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IN THIS ISSUE

THE CLEVELAND PARK PLAN • SEX TRAFFICKING: IT’S HAPPENING HERE • SPRING MENUS

GREENVILLEJOURNAL GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM • Friday, April, 7, 2017 • Vol.19, No.14

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BABY BLUES

Marcus King is only 21, but his band is about to take the blues world by storm Photo by Emily Butler


2 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

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EDITOR | Chris Haire chaire@communityjournals.com MANAGING EDITOR | Jerry Salley jsalley@communityjournals.com DIGITAL CONTENT MANAGER | Tori Lant tlant@communityjournals.com ASSOCIATE EDITOR Emily Pietras | epietras@communityjournals.com STAFF WRITERS Cindy Landrum | clandrum@communityjournals.com Andrew Moore | amoore@communityjournals.com Ariel Turner | aturner@communityjournals.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Vince Harris | vharris@communityjournals.com Melinda Young | myoung@communityjournals.com

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NEW SEASON...NEW HOURS! Passerelle Bistro welcomes the return of Spring with a return to our regular hours: Lunch & Dinner: Monday - Friday Brunch & Dinner: Saturday & Sunday 601 South Main Street * 864.509.0142 PasserelleinthePark.com

Photo by Jacob Blickenstaff

THEY SAID IT

“I’D TAUGHT HIM ‘SWEET HOME ALABAMA’ ALREADY. SO I SAID, ‘YOU MEAN YOU LEARNED THE SONG.’ AND HE SAID, ‘NO, I LEARNED THE WHOLE RECORD.’” Marvin King, on the early musical promise shown by his son, Marcus.

“They aren’t kicking our door down and reporting that they’re victims of sex trafficking, so that’s a No. 1 problem.” Shannon Piller, human trafficking investigator for the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, describing the difficulty in identifying victims.

“We want people to slow down and realize they are in a neighborhood. McDaniel is not a highway.” Elizabeth Baucom, an Alta Vista resident, on plans to calm traffic on McDaniel Avenue.

ON YOUR MARKS

3,000 Runners expected to participate in this year’s Reedy River 5K on Saturday, April 22.


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OPINION

Views from your community

Curiosity is the key to getting to know your neighbors and bettering your community By Debbie Nelson and Jonathan Parker

“Curiosity killed the cat” — it’s a simple proverb that many of us heard during childhood. We were often discouraged from being curious to avoid what might happen if we acted on our curiosity. The cat often died. Fortunately, cats have nine lives. No matter how old you are, there is power in being curious. Curiosity is the key ingredient for lifelong learning and the fuel for building strong relationships. And it is the foundation for any worthwhile conversation. Just consider the definition of conversation: the mutual sharing of ideas, stories, and experiences around a specific topic that builds common ground. Conversations are the way humans connect. Yet you will not have a conversation with someone unless you are curious first. Think about this the next time you meet someone new. Curiosity is also a basic tenet of community engagement. After all, how can you truly engage a community that you are not interested in? Community engagement without curiosity is at best selfish and at worst impossible. A lack of curiosity can even establish the many walls that so often divide our communities. Look around us. The ground is fertile for division. Most conflicts and disagreements originate when individuals stop being curious about others’ points of view. This mindset fortifies the walls that divide us since we believe we already understand a person, belief, idea, or choice. We give in to the illusion that we know everything we need to know.

However, when curiosity is interjected, there is an opportunity for authentic conversations and true community engagement. As we lean into a curious question, we will learn more through conversation than we could through a debate. In addition, this approach allows us to put a face, a name, and perhaps a shared experience to what once were just issues, generalities, and opposing beliefs and ideas. Curiosity can provide context and a personal identity to what is dividing us. As Greenville tackles complex community issues, let’s be part of the solution by allowing ourselves to be curious. Instead of inadvertently building walls, let’s tear them down for the betterment of all. Commit to initiating conversations, asking questions, and intentionally listening. You may ask: Will curiosity end racism, fear of opposing beliefs, skepticism of people who look different than us, and countless other critical social issues? Of course, the answer is no. However, curiosity is the hammer that we as a Greenville community can begin to use to break through the walls that divide us. Curiosity is a critical first step to building strong relationships in our personal lives, organizations, and beyond. An anonymous author once said, “The future belongs to the curious. The ones who are not afraid to try it, explore it, poke at it, question it, and turn it inside out.” Without being careless, curious people are not afraid to try the unfamiliar, explore the undiscovered, poke the unknown, and question the unchallenged. They turn the status quo on its head in order to know what could be — not just be content with what is. On April 12, Shine the Light Nonprofit Forums, in partnership with United Way of Greenville County, the Community Foundation of Greenville, and the Hollingsworth Funds, is eager to share the gift of curiosity with Greenville’s nonprofit leaders for our discussion, “Community Engagement: Authentic Voices Really Matter.” The event starts at 8 a.m., and it takes place at the Warehouse Theater. The cost for this half-day session is $85. For more information, visit nonprofitforums.org. There, we will build a wall together to demonstrate the many barriers each of us face when trying to engage folks who are different than we are. With the power of curiosity, we will conclude by breaking through the wall and outlining a future course for building more bridges in our community. Let’s reinvent the proverb “Curiosity killed the cat.” Going forward, consider saying to your children and grandchildren, “Curiosity made the cat stronger.” Now is the time as a community to become more curious, so that we will be even stronger and once again top a list. This time as “the most curious community in the world.” Debbie Nelson is the president of DNA Creative Communications and the founder of Shine the Light Nonprofit Forums and coordinates board leadership training through Together SC. Jonathan Parker is the director of city involvement at Fellowship Greenville and the creator of the Art of the Conversation leadership training.

Speak your mind

The Journal welcomes letters to the editor and guest columns on timely public issues. Letters should include name, city, phone number and email address for verification purposes and should not exceed 300 words. Columns should include a photo and short bio of the author and should not exceed 600 words. Writers should demonstrate relevant expertise and make balanced, factbased arguments.

All submissions will be edited and become the property of the Journal. We do not guarantee publication or accept letters or columns that are part of organized campaigns. We prefer electronic submissions. Contact Editor Chris Haire at chaire@communityjournals.com.


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GRAND OPENING

NEWS

April 14 & 15

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HolyWeek & Easter

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Palm Sunday, aPril 9

Palm Processional of the Children 8:45 AM in the Sanctuary

monday, aPril 10

12:00 noon in Memorial Chapel with Rev. Grover Putnam

TueSday, aPril 11

12:00 noon in Memorial Chapel with Rev. Gayle Quay

WedneSday, aPril 12

12:00 noon in Memorial Chapel with Rev. Roy Mitchell Walk to the Cross at 6:00 PM on the Sanctuary Steps

Holy THurSday, aPril 13

7:00 PM in the Sanctuary Worship Service with Holy Communion Dr. Robert Howell and Rev. Gayle Quay

Good Friday, aPril 14

7:00 PM Tenebrae Worship Service in the Sanctuary Dr. Justin Gilreath and Tommy Sinclair

eaSTer Sunday, aPril 16

8:45 AM and 11:00 AM in the Sanctuary Traditional Services with Brass and Handbells Dr. Robert Howell 8:45 AM and 11:00 AM in Sisk Hall Contemporary Services Dr. Justin Gilreath Childcare is available for all of the services, but not for the Walk to the Cross. Buncombe Street United Methodist Church To Be and To Make Disciples of Christ 200 Buncombe Street | In Downtown Greenville www.bsumc.com | 864.232.7341

Some Greenville County teachers received training in March from the Roper Mountain Science Center on how to view the solar esclipse.

EDUCATION

The curious reason Greenville Schools will start late this year Greenville County Schools will start its 2017-18 school year on Tuesday, Aug. 22, the day after the total solar eclipse, Monday, Aug. 21. South Carolina is one of the 12 states in the country that will experience a total eclipse of the sun. Recently, lawmakers voted to allow schools to start Thursday, Aug. 17, earlier than normal. Some districts have chosen to do that and cancel classes on the day of the eclipse. Greenville County Schools elected not to start early. The district’s calendar committee, comprised of parents, teachers, principals, and staff, were concerned over the timing of the eclipse, which will coincide with elementary school dismissal, and the challenges of ensuring safe viewing during pickup and bus rides. “Opting not to have school on the day of the total solar eclipse provides an opportunity for families to experience this incredible phenomenon together and for parents to ensure the protection of their children’s eye health,” Superintendent Burke Royster said. The district will provide eclipse education at the end of this school year and will post additional information and resources on its website and social media in August. The last day of school is Wednesday, June 6, 2018. The calendar includes three snow days and two half-days. —Cindy Landrum

CITY

Your Greenville City Council candidates Filing for this year’s Greenville’s City Council races ended last Thursday at noon, and all three seats up for election this year will be contested.

Long-time District 2 representative Lillian Brock Flemming, a Democrat, will face commercial banker Matt Cotner, a Republican, in the November general election. District 2 snakes through the city and includes parts of North Main Street, the Southernside neighborhood, West Greenville, the West End, part of Augusta Street, and the Pleasant Ridge area. Incumbent David Sudduth will face challenger Wil Brasington in the Republican primary for the District 4 seat. Sudduth, on council since 2005, is vice president and chief operating officer of the Greenville Health System’s health sciences center. He is a Clemson graduate and a former member of the Clemson University Board of Visitors. He serves on the Greenville Water Commission. Brasington is a former president of the Alta Vista Neighborhood Association and is executive director of the Clemson University Alumni Association. District 4 encompasses the southeastern part of the city that includes Augusta Road, Parkins Mill, the TD Convention Center, the downtown airport, and the Clemson University-International Center for Automotive Research. One of the two at-large seats will also be up for grabs. Republican John DeWorken and Democrat Russell Stall will face off in the general election for the seat now held by Gaye Sprague, who is not running. DeWorken is a Greenville businessman; Stall is the retired former director of Greenville Forward. Greenville Water Commissioner Phillip A. Kilgore is seeking re-election. Nobody filed to run against him. The primary is June 13. The general election is Nov. 7. —Cindy Landrum

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NEWS Traffic calming coming for « McDaniel Avenue Sometimes residents of McDaniel Avenue feel like they live next to a drag strip as cars roar past at speeds up to twice the posted limit. But they could soon get some relief as the Greenville City Council plans to include $100,000 in its 2017-18 capital improvement plan budget for traffic calming measures on the busy cut-through to downtown from Augusta Street. The Alta Vista Neighborhood Association, which has been asking for traffic calming measures on the street for the past two years, bought a radar gun and measured speeds over three days. The average speed was 41.5 miles per hour, well over the 30 mph posted limit. They clocked some drivers going 60 mph. “The only cars under the speed limit were those following a car that was turning into a driveway or another street,” said Curt Hall, neighborhood association president. Part of the problem is how McDaniel is designed.

It’s wide and straight. According to the National Association of City Transportation Officials Urban Street Design Guide, drivers travel about 9 mph faster for every three feet wider a road is. Elizabeth Baucom, an Alta Vista resident, said because McDaniel Avenue is a state road, speed bumps cannot be installed. Instead, plans call for striping and bump-outs between McDaniel Court and around Cothran Street. Near Woodland Way, plans call for a median in the middle of the road and a crosswalk at the stop sign. How much can be done will depend on funding. “We’re trying to make it safer. We want people to slow down and realize they are in a neighborhood. McDaniel is not a highway,” she said. —Cindy Landrum

March for Science rally planned for downtown Scientists and science supporters from across the Upstate plan to march in downtown Greenville on April 22, Earth Day, to take a stand for public policies based on science. The March for Science rally is scheduled to begin at noon at ONE City Plaza. “We need to recognize that science plays a very real role in our daily lives,” said one of the event’s organizers, Brandis Hartsell, president of the Greenville County Science Teachers Association. NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 8

Surf’s Up Y’all! Surf’s Up Y’all!

Making Waves for Haiti Making Waves for Haiti Changing the Tide of Malnutrition Changing the Tide of Malnutrition

Join Us For A Beach Party! Join Us For A Beach Party! Shagging  Low Country Boil  Beer & Wine Shagging  Low Country Boil  Beer & Wine April 22, 2017  6:30 p.m.  April Street, 22, 2017  6:30 p.m. 112 Guess Greenville, SC 29605 112 Guess Street, Greenville, SC 29605 Benefiting Partners in Agriculture Benefiting Partners in Agriculture Fighting Hunger, Educating Leaders Fighting Hunger, Educating Leaders Purchase tickets for $50 each and get more information at Purchase tickets for $50 Surf’s each and more information at at eventbrite.com (Keyword: Up)get or contact Babs Wilson eventbrite.com (Keyword: Surf’s Up) or contact Babs Wilson at 864-363-2200. Sponsorship packages are available! 864-363-2200. 2200. Sponsorship packages are available!

The evening will also include: The evening will also include: Island Drinks, Shagging Lessons, Island Drinks, Shagging Lessons, Haiti Handicrafts and Rugs, and Haiti Handicrafts and Rugs, and a Mystery Raffle! a Mystery Raffle!

Bless your heart. bonsecours.com/heart


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NEWS NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 7

Bob Jones University Director of Bands Dan Turner, shown here directing the U.S. Army Band, is one of nine people from South Carolina inducted into the American Bandmasters Association.

“Our rally is more about celebrating science and less about politics.” The rally is one of more than 300 events supporting the March for Science in Washington, D.C. The official march is a grass-roots response to President Donald J. Trump’s policies that threaten to cut funding for scientific research. “The Trump administration should be using evidence-based research to craft their policies, but they’re not,” said Hartsell, a former earth and marine science specialist at the Roper Mountain Science Center. “We hope that our rally creates civil discourse about what science is and why it deserves funding.” The rally will feature several keynote speakers from research institutions. “We’re trying to promote the research that’s being conducted in the Upstate,” said Hartsell. “But I think the science community could learn how to communicate their research more effectively with non-scientists. That’s something we’ve struggled a lot with through the years, and hope to address with this event.” Hartsell plans to host community building events at Earth Fare on Pelham Road to meet attendees and construct signs for the rally. The first event is scheduled to begin at noon on Monday, April 3. The second event is scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. on Saturday, April 8. Attendees should bring their own poster boards. —Andrew Moore

COUNTY

Greenville County working to develop Veterans Park Greenville County Council has asked Vietnam combat veteran and founder of the Upstate Chapter of the Military Order of the Purple Heart

Doug Greenlaw to form and lead a committee to study potential locations and designs for a Veterans Park in Greenville County. Greenlaw is chairman and co-founder of Community Journals. “This Veterans Park should be of the quality, convenience, and scope of the award-winning Falls Park in Greenville,” Greenlaw said. “The park should be a dynamic tribute to our veterans as well as a wonderful community asset.” The committee will evaluate current parks in all areas of Greenville County, including those located inside municipalities, for the best place for the Veterans Park, said County Council Chairman Butch Kirven. “Several times over the last few years, we’ve been approached by people who want one place with which veterans can identify,” Kirven said. “We want a place where services could be held on Memorial Day and Veterans Day, a designated place that will be a fitting tribute to our vets.” There are several other veteran memorials in the county. There’s a Vietnam Veterans Memorial

honoring 14,000 Greenvillians in Cleveland Park. A Korean War Memorial is located at Lake Conestee Nature Park on Mauldin Road. Cleveland Park is also home to the Rudolf Anderson Jr. Memorial. Anderson, a Greenville native, was the only casualty of the Cuban Missile Crisis. A Confederate war monument, erected in 1891, is located in Springwood Cemetery. In addition to studying and evaluating potential locations and designs, the committee will also consider land development and funding opportunities, Kirven said. In addition to Greenlaw, members of the committee are Stephen Duerk, a decorated Vietnam veteran and former textile executive; Hayne Hipp, co-founder of the Liberty Fellowship; Jason Livingston, a decorated Afghanistan War veteran; Megan Riegel, president and CEO of the Peace Center; Michael Riordan, a U.S. Marine Corps veteran and CEO of the Greenville Health System; and Thom Shea, author and decorated Navy Seal. —Cindy Landrum

MUSIC

BJU’s Turner inducted into bandmasters association Dr. Dan Turner, professor and director of bands at Bob Jones University, has been inducted into the American Bandmasters Association. About 300 band conductors and composers in North America are in the American Bandmasters Association. The association was founded in 1929 with John Philip Sousa as honorary life president. Membership is by invitation only, and nominees undergo a rigorous review of their live concerts as well as a ballot vote by the membership. Turner is one of nine band directors from South Carolina to be inducted into the association since its founding. The conductor began his music career more than 40 years ago. “I never imagined so long ago that I would be able to stand alongside so many amazing conductors and composers from America’s rich heritage of concert band performances,” Turner said in a press release. NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 10

Welcome to the family Muthamma Machimada, MD American Board of Internal Medicine – Rheumatology

UPSTATE OSTEOPOROSIS & ARTHRITIS 864-297-0080


“Largest Cruise-In in the Upstate� featuring

Little Anthony & The Imperials The Contours Jim Quick & Coastline and The Flashbacks April 28, 2017 5:30 pm -10 pm at Blue Ridge Electric Co-op, 734 W. Main St., Pickens, SC Come in a classic car (1989 or older) and $30 admits a carload of up to four! Line-up begins at 2 pm. Gates open at 3 pm for classic cars. Dash plaques are available for the first 400 cars. Proceeds benefit Upstate charitable organizations. For more information, call 1-800-240-3400 or visit online at blueridgefest.com.


Artists in Bloom Ad_GJ_3 Qtr_7.4625x11.pdf 1 3/27/2017 11:39:44 AM

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NEWS A FUNDRAISING EVENT BENEFITING THE GOVERNOR'S SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS AND HUMANITIES

Artists in Bloom

CELEBRATING SOUTH CAROLINA'S EMERGING YOUNG ARTISTS

APRIL 20th, 2017

LOCATION:

TIME:

ZEN, 924 S. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601

5:30 - 7:30 p.m.

The 3rd Annual Artists in Bloom

Presented by the Governor’s

As South Carolina’s only public,

C

will feature music, dance and

School for the Arts Foundation,

residential high school for the arts,

M

drama performances and

proceeds from Artists in Bloom

SCGSAH offers students from all

Y

artwork from students of the

provide scholarships for SCGSAH

backgrounds the opportunity to explore

South Carolina Governor’s

students, bring world-renowned

and refine their talents in a one-of-

School for the Arts and

guest artists to the Upstate, and

a-kind, master-apprentice community,

Humanities (SCGSAH).

fund outreach programming to

while receiving a nationally-recognized

schools across the state.

academic education.

