat,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical written by Lynn Nottage, addresses some of the most-difficult issues that working-class America faces today, and does not back down from the harsh realities that plague the working class of Reading, Pennsylvania. “Sweat” follows the lives of several residents of Reading, a town described as “synonymous with deindustrialization” and a home of the “blue-collar workers who voted in Donald Trump as president.” The action of the show takes place between the current time in a bar and scenes eight years earlier, which Nottage uses to show how the characters' lives take divergent paths, many of which revolve around layoffs, poverty, and race relations. The Warehouse Theatre will premier “Sweat” on Oct. 12, directed by Charlotte native Martin Damien Wilkins. “The context and the climate in which it premiered was really politically fraught,” Wilkins says of the show. “They walked out on stage and kind of said, we were the people who weren’t being heard. Part of what Lynn was able to do was not only document it but dramatize it in a beautiful way.” While many of the characters share circumstances, like jobs and family lives, their differences in experience are stark, ranging from racial inequality to job security. The show documents their attempt to find and cling to commonalities. Anne Tromsness, who portrays Stacy, a middle-aged woman who is dealing with the death of her husband and hardships at work, says, “One thing a play like this does is it brings to light how close we are. What’s heart-

breaking is that these characters have a lot more in common than they don’t, but it's the differences that break them apart. There are outside forces that are more to blame, and if they could rally against those things, they could save their relationships. This experience is one in starting to look at, where are the opportunities that I could search for common ground?” This play does not focus on intense drama or unlikely events, but rather events, challenges, and triumphs that mirror everyday life. “Part of the resonance of a play like ‘Sweat’ is there isn’t an attempt to make heroes out of these characters, as much as it is about depicting what their day-to-day lives are and how it’s impacted by those around them,” Wilkins explains. Part of Nottage’s brilliance in the show comes from her ability to give a voice to characters who carry unpopular opinions, including a white nationalist with tattoos covering his face. These characters were inspired by Nottage’s time in Reading researching the show and the town. “There isn’t a single character in this play that you can dismiss, even the white supremacist,” Tromsness says. “That’s a testament to the writing, that we are forced to examine the characters’ humanity and our own humanity.” To create a character that is fundamentally difficult to agree with or like is no small task for the writer, director, or actor portraying him or her. “It is one thing to sit at home and learn lines of a character who says things that are hurtful and racist, but it’s another to look a human being in the eyes and say those things, even as a character,” Tromsness says. “It’s been a process that I wish more people could go through, to

sit in a room and talk about these tough issues. For me, right now, we are in tough and tumultuous times and the nature of our conversations doesn’t always reflect that complexity.” The challenges this show brings about are for both those involved creatively and the audience. “I think that is what a really good play should do; it should ask really difficult questions and not even try to answer them. It's uncanny how this play knows what questions to ask,” says Jayce Tromsness, who plays Stan, a local who became a bartender after an injury cost him his job at the steel factory. This show has been acclaimed for its uncanny timeliness of addressing issues that are prominent today, and especially when it first premiered in 2015. The characters portray those who are often overlooked on the political and economic spectrum, and seek to give them voices, understanding, and a story. “I think it’s more relevant than anything I’ve ever seen,” says Jayce Tromsness. “I’ve been teaching theater for over 20 years and I don’t usually worry if my students come see my work, but this might be one of the three or four plays of my entire career that I will demand for them to see, as theater students but also citizens.”

“SWEAT” WHEN Oct. 12-28 WHERE The Warehouse Theatre TICKETS Starting at $35 INFO www.warehousetheatre.com


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

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Anderson University professor’s play to appear in NYC solo festival MELODY WRIGHT | STAFF

mwright@communityjournals.com

Making her second appearance at the United Solo festival in New York City on Oct. 14, Deborah McEniry will perform a one-woman play called “Hazel Louise” about the life of her grandmother and her battle with Alzheimer’s disease. Hazel Louise Corts lost her life to the disease in 1998, and the play is a tribute to her as well as a call-to-action against Alzheimer’s. In its ninth season at Theatre Row, United Solo is the world’s largest solo theatre festival and features a variety of one-person shows selected from an application process. McEniry, theatre professor and chair of the Anderson University’s Theatre Department, co-wrote the 75-minute show covering 18 different ages of her grandmother’s life with her cousin, Alicia Corts, a theater professor at St. Leo University. As McEniry’s love letter to her grandmother, the play highlights key events in Hazel Louise Corts’ life from age 9 in

Deborah McEniry | Photo provided

Illinois during the time of the Great Depression to age 86 during her final days in West Palm Beach, Florida. Depicting a small child up to an elderly woman proved challenging for McEniry. But, the most difficult scene for her to perform is when 9-year-old Hazel Louise looses her twin sister to diphtheria. Hazel Louise was a pastor’s wife, a mother of seven children, and a full-time worker — a true superhero of her time. But eventually, a disease created cobwebs in her mind and stole away her beloved memories.

“Memories are all you have in old age, then they’re taken away,” McEniry said. “It’s something many people struggle with. We need to constantly be aware of it and know what it takes from a person.” With stories gathered by the whole family as well as some of McEniry’s personal experiences with her grandmother, the play shows hard, happy, and confusing times while presenting some of Hazel Louise’s moments of Alzheimer’s. “We certainly don’t have a cure yet,” McEniry said of Alzheimers. She hopes to stress the importance of finding a cure for the disease that currently plagues 5.7 million Americans, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. While a range of demographics will be watching “Hazel Louise,” McEniry hopes the audience response will be the same. “I don’t think they’ll be able to go away from it without realizing how devastating Alzheimer’s disease is,” she said. True realization of the problem is the first step to finding a solution, which is

Hazel Louise Corts | Photo provided

what McEniry hopes to see sooner rather than later. Two Anderson University Theatre Department professors, Cara Wood and Jessica Snyder, will also assist with lighting, tech, costumes, and hair for the production of “Hazel Louise.”


38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Join us this season in Genevieve’s theater lounge for an intimate listening room experience

fall for GREENVILLE

WITH

EDWIN MCCAIN AND MAIA

SHARP AND SPECIAL GUESTS

Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics | Photo provided

Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics bring soul, funk sounds to Fall for Greenville VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

PHILLIP LAMMONDS

GABE DIXON

NOVEMBER 2

JANUARY 25

JILL SOBULE

DAVID WILCOX

MARCH 1

MAY 3

ON SALE NOW!

In September 2012, Atlanta’s Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics released its debut album, “It’s About Time.” It was 10 tracks of soul and funk music that sounded, quite intentionally, like it could’ve been recorded in the late 1960s or early 1970s. Bathed in a decidedly raw, analog-style production, Velle sang with grit and passion while The Soulphonics got into a deep, horn-spiked groove, echoing the sinewy funk of classic Stax Records singles, or perhaps Motown when the strings kicked in. It was a sound similar to what Sharon Jones & The Dap-Kings were doing at the time, even if Velle’s voice was closer to the late Amy Winehouse’s than it was to Jones’, and that throwback soul-revue style helped the Soulphonics become an overnight sensation after nearly a decade of playing live. The single “My Dear” racked up around 200,000 downloads on iTunes, and the “It’s About Time” album hit the top 30 on the Billboard charts and earned critical raves from The New York Daily News and Paste magazine. That momentum was enough to propel the band onto concert stages with Kendrick Lamar, Gary Clark Jr., and Erykah

Badu, among many others. Most bands riding a wave like that would probably want to head back into the studio quickly to get new material out, but Ruby Velle & The Soulphonics are not most bands. Six years passed between “It’s About Time” and their second album, “State of All Things,” which came out last April. “We just wanted to make sure that our sophomore effort was something that we could really get behind and be proud of,” Velle says of the long gap between records. “Coming off of the success of ‘It’s About Time,’ it was important that we stayed true to our sound but also explored our influences in a deeper way, and that just takes time. As a band, we’ve always had the mindset that it will happen when it happens. It wasn’t really about anything more than making something we could be proud of.” The safe move would probably have been to make “It’s About Time, Part Two,” but that’s not what the band did. The soul-revue style is still the foundation of the music on “State of All Things,” but The Soulphonics have expanded their reach significantly. There’s more of a rock ’n’ roll edge on songs such as “Broken Woman” and “Love Less Blind,” and Velle’s vocals take center stage on a couple of gritty, less-is-more ballads:


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM “Way Back When” and “Used Me Again (Now Lose Me Forever).” There’s also a disco-style track that should come with its own spinning mirror-ball (“Overwhelming”) and an epic final number that brings mindbending psychedelia into the mix (“Call Out My Name”). It wasn’t a direct sequel, in other words, and that’s just how the band wanted it. “The first album was a little too close to a retro-inspired sound,” Velle says, “and it put us in this box of playing this soul music from the ’60s and ’70s. I love that sound, and I grew up on that stuff, so I don’t think that was a negative thing, but it gave us less of an ability to explore different sounds. So ‘Shape of All Things’ takes on different genres within the soul spectrum.” In fact, Velle says she sees it as the band’s responsibility to develop their sound, no matter how well-received their older work has been. “We as artists are supposed to evolve,” she says. “We’re supposed to meld different sounds together. And I think that’s something we strived to do on ‘State of All Things.’” Velle and The Soulphonics will be playing many of those new songs when they perform their headlining set on the Iron Hill Brewery stage at BB&T Fall for Greenville on Friday night, and she says that on stage is still the best place to see what the band can do. “There are moments when I’m onstage just enamored of the musicians I’m surrounded by,” she says. “We’ve always been a band I encourage people to see live, because meticulousness in the studio can be overwhelming. There’s a certain level of celebration when you just get out there onstage and make it happen, and I live for that moment.”