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NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 8

Turner credited his mentors and expressed gratitude for his sponsors for the award. “But always, I have to give first place to all the students I’ve conducted, who have poured their hearts, their talent, their energy, and hard work into music,” he said. “As I’ve found over years of travel, teaching, conducting, and performing in numerous venues, the language of music is universal and it can bridge many barriers if given a chance.” Furman University Director of Bands Dr. Les Hicken nominated Turner. Turner is a tubist and directs BJU’s Symphonic Wind Band. He’s also president of the GingeryMack Music Scholarship Fund. He plays in the Foundation Brass Sextet and the Anderson Chamber Orchestra. Four years ago, Turner received a Citation of Excellence from the National Band Association. —Cindy Landrum

Organizers expect at least 30,000 to attend ArtFields this year.

ARTS

K

TICKETS $100 Sponsorship Opportunities Available

From April 21–29, more than 400 artists from across the Southeast, including 17 from Greenville and more from all over the Upstate, will be represented at ArtFields in Lake City, S.C. Now in its fifth year, the festival has helped transform one of the state’s former agricultural hubs into an emerging destination for arts and culture. Throughout the nine-day event, more than 40 local businesses, from bakeries and boutiques to salons and restaurants, will double as art galleries.

Presented by

TICKETS?

Lake City’s ArtFields to feature Greenville artists

864.282.1570 OR gsafoundation.net/artistsinbloom

For sponsorship information and tickets, visit gsafoundation.net or call 864.282.1570. All proceeds benefit the students of the South Carolina Governor's School of the Arts and Humanities.

Additional activities include talks with participating artists, hands-on arts and crafts stations, a two-day Makers Market featuring handcrafted goods from 30 Southeastern makers, live music performances, and more. Students from 5K through 12th grade who participate in ArtFields Jr., a program designed to bring creative art opportunities to local underserved youth, will have their work showcased at the designated ArtFields District area, and students from nearby colleges and universities are designing functional putt-putt holes to be enjoyed by visitors. “Events spanning from visual art to musical performances to interactive stations like artinspired putt-putt distinguish ArtFields from

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NEWS «

other regional events,” said Taronda Barnes, ArtFields program director. “We have activated the entire community, as we always have, to make ArtFields an immersive experience that can be enjoyed any way the visitor chooses — for free.” This year, organizers expect attendance to exceed 30,000. Both visitors and judges will help disseminate $100,000 in prizes to participating artists. —Emily Pietras

the 2016 election. The South Carolina senator, appearing on NBC’s “Today” show last Tuesday morning, said Nunes, R-Calif., should disclose the source behind his claim that President Donald J. Trump’s transition team was inadvertently surveilled following the election. “If he’s not willing to tell the Democrats and Republicans on the committee who he met with and what he was told, then I think he’s lost his ability to lead,” Graham said. “I think he put his objectivity in question at the very least.” Nunes recently claimed a source had shown him intelligence reports that suggested information had been incidentally collected from the Trump transition team during a broader intelligence probe. Nunes has been unwilling to name his source but did reveal that he had a meeting at the White House one day before he made his announcement, raising questions about his motivations.

Devin Nunes, R-Calif.

POLITICS

Graham says Nunes’ objectivity ‘in question’ Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham believes House Intelligence Committee Chair Devin Nunes has “put his objectivity in question” when it comes to investigating Russia’s alleged interference in

Health Events

Graham said the series of events revolving around Nunes is “bizarre,” but he stopped short of saying whether the House Intelligence Committee chairman should recuse himself from the probe into Russian election interference.

LEAP for Stroke Survivors and Caregivers Mondays, April 3-24 • 4-6 p.m. • Greenville Memorial Hospital This four-part series covers topics like understanding stroke, communication, fitness and nutrition. Free; registration required. Call (864) 455-1028.

“The problem that he’s created is he’s gone off on a lark by himself, sort of an Inspector

Caregiving ABCs April 4-May 17 • 6-8 p.m. • Patewood Medical Campus This six-week series meets weekly and provides education and support to those caring for a loved one with dementia or memory health condition. Free; registration required.

NEWS BRIEFS continued on PAGE 12

Spring Style

Minority Health Summit Sat., April 8 • 10 a.m.-2 p.m. • TD Convention Center This event focuses on diabetes and mental health. Former Clemson University quarterback Tajh Boyd also will speak. Free; registration required. Oral Cancer Screening Fri., April 14 • 1-5 p.m. • GHS Cancer Institute Get screened for common oral, head and neck cancers. Free; registration required. Call (864) 455-5300. Walk with a Doc Sat., April 22 • 9 a.m. • Caine Halter YMCA Join GHS physicians for a walk on the GHS Swamp Rabbit Trail in honor of Minority Health Awareness Month. Free; registration required. Please visit ghs.org/walkwithadoc. To register, for more information or to see a full schedule of events, visit ghs.org/healthevents.

M-F 9-6; Sat. 9-3

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3219 Augusta St., Greenville • 864-277-4180 • ThePickwick.net

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NEWS NEWS BRIEFS continued from PAGE 11

Clouseau investigation here,” Graham said, comparing the chairman’s performance to Peter Sellers’ iconic detective from the “Pink Panther” movies. “The only way this thing can be repaired is he tells his colleagues on the House intel committee who he met with and what he saw and let them look at the same information.” —Andrew Moore

PHILANTHROPY

Rose Ball decorations theme announced The 24th Rose Ball’s decorations theme will be “The Palette of the Rose,” the event’s organization committee announced last Tuesday. “The choice of this theme celebrates not only the many varieties of colors of the rose but also the depth and meaning of such a historic and lovely flower,” said Allison Spinks, 2017 Rose Ball decorations chair, in a press release.

Run (or walk) the nature trails with your dog!

SATURDAY, MAY 6 8:30 AM at Conestee Park $25 entry $30 after April 24 $15 per person for teams of 6+

REGISTER AT GREENVILLEPETS.ORG All proceeds go directly toward building a NO KILL community in Greenville County. For more information contact Paula Church at pchurch@greenvillecounty.org.

Thank you to our 2017 Sponsors:

GREENVILLE COUNTY CONSERVATION DISTRICT

The Rose Ball, known as “The South’s Most Elegant Charitable Gala,” is Greenville’s longestrunning charitable community event and has been held biannually since 1971. The ball raises funds to support various projects and programs that will advance the Greenville community’s “physical, emotional, educational, and cultural needs.” Since its inception, the Rose Ball has raised more than $3.3 million. The 24th Rose Ball will be held Friday, Sept. 15, 2017, at The Poinsett Club. Twenty artisans and designers will transform the venue’s “entrance, hallway, rooms, and a staircase into works of art that illuminate the hue of the rose,” with featured colors ranging from pink and white to yellow and orange. Additionally, more than 4,000 roses, which are donated from local gardens, will

be on display at the event. Beneficiaries for the 24th Rose Ball will be announced soon. For more information and tickets, visit theroseball.org. —Emily Pietras

RECREATION

TD Bank Reedy River Run to celebrate 40th year The TD Bank Reedy River Run, one of the Southeast’s and the Upstate’s signature running events, will celebrate its 40th year on April 22, 2017, in downtown Greenville. “We are honored to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the TD Bank Reedy River Run, and we could not have reached this milestone without the community’s support throughout the years,” said Mike Caldwell, race director, in a press release. Last year’s event drew 2,500 participants, and organizers expect this year’s to exceed 3,000 runners. Pets and strollers are not allowed on the race routes. Race options include a 10K, 5K, and a Youth Mile. The 10K, which begins at 7:55 a.m., is limited to 1,500 participants, and registration is $37. The 5K race begins at 7:20 a.m., and registration is $29. The Youth Mile begins at 7:25 a.m. and is open to runners ages 5–14, as well as any parent who wishes to run with their child. (In that case, parents must also register.) Registration is $10. Online registration closes at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, April 19. Participants can also register at packet pickup on Thursday, April 20, and Friday, April 21, which will be held at Fleet Feet (635 Augusta St.) from 11 a.m.–6 p.m. There is no registration available on the day of the races. Following the race, there will be a celebratory festival held in Falls Park, with live music, food, and refreshments. For more information, including route maps and registration, visit tdbankreedyriverrun.com. —Emily Pietras


04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 13

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

NEWS

Cleveland Park master plan to re-evaluate site’s needs CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

A lot has changed since William Choice Cleveland donated a crescent-shaped, 110-acre plot of land to the city in 1924, a move that led to the creation of Cleveland Park. Initially, the park, much of it along the Reedy River, originally had a Girl Scout meeting place and a nine-hole golf course. And at one time it even had a swimming pool and skating rink. In 1960, the Greenville Zoo opened in Cleveland Park. It housed indigenous animals, including bears, deer, bobcat, foxes, ducks, and prairie dogs. Then came monkeys and chimpanzees. Next came elephants, then giraffes. Now, the Swamp Rabbit Trail is a major drawing card to downtown’s original signature park. Today, Cleveland Park is being hurt by its own popularity. On nice weekend days, even if there’s no special event in the park or at the zoo, it’s tough to find a parking spot. That leaves visitors trying to find a space anywhere they can, lined up on the streets that wind through the park and sometimes turning one of the park’s meadows into a makeshift parking lot. Last year, that situation prompted complaints and an online petition by nearby residents to keep cars off the grass. “All the variables in and around the park have changed,” said Mari Steinbach, the city’s parks and recreation director. “A lot has happened in terms of the neighborhood and com-

Mike Blocker with the City of Greenville Parks and Recreation Department mows the grass near the Major Rudolf Anderson Jr. Memorial F 86 Saber Jet.

munity, demographics, resources, and creek flow.” Enter Greenville City Council, which has set aside $165,000 to craft a master plan for the park in its proposed 2017-18 capital improvement plan budget. The budget is expected to be approved in May. The master plan will look at how individual spaces in the park perform and whether any changes need to be made to meet the recreation needs of a new generation, Steinbach said. It will also address vehicular and pedestrian flow and parking.

“We would be amiss if we looked at a single element such as congestion in the park and just addressed that,” she said. “We have to look at the effects of the water of the Reedy River on the park and the park’s effects on the water.” The study will also have to look at how the continued expansion of the Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail will affect Cleveland Park, Falls Park, and the new City Park. “We have to look at the totality of the parks,” she said. Recreation trends affect how people use parks, Steinbach said. Parks started as playgrounds, then in the 1960s the popularity of adult softball and youth baseball exploded. In the 1970s and ’80s, there was a surge in tennis play. The 1980s saw the growth of soccer. Today, the popular sport may be lacrosse, she said. “The number of folks participating in sports changes from generation to generation and sometimes within a decade,” she said. In addition to the congestion problem, the master plan study will consider the way people are using the spaces within the park and development that has occurred at either end of the park, Steinbach said. It will also consider the zoo master plan approved a few years ago. Steinbach said the Cleveland Park master plan will tie into an eventual comprehensive parks and recreation master plan that ensures that Greenville is keeping current on trends and makes sure the city can take care of its parks and recreation assets.


14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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NEWS

Greenville Memorial unlikely to lose Medicare money following warning MELINDA YOUNG | CONTRIBUTOR

myoung@communityjournals.com

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Neither the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nor the Greenville Health System expect Greenville Memorial Hospital to lose Medicare and Medicaid funds. Last week, CMS published a legal notice in the Greenville News, stating that Greenville Memorial was not in compliance with regulations and CMS would no longer make payments to the hospital for Medicare patients admitted after April 16, 2017. Greenville Memorial also could lose its Medicaid funding. The notice applies only to Greenville Memorial and not to the other health care entities that comprise the Greenville Health System (GHS), the Upstate’s largest such organization. “We do not believe there will be any interruption in services to Medicare patients at Greenville Memorial,” says Dr. Scott M. Sasser, chair of emergency medicine for GHS. “We’re absolutely confident we can do the plan of action in time for the deadline. We’ll look for anything we can to serve our patients.” Sasser added, “I’m very confident in our team.” April Washington, CMS public affairs officer for Region IV, points out that it’s unlikely Greenville Memorial will lose future Medicare money. “In most cases, hospitals take the necessary steps to correct their deficiencies,” Washington says. It is exceedingly rare for CMS to pull Medicare/Medicaid funding from a hospital, Washington says. More commonly, hospitals receive an “immediate jeopardy” compliance finding, which is what Greenville Memorial received in three general areas: governance, nursing services, and patient rights. Greenville Memorial had until April 3 to submit a plan explaining how the hospital will correct the problems. “The hospital has an opportunity to file their plan with us and tell us how they’ll correct their process or deficiencies,” Washington says. According to Sasser, the hospital has already developed an appropriate action plan and initiated most parts, a move that includes strengthening clinical documentation processes related to patient care, in-

Greenville Memorial

creasing staffing, and providing employees with more intensive training. Following the recent asphyxiation death of a man in the emergency room of Greenville Memorial Hospital, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) visited and surveyed the hospital’s emergency room. CMS reportedly found compliance problems. CMS cited Greenville Memorial for its “failure to perform a safe takedown hold while applying four-point restraints and administering an injection,” says Washington, who did not know what medication was injected. Washington and Sasser could not confirm earlier news reports that the survey was a response to the death of 48-year-old Donald Keith Smith of Greenville, a man who died at Greenville Memorial Hospital from asphyxiation following a struggle with guards. Keith’s death was ruled a homicide by the Greenville County Coroner’s office, according to reports. Greenville Memorial voluntarily filed a report with CMS and the S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), a move that led to the survey. Hospitals are routinely cited by CMS for failing to comply with regulations. For the fourth quarter of 2016, there were 170 hospitals that had findings related to governance, 298 with patient rights findings, and 169 with nursing services findings, Other hospitals that recently were given an immediate jeopardy status by CMS include the University of Minnesota Medical Center, where a 13-year-old patient ran away from a psychiatric ward, and Abbott Northwestern Hospital in Minneapolis. Abbott Northwestern was cited because of a nurse’s medication error that sent an asthmatic patient to the intensive care unit.


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16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

NEWS

Flemming touts record, ability to get things done CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Lillian Brock Flemming knows that as a single vote on a seven-member City Council, she can’t accomplish much by herself. But her ability to work with residents, fellow council members, and the private sector has allowed the veteran council member to get things accomplished. “One person can lead the charge, but they can’t do it by themselves,” said Flemming, who has represented District 2 since 1981 and is seeking another term. “My vote alone is just that — one vote. But as a team, we’re solid.” Flemming, a Democrat, faces opposition from at least one challenger. Commercial banker Matt Cotner will run for the District 2 seat as a Republican. District 2 snakes its way through the city, touching three other districts, and includes parts of North Main Street, the Southernside neighborhood, West Greenville, the West End, part of Augusta Street, and the Pleasant Ridge area. Flemming said she’s proven she can get things done during her time on council, the most recent examples being her spearheading the effort to get City Council to earmark money for affordable housing and City Park, the massive park planned for west of downtown. “The new park is something we’ve been working on for a long time and it is much needed,” said Flemming, who pushed for

council to earmark up to $2 million per year in tourism tax money for 20 years to pay for the park. “It’s important that it be a true park of its own, not just an extension of Cleveland Park. It needs to be a new entity that has its own feel and look.” More money for affordable housing is key, too, especially in District 2, which has felt the effects of downtown’s rapid residential development. Lillian Brock Flemming “Greenville’s not unlike hundreds of other cities where private investors look for opportunities, normally upscale housing. It can change the demographics of a neighborhood,” she said. “We have to make sure Greenville is a city in which people of all incomes can live.” One way would be through inclusionary zoning, Flemming said. The city is pushing for the state legislature to pass legislation that would allow municipalities to offer developers in-

centives such as increased density for putting affordable housing units in their developments or contributing to a fund that would be used to build affordable units elsewhere. Other issues facing the city are improving the quality of the Reedy River, one of the main reasons for City Council’s decision to move the public works complex on Hudson Street and turn the area into a park, and paying the increased costs of employee insurance and retirement plans. In addition, she said, the city must be smart about growth. Programs to help low-income homeowners stay in their homes are just as important as programs to increase the number of affordable housing units. “I’m accessible, dependable, and have great knowledge of the community and its assets. I know the history of why some things work the way they do,” she said. “I find out what the people want and don’t assume I know. I’m a community servant.” Flemming is an employment recruiter and former teacher for the Greenville County School District. She attended Furman University, where she was one of the university’s first African-American students, and earned her bachelor’s and master’s degree in education.

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04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 17

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INTRODUCING

THE

MARCUS KING BAND FROM HOMETOWN FAVORITES TO NATIONAL BLUES SUPERSTARS

WORDS BY VINCENT HARRIS Photo by Emily Butler

M

arvin King had been to a lot of places and seen a lot of things by the time he became a father at age 40. Before moving to Greenville, he spent his childhood in Germany where he watched Jimi Hendrix take Europe by storm. Marvin’s father was country guitarist Bill King, who played with Johnny Cash and a host of other big stars. Like father, like son, Marvin grew up to become an incredibly skilled blues-rock guitarist and landed two different record deals with Polydor and Capitol in the ’80s and ’90s. But in addition to all of those great memories, he still very clearly remembers the day that he came home from work and his young son, Marcus, not yet 10 years old, proudly told him he’d learned to play an entire Lynyrd Skynyrd album on guitar.

Marvin had only recently bought his son his own Fender Squier Stratocaster electric guitar, mostly because he couldn’t keep the boy away from his own six-string. “I’d taught him ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ already,” Marvin says, “So I said, ‘You mean you learned the song.’ And he said, ‘No, I learned the whole record.’ He’d learned the whole album in a day, just playing along with it. He had an incredible ear. He was improving by the millisecond.”

GROWING UP IN MUSIC

That level of passion was clear from the second King picked up a plastic toy guitar when he was in diapers, and it’s fueled him for most of his 21 years. Marcus has said before that when he was bad as a child, his dad would tell him that he could either get a spanking or have his guitar taken away. He picked the spanking every time. “My dad would go to work and leave me with his music collection and I’d go through it,” he says. “I loved the Allman Brothers; he put me onto them at a really early age. I loved Stevie Ray Vaughan and B.B. King. I loved Johnny Winter. I would also get into the early Skynyrd stuff, with Ed King, Allen Collins, and Gary Rossington playing guitars.” As Marcus moved into his teens, he developed an incredible feel, control, and tone. His solos were blistering and dazzling displays, almost as dazzling as the sight of a 13- or 14-year-old standing on stage with veteran musicians, blazing away at clubs he technically wasn’t old enough to get into as a customer. That’s where keyboard player Matt Jennings first saw Marcus — onstage at the now-defunct Brown Street Club in downtown Greenville. “I don’t know if it was him sitting in with his dad’s band or him sitting in with Gypsy Souls, or some other concoction,” Jennings says. “I’d already had a couple of folks telling me, ‘Man, you gotta see this

kid sitting in and killing it,’ and I finally did. I know I didn’t get out there til 11:30 or so, and I remember thinking, ‘Isn’t it past this guy’s bedtime?’ But he was ripping from the first moment I ever saw him.” It was probably Gypsy Souls that Jennings saw Marcus with, because the band’s singer and trumpet player Craig Sorrells had already developed a rapport with King. “Marcus started playing with us at a very young age,” Sorrells says. “Around 12 or 13, I guess. We knew immediately that he was something special, because he was holding his own with Shane Pruitt, Troy House, and just about any other guitar player he shared the stage with.”

‘THE CURSE OF THE FIRST RECORD’

Jennings will return to our story later on, but in the meantime, the still-teenaged Marcus was busy forming his own band, writing songs, and aiming to get out into the world. “When I was in high school, maybe younger than that even, I knew I wanted to travel and play music and put everything I had into it,” Marcus says. “And I definitely made a conscious decision at a young age that as soon as I was free to do so, I was going to go as far as I could as often as I could.” King’s first eponymous band independently released an album called “Soul Insight” in 2014, when Marcus was 18 years old. It was a mix of ferocious electric blues, deeply felt soul balladry, and stretched out jams, but in the aftermath of its release, King lost most of his band. “After ‘Soul Insight,’ me and [drummer] Jack Ryan came back home, and we’d caught what I call ‘the Curse of the First Record,’” King says. “That’s when the first record’s done and people start to see, ‘OK, we’re getting ready to start making tracks and we’re not go-


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

DEEP CUTS “Always,” from “Soul Insight”

The first-ever taste of Marcus King on wax is everything a heavy-blues lover could want. A stomping beat, a swaggering howl of a lead vocal, and a lethal, no-holds-barred electric guitar onslaught.

“Boone,” from “Soul Insight”

Another first-album track that shows off Marcus’ wicked acoustic slide chops and points toward the Mach II version of the band with its miles-deep Hammond organ foundation.

“Ain’t Nothin’ Wrong With That,” from “The Marcus King Band”

The MKB’s second album reveals the band’s new soulrevue skills, melding a slippery old-school funk groove, some explosive R&B horns, and King’s pure-emotion testifying on both vocals and liquid-mercury guitar.

“Self-Hatred,” from “The Marcus King Band”

A startling, quick-footed expansion of the band’s sound into psychedelic jam-rock that is at once relentlessly experimental and compellingly catchy. It’s songs like this that display the band’s new maturity and confidence; it’s hard to imagine a track this unusual being on their first record.

“Virginia,” from “The Marcus King Band”

Student meets master as Marcus and producer Warren Haynes trade fiery solos on this heavy, head-nodding blues rocker that wouldn’t sound out of place on a late-period Allman Brothers Band album. Photo by Matt Wignall Marcus King and his band released their first album, “Soul Insight,” in 2015, when King was 18 years old.

ing to be home very often. After that starts to set in, you see who’s really ready to do it. And we learned that our keyboard player and bass player at the time both really wanted to go back to school. So Jack and myself found ourselves without a band.” That’s where Jennings comes back in. “I’d told Matt before that we’re going to play together one day,” King says. “And he was like, ‘OK, sure, whatever.’ And so when I saw him again, I told him the offer was still there.” Jennings came on board, along with bassist Stephen Campbell and horn players Justin Johnson and Dean Mitchell. With the new, improved Marcus King Band ready for action, all they needed now was a break. And they got one in the form of Allman Brothers Band and Gov’t Mule guitarist Warren Haynes. “We were offered a gig at the One Stop Deli [a restaurant located in the Asheville Music Hall venue] at the end of 2015 on the same day as Warren’s annual Christmas Jam. And afterwards, Warren’s manager, who is now my manager, approached us and offered us a deal to work together,” King says. “I found out later that some mutual friends of mine had gotten ‘Soul Insight’ into Warren’s hands and he was really into it. And once we played together a couple times and talked about music, it became clear that he was a really great mentor, and he took us under his wing from there.”

‘WELL BEYOND HIS AGE’

“Took us under his wing” is a bit of an understatement. The Marcus King Band eventually signed to Haynes’ management company, Hard Head Management, which was founded by Haynes’ wife, Stefani Scamardo. Then Haynes reissued “Soul Insight” on his own record label, Evil Teen. And finally, with Haynes behind the board, the band went

into the studio to record their self-titled second album, which was released last October by Fantasy Records. “Marcus is the first player I’ve heard since Derek Trucks to play with the maturity of a musician well beyond his age,” Haynes said just before going into the studio to produce the album. “He’s very much influenced by the blues, but also by jazz, rock, and soul music. You can hear the influences, but it all comes through him in his own unique way. He has one of those voices that instantly draws you in, and his guitar playing is an extension of his voice and vice versa.” “He had an enormous amount of patience,” King says of Haynes. “None of us had done a record for a major label before. Once we were in the studio, he made us feel really at ease.” “Every moment he was there, he was completely involved and 100 percent into it,” Jennings adds. “He took notes on every verse and every nuance of every song. He was so hardworking and persistent and focused.” From the first note of the album, it was clear that the band had reached a new level of skill. Jennings’ miles-deep Hammond organ fuses with the rhythm section flawlessly, creating a foundation of grooves for King to unleash his gruff, soulful vocals, and stinging liquid-mercury guitar solos. Combined with the horns that seem to leap out of the speakers, the band comes off like a vintage R&B revue as much as a roadhouse-ready blues band, and that’s before you get to the laid-back funk or the feverish, frenzied psychedelic rock. All this from a singer, guitarist, songwriter, and bandleader who was 20 years old when the album was released. The critical response was immediate and effusive. Music magazines and websites all over the country proclaimed King to be the real deal.

“King has his own thing, yet analogies to the Allman Brothers Band abound,” wrote Jimmy Leslie in Guitar Player magazine. “With his vocals closest to Haynes, his guitar style like a jazzed-up Dickey Betts, and a tone somewhere between Duane Allman and Derek Trucks, King is that good.” “The Marcus King Band addresses expectations with confidence, panache, and imagination right from the start of this eponymous record,” Doug Collette said on allaboutjazz.com, “firing on all cylinders from the beginning of ‘Ain’t Nothin’ Wrong with That.’”

‘THIS TRAIN IS PICKING UP SOME SPEED’

And the band’s career has essentially been on an upward trajectory since then. The album reached No. 2 on the Billboard Blues Album charts, the band was one of the headliners at last year’s Fall for Greenville, they’ve just made an appearance on “CBS This Morning,” and they’ll be playing Colorado’s legendary Red Rocks Amphitheatre in August. Over the past few months, they’ve played The Beacon Theatre in New York, performed at multiple prestigious festivals, and scored a feature in Guitar Player magazine. “It’s a thrill to be able to access the people on such a large scale,” King said after the band’s March 25 “CBS This Morning” performance. “It’s a blessing and an honor to have a platform to express our minds and souls musically. This train is picking up some speed, and it ain’t slowing down anytime soon.” All this good news is coming on the back of a lot of hard touring, but King says he’s always known what he was in for. “I knew it was going to be tough,” he says. “My dad was a touring musician his whole life, and he told me it was tough. But I was always ready to go. I remember having multiple conversations with him where he asked me


04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 19

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

“I definitely made a conscious decision at a young age that as soon as I was free to do so, I was going to go as far as I could as often as I could.” if this was what I really wanted to do, and he said he’d stand behind me no matter what. I’m ready for any of the challenges that might ensue. And it can be challenging, but once we get onstage, it’s a unanimous feeling that we love getting our music in front of new people and new ears, and seeing new faces every night.” The hometown crowd is thrilled about what’s happening with Marcus, and many of them say they knew it was coming all along. “I used to joke with him about how he was going to go do much bigger things than us, and I would be playing in his band instead of the other way around,” Sorrells says. “He’s a special guy and

Band members, from left: Dean Mitchell, Marcus King, Jack Ryan, Justin Johnson, Matt Jennings, and Stephen Campbell. Photo by Jacob Blickenstaff

I’m very proud to call him my friend and to have been there to see the progression he made as a musician.” “We’ve watched Marcus develop into an artist with a sound beyond his years, both as a soloist and a bandleader,” adds Thomas McPartland, who books bands for Greenville’s Gottrocks venue and saw King play there many times. And how does Marvin feel now, watching his barely-21-yearold son traveling the country, playing bigger and bigger rooms, and standing in the national spotlight? “As a father, I just wanted him to live his life,” Marvin says. “I

didn’t want to push him into music, because it’s a hard life. But ultimately you do what you’re passionate about and what you love. To see him at his age with Warren taking him under his wing, I couldn’t ask for anything better. I told him when he was little, ‘Your dad can only take you so far. You need to be discovered by someone who’s a staple in the business like a Warren Haynes or Eric Clapton. They’ll push you more because they’re your discovery.’ And it’s almost like prophecy. I’m elated.”


20 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

COMMUNITY

A GROWING STATEWIDE PROBLEM

‘IT’S HAPPENING ON OUR DOORSTEP’

2012

206 hotline calls in South Carolina 29 human trafficking cases reported 17 calls from victims and survivors 2016:

259 hotline calls in South Carolina 73 human trafficking cases reported 56 calls from victims and survivors

Local agencies, Bon Secours join forces to fight Upstate sex trafficking

Source: National Human Trafficking Hotline

WORDS BY EMILY PIETRAS

en’s m o W

Health

Iss u

es

Specialize We in

According to Shannon Piller of the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office, one of the main misconceptions regarding sex trafficking in Greenville and the Upstate is the assumption that it’s not even happening here. “Many can’t wrap their heads around the fact that there’s a large commercial sex industry here and a sex trafficking problem in this area,” says Piller, who has been a human trafficking investigator for three years and in law enforcement for more than two decades. The increase in sex trafficking cases in the Upstate can largely be attributed to a combination of its geographic location and growth. Atlanta is one of the worst cities in the country for sex trafficking, and Charlotte, N.C., is consistently within the Top 10. The region’s central location between the two major metropolitan areas, along with its recent population boom, has led to an evolving market. “Within Greenville, Spartanburg, Anderson… people know they can come here and make money,” Piller says. “When we talk to defendants in cases, they tell you Atlanta is too oversaturated and overflowing, so it starts to spill out into smaller towns. Being in between those bigger cities has been pushing it into our town,” he continues. “Traffickers feel more comfortable coming in and out of our city with little to no detection just because of the resources — or lack thereof. The bigger Greenville gets, we’re going to have those bigger-city issues.”

According to the National Human Trafficking Hotline, common venues for sex trafficking in South Carolina in 2016 were hotels and motels; commercial-front brothels, such as illicit massage parlors; residential brothels; and online advertisements. “Most of what we are seeing is through online prostitution. In other words, places … that have escort or dating sections where people post ads for sex,” Piller says. The majority of the cases Piller and his investigators encounter involve female victims under age 18, a pattern that aligns with overall state numbers released in the S.C. Human Trafficking Task Force 2016 Annual Report. Last year, there were 50 charges of trafficking in the state courts, with 36 of those cases involving minors. Out of an additional 28 cases pending in state courts, 22 involve minors. Runaway youth and those in group homes and foster care settings are more at risk for victimization, Piller says. Last year, out of almost 300 runaways in the Upstate, 43 were potential victims of sex trafficking. National statistics report that one in five runaways will be approached by a sex trafficker within the first 48 hours of their leaving. The statistics challenge a common belief about the commercial sex industry: that prostitution is a so-called victimless crime, Piller says. But individuals under 18 years old “cannot legally consent to be involved in commercial sex,” he emphasizes. “There’s no such thing as child prostitution. It’s trafficking.”

In addition to his investigative duties, Piller is the head of the Upstate Human Trafficking Task Force, which focuses on awareness training and education. Last year, the task force held 104 sessions that reached 5,310 individuals, both outside of and within law enforcement. “Even in the law enforcement community, we’re still educating a lot on what the law states and what the law requires to make a proper charge,” Piller says. “We’re teaching awareness and the basics of it, but when we get into the investigations, we’re teaching law enforcement to proactively go after this crime.” But law enforcement alone can’t combat sex trafficking. The Greenville County Sheriff’s Office relies on a variety of partner organizations, including the Phoenix Center for pro-bono counseling, the Julie Valentine Center for victim services, and Safe Harbor for immediate shelter. SWITCH, a faith-based nonprofit that seeks to end sex trafficking and sexual exploitation in the Upstate, closely coordinates with the Sheriff’s Office to provide case management, conduct intervention efforts, and hold education sessions. For Zaina Greene, executive director of SWITCH, the community needs to be educated about the warning signs of sex trafficking. “You’re not going to spot it before you know what you’re looking for,” says Greene. In 2016, the organization held 65 training sessions for 3,065 attendees, and this year they have already completed 34 speaking engagements.

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Alex Garvey, senior vice president of mission, Bon Secours St. Francis Health System

88%

of trafficking victims reported accessing medical care during their trafficking situation. Source: Polaris Project

“Many can’t wrap their heads around the fact that there’s a large commercial sex industry here and a sex trafficking problem in this area.” Shannon Piller, human trafficking investigator, Greenville County Sheriff’s Office Hospital systems also play a key role in detecting cases of sex trafficking, because victims often come into contact with health care providers and staff. According to a study cited by Polaris Project, “88 percent of trafficking victims reported accessing medical care during their trafficking situation.” That statistic is part of the reason why Bon Secours St. Francis Health System has launched a new initiative to train employees to recognize the signs of sex trafficking while forming partnerships with organizations like SWITCH. As a Catholic, faith-based hospital, St. Francis has a moral responsibility to try to raise awareness, says Alex Garvey, senior vice president of mission. “We have an obligation to take care of our brothers and sisters, but in particular we need to take care of the poor and vulnerable,” he adds. “If we don’t be an advocate for those that don’t have a voice and can’t bring hope to them, then we’d have to take a step back and take a serious look at ourselves and ask how we are taking care of God’s people.”

St. Francis initially focused on educating their emergency room staff and other medical personnel working on the front lines, “because they are the ones who recognize the symptoms first,” Garvey says. “We’re educating them to be aware not only of [physical] signs or symptoms but also psychological issues. … There’s a pattern for them that we train our staff to be aware of.” Having health care providers be equipped with this knowledge can help offset one of the chief obstacles to uncovering cases of sex trafficking: Victims rarely self-identify. “They aren’t kicking our door down and reporting that they’re victims of sex trafficking, so that’s a No. 1 problem,” Piller says. “We compare it to domestic violence a lot, if there’s psychological or physical intimidation and they’re fearful of their trafficker.” “There’s a lot of mistrust, believe it or not,” Garvey says. “Even when our medical personnel can sit with them and ask them questions, they don’t know if they’re just being set up.” But by undergoing specialized training, hospital staff will be better prepared to approach the delicate situation of interacting with a potential trafficking victim. “We’re empowering them to do their jobs,” he adds. Throughout the year, St. Francis will continue to work with SWITCH and other entities to offer continuing education and outreach. In addition to spreading awareness within the health care setting, St. Francis hopes to connect with other faith-based organizations, nonprofits, schools, and churches. “We always find our investment in the community is magnified when we work with partners,” Garvey says. “We believe education will be the impetus or the flame to start a bigger fire,” he adds. “We’re trying to create a level of awareness in the city. … We want to make sure people know it’s happening on our doorstep.”

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feast Unfortunately, peaches, which are typically spring and summer mainstays of Southern cuisine, are not likely to have the same prominence on menus because of the late freeze and hail damage wiping out much of this year’s crop in the Upstate. The weather’s effect on other local crops has caused many chefs to rework their menus and some have delayed their release until later in the spring. But, despite those setbacks, the season of rebirth will be well represented in local dishes.

Dive N Boar | Photo by Will Crooks Clockwise: Artichoke Panzanella, Fava Bean Succotash, Mojo Shrimp, Strawberry & Golden Beet Salad

AMERICAN GROCERY RESTAURANT

ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@ communityjournals.com

VEGGIE TALES

SPRING IS HERE, AND THAT MEANS LOTS OF VEGETABLES ON MENUS AROUND TOWN Spring has sprung, and restaurant menus all over town are reflecting the change in season. Some have already transitioned their menus, while others are planning to roll out new entree lineups in the coming weeks. Expect to see fresh peas, asparagus, mushrooms, beets, ramps, mint, and basil.

Chef Joe Clarke has been a busy man, opening up a new bar, Vault & Vator, along with keeping things fresh at AGR. New spring appetizers include grilled white asparagus with a sunny-side-up farm egg, preserved lemon breadcrumbs, and pickled ramp aioli, and cured pork cheek with goat cheese gnocchi, peas, arugula, and mint. “On first glance, pork might not scream ‘spring,’ but he is balancing the meat with the spring flavors of peas, arugula, and mint,” says Becky Tanenbaum of Mise En Place Public Relations, who represents AGR. The rabbit, one of their most popular entrees, gets a spring reboot. It’ll feature confit of local rabbit with bacon lardons, spring vegetable ragout, and Reedy River Farms spinach.

THE ANCHORAGE Chef Greg McPhee is switching things up in the Village of West Greenville, almost weekly. “We’re changing it again

next week,” he said while handing over the current menu. Basically, don’t get too attached to any menu items, but rather, approach the dining experience as a possible adventure. And dine early and often to fully appreciate McPhee’s range of skills, which are starting to garner national attention. Beets, peas, greens, sunchokes, and radishes are starring in his dishes lately alongside Carolina sheepshead (a saltwater fish found year-round in South Carolina coastal waters) and suckling pig, among other proteins. But it’s clear veggies are the star of the menu.

BACON BROS. PUBLIC HOUSE The inspiration for chef Anthony Gray’s new menu that debuts April 10 is the desire to keep things as locally focused as possible. “I want to showcase Greenville across the board,” he says. For example, vegetables are coming from Reedy River Farms, Crescent Farm, and Bioway Farms, among others. Dairy is coming in from Blue Ridge Creamery and Whispering Pines. Rabbit is being provided by the Lazy Farmer, Greenbrier, and Bethel Trails; Johnson Creek and Carolina Heritage farms are providing pork; and chicken is coming from Johnson Creek farms. “I’m standing outside feeling the weather and getting excited about all the veggies,” Gray says. All of these local ingredients will be used to create numerous new dishes, including pork belly bulgogi, crispy pork tail, and rabbit carnitas on scratch-made tortillas. New sandwiches and mains include a hot chicken sandwich, Italian

hot ham sandwich, Red Ranger chicken, country ham-wrapped rabbit, and fried catfish. Also, on the weekends, look for Louisiana boiled crawfish that Gray says has been selling out, and some wagyu beef and dry-aged beef on the menu and specials.

DIVE N BOAR Vegetables take center stage in chef Adrian Carpenter’s updated menu. New dishes include a green pea and mozzarella arancini snack; blistered asparagus with pickled shrimp and smoked paprika aioli; fava bean succotash; and artichoke panzanella (country bread, tomatoes, capers, fresh basil). Larger plates include a strawberry and golden beet salad; crispy frog legs; and duck leg confit with wilted spinach, black currants, soft cooked eggs, and warm chorizo vinaigrette.