RUBY VELLE & THE SOULPHONICS WHEN 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12 WHERE Iron Hill Brewery Stage, BB&T Fall for Greenville INFO https://fallforgreenville.net/

fall for Jerry Douglas brings his GREENVILLE Grammy-winning bluegrass, jazz, blues-rock sounds to Fall for Greenville VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

When Grammy and IBMA-award-winning Dobro player, songwriter, and bandleader Jerry Douglas is touring as part of Alison Krauss’ band Union Station, there’s a phrase he likes to use for a night when he feels like working a lot of high-wire improvisation into his playing. He tells his bandmates that “it feels like Tuesday” to let them know to get ready for some curveballs. The other members of Union Station are skilled enough at their bluegrass-country-folk hybrid music to handle Douglas’ wildest playing, but they’re not as game for it as Douglas’ namesake band, who will perform the headlining Sunday night set at BB&T Fall for Greenville this year. “With my band,” Douglas says with a laugh, “it’s always Tuesday, that’s for sure.” A quick spin through The Jerry Douglas Band’s 2017 album “What If” bears that out in spades. With Douglas’ quicksilver Dobroplaying leading the way, his ensemble flies through high-speed jazz (“Cavebop”), heavy blues-rock with a dash of New Orleans brass (“2:19”), and a shimmering folk ballad (“Go Ahead and Leave”), trying on different styles like clothes and playing up a storm. The album is simply further proof, if any were needed, that after appearing on more than 1,600 albums as either a sideman, producer, or leader — yes, you read that correctly — Douglas obeys no rules other than his own. His foundation after more than 40 years as a professional musician remains bluegrass,

The Jerry Douglas Band | Photo provided

though, even as he stretches and bends the genre into something new. And it’s not just because he loves that music. “The thing about bluegrass is that it’s improvisational music,” he says. “That’s why some of us were able to move it towards different genres. We changed the substance and the chord structures but still used these instruments that are based in bluegrass.” The “we” Douglas refers to are his musical peers, such as banjo player Bela Fleck and mandolin player Sam Bush. They’ve all pushed the boundaries of bluegrass, and acoustic music in general, for decades. “That’s been our modus operandi,” Douglas says. “It’s closer to jazz, in that I’m making a statement in the front of the song and then the gates are wide open to where you want to take that as long as you get back to where you started.” The Fall for Greenville performance will be the band’s first show together since midJuly, and Douglas says he’s looking forward

to diving into the musical unknown again after a long stretch with a more traditional group. “I just finished a long stretch with the Earls of Leicester (pronounced ‘Lester’),” Douglas says, “and that’s just the opposite of this. It’s a dyed-in-the-wool bluegrass band that plays all Flatt and Scruggs material. We don’t go too far outside of what was originally stated by the guys who created that music. So when I get back with my band it takes me a few minutes to give myself the OK to just go. We all get on this wild ride together, and we shake our heads and laugh at the end at what’s just taken place.”

THE JERRY DOUGLAS BAND WHEN 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 WHERE Carolina Chevy Stage, BB&T Fall for Greenville INFO https://fallforgreenville.net/

Greenville County Schools Creating College- and Career-Ready Graduates

Inspired | Supported | Prepared Accredited district-wide since 2008 by AdvancED


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

fall for GREENVILLE

Fall for Greenville offers chance to dine at several new restaurants in one place

ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

BB&T Fall for Greenville is essentially an opportunity to dine al fresco at 49 restaurants with 60,000 of your closest friends. That prospect could seem simultaneously exhilarating and daunting. While the three-day festival, held Oct. 12-14 along Greenville’s Main Street, offers an ample amount of time to hit all of them, chances are your budget might not. Tickets are $5 for a sheet of 10 and are the only currency accepted for food and beverages, so there can be a bit of a strategy involved in using them as judiciously as possible. To help with that, here’s a sample of offerings to give you an idea of types of food and ticket costs. Additionally, this year’s lineup includes some of the newer restaurants in town, so if you haven’t gotten to enjoy their menus yet, now’s your chance.

Cocobowlz

Iron Hill Brewery & Restaurant

Nutella (açai bowl) — 10 tickets

Ahi tuna tartare — 10 tickets

Downtown (açai bowl) — 10 tickets

Baked Chesapeake-style crab cake — 10 tickets

Flu Shot juice — 5 tickets

Vienna Red Lager braised pulled pork slider — 8 tickets

Crimson smoothie — 5 tickets

Le Petit Croissant

Crêpe du Jour

Parisian sandwich — 10 tickets

Chicken and mushroom crepe — 10 tickets

Raspberry chocolate ice cream sandwich — 10 tickets

Ham and cheese crepe — 10 tickets

Coconut macaroons — 8 tickets

Almond cream with strawberry coulis crepe — 8 tickets

Plain croissant — 8 tickets

Banana Nutella crepe — 8 tickets

Almond croissant — 8 tickets Mini 70% chocolate bar — 5 tickets

Husk Greenville Pulled pork rillette — 9 tickets

Limoncello

Pimento cheese — 8 tickets

Baked ziti — 10 tickets

Sweet corn relish — 7 tickets

Meatballs — 8 tickets

Barbecue corn nuts — 5 tickets

Antipasto skewer — 7 tickets

Pickled veggies — 5 tickets

Lemon almond torta — 7 tickets

Congratulations!

MARK YOUR CALENDARS

Maggie Kleger Maggie won a Tasting Party for 10 Plus a Gift Basket from Oil & Vinegar, located at NOMA Square, N. Main Street.

OCTOBER

20th & 21st

Pictured are Veera Gaul, Owner of Oil & Vinegar, Weekly Winner Maggie Kleger and Club President Randy Vogenberg.

for the premier health and lifestyle festival of the year!

Be a 2019 Prize Sponsor by donating a prize worth $300 or more. Visit us online to download the sponsor form.

North Greenville Rotary Club

E L F F A R R E P U 2018 S P U R C H A S E YO U R T I C K E T AT

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Proud sponsor and presenter at the NESS Fest, at Fluor Field SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

2:15pm | Dry Needling

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21

2:15pm | Fitness & Wellness Demonstration

Save 10% on your tickets using our discount code... ELITETHERAPY10

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10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

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KING TUFF

“There’s always the thought that you want to make something that your fans will like, and I felt like I did that with the last record,” he says. “I thought my fans wanted a rock album. It’s so easy to get caught in a trap of playing to other people’s ideas of what you think they want. And that’s no way to make art; you have to do it for yourself.” And somewhat unexpectedly, Thomas says that his new songs have made his live show at lot more interesting. “It’s cool because it creates a dynamic kind of set with a lot of different styles in it,” he says. “There have been some people who have been like, ‘What about that other style?’ and I say that I’m not going to make the same record over and over again; are you doing the same thing you were 10 years ago?”

Expect super-sized rock, haunting ballads during Fall for Greenville performance VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

The harsh reality for most musicians is that if they’re going to make music for a living, they have to do it on the road. Royalties from the sale of albums and singles don’t come rolling in like they used to, particularly if your songs aren’t getting played on mainstream radio, so touring is the most reliable way to bring in cash while creating your art. And that’s a reality that can lead to burnout for a hard-working rock ’n’ roller. That’s the situation that Kyle Thomas, aka King Tuff, found himself in after a particularly long touring cycle for his 2014 album “Black Moon Spell.” Thomas, who will play a headlining set with his band on Friday night at BB&T Fall For Greenville’s Carolina Chevy Stage, did a lot of shows for “Black Moon Spell,” ultimately pushing the album to No. 1 on Billboard magazine’s Heatseekers chart and making noise on college radio as well. “I did a lot of touring for the last record, and really I’d been doing a lot of touring for years,” Thomas says. “And I got into music for the creative aspect, not necessarily the touring part. And I felt like after that I was lost, creatively, and I needed to try new things in order to break myself open a little bit.” Thomas also felt somewhat trapped by the sound he’d created for King Tuff. Blending a flashy 1970s T. Rex-style glamrock persona with grungy, distortionencrusted garage-punk, Thomas had hit upon a crowd-pleasing, party-hearty style but felt increasingly limited by it. “I felt like it had settled into this one zone of sound, or this one style of rock music,” he says. “But that’s not who I am. I’m a fan of all sorts of different things and I have all kinds of different influences, and I just wanted to reveal a little more of that and explore more of those influences.” On King Tuff’s new album, “The Oth-

King Tuff | Photo by Olivia Bee

er,” you can hear Thomas expanding his reach, moving from his foundation of super-sized rock into haunted, skeletal balladry (the title track), pulsing funk-rock (“Raindrop Blue”), wide-screen psychedelia (“Thru The Cracks”) and dreamy acoustic pop (“Neverending Sunshine”). The album is kaleidoscopic in its musical reach, even while lyrically it reflects the hopelessness that Thomas felt after essentially living on the road for more than 10 years and five albums. “Science can cure sickness/ But what can cure my soul,” Thomas sings on the title track. “It won’t be long before I'm

“I’m a fan of all sorts of different things and I have all kinds of different influences, and I just wanted to reveal a little more of that and explore more of those influences.”

want, and make as many mistakes as you want and then explore the mistakes, too.” As he began the process of creating “The Other,” Thomas felt a bit of hesitation because he knew he was moving away from a sound that had found commercial success last time out.

South Carolina Koi & Goldfish Show

KING TUFF WHEN 9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 12 WHERE Carolina Chevy Stage, BB&T Fall For Greenville INFO https://fallforgreenville.net/

Friday, October 19 • 2pm-6pm Saturday, October 20 • 9am-6pm Sunday, October 21 • 9am-1pm

FREE ADMISSION!

Numerous Home & Garden, Yard, and Water Garden Vendors on site

– Kyle Thomas, aka King Tuff

gone/ Laying in some hole.” “The Other” was recorded in Thomas’ home studio rather than a more professional (and expensive) environment, which allowed him to take his time and experiment. “You’re on the clock and you’re paying for it,” he says of the typical recording-studio experience. “You have to know what you’re going to do and go in and execute it. But in your own world, you can take as long as you

The South Carolina Koi & Water Garden Society ACTIVITY AND SENIOR CENTER 310 W. Curtis St. • Simpsonville • www.sckwgs.org


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

‘Every Breath’ A R T S C A LE N DA R OCT. 12-18 Carolina Music Museum

Michael Tsalka Oct. 12 ~ 520-8807 Greenville County Museum of Art

Antiques, Fine Art & Design Weekend Oct. 12-14 ~ 271-7570

Nicholas Sparks to promote new book at Fiction Addiction SARA PEARCE | STAFF

spearce@communityjournals.com

The Warehouse Theatre

Sweat Oct. 12-28 ~ 235-6948 Younts Center for Performing Arts

The Little Mermaid Oct. 12-28 ~ 409-1050 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Imaginary Tails: Works by Vivian Morris and Freda Sue Oct. 12-Nov. 23 ~ 233-6733 Artist Guild Gallery of Greenville

The Great North Main Art Experience Oct. 13 ~ 878-0221 Greenville Symphony Orchestra

Sherwood’s Picks Oct. 13 ~ 467-3000 The Peace Center

The Tempest Oct. 16 ~ 467-3000 Greenville County Youth Orchestra

Fall for Music Oct. 18 ~ 467-3000 The Peace Center

Renaissance – Monteverdi and Merlot Oct. 18 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council

Works by Aldo Muzzarelli & Yelitza Diaz Through Oct. 19 ~ 467-3132 Furman University Theatre

Lobby Hero Through Oct. 21 ~ 294-2125 Furman University Thomas Art Gallery

Lineage: Tom Flowers & Family Through Nov. 2 ~ 294-2995 SC Children’s Theatre

The Teddy Bears’ Picnic Through Nov. 20 ~ 235-2885 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

Textiles: A History of Expression Through Nov. 28 ~ 735-3948 Main Street Real Estate Gallery

Works by Nathan Bertling Through Dec. 31 ~ 250-2850 Greenville County Museum of Art

Bob Jones Museum Highlights Through Dec. 30 ~ 271-7570

Andrew Wyeth Watercolors Through Jan. 13 ~ 271-7570

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

“The Notebook,” “A Walk to Remember,” “Nights in Rodanthe,” and “The Choice”: These are just a few of the love stories Nicholas Sparks has created. Sparks' new novel, “Every Breath" returns to his roots and channels the classic love story that he has become so wellknown for. Sparks will be at Greenville’s Fiction Addiction on Oct. 19 to promote his first book in almost two years. The author says he took a year off from writing to travel and reconnect with his passion as an author. “Every Breath” tells the story of two very different individuals who have a chance encounter that changes their lives. The story centers on a place that Sparks encountered in Sunset Beach, North Carolina, called “Kindred Spirit,” that served as a huge inspiration for the novel. Kindred Spirit is a lone mailbox on the uninhabited Bird Island that is filled with notes, journals, and letters from the strangers who pass by. “Making a trip to Kindred Spirit would really be worth it,” Sparks explains. “It’s not especially convenient to get to, and there’s nothing out there. It makes me wonder who thought of it and why. How many people have visited? How many stories have been told here? All of those elements appeal to me both as a person and as an author.” While the mailbox serves as inspiration, Sunset Beach serves as the backdrop for the chance love story between characters Hope Anderson and Tru Walls, both at a crossroads in their lives. Sparks says he is excited for this novel because it brings him back to his roots. “The original idea was that I wanted a return to form, a novel vaguely similar in structure to some of my earlier work (such as) ‘The Notebook’ or ‘Nights in Rodanthe,’” he says. “It’s a two-part story: What happens if you fall in love and then something happens — what is the outcome of that?” In the story, Hope Anderson has dated a man for six years with no marriage on

Nicholas Sparks (above) was inspired to write his latest novel, “Every Breath,” (pictured below) in part by a mailbox on secluded Bird Island, off the coast of the Carolinas. Photos provided

the horizon. Her father has recently been diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig's disease, so she decides to take a week of vacation to her family’s cottage at Sunset Beach. Tru Walls is summoned to Sunset Beach by a man claiming to be his biological father. As a safari guide born and raised in Zimbabwe, Walls is new to America and definitely does not expect to connect with Anderson. Sparks explains that some of Walls’ character was inspired by his travels to Zimbabwe. “The character of Tru was reminiscent of the people that I met in Zimbabwe, and my readership is more international now. I want to appeal to them while retaining my North Carolina roots. Those ideas kind of mash together in the character of Tru Walls.” Sparks will discuss his upcoming novel and read for fans of his 20-year career. “I’m excited about the novel in general and I’m hopeful that people will love it and there is something for everyone,” Sparks says. “I’m hopeful that in the reading of this novel that they understand why I love the Carolinas so much.”

NICHOLAS SPARKS BOOK DISCUSSION AND READING WHEN 5 p.m. Oct 19 WHERE Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road No. 5 TICKETS $28-35 INFO www.fiction-addiction.com


Mark Your Calendars

143 Artists

89 Locations

1 Weekend

Tanya Stiegler

24 New Artists

Elizabeth Speaker

About the Weekend Greenville Open Studios allows you to experience the life of local artists at work in their studios for one full weekend, November 10â&#x20AC;&#x201C;11. This free, self-guided tour is a unique experience to engage with our communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s incredible talent, learn about artistic processes, enhance or begin your art collection and become inspired. Visit our website to see work by all of the 143 participating artstis. @macARTScouncil

greenvillearts.com

#MACopenstudios


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

ROCK’N ON THE RUNWAY

Intimate concert features top talent, benefits Pendleton Place VINCENT HARRIS | ARTS & CULTURE WRITER

vharris@communityjournals.com

One night about 10 years ago, a group of around 400 people gathered in a tent in the parking lot of the Arizona Steakhouse restaurant on Woodruff Road to watch four classic-rock stars play an intimate show. Jack Blades of Night Ranger, Danny Seraphine of Chicago, Tommy Thayer of KISS, and Rick Seratte of Foreigner pumped out stripped-down versions of their hits for a select group to raise money for Pendleton Place for Children and Families, an organization dedicated to helping abused children and their families. The concert began when Mark Craig, Kevin Cox, Troy Baldree, and Mike Williams, the co-founders and directors of the nonprofit Arizona's Children’s Charities organization, decided to expand upon their usual centerpiece fundraising event, an annual golf tournament at Thornblade. The men visited a similar tournament hosted by golfer John Daly where Blades, Seraphine, Thayer, and Seratte were performing, and on the spur of the moment asked them to play in Greenville to raise money for Pendleton Place. The quartet agreed, and the concert was a great success. Ten years down the line, Arizona Steakhouse isn’t around anymore but Arizona's Children’s Charities is going strong, and — aided by title sponsor ScanSource coming aboard in 2015 — they’ve long since moved the concert to a bigger venue, the Greenville Jet Center at the Greenville Downtown Airport. On Sunday, Oct. 14, the day before the golf tournament, more than 1,000 people will gather to see an all-star band featuring Seraphine, Jeff Adams of Starship, for-