(JĪ-RŌZ) Chef and owner John Makkas says his farm-totable Greek restaurant will be adding more vegetarian dishes along with a selection of rosé wines for sipping on the patio.

TUPELO HONEY CAFÉ The new menu rolled out on March 30 is a change for the Southeastern chain. After months of testing and narrowing 70 dishes down to the final 14, executive chef Eric Grabrynowicz is taking some risks with new entrees like organic venison with foie gras dirty rice, small plates like roasted and raw carrots (watercress, hatch chilis, beet juice reduction, saffron buttermilk dressing), and a completely vegetarian dish (cauliflower steak

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feast with chili oil, parsnip purée, quinoa, beech mushrooms, rainbow chard). But he’s also appealing to the less adventurous diner with some playful takes on standard dishes, such as sweet tea-brined and roasted half chicken with a grain mustard sauce. “I want to pay homage to Southern cuisine in a playful but respectful way,” Grabrynowicz says. Grabrynowicz says the restaurant listened to cus-

tomer feedback, some of which indicated the menu didn’t have enough healthy options. “We now have four salads, and we’re very vegetarian-friendly and veg-focused,” he says.

UP ON THE ROOF Chef Eric Omick’s Pacific roots continue to show in three new dishes: mini lobster roll, herb crème fraiche, pickled fennel,

Crystal hot sauce, brie cheese, and Applewood smoked bacon; papaya salad, butter lettuce, goat cheese, bourbon bacon, curried yuzu vinaigrette, and fried onion; and panseared day boat scallops, ahi sweet potato cake, soy sake butter, and spring herb salad.

TABLE 301 RESTAURANTS Nose Dive, Passerelle,

STELLA’S SOUTHERN BRASSERIE MAKES A LIVELY DINING DEBUT

Stella’s Southern Brasserie | Photo by Andrew Huang

ARIEL TURNER | STAFF

aturner@communityjournals.com

S

tella’s Southern Brasserie opened last Tuesday at 340 Rocky Slope Road in the Hollingsworth Park Verdae development without much fanfare, as many new restaurants do to give the staff a chance to acclimate to the new gig. But the low-key opening announcement is the only aspect of the newest eatery from Jason and Julia Scholz that could be described as quiet. The vibe, with hardwood and tile floors and soaring ceilings, is boisterous by design. The decibel level in the Scholz’s first restaurant, Stella’s Southern Bistro in Simpsonville, is actually the biggest criticism Jason hears from guests. But he’s OK with it. “I like it loud,” he said a few weeks before the Brasserie opened. After all, “brasserie” is French for “brewery” — not exactly a title for a demure atmosphere. And by the sound of it on opening night, all of those hard surfaces did their job. “We want to have fun here,” Jason says. “We’re trying some different things, and we’ll see what sticks.” Exhibit A: Wine pours come in two sizes — petite and fun-size. The wine menu features a mix of European and domestic wines, with an expected

the Lazy Goat, Jianna, and Soby’s chefs have new dishes planned in the coming weeks. The highlights from Gina Boulware, director of marketing and public relations: Passerelle is serving a new salad of pickled strawberries and fromage blanc (arugula, fennel, toasted almonds, and honey-black pepper vinaigrette). The Lazy Goat has changes coming shortly that will feature as much local pro-

duce as possible, including local tomatoes, radishes, leafy greens, beans, and peas. The focus may lean more toward dishes from North Africa, Spain, and Morocco. Jianna chef Michael Kramer planned his opening menu to feature more spring produce since he knew that would be appropriate to the restaurant’s opening timing — dishes like the Casarecce Pasta (lump crab, asparagus,

lemon, and chile flakes) and the Acquerello Carnaroli Risotto (asparagus, tomato, parmesan).

Other restaurants to keep an eye on for seasonal changes: Stella’s Southern Bistro Stella’s Southern Brasserie Golden Brown & Delicious Roost

preponderance of French reds. A small, but intentionally curated, draft beer list includes Brewery 85’s Fishin’ Lager, Charleston’s FreeHouse Organic Green Door IPA, and Kronenbourg 1664, a French pale lager. Bottled and canned beers run the gamut, while large-format beers and ciders — 750 ml bottles labeled Beer & Cider For Fun — provide even more variety. The spirits program includes crafted cocktails such as the Brown Derby (Elijah Craig Small Batch Bourbon, fresh-squeezed pink grapefruit, honey), the Selbach Cocktail (Evan Williams White Label Bourbon, Angostura and Peychauds Bitters, sparkling wine), and the table favorite Gingerine (Citadelle Gin, tangerine juice, honey, mint). Also prominently featured is a selection of gin categorized by style (London Dry, American, and Unique and Unusual) and house-made tonic. Garnishes include the usual citrus along with violet, cardamom, black pepper, caraway, and lavender, to name just a few. The beverage program is just the beginning. Chef Jeff Kelly’s regionally sourced menu includes a selection of house-made charcuterie (porchetta di testa, bresaola, rabbit rillettes, chicken liver mousse, and country pate) and fromage, including a Whispering Pines manchego from Mauldin and a Forx Farm Gouda from Anderson. Also, for the gluten-conscious, gluten-free bread is available. Cold starters include two tartares — steak and tuna — and a foie gras terrine with an Asian twist. Chef Kelly also sent out a beef carpaccio not listed on the menu. It didn’t last long. The star of the hot appetizers is the charred octopus atop a citrus white bean puree, with peppers and an olive and greens salad nestled on top. It was as much a feast for the eyes as the palate. The fewer than 10 entrees range from classic French (Cote du Boeuf and Steak Frites) to Asian-inspired vegetable pot-au-feu (roasted corn, kale, shiitake, kimchi, squash, farm egg, soba noodles). A sea bass special came highly recommended. We concur. Shareable sides include petite peas (English peas, lettuce, bacon, pearl onions) and brasserie potatoes (confit fingerling potatoes, raclette cheese, caramelized onions). And of course, a French brasserie menu wouldn’t be complete without mussels and frites (try the green curry) and a burger on a house-made English muffin, topped with bacon jam and Gruyere. Desserts, which we had to decline on account of ordering half the dinner menu, include a crème brûlée, pot de crème, and seasonal fruit sorbet. We will strategize before our next visit. Stella’s Southern Brasserie opens 7:30 a.m. Tuesday through Friday and 8:30 a.m. Saturday and Sunday with a selection of house-baked pastries and a full Counter Culture Coffee program. Lunch will also feature a small selection of entrees constantly changing according to what is locally available. Parking is convenient, as are Legacy Park’s walking trails and park benches, just across the parking lot.

Stella’s Southern Brasserie | 340 Rocky Slope Road | 864-626-6900 Mon. Closed, Tues.– Thurs. 7:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m., Fri. 7:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Sat. 8:30 a.m.–10:30 p.m., Sun. 8:30 a.m.–3 p.m.

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COMMUNITY Our Community

ANIMAL WELFARE

Community news, events, and happenings

CHARITY WALK

Greenville Humane Society announces sixth annual Mutt Strut

Walk MS to host Upstate South Carolina fundraiser

The Greenville Humane Society’s sixth annual Mutt Strut, presented by Papa John’s, will be held April 29 from 8:30–11 a.m. on a 2-mile walk/run course through downtown Greenville. The event is family and dog friendly. This year’s event also features a Mutt Market and an after-party throughout Falls Park. Participants will enjoy complimentary refreshments, live entertainment, and plenty of dog-friendly fun. All proceeds from the Mutt Strut benefit the Greenville Humane Society and the homeless pets in their care. To register for the race as an individual or a team, visit www.ghsmuttstrut.com. To inquire about sponsorship or volunteer opportunities, call 864-235-8330.

Walk MS: Upstate South Carolina will be held on April 22 at Timmons Arena, Furman University, 3300 Poinsett Highway. The site opens at 8 a.m., and the event begins at 9 a.m. The walk is one of hundreds held across the country each year and is expected to draw around 400 people and raise more than $45,000. Walk MS unites teams of families, friends, neighbors, and co-workers to increase awareness and raise critical funds for groundbreaking research. For more information about the walk or to register as a volunteer or participant, visit walkMS.org or call 855-372-1331.

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Students at Sara Collins Elementary School raised more than $1,800 for the Nature Trail Project at next-door neighbor The Washington Center during a three-day change collection event called “Pay It Forward.” The Washington Center serves profoundly disabled children throughout the district, many with mobility impairments. The wheelchair-accessible nature trail will provide an outdoor learning environment available to students at both schools. Submit education news items at bit.ly/GJEducation.

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HOME

Featured Home

Six Mile

2962 Walhalla Highway, Six Mile, SC

Home Info Price: $ 1,075,000 MLS: 1318927 Bedrooms: 5 Baths: 4.5 Sq. Ft: 5,500+ Lot Size: 31 Acres (8.5 acre adjoining parcel also available) Schools: Six Mile Elementary, R.C. Edwards Middle, and Daniel High Agent: Justin Winter 864.506.6387 | justin@justinwinter.com

Extensive and far-reaching mountain vistas provide an incomparable backdrop for this magnificent country estate. Thirty-one acres (with 8.5 acres available by separate contract) comprise undulating, open fields, mixed forest, and two streams. Privately situated from the main road by the gentle fall of the land, mature oaks and impeccable landscaping line the drive to the main residence, where an elegant Georgian exterior houses over 5,000 square feet of luxurious living space. This is finished to an exacting standard and incorporates

five bedrooms, four and one half bathrooms, a cherrywoodlined library, formal dining and living areas, spacious kitchen, media room, wine cellar, and generous storage. Gracious, classical proportions, oak flooring, numerous mod cons, lavish moldings and finishes, and custom cabinetry all exude quality and comfort. Further, a tidy 1,500 square foot guest house with 6-stall horse barn entice with compelling possibilities. This very special and unique property offers an extraordinary lifestyle within a setting of immense natural beauty.

Real Estate News

Coldwell Banker Caine Names February Circle of Excellence Recipients Coldwell Banker Caine recently recognized its top producing agents in property sales and listings from February through the Circle of Excellence program. The Circle of Excellence distinction is awarded to agents within the company’s five offices – Easley, Greenville, Greer, Seneca and Spartanburg – and celebrates $1 million in listing or closing volume, or four units listed or closed. Circle of Excellence agents achieving $1

million in listing/closing volume or four listed/closed units include: Bobbie Johnson-Gould Charlene Panek Charlianne Nestlen Donna Morrow Eva Sandfort Faith Ross Felicia Griggs Francie Little Helen Hagood Jacob Mann Kiersten Bell Mike Dassel

Pat Loftis and Brett Smagala Shelbie Dunn Susan Gallion Tracy Bogie Virginia Hayes Wanda Stewart

Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Celebrates Company’s Top Producers At Annual Awards Event Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C.

Dan Joyner, REALTORS recently honored the company’s top producers for 2016 during its annual awards event. The top individual agent was Melissa Morrell, who was also the top agent in the Morrell Greater Greenville Association of Realtors for 2016*. The top team was The Chet & Beth Smith Group, also recognized as the top real estate team in the Greenville-Anderson-Mauldin MSA for REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 27


26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

HOME : On the market

12 Sevier Street, Greenville 864.282.8600 www.embassy-flowers.com

Cherokee Park • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Weatherstone • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

14 Keowee Avenue · $798,000 · MLS# 1338491

220 Weatherstone Ln · $549,900 · MLS# 1337846

4BR/3.5BA Brand new construction in heart of Augusta Road area! Open floorplan, gourmet chef’s kitchen, master on main. A must see! Augusta St to Cateechee Ave. Left on Keowee Ave.

5BR/6BA Amazing custom home w/walkout basement! Master plus one br on main level! Loaded with upgrades! Amazing storage! Must see! I385S to Exit 27, R@Fairview Rd, R@ Harrison Bridge, L@NHarrison, R@Weatherstone

Contact: Blair Miller 430-7708 Wilson Associates

Contact: Carolyn Irwin 451-9407 Allen Tate

Willow Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Asheton Lakes • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

364 Crepe Myrtle Drive · $500,000 · MLS# 1336251

216 Asheton Lakes Way · $500,000 · MLS# 1337857

5BR/3f2hBA Golf course home w updated kitchen, more than 4,600sf backing to 2nd tee box! View the 3D tour on GreenvilleMoves.com! Woodruff Rd to Willow Creek, LEFT on Crepe Myrtle.

4BR/3.5BA Full brick waterfront BASEMENT home with nearly 5,000sf, master on main and more! View the 3D tour on GreenvilleMoves.com! Woodruff Road to Asheton Lakes. Home on RIGHT.

Contact: Laura Schwartz 630-8970 RE/MAX Moves

Contact: Cameron Keegan 238-7109 RE/MAX Moves

Somerleaf • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Asheton Lakes • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

2 Somerleaf Way · $489,000 · MLS# 1338222

500 Mossy Ledge Lane · $450,000 · MLS# 1339493

5BR/4BA Like a model home with wide hardwoods , 2 fireplaces, designer colors, updated fixtures, & 2 BRs on main floor. HWY 14 to Maxwell. Left onto Brown, right into Somerleaf

4BR/3.5BA Full brick waterfront home with more than 3,400sf, master on main and more! View the 3D tour on GreenvilleMoves.com! Woodruff Road to Asheton Lakes. RIGHT on Mossy Ledge.

Contact: Rick Horne 982-7653 Custom Realty

Contact: Tony Russo 908-7909 RE/MAX Moves

Trollingwood • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Advertise your home with us Contact:

141 Greybridge Road · $439,900 · MLS# 1339258 4BR/3.5BA Lakeside ~3 acre lot w/unique & updated brick ranch home w/full walkout basement! Newer custom kitchen! Near Simpsonville! Wow factor! I385 to Exit29, R@W Georgia, L@Garrison, L@Reedy Fork, R@Greybridge

Contact: Nicole Matthews 320-1837 Allen Tate

Annie Langston 864-679-1224 alangston@communityjournals.com


04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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HOME : On the market Willow Creek • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Snow Farms/041 • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

North Main • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

Coachwood Forest • Open Sun. 2-4 p.m.

654 Driftwood Dr · $414,900 · MLS# 1338237

175 SNOW ROAD · $399,999 · MLS# 1330343

401 Randal Street · $365,000 · MLS# 1330718

49 Prince Williams Ct · $339,900 · MLS# 1334306

4BR/3.5BA Beautiful home on Willow Creek golf course! 4 bedroom, 3.5 bath plus bonus, screened porch, and master on main. Willow Creek, left Sandy Run, left Crepe Myrtle, right Driftwood.

3BR/2BA Brick ranch on 13.7 Level acres! Fenced pasture, inground pool, nice updates! Near Simpsonville or hwy 25! Wonderful location! I385S TO Exit 29,R@W Georgia, Stay Left on Garrision, R@Snow

3BR/2.5BA Great North Main 1500 square foot home. Completely renovated with huge windows for great light. Large corner lot and garage. From Stone Ave turn right on Wilton then left Randall.

3BR/3BA Custom Brick Ranch Home nestled onto 1.5 acre wooded lot near Simpsonville! THREE Car Garage & very private! NO HOA! Woodruff Rd to R@Scuffletown Rd, L@E Georgia, R@Coachman, L@Georges, L@Prince

Contact: Jacki Jesch 674-7482 Wetzel Realty

Contact: Susan Mcmillen 238-5498 Allen Tate

Contact: Davod Auler 404-9546 CB Caine

Contact: Whit Linhares 270-6852 Allen Tate

Parkins Mill

Augusta Road

Augusta Road

Rosedale

75 Stonehaven Drive · $549,000 · MLS# 1340397

454 Longview Terrace · $459,000 · MLS# 1339842

404 Aberdeen Drive · $315,000 · MLS# 1339656

203 Rosemary Lane · $205,000 · MLS# 1340514

5BR/3f3hBA Wonderful and rare opportunity to create your dream home on 1.1 acres just minutes from downtown. Great flooplan offers 5 bedrooms, master on main, 2-car garage, lots of living space!

3BR/4BA Charming home features 3 bedrooms + optional 4th bedroom or mother-in-law suite! Open floorplan, master-on-main, renovated kitchen, 4 full bathrooms, huge fenced yard, many updates!

4BR/2BA Looking for a fixer upper in heart of Augusta Road? This one has a great floorplan already! Large, open kitchen, living, dining, den, office, master on main, large lot!

3BR/2BA 3BR/2BA brick ranch/Eastside. Open floor plan-Hardwoods throughout/new roof/ newer gas furnace/new vapor barrier/new ductwork/new sod and landscaping. Granite countertops, new dishwasher, gas stove top. Kitchen open to den & sunroom.