Proceeds from Rock’n on the Runway will benefit Pendleton Place. Photo provided

mer Billy Joel drummer Liberty DeVitto, 38 Special’s Jeff Carlisi, Kool & the Gang’s Al Paris, Jim Peterik of Survivor, and more. The band will perform several hits from each of their former groups while the crowd enjoys a catered dinner and an open bar. There will also be a silent auction where the musicians’ art and memorabilia will be for sale, some of it signed onstage during the performance. Williams says the concert, now called Rock’n on the Runway, has brought a whole new level of excitement to the charity’s fundraising endeavors. “We wanted to distinguish our event from any other one like it in Greenville,” he says. “That’s what’s allowed us to grow

the donation side of it, is the concert. The golf tournament is still popular; there’s a waiting list for it every year. But the concert has become the primary focus. The set list is two to four songs from everybody’s band. There will be dual drummers, and it’s quite an experience.” Troy Baldree says that it’s not just a growing audience that has helped make the event special; the musicians have come to look forward to Rock’n on the Runway every year, too. “We got them very involved with the children at Pendleton Place from the beginning,” he says. “We wanted to make sure they knew what the cause was and know who they’re raising money for. They’ve

gotten very involved in our cause, we’ve become friends with them, and they’ve become friends with each other. Now they put it on their calendar every year.” Jeff Carlisi has perhaps become the musician most involved in the concert; not only has he played just about every year, he’s become the musical director of the event. “By the time we got into the fourth year of doing it, it [evolved] into a full rock ’n’ roll show with more and more people participating, which is when I kind of evolved into that role of music director,” Carlisi says. “It’s great because I can reach out to my friends who have played there before, bring different personalities into it, and for me, it’s such an enjoyable experience being involved with this charity.” Carlisi says that even with an audience of more than 1,000 people, the show still has an intimacy that rock fans just can’t get at an arena or stadium show. “It’s become a larger beast, but the organizers still want to keep it a special event,” he says. “Now we’re in this hangar with full concert staging and production just like you would see at Bon Secours Wellness Arena. It could get bigger, who knows, but right now it’s great because we have a chance to be up close and personal with the audience.”

SCANSOURCE PRESENTS ROCK’N ON THE RUNWAY WHEN 5 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14 WHERE Greenville Jet Center, 1 Aviation Lane TICKETS $125 INFO www.arizona-open.org


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NOD TO THE PAST Greenville’s newest coworking space is paying homage to the building’s prior owner – Piedmont Plush Mill – and to the city’s rich textile history through art. Serendipity Labs’ mural depicts the Plush Mill logo, imagery of mill workers and their homes, and a map of Greenville mills. Mural by Emanate Brands & Environment | Photo: Serendipity Labs

Paul’s pick of the week

‘Sweat’ at The Warehouse Theatre PAUL HYDE | CONTRIBUTOR

Why you should go: If you want to better understand our angry, polarized nation, this may be the play for you. What its about: Lynn Nottage’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Sweat” focuses on blue-collar workers whose lives have been upended by ruthless economic change. They’re the folks President Trump has referred to as the “forgotten people.” No surprise, the New Yorker magazine called the play “the first theatrical landmark of the Trump era.” The steelworkers in “Sweat” struggle with job insecurity, failed relationships, and drug abuse. They’re friends who have spent their lives sharing drinks, secrets, and laughs. But when layoffs and unexpected promotions chip away at their trust, class resentments and racial animosity reach a boiling point. What to expect: “Sweat” is a scorching drama, but one with a lot of heart and humor — particularly the sort of gallows humor that serves as a coping mechanism in tough times.

How Greenville can relate: The steel mills in “Sweat” may bring to mind the textile mills that used to dominate the Upstate. Greenville was dubbed the Textile Capital of the World. The Upstate keenly understands economic disruption and the often-vain hope that old industries will be restored. “Nostalgia is a disease,” says a character in “Sweat.” Just the facts: Nottage based “Sweat” on her interviews with struggling workers in Reading, Pennsylvania, one of the poorest cities in America of its size. The play has been hailed for spotlighting lowermiddle-class Americans who are too rarely seen in contemporary American drama: “forgotten ones” indeed. Nottage said in an interview that after one performance of “Sweat,” a man approached her and said “thank you for humanizing some of these stories, and he wanted to hold my hand for five minutes.” Paul Hyde, a veteran Upstate journalist, writes about the arts for the Journal. Write to him at paulhydeus@yahoo.com. Follow him on Facebook and Twitter: @PaulHyde7.

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46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018

The Black Thai food truck serves up American food with Thai flavors

feast

WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER PHOTOS BY WILL CROOKS The Black Thai recently added pad Thai fried rice to its menu.

F

Charlie Phillip describes his cooking style at The Black Thai as using Thai ingredients to make American food.

ree ski-lift passes and restaurant life in Jackson, Wyoming, brought the three owners of The Black Thai food truck together in 2012. J.L. Mann High School grads and longtime friends Brayden Wynn and Dean Johnson had moved to the ski-resort town after college graduation, where they met Charlie Phillip in the resort kitchen. They all worked on the line together. “We thought ‘Charlie’s a funny dude,’” Johnson says. They became fast friends and eventually roommates, and began to dream and scheme about owning their own restaurant. After Wynn and Johnson moved back to Greenville, they were able to lure Phillip away from a catering job he had taken in Memphis, Tennessee, to make their dream a reality. They saw the food truck scene taking off and decided that was the direction they should take first. Strangely enough, Thai food has a major presence in Jackson, so the three friends naturally gravitated towards that type of cuisine when thinking about concepts. “Thai food warms you up,” Wynn says, which, he adds, is precisely why they’ve held off serving traditionally spicy Thai food from the truck so far. “People don’t want to be sweating outside of the truck.” Wynn says. The truck officially launched Aug. 31 at Piney Mountain Bike Lounge, and they’ve received rave reviews so far, but there’s been one consistent criticism. “The biggest knock we’ve gotten is that the word ‘Thai’ is on the side of our truck,” Johnson says. “We wanna stress that we are Americanized Thai.” And that’s been a strategic move on their parts to be sure they can produce a product about which they were 100 percent confident.

Those include The Black Thai burger served on an English muffin topped with the secret “bolo” sauce, Muenster cheese, and shishito peppers; Asian zoodle salad; Brussels sprouts bowl; wings flavored with ginger soy, buffalo sambal, or spicy apricot; and the newest addition of pad Thai fried rice. “We are American food with Thai flavors,” Wynn says. Phillip, who’s been cooking his whole life and is the chef of the operation, says he views it as making food, no matter the ethnic origin, with Thai ingredients. “If I want to make Thai meatballs, I can,” he says, adding the creative freedom he has is one of the perks of this job. The weather also plays a role in menu creation. “Once it gets cooler out, we’ll have more traditional Thai,” Wynn says. Now with four to five gigs a week — either private parties or serving at bars and breweries such as The Community Tap, Grateful Brew, and Fireforge Crafted Beer — they are finding their stride. Phillip says that means they’ll start working with a wok in the truck and serving curries and soups. The next step is also to grow the catering business and the food truck’s following. “This is a segue to brick and mortar,” Wynn says. “We have a vision here. It’s a passion that’s brought us together.” Wynn, who also works full time as a commercial real estate broker with Collett, says they are currently scouting locations but have no plans of jumping into a permanent space that doesn’t fit with their vision. “We want it to go somewhere,” Johnson says. “We’re all relatively young and ambitious. We see the growth happening in Greenville, and we want to be a part of it.” Keep up with The Black Thai’s schedule on Instagram @theblackthaigvl.


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small plates

It’s burger time

Burgerim, the international fast-casual burger joint that’s been under construction at 115 Pelham Road in the Pelham Court shopping center, opens this week. Greenville franchisee Nick Patel FOOD NEWS said a soft opening would be held from & EVENTS 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11, with BY ARIEL TURNER limited items. The restaurant concept is based on customizable burgers that come in one size, 2.8 ounces, and are sold as an uno, duo, trio, or 16-count party box. For size comparison, White Castle patties are less than 1 ounce and Five Guys’ patties are 4 ounces, so these are a happy medium. Patty options are beef, dryaged beef, wagyu beef, merguez (spicy beef), turkey, lamb, chicken, salmon, veggie, Spanish beef, and falafel. Toppings are the usual suspects plus sautéed mushrooms, jalapeños, avocado, and fried egg. In addition to cottage-style round fries and sweet potato fries, the menu includes chicken wings, a variety of salads, and home fries (cubed potatoes tossed in chili sauce and topped with sesame seeds).

Fish Camp Mondays Stella’s Southern Bistro is going back to chef Jason Scholz’s Lowcountry roots. Every Monday, the Simpsonville restaurant (worth the drive, Greenville friends) will be serving up fish camp-inspired seafood specials for lunch and dinner. Think battered, fried, and blackened with traditional sides of fries, grits, hushpuppies, and slaw. Select wines will be 50 percent off as well. And here’s the kicker — the cost is $10 for lunch or $20 for dinner. That seems like a no-brainer when very few locally owned restaurants are open on Mondays.

Who you gonna call?

Film with LIVE Orchestra & Costume Contest The Peace Center Tuesday, October 30 • 7:30 p.m. Experience the classic 1984 movie starring Bill Murray and Dan Aykroyd in a whole new way as the blockbuster hit plays on the big screen and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra performs the soundtrack LIVE!

Two Costume Contests

Putting the green in Greenville Kitchen Sync, Greenville’s first and only certified green restaurant, has been named the winner of two Green Restaurant Awards. Presented for the first time by the Green Restaurant Association, Kitchen Sync received top honors in the categories of Greenest Independent Restaurant and Water Conservation. The local, family-owned restaurant is a four-star SustainaBuild certified green restaurant, which is the highest rating offered by GRA. Kitchen Sync has earned 437.30 GreenPoints — the most of any independently owned restaurant — and has implemented 72 environmental steps. Some of those steps include on-site renewable energy, on-site food production (rooftop garden), use of reused/salvaged building materials, no bottled waters, and using only 100 percent compostable single-use service products such as straws and take-out containers.

One for Adults and one for Children with Fantastic, “Spooktacular” Prizes! Visit greenvillesymphony.org for contest details.

ICYMI from UBJ: Caviar & Bananas new ownership The now-previous owners of Caviar & Bananas Greenville, Kris and Margaret Furniss, released a statement Oct. 6 saying they no longer own the Charleston-based restaurant and bodega’s location at 1 N. Laurens St., Greenville. The Furnisses will, however, retain the original Market Street Charleston location. Other Caviar & Bananas restaurants under the new ownership are a second Charleston location as well as a location in the Charleston Airport. The Nashville location closed June 29, but will be reopening, according to a Craigslist ad for employees. New York City-based Feenix Venture Partners, a venture capital firm, now lists Caviar & Bananas as a partner on its website and no word yet if this ownership switcheroo means any changes for the Greenville location. A phone number registered to Blake Anthony of The Eleven Group is listed with the Nashville Craigslist ad. “It is a bittersweet day for us as we announce that after 10 amazing years we are passing the torch of Caviar & Bananas on to a new set of inspired leaders to see it in to its next phase. We are so grateful to all of those that we have been able to serve and to all of our employees for their hard work and support through the years and in letting us build our dream in to a reality. We are excited for what this change means for the future of C&B. The Market Street location will remain in the hands of the original ownership,” Margaret Furniss said.

Tickets: 864-467-3000 or purchase online: greenvillesymphony.org

Thanks to our Sponsors: Thanks to our Sponsors: “Who You Gonna Call Sponsor”

“Slimer Sponsor” THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS!

“Who You Gonna Call Sponsor”

Timothy E. Hughes, D.M.D

“Slimer Sponsor”

Timothy E. D.M.D D.M.D. Timothy E.Hughes, Hughes,


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OCT. 12

Plasma Wave Records presents Ambient Rave 2018

The Artistry Gallery and Workshops, 12 Andrews St.

7 p.m. | $5 donation suggested The term “ambient rave” is a deliberate contradiction, one designed to provoke further inquiry. It’s also a term that electronic music producer and event organizer Christoph Kupernikus created to let people know that this isn’t your typical frenzied techno dance-a-thon. Instead, it’s six experimental electronic music performers working in genres like industrial, ambient, noise, and chill, creating soundscapes instead of 120 beats-per-minute marathons. “I’ve been producing electronic and ambient music for over 10 years,” Kupernikus says, “and the problem in Greenville is that, though we have a very vibrant overall music scene, we’ve never had a very vibrant ambient or experimental music scene. We always had to go out of town to Asheville or Atlanta or Athens [Georgia] to perform, either because the right venue wasn’t available or there weren’t enough people interested. I finally came to the point where I said enough is enough. If you want to have scene, you have to get it started yourself.” After partnering with The Artistry Gallery and Workshops, Kupernikus curated a show that will be a feast for multiple senses. “We will have constant projections on the stage while the music is performed,” he says. “It will be a great experience because of the variety of sounds and sights.”

FRIDAY | OCT. 12 ‘Five Languages, Three Pianos! One Man!’ ■■ 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m. ■■ Carolina Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St. ■■ $5 – $15 Michael Tsalka is keeping the program secret, but it is entirely possible that he’ll move from piano to piano, piano to forte piano, forte piano to harpsichord. LatinosUnited Black & White signature event ■■ 8 p.m.-11:45 p.m. ■■ Zen, 924 S. Main St. ■■ $30 Guests can celebrate LatinosUnited’s annual signature event and help raise funds for scholarships for the community. The event features a dance show, silent auction, raffles, free appetizers, light refreshments, cash bar, and music from DJ Jam. Guests should wear black and white to go along with the theme of the party.

This month, Meals on Wheels of Greenville celebrates 50 years of providing meals and hope to the homebound in Greenville County.

And it’s all because of you. Since 1968, you have volunteered your time, donated your resources and referred neighbors in need. We wouldn’t be here without you. On behalf of our board of directors, staff and homebound clients, thank you.

Help us care for our neighbors for years to come by getting involved today.

www.MealsonWheelsGreenville.org meals@mowgvl.org | 864.233.6565 A friend to the homebound since 1968.

SATURDAY | OCT. 13 The Greenville Council of Garden Clubs annual Fall Festival and Plant Sale ■■ 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ■■ The Kilgore-Lewis Home, 560 N. Academy St. ■■ Free The Greenville Council of Garden Clubs will host its annual Fall Festival and Plant Sale at the historic KilgoreLewis Home to benefit the maintenance of the home and grounds for the Greenville community. The council will sell pass-along plants from its members’ gardens, and 20 Upstate retail artisans and food vendors will be at the event. ‘Sherwood’s Picks’ ■■ First Baptist Greenville, 847 Cleveland St. ■■ $16 Greenville Symphony Orchestra’s late colleague and friend, Sherwood Mobley, loved the Spotlight Series, and over his tenure put together a top 10 list of pieces to be performed. The first Spotlight Series concert will present four of these selections. Secure Your ID Shred Day ■■ 8 a.m.-11 a.m. ■■ Better Business Bureau, 408 N. Church St. ■■ Free Better Business Bureau of the Upstate and AARP South Carolina are partnering together to host

Secure Your ID “Shred Day,” a national event created to promote awareness about identity theft and fraud protection. Educational handouts to prevent consumers and businesses from becoming victims of identity theft will be provided. Individuals and businesses can take advantage of free on-site document shredding, electronic recycling, and practical tips to prevent identity theft. Pynkalicious Breast Cancer event ■■ 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ■■ The Younts Center for Performing Arts, 315 N. Main St., Fountain Inn ■■ Free – $35 The Chapman Foundation celebrates life, survival, purpose, and “Everything Pink” at the annual Pynkalicious Breast Cancer Awareness 4K Walk. The primary aim of Pynkalicious is to raise funds for breast cancer research and survivors, benefitting the Pearlie Harris Center for Breast Health at St. Francis Hospital of Greenville. The Poverty Factor ■■ 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ■■ Messiah Lutheran Church, 1100 Log Shoals Road, Mauldin ■■ $20 The Poverty Factor is an interactive workshop designed to help individual, leaders, organizations, institutions, and communities develop a deeper understanding of the challenges and needs of people living in generational poverty and the know-how to partner with them to create successful outcomes that build healthy individuals and communities. 40th annual Pumpkintown Festival ■■ 9 a.m. ■■ Oolenoy Community Building, 5301 Dacusville Highway, Pickens ■■ Free The 40th annual Pumpkintown Festival will include a parade, 152 arts and crafts booths, music, clogging, children’s activities, and barbecue and other foods. Steve and Kathy Doocy book signing ■■ 10 a.m.-11:30 a.m. ■■ Fiction Addiction, 1175 Woods Crossing Road No. 5 ■■ $31.79 Steve and Kathy Doocy take joy in cooking and entertaining with their family and friends. In “The Happy Cookbook: A Celebration of the Food That Makes


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OCT. 13

Fall for Greenville After-Show featuring Silver Tongue Devils, The Head, Grown Up Avenger Stuff, and The Velvet Devils Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway 9 p.m. | $7