Contact: Virginia Hayes 864-313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Virginia Hayes 864-313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Virginia Hayes 864-313-2986 Coldwell Banker Caine

Contact: Maggie Aiken 864-616-4280 BHHS C Dan Joyner Real Estate

Real Estate News continued 2016. Morrell, who has been with C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS since 2003, is the company’s top agent for the sixth year in a row. She was also recognized by Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices with a Legend Award for achieving the company’s prestigious Chairman’s Circle – Platinum award for five years. The Chet & Beth Smith Group have been the top C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS team for 15 years and consistently rank as a top team in Greenville and one of the top teams in the region. The team Smiths also received top awards from Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, achieving the national network’s top performance level, Chairman’s Circle – Diamond, and ranking among the network’s Top 100 teams for the 18th year. “I cannot tell you how incredibly proud we are of Melissa, The Chet & Beth Smith Group and all of our top producers for 2016,” said Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices, C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS president and CEO, Danny Joyner. “And to have Greenville’s number one agent and team both representing our company is a remarkable achievement. Our sales associates are the reason we continue to be the market

leader, and we are grateful for their continued loyalty and hard work.” The annual Awards & Recognition Celebration honored the company’s top REALTORS who achieved great success in 2016. The company recognized more than 100 agents and teams for reaching production milestones last year. The top agents for the company were: 1. Melissa Morrell, N. Pleasantburg Office 2. Maggie Aiken, N. Pleasantburg Office 3. Paige Haney, Greer Office 4. Jennifer Van Gieson, Pelham Road Office 5. Robbie Haney, N. Pleasantburg Office 6. Marie Crumpler, Pelham Road Office 7. Anthony Hackney, N. Pleasantburg Office 8. Nichole Moore, Pelham Road Office 9. Jeffrey Meister, N. Pleasantburg Office 10. Twila Kingsmore, Easley/Powdersville Office The top C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS teams for 2016 were: 1. The Chet & Beth Smith Group, N. Pleasantburg Office 2. Spaulding Group, Pelham Road Office 3. The Toates Team, Pelham Road Office 4. The Keagy Team, N. Pleasantburg Office 5. Pam McCurry Team, Pelham Road Office 6. The Clever People, Anderson Office

ANDERSON OFFICE                     Top Teams: 1. The Clever People 2. Sheila Newton Team 3. Amy Tippitt Team     Top Individuals: 1. Mike Stroud 2. Hannah Johnson “We are the market leader because our 3. Holly Gunnels agents are the best in the business,” said Da-   vid Crigler, Executive Vice President of C. AUGUSTA ROAD OFFICE                       Dan Joyner, REALTORS. “We commend our 1. Ginger Sherman agents on their outstanding achievements 2. Cindy Bolt Bishop in 2016 and recognize that their hard work 3. Beth Joyner Crigler is the reason C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS’ 4. Vicki Galloway Roark 5. Amy Ray Thomas success is unmatched in the Upstate.” 6. Anna Hill Miller                                                                                                            Berkshire Hathaway Homeservices OFFICE     C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Announces EASLEY/POWDERSVILLE Top Team: Top Producers for February  1. Sheri Sanders/Gary Thompson/Dara Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Lynn Ratliff Dan Joyner, REALTORS®  announces  the   top producers from each of its residential Top Individuals: sales offices for  the month of February. 1. Carol Houston These agents and teams earned the highest 2. Gary Morris gross commission incomes (GCI) based on 3. Linda Ballard   closingscompleted  February 1 – 28, 2017. February Top Producers Listed By Office:           7. MacDonald Home Team, N. Pleasantburg Office 8. The Sheri Sanders Team, Easley/Powdersville Office 9. The Morgan Group, N. Pleasantburg Office 10. The Greenville Team, Pelham Road Office

REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 28


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HOME Real Estate News continued GARLINGTON ROAD OFFICE Top Team: 1. Ronda & Chris Holder Top Individuals: 1. Jon Ferguson 2. Ed Benton 3. Eddie Burch   GREER OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Jan Walker Team 2. The Shepherd Team   Top Individuals: 1. Paige Haney 2. Chrys Davis 3. Jill Chapman   N. PLEASANTBURG OFFICE Top Teams: 1. The Chet & Beth Smith Group 2. The Keagy Team 3. MacDonald HomeTeam   Top Individuals: 1. Jeffrey Meister 2. Melissa Morrell 3. Maggie Aiken

PELHAM ROAD OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Spaulding Group 2. The Toates Team 3. Pam McCurry Team   Top Individuals: 1. Sonia Carr 2. Sam Hankins 3. Chris Pryor   SIMPSONVILLE OFFICE Top Teams: 1. Cousins & Associates 2. Sandra Palmer & Associates 3. Bob & Linda Brown Group   Top Individuals: 1. John Bennett 2. Diane Dix Shapuite 3. Melissa Robison   “Congratulations to these top performing agents and teams,” said Danny Joyner, CEO, Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS.  “I thank all of our associates for their unwavering commitment to the highest level of integrity, service and ex-

pertise for our clients, month after month.”

Calder And Drummond Join the Pelham Road Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Lydia Calder and Adam Drummond have joined the company’s Pelham Road office as sales associates. Lydia Calder was born in Chicago, IL and moved to Greenville, SC in 2000 when her father started a family business with his brothers. She attended Converse College before returning to Greenville Calder where she currently resides with her two year old daughter. Adam Drummond brings over 12 years of real estate experience to his role with the company. Most recently, he has focused on Clemson and surrounding areas, including Lakes Keowee and Hartwell. Drummond and his wife recently relocated to the east side of Greer with their three young sons,

and he looks forward to helping his clients buy and sell real estate in this very exciting, fast paced market. “We are happy to welcome Lydia and Adam to our Pelham Road locaDrummond tion. They are both well on their way to achieving positive results for their clients,” said Duane Bargar, Broker-In-Charge of the Pelham Road Office.

Paul Byrne Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Paul Byrne as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Paul holds a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration from the University of South Carolina. He has widespread experience in sales, previously working as a Client Director at IBM Corporation and as Vice President of Sales for Pomeroy, Inc. Paul is a United Way Executive Sponsor and has been involved in numerous community organizations, including, the

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Real Estate News continued Urban League of the Upstate, Phyllis Wheatley Center, Greenville Family Partnership, and the Meyer Center. In his spare time Paul enjoys traveling, reading, and playing golf at one of Byrne Greenville’s many courses. Paul is married and has three children. “We are delighted to have Paul bring his incredible sales experience to our firm,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “He brings great insight, relationships, and a dedication to his community—all features that will serve his clients well.”

since 1979 and was previously a broker for Coldwell Banker Carroll & Kasey a brokerin-charge with Sellstate Premier/Blue Ridge Properties, both located in Asheville, NC. Jane is involved in several upstate organizations, including the South Carolina Children’s Theatre and Open Arms Hospice. In her free time, you can find Jane painting, making jewelry, or sharing moments with her five grandchildren. “Jane brings so much wisdom, experience, and grace to our Greenville team,” said Stephen Edgerton, president and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “She understands the market’s many facets and has a unique compassion that will serve her clients well.”

Jane Gray Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville

The Marchant Company Recognizes Agents for Excellent Performance in February 2017

Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Jane Gray as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Jane joins the firm with advanced experience in real estate. She has been in the business Gray

As the Upstate’s “Signature Real Estate Agency,” The Marchant Company is a small boutique business of just 30 agents that is consistently a top performer in Greenville. The Marchant Company is proud to recognize the following REALTORS® for REAL ESTATE NEWS continued on PAGE 31

LOCALLY GROWN Y NDA N SUO 4 E P O 2T

Y NDA N SUO 4 E P O 2T

CROFTSTONE

1031 Summit Drive $294,609 3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms

CROFTSTONE

908 Summiit Drive $239,609

3 Bedrooms, 1 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

ING

IST

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4 Bedrooms, 3 Full Bathsrooms, 2 Powders

3 Bedrooms, 2 Bathrooms, 1 Half Bathroom

14 Parkins Glen Ct $899,607 172 Ridgeland Dr Unit 100 $729,601 N THA . RE . FT MO 00 SQ 4,5

SUGAR CREEK

138 Sun Meadow Rd $519,650 4 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms

As a lifelong Greenville resident, born into the real estate business as a third-generation

AGENT

OVERALL

2016 C. DAN

JOYNER® REALTORS

864-616-4280 cell 864-371-6013 efax maiken@cdanjoyner.com MaggieAiken.com

REALTOR, with $6.1MM+ in Greater Greenville MLS sales volume in 2016, I look forward to helping you navigate your next move.

AugustaRoad.com Realty LLC “GREENVILLE’S HOMETOWN AGENT” JACKSON HERLONG

(864) 313-2520 Jackson@AugustaRoad.com


30 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of March 6 – 10, 2017 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$4,986,500 THE POINT $1,700,000 $1,300,000 $1,154,000 $871,000 $850,000 THORNBLADE $820,000 $800,000 $674,795 $650,000 $580,000 WEATHERSTONE $545,000 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $487,550 WEATHERSTONE $484,000 NORTHWOODS $475,000 STAFFORD GREEN $442,878 WINDWOOD COTTAGES $435,945 $435,000 STONEFIELD COTTAGES $432,448 SILVER RIDGE $419,900 AVONDALE HEIGHTS $410,000 PELHAM FALLS $401,500 LAVENDER HILL $399,900 BATESVILLE FALLS $399,900 SYCAMORE RIDGE $380,000 $375,000 KINGSFIELD $372,000 SYCAMORE RIDGE $370,000 SADDLEHORN $369,044 BELSHIRE $358,075 BENNETTS GROVE $355,000 LAKE FOREST $348,000 WESTHAVEN $326,879 CARILION $325,400 SNOW ACRES $324,523 MILLCREEK ESTATES $322,000 RIDGEWATER $320,120 WATERSTONE COTTAGES $320,000 RUNION ESTATES $316,096 HOLLAND PLACE $315,000 MULBERRY AT PINCKNEY $310,000 $310,000 CHANDLER LAKE $308,650 ASHETON LAKES $304,000 $300,000 STONEHAVEN $300,000 SHELLBROOK PLANTATION $296,790 $292,500 $287,800 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $286,720 $284,500 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $284,403 MERRIFIELD PARK $275,000 CAROLINA SPRINGS $272,500 SOUTHSIDE ESTATES $269,900 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $260,809 BROOKFIELD GARDENS $259,900 MORNING MIST $259,184 BRYSON MEADOWS $254,819 AUTUMN HILLS $253,000 LANDING AT SAVANNAH POINTE $245,000 SHERWOOD FOREST $240,000 CHARLOTTE’S MEADOW $237,500 FORRESTER HEIGHTS $235,000 100 COURT ST CONDO $232,500 ONEAL VILLAGE $230,275 PELHAM FALLS $227,000 COUNTRY VIEW $225,000 ROPER MEADOW $224,500 MERRIFIELD PARK $222,000 HOWARDS PARK $221,030 RIVERSIDE COMMONS $218,298 RAVINES AT CREEKSIDE $217,000 ABLES & RASOR $215,000 GOWER ESTATES $210,000 MCSWAIN GARDENS $205,000 THE RESERVE AT RIVERSIDE $204,900 $200,000 POINSETTIA $199,900 HUNTERS WOODS $199,900 WATERMILL $196,000 REMINGTON $193,500 EAST HIGHLANDS ESTATES $190,000 POPLAR DRIVE EXT $189,000 TREYBERN $185,000 PHEASANT RIDGE $184,000 FORRESTER WOODS $183,000

JTM PROPERTIES LLC OFFLEX ONE LTD PARTN FL SCREP LTD SCREP LTD SCREP ACQUISITION LLC SCREP LTD ORFANEDES KAROL J TRUSTE EVANGEL CHRISTIAN FELLOW FANN RIVER ROAD LLC SCREP LTD GIVENS INVESTORS LLC CAMPBELL BRYAN E (JTWROS NVR INC WILLIAMS ANTHONY C TRETINIK DEAN E (JTWROS) MUNGO HOMES INC ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC WILSON WILLIAM NEIL ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC HINDMAN MARIE BROWN MILLER PAUL URBAN HOWARD P STANWICH MORTGAGE LOAN T KENDRICK JAMES (JTWROS) SCHWARK ALODIA M COX MARTHA C TRUSTEE LITTLE REEDY LAND TRUST NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO SADDLE HORN LLC NVR INC FORMAN RICHARD HAVEN INVESTMENTS LLC D R HORTON-CROWN LLC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL ARTHUR DORIS W (SURVIVOR CARDON BETHANY B (JTWROS MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH FICICCHY TERESA DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL ANDERSON ADAM C WOOD BRYAN D BONIFACE LEWIS J BENNER ALETA K (JTWROS) EDMONDS KIRKLAND M (JTWR PEABODY ALAN M THOMAS FRANK P JR MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH WATCH PROPERTIES LLC DAVIS LAUREN C NVR INC JORDAN DONALD H NVR INC REEVES ALLISON MUNN JASON D TWEED BARRY NVR INC DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL D R HORTON-CROWN LLC MUNGO HOMES INC STANKUS JANA M MOORE LAURA L SCARLETT PROPERTIES LLC YANOVER ALLISON PANGBORN MEGHAN M RICHARDS REED E DAN RYAN BUILDERS S C LL LANDSVERK COURTNEY C ROGERS JACKIE L (JTWROS) ROPER MEADOW WARD REVOC KEEL RONALD D D R HORTON-CROWN LLC NVR INC JACKSON ROBERT O ABNEY CAROL G HOWARD WADE C BARRETT AARON (JTWROS) FAHR DAVID W COOPER AGNES COX MUNN CHRISTOPHER L (SURV CARROLL HEATHER N HILL RASTASHA A (SURV) FLOYD RODNEY W (JTWROS) REEVES KELLEE T 1010 POPLAR DR RXT LAND ARNOLD ELEANORE L AM PROPERTIES AND HOLDIN ALIKHANI TOURAN

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1 AUGUST STREET PARTNERS EAGLEWOOD DEVELOPMENT LL PVG PROPERTIES III LLC PVG PROPERTIES III LLC DAGG II LLC DAGG II LLC JONES LINDA G (JTWROS) EAST BUTLER ROAD VENTURE CHANCEUX INVESTMENTS LLC PVG PROPERTIES II LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC KRUGER STEVEN (JTWROS) KUTCHER EVAN J (JTWROS) GILLIAM REVOCABLE LIVING BENJAMIN FAMILY TRUST WELLS CHARLES W (JTWROS) STORER EDWARD J (JTWROS) CAMNER DAWN M (JTWROS) COWGILL RONALD H (JTWROS YARBRO JOHN F BARNHILL CLAUDIA L (JTWR ANDERSON KERRY LYNN (JTW WILIFORD STEPHANIE A HELMAN MEGHAN PANGBORN ( NEI GLOBAL RELOCATION CO DISTRICT MAIN STREET TR SK BUILDERS INC WEAKLEY MARILYN JANE MANTEN ERIC G (JTWROS) FLOYD HENRY C WHITE RANDALL J HASS HEATHER M (JTWROS) FAHR DAVID W (JTWROS) GATLIN CYNTHIA L HAWKINS EDGAR G (JTWROS) CLOUGH LAURIE A (JTWROS) BRADHAM MARK A (JTWROS) WATSON EVELYN (SURV) MOORE LAURA WRIGHT CHARLOTTE T (JTWR TANCOCK STEVEN LESLIE SPEARMAN STEPHEN T PATEL BINA M (JTWROS) MORRIS CHAD EDWARD (JTWR I & A PROPERTIES LLC PUTNAM JAMES G QUALLS VICTORIA LAUREN N WINDWARD PARTNERS XVI LL GILLESPIE KRISTI REID BACHMANN ZACHERY G (JTWR NATTA MARK K VAN MANCHESTER ALLISON L (JT WOLF LARRY F JR (JTWROS) RAY CLINTON E (JTWROS) PEDEN SELDON T ETHRIDGE TRACY F (JTWROS GOBBETT JOSEPH F JR GOLDSMITH MARCUS ZEIGLER KRISTIN M (JTWRO SMOUSE BRETT D (JTWROS) LEWIS KATIE B (JTWROS) HOLLADAY DAVID MUMLEY ERICA (JTWROS) FORMAN RICHARD (JTWROS) PHAM JEFFREY BROCKLEBANK JERILYN Y SHREVE ZACHARY GRIMES JANET W (JTWROS) GUTBROD KATHLEEN T (JTWR ROATCH DAVID (JTWROS) TALBERT CONRAD LEE BANDARU VENKATA SATYANAR CROWSON PAUL W JTM PROPERTIES LLC KIRVEN CAROLINE C FRY KAITLIN TAYLOR (JTWR NIX JESSE R DIMATTEO KATHRYN JOHNS JOSEPHINE B BARRETT AARON F RODRIGUEZ ERICA E CULBRETH DAVID B JOHNSON DEAN ZHANG MEILANN ANDERSON BARBARA H (JTWR KLEPACKI BENJAMIN D (JTW BOUCHARD ANGELA R (JTWRO

PO BOX 523 33 MARKET POINT DR 1900 W 75TH ST STE 220 1900 W 75TH ST STE 220 1900 W 75TH ST STE 220 1900 W 75TH ST STE 220 104 ANTIGUA WAY 13 NEW HAVEN DR 9820 QUEENSWAY BLVD APT 1210 1900 W 75TH ST STE 220 PO BOX 170248 19 OAKLYNN CT 216 VERLIN DR 5 GRAYWOOD CT 19 WINDSOR DR 126 STAFFORD GREEN WAY 60 VINTON DR 22 CURETON ST 671 PONDEN DR 20 SILVER KNOLL CT 104 STONEBRIDGE DR 461 RIVER WAY DR 100 LAVENDER HILL CT 815 BATESVILLE RD 2707 N 118TH ST 303 S WINGFIELD RD 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 2707 N 118TH ST 19 NOKOTA DR 104 DAUPHINE WAY 89 CLEYERA CT 204 ROCKMONT RD 304 MANSFIELD LN 2 GILLRAY DR 224 SNOW RD 112 MILL CREEK RD 208 IVY WOODS CT 109 TOWSON DR 321 RUNION LAKE CT 511 ROYAL DUTCH LN 210 PINCKNEY ST 111 PENSON RD 405 TEA OLIVE PL 713 MOSSY LEDGE LN 206 WOODLAKE DR 117 TODD CIR 145 PALM SPRINGS WAY 104 W BROAD ST 15 ROCKY CREEK LN 504 TOWNSHIP CT 208 VIEWMONT DR 105 VILLAGE VISTA DR 204 SEABURY DR 214 PHEASANT WAY 100 GEORGIANNA LN 403 FRONT PORCH DR 127 SUMMER OAK LN 405 ASCHOFF CT 30 HOWARDS END CT 14 PERKINS CT 1 RAMAPO CT 127 SCARLETT ST 609 EVERETT RD 233 BARBOURS LN 100 W COURT ST UNIT 3N 11 MERITAGE ST 12 RIVER WAY DR 8 GROVE PARK CT 204 ROPER MEADOW DR PO BOX 49035 205 ELMHAVEN DR 306 CORDAY LN 82 FUDORA CIR 2089 WOODRUFF RD 309 DON DR 217 MCSWAIN DR 14 HESSELL CT 402 N WESTON ST 103 GATEWOOD AVE 200 HUNTERS WOODS DR 331 RIVERDALE RD 124 LANDAU PL 221 VINTAGE AVE 1012 POPLAR DR EXT 117 CHAMPIONS PT 205 WOODBURN DR 109 PIGEON PT

HAMPTON FARMS $181,080 COPE HEIGHTS $180,000 TWIN CREEKS $178,000 HAMPTON FARMS $176,214 $175,000 LAUREL MEADOWS $169,000 WEXFORD $167,000 SPARROWS POINT $166,000 WHITE OAK HILLS $165,000 ORCHARD FARMS BAKER’S GARDEN $165,000 LAUREL TRACE $164,900 LAUREL TRACE $164,900 COLONIAL HILLS $164,500 $164,000 CHARTWELL ESTATES $164,000 $162,000 SUGAR CREEK VILLAS $160,000 AUTUMN TRACE $160,000 CROFTSTONE ACRES $158,396 $152,600 BURGISS HILL $150,000 $150,000 EDWARDS FOREST $150,000 $150,000 $149,900 WEDGEFIELD $148,000 HILL PLACE $145,999 AUTUMN WOODS $145,000 OAK FOREST $144,002 TERRA PINES ESTATES $142,500 HUGHES HEIGHTS $141,500 COUNTRY ESTATES $140,000 $140,000 HUNTERS VALLEY $139,500 BEREA FOREST $139,000 PARIS VIEW $138,000 HADLEY PARK $133,000 DUNWOODY OAKS $133,000 $130,000 WATERS RUN $127,920 FRESH MEADOW FARMS $125,000 WHITE HORSE HEIGHTS $124,000 SPRING CROSSING $118,000 RIVER RIDGE $114,000 RIVER RIDGE $110,000 HILLSBOROUGH $110,000 STANDING SPRINGS ESTATES $110,000 WILLIAMSBURG AT BOTANY $110,000 FRESH MEADOW FARMS $108,000 WOODS AT BONNIE BRAE $106,889 TANGLEWOOD $106,000 $105,445 DOBBINS RIDGE $105,000 $105,000 $104,000 BELLE MEADE $102,500 COTTAGES AT NEELY $101,475 GRACE POINT $100,000 $97,500 HILL PLACE $95,000 VIOLA COMMUNITY $94,669 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $92,880 BELHAVEN VILLAGE@HOLLINGSWORTH $92,880 $90,000 $89,900 $89,900 $88,844 KIRKWOOD HEIGHTS $88,000 $85,000 $84,488 E.A. WOOD $80,000 $79,900 WOODSIDE MILLS $79,500 VALLEY CREEK $75,100 HAMPTON FARMS $74,194 KINGSWOOD $71,400 $68,000 ROCKVALE $67,500 VARDRY-VALE $67,000 GROUP DEV. REGENCY COMMONS $63,000 $62,560 ORDEREST PARK $60,900 PARKDALE $60,000 PARIS HEIGHTS $60,000 $60,000 STRATFORD FOREST $58,597 BELSHIRE $56,056

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04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 31

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FEATURED NEIGHBORHOOD

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Real Estate News continued ing Team of the Month, and Volume Closing Team of the Month

Amanda Laird Joins the Simpsonville Office of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Slayter Riggs The Marchants Miller Properties outstanding performance in February 2017: Anne Marchant & Brian Marchant – Co Congratulated by Seabrook Marchant, Unit Listing Team of the Month, Co Unit broker-in-charge, agents honored included: Closing Team of the Month, and Volume Kathy Slayter – Top Unit Listing & Vol- Listing Team of the Month ume Listing Leader of the Month Valerie Miller Properties (Clint Miller, Barb Riggs – Top Volume Sales & Unit Valerie Miller, Chuck Miller) – Co Unit Sales Leader of the Month Listing Team of the Month, Co Unit Clos-

Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce that Amanda Laird has joined the company’s Simpsonville office as a sales associate. A Greenville native, Laird’s experience includes over 10 years in hospitality, marketing sales and management. During her

most recent assignment, she served eight years as a manager for Brinker. “Amanda’s extensive knowledge of the area will certainly serve her clients well as they make a home purchase or sales Laird decision in the Upstate,” said Matthew Thrift, Broker-In-Charge of the Simpsonville office. Laird currently resides in Greenville with her two young children.