CONCERT

There’s an old line about someone asking a band what they play and the band answering, “Both kinds of music: rock and roll.” And that’s the most simple, straightforward explanation of what the Upstate band Silver Tongue Devils does. They play snake-hipped, groove-heavy rock with loud guitars and a tight rhythm section, and singer-guitarist Michael Miller says that’s precisely what he had in mind when he formed the band two years ago. “I wanted to start a really good rock ’n’ roll band,” he says. “We love big, loud, aggressive rock ’n’ roll; bands like The Who, Slade, Black Sabbath, and AC/DC.” Miller is quick to add, though, that the band has no interest in being a revival act like The Black Crowes were. “We’re not trying to re-create 1972 to a T,” he says. “It’s 2018. We’re trying to add in new elements to allow the music to breathe.” As for Silver Tongue Devils’ appearance at the Radio Room’s after-Fall for Greenville party, Miller says their band name simply came in handy. “They had another band called The Velvet Devils from Greensboro,” he says, “so I guess they just figured the Silver Tongue Devils and The Velvet Devils would go well.” America Smile,” they share favorite recipes, stories, and photos from their family life. Price includes a copy of the cookbook. Autumn Adventure ■■ Noon-5 p.m. ■■ Fairview Water Gardens, 231 Griggs Road, Six Mile ■■ $10 Face painting, food and craft vendors, music, hayrides, a pumpkin decorating contest, a costume contest, and more will take place at Autumn Adventure. Acoustic singer Nathan Melton will open from 1–2 p.m. for The Warcry band, which will perform from 2–4 p.m. Games and some activities will require tickets that can be purchased at the door. Final Carolina BrewHaHa ■■ 1 p.m.-6 p.m. ■■ Anderson Recycling and Education Center, 590 Woodcrest Drive, Anderson ■■ $40 – $55 Anderson’s original craft beer fest celebrates its final party featuring 30 breweries and more than 80 beers. Breweries include mainstays like title sponsor Carolina Bauernhaus Ales, Thomas Creek Brewery, and Quest Brewing along with new additions such as Upcountry Brewing from Asheville, North Carolina, and Edmund’s Oast Brewing from Charleston. There will also be multiple cider and mead vendors. ‘James Gregory, The Funniest Man in America’ ■■ 7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. ■■ Mauldin Cultural Center, 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin ■■ $30 The Mauldin Cultural Center will host veteran comedian James Gregory, who calls himself “The Funniest Man in America,” for a down-home comedy experience. The Grascals ■■ 8 p.m. ■■ Chapman Cultural Center, 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg ■■ $30 Grammy-nominated band The Grascals will open

Bluegrass Spartanburg’s third season. Doors open at 6:45 p.m. The concert is sponsored by WNCW 88.7, Budweiser, the city of Spartanburg, and the Chapman Cultural Center.

SUNDAY | OCT. 14 American Chamber Players ■■ 3 p.m.-5 p.m. ■■ Temple of Israel, 400 Spring Forest Road ■■ $5 – $20 This chamber-music program will feature Miles Hoffman and the American Chamber Players. There will be a complimentary wine and cheese reception to meet the artists. Parking is free.

TUESDAY | OCT. 16 An Evening with Joan Dubinksy ■■ 5:30 p.m.-7 p.m. ■■ One Building, 1 N. Main St. ■■ $10 – $35 World Affairs Council Upstate welcomes Joan Dubinsky, one of the world’s leading experts on ethics, ethical leadership, and responsible business practices. In addition to a leading role in the office of ethics at the United Nations, she has also served as the chief ethics officer for several other leading international organizations and corporations, including the International Monetary Fund, BAE Systems Inc., and the American Red Cross. South Carolina Governor’s Schools information session ■■ 6 p.m. ■■ Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Place ■■ Free The South Carolina Governor’s School for the Arts and Humanities and the South Carolina Governor’s School for Science & Mathematics are hosting Two Paths to the Top, a joint information session for prospective students and their families at the Hughes Main Library, Meeting Room B. This joint information session is designed for students and parents who are interested in learning more about these schools for gifted and talented juniors and seniors.

Homes A Harvest of

THANK YOU!

From The Guild of the Greenville Symphony to our 2018 Tour of Home Sponsors, Homeowners, Guild Members, and Volunteers

SYMPHONY SPONSOR R&D Plumbing

MEDIA SPONSORS

DUET SPONSORS

The Greenville Journal n2 Publishing

Jane & Ian Clarke Corridor Mortgage Group Graham Kimak Landscape Designs IPS Packaging Laurens Electric Roz & Stan Smith Southern First Bank Edna & Ron Thompson

PATRON PARTY SPONSOR Jan Steele Catering

QUARTET SPONSORS Libby & Bill Kehl Pelham Architects The Greenville News United Community Bank

MEMBER FRIENDS

Laura Arnold & Nancie Cheskey Carolyn & Don Beckie Betsy & Kenneth Cates Peggy & Steve Davis Jerry Dempsey Thad Dulin–The Gallivan Group @ UBS Rosa Eisenstadt Julie Fish Sue & Daryl Fisher Sharron & Norman Glickman Peggy Hill & Pat McDonald

Carol & Walter Hinton Janna Kelley Christina & Robert Lowry Ellie & John Mioduski Lillian & Henry Parr Charlie Sabo & Barbra Hyde-White Nancy Stanton Nancy Teachey Margaret & George Wasson Pam & Terry Weaver Bev & Jim Whitten


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AROUND TOWN  PLAN YOUR WEEK WITH THE UPSTATE’S BEST LOCAL ACTIVITIES  |  FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Making sense of Latin American elections ■■ Noon-1:30 p.m. ■■ Ogletree Deakins, 300 N. Main St. ■■ $5 – $10 World Affairs Council Upstate is hosting a presentation by Furman professor Cleve Fraser, a professor of politics and international affairs. Fraser’s lecture, “Power to the People? Making Sense of Latin American Elections,” will discuss current election events and provide insight into Latin American politics. This event is in partnership with Furman University. » Comedian and writer Sarah Tiana comes to Greenville for “Late Night Tailgate” on Oct. 17.

WEDNESDAY | OCT. 17 ‘Late Night Tailgate’ ■■ 7:30 p.m. ■■ Peace Concert Hall, 300 S. Main St. ■■ $35 – $45 “Late Night Tailgate” is a topical and unpredictable live comedy and spirited sports discussion show. Headlined by an all-pro roster of hilarious — and opinionated — comedians, athletes, and pop-culture experts, “Late Night Tailgate” will tackle the biggest topics in professional and college sports, as well as touch upon current events, entertainment, pop culture — and all things incendiary and debatable. “Saturday Night Live” co-head writer Bryan Tucker will provide creative direction for the show, which features Steve Rannazzisi’s stand-up and commentary from a panel including former NFL star Takeo Spikes, and comedian and writer Sarah Tiana.

THURSDAY | OCT. 18 Third Thursday Tour: ‘Art and Artists of South Carolina’ ■■ 11 a.m.-noon ■■ Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. ■■ Free Participants should meet at 11 a.m. at The Salon near the front door for a free, docent-led tour of the exhibition “Art and Artists of South Carolina: David Drake, Jasper Johns, William H. Johnson, and Grainger McKoy.”

FRIDAY | OCT. 19 Gaither Vocal Band Reunion ■■ Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ■■ $31.50 – $85 The Gaither Vocal Band Live! will perform Oct. 19–20. Artists include Bill and Gloria Gaither, Mark Lowry, Guy Penrod, David Phelps, Michael English, Wes Hampton, Larnelle Harris, Gary McSpadden, Russ Taff, Marsh Hall, Jim Mohr, Buddy Mullins, Adam Crabb, Jim Murray,

Bluegrass & Big Band Chuck Nation Bluegrass Band joins the Greenville Chorale to present, “Come Away to the Skies: A High Lonesome Mass,” by Wes Ramsay & Tim Sharp. Along with the Greenville Jazz Collective, the Chorale will feature excerpts from Duke Ellington’s “Sacred Concerts” combining big band jazz sounds with sacred texts.

Todd Suttles, and Reggie Smith. The weekend events include a concert at 7 p.m., and a keynote convocation at 10 a.m. Oct. 20 followed by a concert at 6 p.m. Secure Your ID Shred Day ■■ 9 a.m. -noon ■■ Heritage Park, 861 S.E. Main St., Simpsonville ■■ Free Better Business Bureau of the Upstate and AARP South Carolina are partnering together to host Secure Your ID Shred Day,” a national event created to promote awareness about identity theft and fraud protection. Educational handouts to prevent consumers and businesses from becoming victims of identity theft will be provided. Individuals and businesses can take advantage of free on-site document shredding, electronic recycling, and practical tips to prevent identity theft. Mountain View Bluegrass Band ■■ 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m. ■■ Carolina Music Museum, 516 Buncombe St. ■■ $5 – $15 The Mountain View Bluegrass Band will play music popular not only in the South but across the country.

SATURDAY | OCT. 20 Art on the Trail ■■ 10 a.m.-4 p.m. ■■ Trailblazer Park, 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest ■■ Free “Art in TR” will be at the seventh annual Art on the Trail event at Trailblazer Park. This gathering of visual and performing artists is designed to arouse the

inner artists in everyone. Participants can enjoy local fare from select food trucks and shopping at the Art Market. A series of performances, literary art readings, children’s art activities, and more will be offered. Read Up Greenville ■■ 9 a.m. ■■ Peace Center, 300 S. Main St. ■■ Free Read Up Greenville is a celebration of young adult and middle-grades books and authors. There will be book sales, author signings, panel discussions, and keynote speakers. The day will feature nine panels specific to different themes. Tickets are required. Fall Fest at Carolina Fashions ■■ 10 a.m.-2 p.m. ■■ Carolina Fashions, 400 Bon Air St., Mauldin ■■ $5 – $10 Mauldin and Carolina Fashions are holding Fall Fest, a family friendly event featuring games, spooky thrills, food, a costume contest, and more. Attendees will receive 15 percent off a Halloween costume purchase from Carolina Fashions during the event. Greenville International Bazaar ■■ 10 a.m.-5 p.m. ■■ Upstate International, 9 S. Memminger St. ■■ Free Guests can celebrate international cultures in the Upstate by enjoying crafts and art vendors from all over the world, ethnic food, and the opportunity to meet new friends and interact with different cultures. This is a family-friendly event with children’s activities available. Free admission and open to the public.