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RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


ARTS & CULTURE JAMI ATTENBERG: THE ANTI-BRIDGET JONES page

No Holds Bard in ‘Something Rotten’ page

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The Return of the Albino Skunk page

39

03.31.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 33


34 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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07

COMMUNITY

Meredith Piper Opening

Textile Hall 582 Perry Ave. 5-8 p.m. FREE The Village of West Greenville’s Textile Hall co-op space will serve as the venue for a special exhibition of local artist Meredith Piper’s work. The Louisiana native is known for her contemporary, creative approaches to a variety of mixed media, including textile designs, oils, and pastels. The evening’s reception will also feature cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, and the opportunity to take home a unique piece of Piper’s art. bit.ly/2nawzfA

BROADWAY AND THE BARD

LITERATURE

Ashley Poston Book Signing at Fiction Addiction

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 5:30 p.m. FREE Cinderella goes to the con in “Geekerella,” a fandomfueled twist on the classic fairy tale. Meet Columbiabased author Ashley Poston as she discusses her new young adult novel, after which she will take questions from the audience and sign books. Wearing a cosplay costume will get 10 percent off any merchandise purchased at the event. This event is free and open to the public, but please RSVP at 864-675-0540. 864-675-0540 bit.ly/2m8IF8z info@fiction-addiction.com

MUSIC

Hustle Souls live in Greenville

Aloft Hotel 5 North Laurens St. 9 p.m. FREE Hustle Souls combine four-part vocal harmony, roaring trumpet, brilliantly voiced guitar chords, and the most creative rhythm section seen in a long time. With undeniable originality, the music pushes the nostalgic sounds from rustic Memphis to soulful Muscle Shoals into modern and refreshing territory. bit.ly/2nHrcqw

MUSIC

Tracy Lawrence

Blind Horse Saloon 1035 Lowndes Hill Road 7 p.m. $17 adv/$20 door Tracy Lawrence sold 13 million albums and scored seven No. 1 singles on the Billboard Country charts the ‘90s, and he’ll no doubt be playing standbys like “Time Marches On,” “Alibis,” and “Texas Tornado” at his Blind Horse Saloon Show. 864-233-1381 bit.ly/2lCo1Mu

MUSIC

Dirtbag Love Affair, Antiseen & The Casket Creatures

Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg 9 p.m. FREE An all-punk triple bill for Ground Zero, ranging from goth-punkers The Casket Creatures and more straightahead loud-hard-fast attitude from Dirtbag Love Affair and Antiseen. 864-948-1161 bit.ly/2lAVPwz

CALENDAR continued on PAGE 42

Jeremy Daniel / Contributing

Somewhat of a rarity on Broadway these days, “Something Rotten” is an original show — not based on a book, movie, play, or other source.

‘Something Rotten!’ pokes playful fun at them both CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

For the past nine months, Josh Grisetti has starred as Nigel Bottom in “Something Rotten!,” first on Broadway and now in the touring show coming to Greenville for an eight-show run beginning April 11, and he’s still discovering references to beloved musicals the writers have tucked into the script and song lyrics. “Literally two days ago, I heard something that reminded me of the ‘ding, ding, ding’ in the trolley section of ‘Meet Me in St. Louis,’” he said. “I’ve been doing this for nine months and I’m still hearing things I hadn’t heard before. But once you hear it, it’s so obvious that you wonder how you didn’t hear it before.” “Something Rotten!” is set in 1595 London and tells the story of two brothers who are having a tough go of it in the theatrical shadow of the great, rock star-like William Shakespeare. The story kicks off when Nick, Nigel’s brother, decides to consult a cut-rate soothsayer to try to beat Shakespeare to the next hit. The soothsayer says the next big thing in

theater will be something called a musical, or a play where “an actor is saying his lines, and out of nowhere he just starts singing…” Nick thinks it’s ridiculous, but the brothers decide to give it a try if that’s what it takes to get out of Shakespeare’s shadow. The result is a show full of Shakespeare and musical references. But audience members don’t have to be Bard scholars to enjoy the show. “If you know Shakespeare wrote ‘Hamlet,’ that’s all the Shakespeare knowledge you need,” Grisetti said. “You don’t have to be a Broadway expert, either. If you have a basic knowledge of musical theater, there are tons of jokes. If you’re a diehard, it’s endless.” Written by brothers Karey and Wayne Kirkpatrick, “Something Rotten!” is somewhat of a rarity on Broadway these days. It’s an original show, not based on a book, movie, play, or other source. Karey started his career as a screenwriter for Disney Animation with credits that include “The Rescuers Down Under,” “James and the Giant Peach,” and “Chicken Run.” Wayne is a Grammy Award-winning songwriter who penned Eric Clapton’s Song of the Year “Change the World” and Garth Brooks’ “Wrapped Up in You.” They batted around the idea for “Something Rotten!” since the mid-1990s. The show opened on Broadway in April 2015. “It’s a love letter to Broadway,” Grisetti said. “People love it.” Every artist, whether an actor, musician,

or writer, competes with their contemporaries, he said. “You have no choice but to compete,” Grisetti said. “But what it does to you as a person or artist is your choice.” Grisetti said Nick is obsessed that he’s not as good as Shakespeare. Nigel, on the other hand, is inspired by it. He doesn’t want to beat Shakespeare, but he uses him as a source to better himself. While Grisetti is more accustomed to playing the funny role, he relishes playing the straight man in “Something Rotten!” “I think when you’ve played both, it helps you understand the mathematics of how jokes are set up in a show. It’s easier to step into the role of the setup man without competing for the attention or laughs,” he says. “If you’re not careful, you can steal the scene and you don’t want to do that.”

“SOMETHING ROTTEN!” WHEN April 11-16, 7:30 p.m. (April 11-13); 8 p.m. (April 14-15); 2 p.m. (April 15); 1 p.m. (April 16); 6:30 p.m. (April 16) WHERE Peace Center Concert Hall TICKETS $25-$85 INFO 864-467-3000, peacecenter.org


The Metropolitan Arts Council (MAC) congratulates the 2016 TD Bank Business and the Arts Partnership Award and the 2016 MAC Award recipients.

2016 TD BANK BUSINESS AND THE ARTS PARTNERSHIP AWARD RECIPIENTS:

2016 MAC AWARD RECIPIENTS:

BUSINESS WITH LESS THAN 100 EMPLOYEES

Erin Godbey and Elizabeth Ramos

MAC VISIONARY AWARD

Community Journals, LLC

BUSINESS WITH 100+ EMPLOYEES SunTrust Bank

PUT YOUR HEART IN THE ARTS VOLUNTEER OF THE YEAR David Ryder

TD Bank has been the title sponsor of these awards since their inception in 2002. MAC is greatly appreciative of TD’s loyal and generous support.

MAC LIFELONG SUPPORT OF THE ARTS AWARD Hurdle Lea

CARL R. BLAIR AWARD FOR COMMITMENT TO ARTS EDUCATION Elaine Donnan

ANN C. SHERARD YOUNG SUPPORTER OF THE ARTS AWARD Jane Harrison Fisher

SMARTARTS TEACHING ARTIST AWARD Kimberly Simms Gibbs

Metropolitan Arts Council . 16 Augusta Street . Greenville, SC 29601 . (864) 467-3132 . www.greenvilleARTS.com


36 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

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SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

APRIL 18

Choreography by Neil Ieremia

CULTURE

Bye Bye, Bridget Jones Jami Attenberg’s ‘All Grown Up’ is a wickedly funny, antisingle in the city novel CHRIS HAIRE | EDITOR

chaire@communityjournals.com

“Ground breaking and shaking, contemporary Pacific dance” – NEW ZEALAND HERALD

HOME FREE LIVE IN CONCERT APRIL 19

Jami Attenberg

APRIL 27 GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!

Zack Smith Photography

If you’ve read one book or seen one movie about the trials and tribulations of a single gal living in the city, you know exactly what to expect. The woman in question is overworked and underpaid. She lives in a strangely large, income-busting apartment. She drinks too much. She’s cautiously promiscuous. She’s lost and looking for something to fill that aching void that is the root cause of all of her trouble. And that something is almost inevitably the lack of having a real good guy by her side. You can call him Mr. Right, Big, or Mark Darcy. It doesn’t matter. It’s all the same. When Jami Attenberg decided she wanted to write her latest novel, she knew she was going to write a city-single novel, and she was going to sidestep all genre tropes and go with something radically different. That novel is “All Grown Up,” and you can think of it as the anti-Bridget Jones. Written in a stark, darkly comic tone of what one might find in a Chuck Palahniuk first-personer, “All Grown Up” tells the story of Andrea, a one-time painter who has traded in the impoverished life of a struggling artist for the white-collar world of financial security and office drudgery. While some might call Andrea lost, she’s not particularly seeking anything. She’s not after a man or a return to the life of an artist. She drinks and does cocaine and makes some good and some bad decisions, which she only half re-

grets and never really apologizes for. Her biological clock may be ticking, but she’s not listening. And even if she is, it’s more of a reminder that those around her have embarked on paths she’d rather not take. All things considered, it makes sense that when Attenberg first decided to turn a series of short stories about a woman watching her friends become adults, she balked at the idea of turning it into a single-in-the-city novel and ran toward another genre entirely. “I wrote like 100 pages of a ghost story and I didn’t know what to do once I got everybody into a creepy house in New Hampshire,” she says. After that project hit a dead end, she decided she wanted to write a story set in 1970s Chicago. That didn’t work out either. “In all of the books, it was the same characters that appear in ‘All Grown Up.’ In a way, I was developing them all through that process, developing Andrea’s voice in that process,” Attenberg says. “I was trying her out in all of these formats, but she was still always there.” Through it all — the short stories, the ghost story, the Chicago story — Attenberg kept the narrator nameless. “It was interesting not to have a name for a character and to spend all of this time with her,” she adds. Eventually, she realized that her character was named Andrea. For Attenberg, the point of “All Grown Up” — and the joy in writing it — had little to do with advancing a plot that took her main character from 30-something, firstworld malaise to suburban, 2.5 kids happiness. The thing that excited her, and which should excite readers, is that this nonlinear story is more concerned with uncovering the mystery of exactly who Andrea is. Something Attenberg believes is very much like our own life stories. “If we were to make a list of all of the important things that happen to us in our life, they wouldn’t be in chronological order,” Attenberg says. “It’s the way life works, in a way.” Of course, when it comes to fiction, an element of mystery is nearly always a plus. “I wanted somebody to read a book and not know what you are going to get. You don’t know how old she’ll be each time you start a chapter,” Attenberg says. “That to me is an interesting read for the audience. It’s playful.”

JAMI ATTENBERG, BOOK TALK AND SIGNING WHEN Thursday, April 13, 7 p.m. WHERE Fiction Addiction


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A Sound Legacy GSO celebrates Sherwood Mobley’s symphonic life VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Sherwood Mobley always had a certain spring in his step, but when he was really thrilled about something, it turned into something else. His wife, Debbie, called it a “bop.” “He had this little ‘bop’ when he walked,” she laughs. “But when he was excited about something, that bop got even more pronounced.” And for most of his too-short life, Mobley, who spent 23 years playing timpani for the Greenville Symphony Orchestra and two years as the GSO’s executive director, was excited about something. He was excited about teaching gifted young musicians at the SC Governor’s School for the Arts, which he did for 15 years. He was excited about the next piece the GSO was going to play. He was excited about dealing with the personnel in his orchestra, no matter what time of day or night they called. “Most people would probably run from that responsibility,” Debbie says, “because you’ve got the different personalities to deal with, but he just loved them. We’d be driving and someone would call and he’d chitchat with them, and only after talking with them for a few minutes about whatever the issue was, only then would he mention that we were headed on vacation somewhere. He loved his instrument, and his goal was always to do his best by it, but from the other side, he loved people, too.” And Debbie says that Mobley was excited about Greenville and the orchestra from the second he auditioned in 1991. “I remember him coming back to Decatur, Ga., where we lived at the time, and saying Greenville was a really nice town and I should come up and visit. ‘I can see myself living there,’ he said. And from the moment he started working there, before he took on the extra hat of executive director, he just loved the orchestra. He thought that the quality was wonderful; he was really proud of it.” Sherwood Mobley died in February 2016, aged only 59, after a brief struggle with an acute infection and cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, a type of blood cancer. According to Andrew Marotta, the GSO’s principal clarinet player, the loss is still being felt within the orchestra a year later. “You’ll hear the same things from everybody you talk to about him,” Marotta says.

(Above) Maestro Edvard Tchivzhel conducts the Greenville Symphony Orchestra. (Right) Sherwood Mobley

“He was honest and caring and ethical and a great man. It was an honor to know him. He loved what he did for a living, he loved his family, he was very religious, and he really lived his religion. He was just a very caring person in all regards and we all miss him dearly. His death was so sudden and unexpected; my heart still aches that he’s gone.” Gone, but certainly not forgotten, especially if the orchestra he loved so much has anything to say about it. On Saturday, April 8, and Sunday, April 9, the GSO will perform a program called “Triumph of the Human Spirit,” a tribute to Mobley that, in addition to two Mozart pieces, will include Gustav Mahler’s Symphony No. 6 in A minor, a work they’ve never performed before. “It’s a huge, gigantic work,” GSO conductor and artistic director Edvard Tchivzhel says of the Mahler piece. “Very dramatic and heavy, with eight French horns, six trumpets, four trombones, and two sets of timpani, which means we have four kettle drums. There will be over 100 people onstage at the Peace Center.” Tchivzhel chose the Mahler piece to honor Mobley for several reasons: the emotions that the symphony evokes in its four movements and hour-plus length, the love Mobley had for Mahler, and the amount of dramatic percussion in the performance. “It very much reflects our desire to cele-

brate Sherwood’s life and achievements,” he says. “Because it’s about the human struggle with obstacles, with our existence and our struggle with fate. And the hero falls at the end, but his resistance and his unconquered spirit is an inspiration for all of us. And it’s actually also a symphony that presents an enormous amount of musicians in terms of percussion, so of course if Sherwood was with us today, he’d be playing in this symphony, which is why I think it’s the best way to pay tribute to this great man.” “It’s subtitled the ‘Tragische,’ or ‘Tragic,’ which is obviously what losing Sherwood was for our orchestra and the community and his family,” Marotta adds. “And within this huge amount of percussion, there’s this gigantic hammer which you hit on big wooden blocks and it creates this dull thud, which is symbolic of how it felt to lose him. It was such a shock.” And how big would that “bop” in Sherwood’s step be if he’d been able to play on that piece? Debbie says it would be huge. “He loved Mahler,” she says. “And when he got a chance to play something that wasn’t played often, but really took a lot of concentration and showed off the instrument, he was all for it. Give him anything people might not be familiar with and he was so excited about it. Sherwood would’ve been thrilled to be in that spot.”

GREENVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PRESENTS “TRIUMPH OF THE HUMAN SPIRIT” WHEN Saturday, April 8, at 8 p.m. and Sunday, April 9, at 3 p.m. WHERE Peace Center, 101 W. Broad St. TICKETS $18–$69 INFO 864-467-3000, peacecenter.org


Carew Rice now on view A native of the South Carolina lowcountry, Carew Rice was working in Chattanooga, Tennessee in the late 1920s when he discovered the art of cutting silhouettes. He worked from the Depression era up until 1970, when he cut silhouettes for South Carolina’s Tricentennial celebration. He traveled the world creating portraits of politicians, royalty, and ordinary folks, and he became well known throughout the South for portraiture, landscapes, and scenes of everyday life meticulously rendered in this unusual and exacting medium.