Office of Philanthropy & Partnership

Run4Life 2018

Saturday October 20 8:00 PM TICKETS:

864-467-3000 Pre-concert talk with Paul Hyde • 7pm Peace Center Concert Hall Lobby

Sat., Nov. 3, 2018 Caine Halter Family YMCA • Run4LifeSC.org

ghsgiving.org Organizing Partners

Dr. & Mrs. Douglas Kennemore

Platinum Event Sponsor

18-0786UBJ


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AROUND TOWN  PLAN YOUR WEEK WITH THE UPSTATE’S BEST LOCAL ACTIVITIES  |  FIND MORE ONLINE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM ONGOING EVENTS 33rd Annual Antiques, Fine Art & Design Weekend ■■ 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Oct. 12-13, 1-5 p.m. Oct. 14 ■■ Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. ■■ $10 The public is invited to enjoy galleries full of formal and country furniture, fine and folk art, silver, linens, and vintage wares. This year’s special guest is designer and renowned hostess Danielle Rollins. The event is presented by United Community Bank. Upstate Parade of Homes ■■ Oct. 12-14 and Oct. 19-21 ■■ Hartness model home, 3500 S.C. Highway 14 The Upstate Parade of Homes will include nearly 20 homes, built by approved professional builders. The Upstate Parade of Homes will be scattered throughout the region in a variety of new-home communities, including Hartness, a walkable mixed-use village serving as the parade’s signature community. While the event is free, tickets are required to enter the homes. St. Giles Presbyterian Church Pumpkin Patch ■■ 10:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m. weekdays, 8:30 a.m.6:30 p.m. Saturdays, noon-6:30 p.m. Sundays through Oct. 31 ■■ St. Giles Presbyterian Church, 1021 Hudson Road ■■ Free Church members will be on hand to greet the tractortrailer truck, unload the 2,000-plus pumpkins, and open the patch for the season. A wide assortment of pumpkins, minis, and gourds will be available for sale.

A photo prop board will be set up so that parents can photograph their children during their annual pumpkin patch visit. For more than 15 years, St. Giles Presbyterian Church has sold pumpkins in its pumpkin patch to benefit the church youth groups. ‘Lineage: Tom Flowers and Family’ ■■ 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. weekdays through Oct. 31 ■■ Thomas Anderson Roe Art Building, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway ■■ Free This exhibition honors the creative spirit that has grown through three generations and inspired six visual artists, all connected through family ties. Tom Flowers taught art at Furman University from 1959 through 1989. Palmetto Luna Arts presents ‘Muzzarelli-Diaz Art’ ■■ 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Oct. 12 and Oct. 15-19 ■■ The MAC Gallery, 16 Augusta St. ■■ Free “Muzzarelli-Diaz Art” is an exhibition produced by a Latin-American couple in which hope and the search for freedom are a constant. Palmetto Luna Arts strives to foster an understanding of Latino culture in South Carolina.

of Art and the Bob Jones Museum span centuries and continents. For the first time, the two museums have collaborated to present “Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum.” ‘Emerge’ opens at Upstate Gallery on Main ■■ Noon-5 p.m. Tuesdays-Saturdays through Nov. 3 ■■ Upstate Gallery on Main, 172 E. Main St., Spartanburg ■■ Free Upstate Gallery on Main, sponsored by the University of South Carolina Upstate, is hosting the opening a new exhibition by South Carolina artist Leah Cabinum. “Emerge” is a sculptural installation and spatial experience exhibition. Cabinum creates immersive

installations, sculptural objects, and drawings made from diverse materials not necessarily associated with art. ‘Lobby Hero’ ■■ 8 p.m. Oct. 12-13 and Oct. 18-20; 3 p.m. Oct. 14 and Oct. 21 ■■ The Playhouse, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway ■■ $10 – $18 “Lobby Hero” revolves around a luckless young security guard who is drawn into a local murder investigation causing loyalties to strain to the breaking point. Its timely message resonates well with the #metoo and #blacklivesmatter movements.

Journey to the past.

‘Sampling the Old Masters: Highlights from the Bob Jones Museum’ ■■ 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Wednesdays-Saturdays, 1-5 p.m. Sundays through Dec. 30 ■■ Greenville County Museum of Art, 420 College St. ■■ Free Only a few miles apart, the Greenville County Museum

October 12 - 14

downtown greenville,

SC

FALL for TUNES. FALL for TASTE. FALL for TAPS.

Thursday Night Kick-Off Concert

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6:00 PM - 10:00 PM 5:00 PM - 11:00 PM 11:00 AM - 9:00 PM NOON - 7:00 PM

Pre-purchase your festival taste tickets online & in-store at Table 301 Catering and Kitchen or Brewery 85!

for more information, visit fallforgreenville.net

OCTOBER 23-28 GROUPS (15+)


52 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FALL INTO NEW STYLES AT 4ROOMS

AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM Hispanic Heritage Month art exhibit ■■ 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays through Oct. 31 ■■ Hughes Main Library, 25 Heritage Green Place ■■ Free Local Hispanic artists display their work in various media. Cirque Italia: Water Circus ■■ 7:30 p.m. Oct. 12; 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., and 7:30 p.m. Oct. 13-14 ■■ Anderson Mall, 3131 N. Main St., Anderson ■■ $10 – $50 Cirque Italia’s first traveling water show provides an experience where technology and preforming arts are mixed to create a one-of-a-kind show.

home decor, gifts, and designer finds

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Fall Bluegrass and Harvest Market ■■ Thursdays through Oct. 25 ■■ Trailblazer Park, 235 Trailblazer Drive, Travelers Rest ■■ Free The Fall Bluegrass Music and Harvest Market celebration will be at Trailblazer Park. Participants should come early for local produce, baked goods, arts, and crafts from the farmers market. Food trucks will be on site, and craft beer and wine will be in the beer stand. The open-air amphitheater makes for a great eveing of bluegrass. Participants are encouraged to bring lawn chairs or blankets. Israeli Folk Dance ■■ 7 p.m. - 9 p.m. Mondays through Nov. 5 ■■ Sears Shelter McPherson Park, 120 E. Park Ave. ■■ $3 – $10 This five-week class, co-sponsored by Greenville

Parks and Recreation, presents basic Israeli dances as well as more recent choreographies. Greenville International Folk Dancers seeks to build community and intercultural understanding through dance while offering a moderate exercise opportunity. No prior experience is needed, and no partner is needed. ‘Click, Clack, Boo! A Tricky Treat’ ■■ 10:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Oct. 13, 20, 27 ■■ The Salvation Army Kroc Center, 424 Westfield St. ■■ $11 Guests can join Duck, Pig, and all beloved barnyard friends in the spook-tacular event of the season. No tricks, all treats are offered up in this tasty musical. Costumes are encouraged. This event is most enjoyed by children ages 3 and up. Annual pumpkin patch ■■ 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Oct. 14-31 ■■ Abiding Peace Lutheran Church, 401 Batesville Road, Simpsonville ■■ Free Abiding Peace Lutheran Church and Academy will hold it’s third annual pumpkin patch. The church will be selling all sizes, shapes, and colors of pumpkins and gourds. All proceeds will be going to hurricane relief efforts. Outshine homework-help program at CDS ■■ 3:30 p.m. - 4:45 p.m. through Dec. 12 ■■ Center for Developmental Services, 29 N. Academy St. ■■ Free CDS will host Outshine, a program to help cultivate

October 19-21, 26-28 Fridays: 5:30 pm - 8:00 pm • Saturdays & Sundays: 4:00 pm – 8:00 pm

buy your tickets at greenvillezoo.com/boo


10.12.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 53

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AROUND TOWN  MORE AT EVENTS.GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

OCT. 14

Cozy Concert Series featuring South for Winter Brewery 85, 6 Whitlee Court | 2 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

It’s difficult to believe that the Nashville, Tennessee, trio South for Winter have been together for only a year or so. The band (singerguitarist Dani Cichon, singer-guitarist Nick Stone, and cellist Alex Stradal) have created an adept, genre-blending style of acoustic music that seems like it would’ve taken years to perfect. You’ll hear folk, blues, jazz, and gypsy music in what they do, with Stradal’s mournful cello undergirding Stone’s and Cichon’s weaving vocal harmonies through tight, complex rhythms that never become inaccessible. All three musicians credit the trio format for allowing them the space and discipline to create their unique sound. “If you’re trying to make yourself sound large in a trio, you have to stick to your jobs,” Stradal says. “It’s a fun, challenging musical experience; we can be dynamic and creative and expressive while still creating the intimacy and simplicity of three people making musical decisions.” Not that classifying themselves to people who haven’t heard them is easy. “It’s hard to describe the kind of music we do because each of us has so many influences,” Cichon says. “Alex has more of a classical background, Nick has more of a jazz and blues background, and I have more of a pop background. So we have a natural tendency to cross over genres in our songs.” young minds. Students ages 5-13 will be able to attend and receive extra homework help for various school subjects. This is a great way for volunteers to earn hours for honor societies and clubs. Grief Share ■■ 6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Wednesdays through Nov. 21 ■■ Mauldin First Baptist Church, 150 S. Main St., Mauldin ■■ Free Grief Share is a support group for individuals who are struggling with the loss of loved ones. The 13-week sessions utilize Bible-based videos and group discussions to assist participants with their grief experience.

run time is 30-40 minutes. Friends of the Library semi-annual used book sale ■■ 3 p.m. Oct. 26, 10 a.m. Oct. 27, and 1 p.m. Oct. 28 ■■ Merovan Center of Woodruff Road, 1200 Woodruff Road, Suite E2 ■■ Free The semi-annual Friends Used Book Sale has over 70,000 books — mysteries, cookbooks, local history, children’s classics, picture books — as well as movies, CDs, and record albums.