Carew Rice 1899-1971 Gate of the Swords, Charleston, SC, 1933 hand-cut paper

Greenville County Museum of Art

420 College Street on Heritage Green 864.271.7570 gcma.org Wed - Sat 10 am - 6 pm Sun 1 pm - 5 pm

Journal CRice.indd 1

admission free

3/31/17 1:05 PM


COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE

Couchville Revisited Darrell Scott had to wait 15 years for his new album to come out — but he’s been plenty busy in the meantime VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Darrell Scott is a busy guy. The singer, songwriter, and multi-instrumentalist has spent the last couple of decades writing or co-writing country hits for Travis Tritt (“It’s a Great Day to Be Alive”), the Dixie Chicks (“Long Time Gone”), and Garth Brooks (“When There’s No One Around”). By the time he released his own debut solo album in 1997, “Aloha from Nashville,” he’d appeared as a session man (playing banjo, guitar, bass, Dobro, and pedal steel) on a host of albums by Guy Clark, Martina McBride, and Randy Travis, among many others. More recently, former Led Zeppelin vocalist Robert Plant recruited Scott for his Band of Joy project, where he played an array of instruments alongside Patty Griffin, Buddy Miller, and Bekka Bramlett. That’s in addition to his eight solo albums and two duo records with another multi-instrumental acoustic music wizard, Tim O’Brien. So he’s had a lot going on. Maybe that’s why his new album, “The Couchville Sessions,” was largely made up of songs that were recorded 15 years ago and didn’t see the light of day until recently. The songs, recorded at Scott’s home in 2001 and 2002 with bassist Danny Thompson, drummer Kenny Malone, and pedal and lap steel player Dan Dugmore, move through altcountry, shaggy dog stories, intimate acoustic folk, and raw barroom rock, split between nine Scott originals and five covers. But if it hadn’t been for one more special musician who came along a lot more recently, the songs might have stayed in the vault even longer. “The thing that I was looking for to finish the record, and I didn’t know it until I knew it, was Bill Payne from Little Feat, one of the great rock ’n’ roll keyboard players we’ve got,” Scott says. “It took meeting Bill and realizing that he was the same kind of high-level musician that I recorded with in my house. So I got Bill to play on the songs, and the album was done.” As for why the songs didn’t come out back in the early 2000s, Scott has a pretty good explanation for that. “I actually recorded somewhere between 40-50 songs over these two giant sessions in 2001 and 2002, over two to three weeks for each session,” he says. “I released two albums from those sessions, ‘Theatre of the Unheard’ and ‘The Invisible Man.’ And then there was this third album that I loved, too, and I knew the songs

Darrell Scott

Im McGuire / Contributing

were strong and it was not a lesser project to me. But it’s just that after recording 40-50 songs and releasing two records from that, the creative part in me said, ‘I want to go do some other recordings now.’” So Scott moved on with his career, but the remaining songs from those sessions stayed on his mind. “It was always my intention to release it someday; I just didn’t know when,” he says. “But when something is released is not a huge deal to me. I knew that I’d do it eventually. It was just 15 years and five or six records later.” That’s a laid-back philosophy toward releasing music, and it reflects Scott’s generally relaxed state of mind. That informal perspective is one of the reasons that this Saturday, he’s returning to the spring edition of the Albino Skunk Music Festival at the Skunk Farm in Greer. He will be joined by 16 other local and national performers at the festival. Scott still remembers his 2012 Skunk Fest show, and how much he enjoyed it. “It’s a very casual festival with people having a great time feeling safe and secure,” he says, “There’s good roots music and a bunch of campers and trailers. That’s what Zig [festival founder and Skunk Farm owner Glynn Zeigler] does so well at Albino Skunk. That’s what I remember: just people having a good time.”

ALBINO SKUNK SPRING MUSIC FESTIVAL WHEN April 6–8 WHERE Skunk Farm, 4063 Jordan Road, Greer TIME 3 p.m. (April 6), 1:15 p.m. (April 7), 12:30 p.m. (April 8) TICKETS $25–$350 INFO albinoskunk.com

04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 39


40 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

APR. 7

APR. 8

VISUAL ARTS

“Absence: An Exhibition” by Katie Fenske and Rachel Rinker

HOLIDAY

Community Easter Egg Drop

Greenville Technical College Riverworks Gallery’s latest exhibition, “Absence,” features photographer Katie Fenske and painter Rachel Rinker, who both approach the titular subject matter quite differently. For Fenske, that absence is felt in her photographs of homes, images that are devoid of people. “A home’s exterior is giving us a glimpse into its resident’s character while hinting at the struggles that built it,” she said. Rinker’s paintings are based on photo sketches she makes at gatherings of family and friends. They include “Coming Together” by Rachel Rinker people, but the figures appear to be unraveling as they leave the event to disappear into their individual lives. “Absence does not exist without the concept of presence, and humans feel something from both as they exist in our lives,” Rinker said. “Absence itself hints that something is lacking, and to me it also incorporates the unknown. We can never truly be sure what is lacking because it is innately missing.” —Cindy Landrum

WHERE Greenville Technical College, Riverworks Gallery, 300 River St., Suite 202 WHEN Artist reception: Friday, April 7, 6–9 p.m. and Exhibition: Thursday–Sunday until May 7, 1–5 p.m. ADMISSION Free INFO 864-271-0679, gvltec.edu/dva

It’s a bird. It’s a plane. Close — It’s actually a helicopter dropping thousands of Easter eggs filled with treats onto a field. The popular Community Egg Drop returns to Sunset Park on Saturday afternoon, where children ages 1–12 — divided into age groups — will have a chance to collect eggs that fall from the sky. Following the main event, there will be games, face painting, music, inflatables, food, and other family-friendly fun. Arriving early is recommended, as this event draws a large crowd. —Emily Pietras

WHEN April 8, noon-4 p.m. WHERE Sunset Park, 204 Fowler Circle ADMISSION Free

APPLY

now! FOR SUMMER & FALL CLASSES

WWW.USCUPSTATE.EDU/APPLY


04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 41

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

APR. 13

APR. 13-15

COMEDY

Doug Stanhope

Living Gallery: The Savior’s Call

“America may be the best country, but that’s like being the prettiest Denny’s waitress,” said comedian Doug Stanhope in his comedy special “Word of Mouth.” “Just because you’re the best doesn’t mean you’re good.” But to fully grasp Stanhope’s cynical comedic sensibility, it’s important to note that this was just a few months after 9/11, when fellow comedians Bill Maher and Gilbert Gottfried were widely criticized for comments that some felt were “too soon.” Thanks to nearly 30 years of standup appearances, TV, and movies, Stanhope has become a cult star. He has also been a frequent guest on “The Howard Stern Show” and a former co-host of Comedy Central’s “The Man Show,” and he made a memorable appearance on “Louie” as suicidal comic Eddie Mack. In 2006 and 2008, “Time-Out New York” even voted his live act the Best Comedy Performance of the Year, an accolade that may not be as good as being named the prettiest Denny’s waitress, but it’s close. —Jerry Salley

WHEN April 13, 8 p.m. WHERE Ground Zero 3052 Howard St., Spartanburg

THEATER

Classic sacred art will come to life at Bob Jones University on April 13-15. The Living Gallery, which has become a popular Upstate Easter tradition, mixes music and drama with art. Live models take the place of human figures in life-sized re-creations of Biblical-themed paintings and sculptures. Through the use of costumes, makeup, and lighting techniques, the reproductions and human models look truly like twodimensional paintings and three-dimensional sculptures. “Creative elements in the artwork, music, and script will provide a unique interpretation of what BJU has been doing for two decades,” said this year’s director, Dr. Paul Radford. This year’s Living Gallery features Dr. Dan Forrest’s musical work “Requiem for the Living.” —Cindy Landrum

TICKETS $35 INFO 864-948-1661 bit.ly/ground-zero-spartanburg

WHERE Rodeheaver Auditorium, Bob Jones University WHEN April 13-14, 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m.; April 15, 2 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 8 p.m. TICKETS $14 INFO 864-770-1372, livinggallery.bju.edu

Sherwood Mobley Memorial Concert

TRIUMPH OF THE HUMAN SPIRIT

Featuring the timeless music of Mozart and Mahler

SAT., APRIL 8 AT 8 PM & SUN., APRIL 9 AT 3 PM THE PEACE CENTER The music of two Austrian legends pay tribute to our late Executive Director and former Principal Timpanist, Sherwood Mobley. Mozart’s exquisite Overture to “Don Giovanni” and his timeless and charming Serenade (“Eine kleine Nachtmusik”) set the stage for a powerful ending with the Greenville premiere of Mahler’s epic Sixth Symphony.

For tickets call (864) 467-3000 or purchase online at greenvillesymphony.org.


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE THRU SAT

08

THEATER

“Sister Act: The Musical”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Thursday-Saturday, 8 p.m.; Sunday, 3 p.m.

$20-35 “Sister Act” will give you a reason to rejoice. Based on the popular 1992 film, this heavenly smash hit musical tells the story of disco diva Deloris Van Cartier who, after witnessing a murder, is put into protective custody in the one place the cops are sure she won’t be a found: a convent. 864-233-6733 | centrestage.org

SAT

08

COMMUNITY

Greer Trade Days

Carolina Treasures Antiques and Vintage Goods 214 Trade St., Greer 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE Greer Trade Days is an open-air market of 50+ vendors encompassing antiques, vintage, repurposed, upscale crafts, farm to market, rust to dust, and just out of the barn. Musicians throughout the day featuring Row 22. There will also be face painting and photo ops throughout the market. Prizes on the hour. Trade Street will be closed to traffic, and parking is readily available. 864-655-7721 bit.ly/2nGoRNH

MUSIC

JL Fulks at Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant 1237 Pendleton St.

soundcloud.com/neonsavant/this-is-not-a-test-producer-composer

CONCERT

APR. 7

CALENDAR continued from PAGE 34

MUSIC

Taina Asili w/ Matt Townsend

The Spinning Jenny, 107 Cannon St., Greer | 7:30 p.m. | $10 in advance/$12 day of show

Singer, songwriter, and activist Taina Asili’s new single, “No Es Mi Presidente,” is a fierce plainly worded broadside against what she sees as the racism, homophobia, and sexism of President Donald J. Trump’s administration. Singing in both Spanish and English, over a stuttering, Latin-music-tinged electronic beat, she passionately declares, “We reject him / And we don’t fear him / We choose freedom over fear,” building the track to a fierce chorus that channels both anger and hope. “I’ve been feeling the way a lot of the country feels about this election and the presidency,” Asili says. “But I also know that these problems did not start with this presidency. Racism, sexism, homophobia have all existed for a long time. But they’re only going to be worsened by the intentions of Donald Trump. So I wanted to write a song that responded not only to that feeling, but also an acknowledgement that we have a powerful movement of resistance that’s existed for as long as these problems have existed.” The song was inspired by Asili’s performance at the Women’s March on Washington last January. “I was very much inspired by the masses of people who were at the march,” she says. “It felt like a million people in front of me and it meant that I was not alone in this struggle.” —Vincent Harris 8 p.m. | $10 At 26 years old, JL Fulks has already lived the dream that most musicians work their whole lives to achieve. The Greenville native has relocated to South Florida and started fronting his own trio, performing at the best clubs and festivals in South Florida. JL continues to collaborate with many

artists as he looks to tour nationally. He is also a private guitar instructor and a substitute teacher at the School of Rock in Coral Springs, Fla. Come to Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant on April 8 to hear this award-winning musician. 864-558-0747 bit.ly/2kUHE6T

Mariel Elizabeth Live

Joe’s Place | 640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE Mariel Elizabeth is a local singer-songwriter. For her, songwriting has always been a way for her to genuinely process life. It is her favorite vehicle of expression and she enjoys how songs can connect people and help them feel emotions in a unique way. bit.ly/2oGurvR

EDUCATIONAL

Hike Hagood Mill

138 Hagood Mill Road, Pickens 10:30 a.m.-noon | $3 An educational and informative glimpse into the natural history and folklore which abounds around the Hagood Mill Historic Site and its surrounding areas. This inspirational hike will be led by Scott Withrow, noted historian and naturalist. Sign up at 864-898-2936. 864-898-2936 BillyC@co.pickens.sc.us

SAT-SUN

08-09

CONCERT

Greenville Symphony Orchestra presents “Triumph of the Human Spirit”

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. | $18-69 A tribute to the GSO’s late executive director and former principal timpanist, Sherwood Mobley, the orchestra premieres Mahler’s 6th Symphony. Full of contrasting emotions, this epic piece, known as Mahler’s “Tragic Symphony,” is coupled with Mo-

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE «

zart’s exquisite Overture to “Don Giovanni” and his timeless and beautiful “Eine kleine Nachtmusik.” 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

MUSIC

WED

12

Furman Presents William Pruecil in Concert

Daniel Recital Hall at Furman University 3300 Poinsett Highway 8 p.m. | FREE The Furman Department of Music and Partners in the Arts present Distinguished Visiting Professor of Violin William Preucil, guests, and faculty in a free concert. Preucil and chamber musicians will perform Mendelssohn’s String Quartet Op. 44 No. 1 and Mendelssohn’s Octet. Joining Preucil are Cathy Meng (Miami String Quartet); Sonja Molloy (The Cleveland Orchestra); Eric Kim (Indiana University); Furman faculty members Thomas Joiner and Anna Joiner; Dianna Joiner (Akron Symphony Orchestra); and Charae Kreuger (Atlanta-based chamber musician). 864-294-2086 bit.ly/2dSO2qr Tina.underwood@furman.edu

MUSIC

FRI

14

“Seven Last Words”

Westminster Presbyterian Church 2310 Augusta St. 7 p.m. | FREE The Sanctuary Choir of Westminster Presbyterian Church presents “Seven Last Words” by Michael Trotta on Good Friday, April 14, at 7 p.m. This newly commissioned work for choir and orchestra is a seven-movement choral journey through the Passion, delivering a powerful and captivating story encompassing a breathtaking palette of emotion, from intimate tenderness to majestic triumph. Contact Westminster Presbyterian Church for more information at 864-232-2424. 864-232-2424 bit.ly/2mYclVQ

MUSIC

Hustle 14

Gottrocks | 200 Eisenhower Drive 8 p.m. | $10 Greenville’s “friendly neighborhood jam-band” is back after some time off, and they’re still banging out all-smiles, groove heavy improvisation, and acousticelectric rock. 864-235-5519 bit.ly/2lI0eyP

CONCERT

APR. 8

04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 43

MUSIC

Same As It Ever Was

The Spinning Jenny 107 Cannon St., Greer 9 p.m. $10 adv/$12 door The Talking Heads were one of the most musically restless rock bands of the ‘70s and ‘80s. They moved from twitchy new wave to funk to worldbeat without batting an eye. So it takes a special group of musicians to recreate their musical triumphs, and that’s what Same As It Ever Was can do. Expect to hear everything from “Psycho Killer” to “Wild Wild Life” and beyond. 864-469-6416 bit.ly/2k4Qz1b

MUSIC

Anni Piper featuring Joe DaSilva

Dr. Mac Arnold’s Blues Restaurant 1237 Pendleton St. 8 p.m. $10 One listen will tell you why in her homeland Anni Piper is known as the First Lady of Blues. Not only is she a sultry vocalist, but an insightful composer, accomplished bass player, and show-stopping performer. Born and raised in Australia, her passion for blues was ignited by the sound of Stevie Ray Vaughan. Piper has called Cocoa Beech, Fla., home since 2014. 864-558-0747 bit.ly/2kUHE6T

SAT

15

COMMUNITY

Greenbrier Farms’ 8th Annual Organic Plant Sale

Greenbrier Farms 766 Hester Store Road, Easley 9 a.m.-4 p.m. | FREE Greenbrier Farms will be open to the public selling organic starter plants such as heirloom tomatoes, pepper varieties, squash, cucumbers, okra, eggplant, herbs, flowers, and more – all from the farm. Greenbrier’s sustainably and humanely raised pasture and grass-fed meats will also be available for sale. In addition, there will be other local vendors selling locally raised landscaping plants. It’s a perfect day to visit the farm and see where your food comes from. 864-855-9782 bit.ly/2lSUyhn chad@greenbrierfarms.com

soundcloud.com/neonsavant/this-is-not-a-test-producer-composer

Replacire, w/ Kingdom Faust, Abductor, & Cadaver Creator

Radio Room, 2845 N. Pleasantburg Drive | 9 p.m. | $7

Five years passed between Boston-based progressive death-metal band Replacire’s first album, “The Human Burden,” and their second, the just-released “Do Not Deviate.” And in that time, the band somehow found a way to make their merciless hardcore metal sound more brutal and more precise, trimming their songs down considerably and upping the punishing rhythms and spine-snapping time-changes. “I think we got a lot heavier, and our songwriting matured, for sure,” says guitarist Eric Alper. “I think we learned to get to the point earlier and cut out a lot of the filler. Something we worried about on the first record was song length. We thought if the songs seemed short, we should flesh the parts out. But this time around there was a lot of content in a small amount of time. The songs got more concise.” As for why the album took five years to make, Alper says it had more to do with contracts than the music. “There was a lot happening behind the scenes,” he says. “We were negotiating a record deal.” —Vincent Harris

«

Presented by the Sanctuary Choir Westminister Presbyterian Church Good Friday, April 14, 7:00 p.m. Westminister Presbyterian Church 2310 Augusta St., Greenville Open to the public/free admission

Military Order of the Purple Heart Chapter 845

1st Annual

Community & Veteran

Easter Egg Hunt

Saturday, April 15 at Noon 2725 Anderson Rd., Greenville Carolina Academy Baseball Field

Open to ages 1 (walking) thru 17 – Free for Adults $4 per child – Family Rate (up to 5 kids) $12 Veteran & Active Duty Military – 1 FREE ADMISSION Purple Heart Recipients – 3 FREE ADMISSION (with proof of service or Purple Heart) Chance to win 1 of 3 larger prizes (per age group) – Over $500 in prizes

Rain date April 22 @ Noon • facebook.com/MOPH845Greenville


44 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

TONY AWARD

CULTURE « J. Michael Peeples

®

MUSIC

NOMINATIONS INCLUDING

BEST MUSICAL

Blues Boulevard 300 River St., Suite 203 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $8 Peeples is a skilled soul-jazz guitarist with a smooth sound that blends muted masters like Wes Montgomery with more laid-back players like George Benson. 864-242-2583 bit.ly/2jHkZKS

SUN

16

FAMILY

Easter Egg Hunt

Biltmore 1 North Pack Square, Asheville The Easter Rabbit makes his annual appearance on Biltmore’s Front Lawn on Easter Sunday. Highlighting the day are the grand Easter Egg Hunts at 11 a.m. and 1 and 3 p.m. Children 9 and younger may attend the hunt for free when accompanied by an estate pass holder or a ticketed adult. 800-411-3812 biltmore.com

TUE

PHOTO © JEREMY DANIEL

18

“BROADWAY’S FU NNIEST MUSICAL COMEDY IN AT LEAST 400 YEARS!”

APRIL 11-16

EDUCATION

Friends & Fundraising Banquet

Christian Learning Centers of Greenville County TD Convention Center 1 Exposition Drive 6:30-8:30 p.m. $60 Unite with fellow warriors for Christ at the 20th Anniversary Friends & Fundraising Banquet featuring keynote speaker Josh McDowell. This year’s banquet is a celebration of the amazing work God has done with this organization for the past 20 years and will motivate and inspire us to continue sharing His word with urgency to the youth in Greenville 864-242-2326 bit.ly/2niXDIK

THEATER

Maya Angelou, Chautauqua Talk led by Glenis Redmond

TIME OUT NEW YORK

OPENS TUESDAY!