Swamp Rabbit Running Series ■■ 6 p.m. Thursdays through Dec. 27 ■■ Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery, 205 Cedar Lane Road ■■ Free Participants are invited to run the Swamp Rabbit Trail every Thursday. The runners can reconvene at the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery and all participants will receive 20 percent off any food or beverage purchase at Swamp Pizza in the Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery.

‘Wait Until Dark’ ■■ 8 p.m. Oct. 26-27, Nov. 1-3, Nov. 8-10; 3 p.m. Oct. 28, Nov. 4, 11 ■■ Greenville Little Theatre, 444 College St. ■■ $28 This masterfully-constructed, spine-tingling thriller centers around a blind woman who is unwittingly at the center of a sinister plot. A Broadway hit and Audrey Hepburn movie, this classic suspense tale moves from one moment of suspense to another as it builds toward an electrifying, breath-stopping final scene.

‘The Teddy Bears’ Picnic’ ■■ 9:30 a.m. - 11:40 a.m. Oct. 22, Nov. 5, and Nov. 20 ■■ South Carolina Children’s Theatre, 1200 Pendleton St. ■■ $11 “The Teddy Bears’ Picnic” is back by popular demand and ready for a whole new crew of wee ones. Mama Bear and Baby Bear invite participants to join them in the woods to help set up the perfect pretend picnic. Participation is encouraged. This event is most enjoyed by ages 18 months to 5 years old. Estimated

‘The Boys in the Band’ ■■ 8-10 p.m. Oct. 26-27, Nov. 1-3; 3 p.m. Oct. 28 ■■ Greenville Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 1135 State Park Road ■■ $15 Set in 1968 just before the Stonewall riots, “The Boys in the Band” features nine gay men at a birthday party in New York City where the insults flow as freely as the booze. This event will be the Deep South premiere of the new, updated version of the classic American play.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE?

Submit your event information by Friday two weeks prior to publishing date at: www.bit.ly/GreenvilleJournalCalendarOfEvents Events are run online and in print on a space-available basis. Publication is free, but not guaranteed.

fAll

Fest


54 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 10.12.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Revolutions ACROSS 1 Mad crowd 4 Ritchie Valens hit of 1959 11 Artificial waterway 16 Jacuzzi joint 19 LAX screeners 20 Mining stuff 21 “Ad — per aspera” 22 Formal duds for a dude 23 Some Sufi ascetics 26 Server’s goal 27 Actress Garr 28 Was ahead 29 Julio’s gold 30 “Much obliged” 32 Air-cooling vanes 36 Means of telling time 38 — good clip 39 Writer Capote, to pals 41 Steed feed 42 Firestone products 50 Lots and lots 54 Gotten up 55 Technique: Abbr. 56 Feel ill 57 Gloomy 59 — mater 60 Wolf down 62 They succeeded audiotapes 65 “Yipes!” 67 Big lug 68 Ward (off) 69 Alley hisser 70 Ax-wielding lumberjack

72 Dust devils’ cousins 75 Old overlords 77 Lupino of “Jennifer” 78 “Arrow” network 80 Quarterback Dawson 81 Big printer brand 83 Carnival classics 86 Coll. email ender 87 Faint trace 90 Tax 91 “Kidnapped” author’s inits. 92 Choose 94 Paradisiacal 96 Talk back to 97 Planets, e.g. 100 Fill-in worker 103 Tyke 104 Pampering, for short 105 Record player parts 110 Kids hold their horses on them 116 Tile design 117 German city 118 It fills la Seine 119 Et — (and others) 120 “Devious Maids” actress Ortiz 121 What 10 of this puzzle’s answers do 127 Beer barrel 128 See 116-Down 129 What’s often decorated for Christmas 130 “— your call”

By Frank Longo 131 Sooner than, in odes 132 One-of- — (unique) 133 Bleepers of bad words 134 Tofu source DOWN 1 Letters of the weekday 2 Actor Milo 3 Scottish tyke 4 Wee, like Abner 5 Meyers of the screen 6 — Jovi 7 Point of view 8 In a self-effacing way 9 Engendered 10 Ireland’s — Lingus 11 Nile capital 12 Professional org. 13 — degree 14 Soul queen Franklin 15 Beat against, as waves 16 Get up 17 NHL game souvenirs 18 Lines of symmetry 24 Celery piece 25 Loudness knob abbr. 31 Actor Aziz — 33 Like flimsy excuses 34 Expiated 35 Little dollop 36 Shorten 37 Wallops in the ring 40 Create a new digital image of 42 Small battery type

All Adoptions

43 E-address 105 Copier stuff 44 Sci-fi travel facilitators 106 Application 45 Inedible kind of orange 107 Martin Van — 46 Suffix with 116-Across 108 Bridges of film 47 Answer to “Are you?” 109 Rhea relative 48 Teases mercilessly 111 Moms’ sisters, say 49 Give a thrill 112 Cyst, e.g. 51 Conductor Arturo 113 — Island (old 52 Film award immigration point) 53 Jays’ places 114 Give a false story 57 “Girl Code” channel 58 Dramatist Clifford 61 In — (agitated) 63 Bar none 64 Examined before robbing 66 “— a jealous mistress” 67 “1984” novelist George 70 LP players of old 71 Plant swelling 73 Earthy hue, to Brits 74 Explorer Hernando 76 Seeded 79 1940s pres. 82 Hopi abode 84 Speakers’ platforms 85 Ending for Siam 86 Zeta follower 88 You, in German 89 Many laptops 93 British island in Polynesia 95 Film providing a factual report, for short 97 Tax-filing pro 98 Rd. relatives 99 Piece of mail: Abbr. 101 Riddle 102 Highest peak in N.Z. Easy

Sudoku

115 Spacek of “The River” 116 With 128-Across, earn wages 118 Falco of TV 122 DiFranco of song 123 The Rams’ gridiron gp. 124 — -Magnon 125 Ending for cash 126 Abode: Abbr. Crossword answers: Page 16

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: Page 16


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that JSP Fuels, LLC d/b/a 7-Eleven #36824B intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 228 Harrison Bridge Road, Simpsonville, SC 29680. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 21, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Topgolf USA Greenville, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 201 Clifton Court, Greenville SC 29615-5768. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that E A Operations, LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 225 Green Valley Road, Greenville, SC 29617. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 14, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Dream Play Group LLC DBA “Gizmo Bar”intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 245 N. Main St., Greenville SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Upstate Fundamentals, Inc intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER, & WINE at 17 South Main Street, Greenville, SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 14, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that ACE’s Bar and Grill intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 3326 New Easley Hwy., Greenville, SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than October 28, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL; P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

GENERAL NOTICE Case Number: 20180119950022 To all persons claiming interest in: 1994-14`-AlumacraftMV1442-ACBG8164H3941993-15HP-EVINRUDEE15RET-G03297806- JEANNE HACKETT will apply to SCDNR for title on watercraft/outboard motor. Upon thirty days after the date of the last advertisement if no claim of interest is made and the watercraft/outboard motor has not been reported stolen, SCDNR will issue clear title.

SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2018-CP-23-04181 DEFICIENCY WAIVED Freedom Mortgage Corporation, PLAINTIFF, vs. Francisco Mendez; Vania N. Mendez; DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of

your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on August 8, 2018. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.

NOTICE OF PUBLICATION IN THE DISTRICT COURT, JEFFERSON COUNTY Case No. DV-18-900122 Visiting Angels, Plaintiff vs. Martin Peacock; Defendant TO: Martin Peacock, You are hereby notified that on 6/1/18 a Garnishment was filed against you naming Wells Fargo Bank as Garnishee. You have the Right to Claim Exemption from Garnishment. By Order of Publication entered by the Court and notice be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation. Defendant must respond to this publication and make their answer known to the Court 30 days from the last date of publication so that monies withheld by the court can be disbursed to Plaintiff’s counsel. Done this ___day of____ , 20___ Clerk of Court Of Counsel: Karen Schwartz McClure 1609 Richard Arrington Jr. Blvd. South Birmingham, AL 35205 (205) 933-9451

When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

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October 12, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

October 12, 2018 GJ  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.