APR. 9 CONCERT

10

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. FREE Discuss the inspiring words and life of poet Maya Angleou with Glenis Redmond, poet-in-residence at the Peace Center and State Theatre New Jersey, Kennedy Center teaching artist, founder of Peace Voices and Greenville Poetry Slam and author of “Backbone,” “Under the Sun,” and “What the Hand Knows.” 244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

Craig Sorrells Birthday Bash Gottrocks, 200 Eisenhower Drive 8 p.m. | $10

For years, singer, trumpet player, and bandleader Craig Sorrells was a mainstay of the Upstate music scene, playing heavy Southern rock with the Gypsy Souls, experimental-but-danceable jamrock with The Work, and digging deep into soul, jazz, and funk with the Craig Sorrells Project. He moved to Myrtle Beach last year, but he’s coming back to town for a birthday celebration at Gottrocks. And he’s bringing just about every piece of his musical history with him. “The Work plays a special early performance. It’s the first time we’ve all played together in almost a year,” he says. “And then the full eight-piece Craig Sorrells Project to close the night out. There will be some special guests sitting in as well.” Sorrells typically brings the party wherever he plays, but his birthday shows at Gottrocks have become well known for their musical madness. “We have a bit of a reputation for getting out of control with musicians and special guests, and this one will be no different,” he says. “I’m so excited to come home and play with all my guys and gals. It’s been too long.” He adds, “Even though I live in Myrtle Beach now, Greenville and specifically Gottrocks will always be my home.” —Vincent Harris

AUTHOR TALK

Book Talk & Signing with David Baldacci

Thornblade Club 1275 Thornblade Blvd., Greer 6 p.m. | $55 Sample drinks and hors d’oeuvres and meet the bestselling suspense author as he celebrates

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE «

the launch of his new book, “The Fix.” His remarkable detective Amos Decker — the man who can forget nothing — was first introduced in the sensational No.1 New York Times bestseller “Memory Man.” Now Decker returns in a stunning new novel. Each ticket admits one and includes a copy of “The Fix” as well as a drink ticket (for beer, wine, or a soft drink) and hors d’oeuvres. Thornblade Club will also offer a cash bar. 675-0540 | bit.ly/2jBGusp info@fiction-addiction.com

LITERATURE

Books & Beyond Club at Joe’s Place

640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 6:30-8:30 p.m. | FREE Joe’s Place Book Club will be reading “The Midnight Plan of the Repo Man” by W. Bruce Cameron before meeting. To participate, just come on in and buy a book. bit.ly/2oGurvR

WED

19

CONCERT

Home Free

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $25-40 The five-man band has become known for their show-stopping performances that mix their signature no-instrument, all-vocal music with their quick-witted humor. In the past three years, Home Free has crashed the world music scene, selling 250,000 albums, gathering more than 100-million YouTube views and entertaining more than 150,000 people live in concert. Tickets and VIP package are available online. 864-467-3000 peacecenter.org

LITERATURE

Bob Strother book launch at Fiction Addiction

1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 5:30-7:30 p.m. | FREE Local author Bob Strother will be celebrating the launch of his new historical novel, “A Fire to Be Kindled,” the sequel to the highly-praised Burning Time at his launch party on Wednesday, April 19, from 5:307:30 p.m. at Fiction Addiction. This event is free and open to the public, and refreshments will be served. 864-675-0540 | bit.ly/2m8IF8z

COMMUNITY

Sierra Club’s Community Tap Social

The Community Tap 217 Wade Hampton Blvd. 6:30-8 p.m. | FREE This is going to be very laid back, no formal meeting, no sales pitch, no forced mingling, and nonmembers are always welcome. Just an opportunity to have fun and meet nice environmentally-minded people. After the success of last year’s “beer event,” the time has come for “Environmentally Responsible Beer 2.0.” Come on by for fun and drinks. bit.ly/2oVANaJ

THU

MUSIC

Jar Menagerie w/ John 20 Mason The Revelator, Sinners & Saints, and The Long Canes

Radio Room 2845 North Pleasantburg Drive 9 p.m. | $5 (over 21)/$7 (under 21) This is hands-down one of the best examples of the Southeast’s musical strength and diversity. Old-school power-trio rock from Mason Jar Menagerie, serrated,

spirited acoustic blues stomp from John The Revelator, two-piece folk-rock from Sinners & Saints, and pure, chaotic guitar-assault indie rock from The Long Canes. Do not miss this show. 864-263-7868 bit.ly/2m4fFSp

LITERATURE

Robert Morgan

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road #5 6 p.m. $10-17 North Carolina author Robert Morgan will be celebrating the paperback release of his latest novel “Chasing the North Star,” a story about a slave running to freedom and the hope that perserveres in the darkest times, at a book talk & signing on Thursday, April 20 at 6 p.m. This will be a standingroom-only event. Purchase a $17 ticket today to guarantee a seat and a paperback copy of Morgan’s new novel. First-come, first-served seating available with a $10 ticket. 864-675-0540 bit.ly/2m8IF8z

FRI

21

COMMUNITY

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Tiffany DeCarlis

wearing Face A Face Bocca Sun

Rendezvous In Paris

Centre Stage Poinsett Club 807 E. Washington St. 7 p.m. | $125 Heavy hors d’oeuvres, drinks, dancing, and a 1920sthemed cabaret. The evening will be spectacular as you are transported to the beautiful and romantic city of Paris. bit.ly/2kQG1mm

Greenville Journal

Just right - for you.

04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 45

«

GARRISON OPTICIANS Fine European Eyewear

McDaniel Village 864-271-1812 M-F 9:30-5:30 & by appt. www.garrisonopticians.com


46 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

CULTURE «Edge of Paradise w/ Black River MUSIC

Rebels, Silver Tongue Devils, & Osara Soundbox Tavern 507 West Georgia Road, Simpsonville, SC 9 p.m. | FREE A great sampling of hard-rock and heavy metal here, but the real band to watch is Black River Rebels, a no-BS Social Distortion-style punk-metal band that pumps like a freight train and puts on a hell of a show. 864-228-7763 | bit.ly/2lmqBL8

COMMUNITY

Trivia Night at Joe’s Place

SPECIAL COLLECTIONS AND ARCHIVES James B. Duke Library, 2nd Floor Furman University

864-294-2194 MONDAY - FRIDAY, 9-5 | UNTIL MAY 31 | THE PUBLIC IS WELCOME

Joe’s Place 640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 7 p.m. | FREE Questions will cover random trivia including, but not limited to books, wine, and art. Previous categories have covered musical instruments, cereal, and common bonds, just to name a few. The winning team will receive their bar tab (including food) paid up to $50! The team in second place will get to chose a book each from the Joe’s Place secret stash. You can have teams up to six. Please note that food/drink ordered after the winning team is announced cannot be included in the $50 prize. 864-558-0828 | bit.ly/2oGurvR

FRI-SAT

21-22

THEATER

“Swan Lake, Act 3” & Other Works

International Ballet | Gunter Theatre | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $35 This spring will feature the dramatic third act of the iconic classic “Swan Lake,” best known for the “Black Swan Pas de deux” showcasing the crafty swan Odile,

School’s out —

Learn about art history and explore different art techniques! Spaces fill up fast!

To register visit TCMUpstate.org, or call 864-233-7755.

®

300 College Street • Downtown Greenville

SAT

22

FUNDRAISER

Strike Out Parkinson’s

Fluor Field | 945 S. Main St. 10 a.m.-noon | FREE Mark your calendar this spring for the Fourth Annual Strike Out Parkinson’s community walk. Fundraising teams, corporate sponsors, GAPS members, and the Greenville community are invited to attend this event, which aims to celebrate and support people living with PD in the upstate. Come take a lap around the warning track at Fluor Field, enjoy music and food, and participate in exercise and therapy demonstrations from local partners while learning more about how GAPS supports its members. 905-2574 | strikeoutparkinsons2017.myevent.com

COMMUNITY

Spartanburg Soaring! International Kite Festival

Chapman Cultural Center Barnet Park 248 E Saint John St., Spartanburg, SC 29603 11 a.m.-5 p.m. | FREE The Chapman Cultural Center is organizing the fourth annual Spartanburg Soaring! This free, family-friendly festival has quickly become a much-anticipated event. Hundreds of kites fill the sky above Barnet Park in downtown Spartanburg complemented by live music, food, and children’s activities. 864-542-1787 | bit.ly/2mJTii7

Registration Now Open!

spring break day camps are in!

April 10-14, 2017 9am-4pm K5-Grade 4

who tricks Prince Siegfred from saving the fated white swan, Odette. Other works will include “La Viviandére,” or “Markitenka,” and new choreography from International Ballet. Tickets are available at the Peace Center Box Office or by phone. 864-467-3000 | internationalballetsc.org

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COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

CULTURE «Together S.O.U.L. at Joe’s Place MUSIC

Joe’s Place 640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 7 p.m. FREE Together S.O.U.L. is a folk duet from the heart of the Blue Ridge composed of Ryan Garst and Emily Kresky. Dreamy harmonies meet sweet guitar lines. Free-spirited musicians with great ambition for the art of songwriting and connection with those who enjoy music and lyrics 864-558-0828 bit.ly/2oGurvR

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04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 47

CONCERT

Gov’t Mule

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7 p.m. | $35-45

CHILDREN

Kids’ Festival at Heritage Green

Heritage Green 420 College St. 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE Kid’s Fest is an annual celebration to kick off the Week of the Young Child. This festival is geared toward our youngest learners and is filled with age-appropriate activities for kids 1-5 years old. Each Heritage Green organization will have a booth on the lawn with opportunities for families to experience what their museum or entity provides our community every day. bit.ly/2oyJGe3

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EDUCATION

Story Time & More

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. | 10 a.m.-1 p.m. | Free with admission Join us at Story Time & More as we kick off our month of Laura Numeroff’s stories. 864-233-7755 | info@tcmupstate.org

Gov’t Mule has showcased its virtuosity, intelligence and breadth for more than two decades, which have encompassed 15 studio and live albums, millions of album and track sales, and thousands of performances. Guitarist-singer Warren Haynes, drummer Matt Abts, bassist Jorgen Carlsson, and multi-instrumentalist Danny Louis take the stage. 864-467-3000 | 800-888-7768 | peacecenter.org

THU

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AUTHOR TALK

David Sedaris

Peace Concert Hall | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $40 With sardonic wit and incisive social critiques, Sedaris has become one of America’s preeminent hu-

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48 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

M A I N S T A G E P L AY P R E S E N T E D B Y S O U T H

C A R O L I N A

Generously sponsored by Harry & Sheila Bolick and Sharon & Greg DeFelice

A Hilariously Divine Comedy

CULTURE «

mor writers. The great skill with which he slices through cultural euphemisms and political correctness proves that Sedaris is a master of satire and one of the most observant writers addressing the human condition today. Stick around before and after the show as Sedaris will be signing books in the lobby. 864-467-3000 | peacecenter.org

COMMUNITY

BYOB to Joe’s Place

640 South Main St. Suite 101-B 6:30-8:30 p.m. | $10 Do you have a favorite bottle of wine that you’ve been wanting to share? Bring it to our first BYOB event. This is a great opportunity to expand your palate and see what others are recommending. We will provide a couple bottles of wine as well as corkscrews and glassware. There will also be door prizes. Space is limited to 15 people. Call or stop by the store today to reserve your spot. Payment is required at the time of reservation. 864-558-0828 | bit.ly/2oGurvR

THE OFF-BROADWAY HIT COMEDY

Music by Alan Menken • Lyrics by Glenn Slater Book by Cheri Steinkellner & Bill Steinkellner

MAR 16 – APR 8 THU-SUN

MAR 21, 22

GET TICKETS

864.233.6733

CENTRESTAGE.ORG

It’s Nesting Time

THRU FRI

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ARTS EVENT

A bold new season at the Brooks Center in 2016-2017

Brooks Center | 141 Jersey Lane, Clemson Admission varies by production Musicians from the Nile region of Africa, dancers from the heart of New York, and theater from the streets of Ireland are among the season’s entertainment at Clemson University’s Brooks Center for the Performing Arts. bit.ly/BrooksCenterSchedule

FRI

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COMMUNITY

“Mutually Exclusive: A One-Act Musical”

The Spinning Jenny | 107 Cannon St., Greer 5 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. | $7 Come enjoy a staged reading of the premiere of “Mutually Exclusive: A One-Act Musical” by Colton Beach with an optional Q&A with the creative team and talent following each performance. bit.ly/2oyxqtM

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29-07

THEATER

“Seussical”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. various times | $27 (adults), $18 (children) Rhyme, dance, and sing with this fantastical, magical, musical extravaganza. The mischievous Cat in the Hat is the master of ceremonies as Dr. Seuss’ beloved tales are brought to life. This fast-paced musical features Horton the Elephant, Gertrude McFuzz, Lazy Mayzie, and all of the Whos in Whoville. So let your toes tap, your fingers snap, and your imagination run wild. See website for performance times. 864-467-3000 | scchildrenstheatre.org

THRU SUN

ART

SUN

MUSIC

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Bring Joy To Your Yard With A Nesting Box

223 N. Main St., Suite 12B Check out their website or Facebook for full class descriptions and registration links. 864-520-1653 | bit.ly/2lL1LVL

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Open Mon. - Fri. 9:30-5:30 • Sat. 9-5

626 Congaree Road | 864-234-2150 | www.wbu.com/greenville BIRDSEED • FEEDERS • BATHS • HOUSES • HARDWARE • GIFTS

Classes at The Art Cellar

Swannanoa Festival Trio

Temple of Israel 400 Spring Forest Road 3 p.m. | adults $20, students $5 This distinguished trio featuring pianist Inessa Zaretsky, violinist J Frievogel, and cellist Rachel Frievogel will perform a program which will include the Rachmaninoff Elegiac Trio and other ensemble works. This is the final concert in the Music on Sunday Series and is a prelude to the Swannanoa Festival five-concert series coming this July to the Fine Arts Center. 864-292-1782

MAY TUE

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THEATER

Cesar Chavez, Chautauqua Talk led by Vera Gomez

Greenville Chautauqua Hughes Main Library 25 Heritage Green Place 7-8:30 p.m. | FREE Discuss Cesar Chavez’s message of non-violence, protest and hope with Vera Gomez, workshop facilitator, performance poet, SmartArts’ teaching poet, founding member of Greenville Poetry Slam, president of Emrys, and author of “Barrio Voices.” For Vera Gomez, the story of Cesar Chavez is not just history. It’s personal. Vera was born to immigrant parents and raised in Lubbock, Texas. Cesar Chavez was the voice that spoke for her family. Vera is a bilingual poet and a firm believer in the power of words. 244-1499 greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org

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COMMUNITY

La Fiesta

Hispanic Alliance The Old Cigar Warehouse 912 S. Main St. 6:30 p.m. $90 (early bird ticket, available through March 15); $100 (single ticket) The Hispanic Alliance will host La Fiesta, an evening celebrating Latin cultures in the Upstate. This year’s theme focuses on the blend of Hispanic-American cultures, food, music, and dance. bit.ly/2m1WQzt

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SPORTS

Insane Inflatable 5k

Insane Inflatable 5k Heritage Park 861 SE Main St., Simpsonville $49, $75, $100 Be part of the fun fitness experience. The Insane Inflatable 5K, a run series made up of inflatable objects, will be taking place in more than 120 cities across the U.S. and Canada. The event is coming to Greenville on May 6. The event is a new take on fitness that will challenge everyone from seasoned marathon runners to weekend warriors. The course features a dozen extreme inflatable obstacles and is over 3 miles long. Participants and spectators have access to games, food, beverages, merchandise, and swag from local vendors and sponsors. No matter where you are in your fitness journey, you’ll be sure to have a blast at this event. bit.ly/2lfRaR9

CHARITY, RECREATION, COMMUNITY

Tails & Trails 5k

Greenville County Animal Care Conestee Park | 601 Fork Shoals Rd. 8:30 a.m. $25/entry+$15 per person for teams of six or more/$30 entry after April 24 This is your chance to help save lives. By starting a team or individual fundraiser for Tails & Trails, you can ask your friends and family to help you reach your goal of raising funds to help build a no-kill community in Greenville County. pchurch@greenvillecounty.org

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA NOTICE To ADONNICA LEE, her personal representative, heirs, or devisees: You will please take notice that on MAY 3, 2017 at 11:00 A.M. in the Probate Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, you shall appear to show cause, if any you can, why the Personal Representative of the Estate of Eric Fitzgerald Lee, Deceased, File No. 2012ES2300747 should not be ordered to distribute the estate as if ADONNICA LEE had died before the decedent; all persons entitled to the above-mentioned estate as heir or devisee of ADONNICA LEE shall appear to intervene for their interest in the estate or be forever barred. Debora A. Faulkner March 22, 2017 Probate Judge for Greenville County

PUBLIC SALE NOTICE Notice is hereby given that on 4/8/2017, at 9:00 a.m. at East North Storage, 4329 East North Street, Greenville, SC, the undersigned, East North Storage will sell at Public Sale by competitive bidding, the personal property heretofore store with the undersigned by: 1. Unit: A200, Kelvin Hunter, Misc household & Alum wheels 2. Unit: B130, Jonathan Carter, Misc hand & air tools; & Misc household 3. Unit: B235, Jun Li, Misc Teahola Business Inventory (Cups, etc) 4. Unit: B236, Jun Li, Misc Teahola Business Inventory (Cups, etc) 5. Unit: C036, Matt Spaulding, Misc. small tools & toolbox; household items 6. Unit: D026, Traci Bruce, Mountain Bike; Misc household items 7. Unit: D001, Benjamin Wilson, Red Love Seat; Misc Boxes

STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT THIRTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COUNTY OF GREENVILLE 2016-DR-23-1065 Annette Marie Arias, Plaintiff -vs.- Delman Mauricio Arias Cordero, Defendant. Date filed: March 14, 2016 Time filed: 4:25 PM TO THE DEFENDANT ABOVENAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is attached and herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to this Complaint upon the subscriber, at 304 Pettigru Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service. If you fail to answer the Complaint within the thirty- day period, the Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein and judgment by default will be rendered against you. David J. Rutledge, Attorney for Plaintiff P.O. Box 10664 Greenville, SC 29603 (864) 467-0999

SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFP#64-05/09/17, Community Centers Cleaning, May 9, 2017, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. A pre-proposal meeting will be held at 9:00 A.M., E.D.T., April 17, 2017, Greenville County Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. RFP# 65-05/16/17, Unit 4 Cell 1 Construction Twin Chimneys Landfill, May 16, 2017, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. A pre-proposal meeting will be held on at 10:00 A.M., E.D.T., April 18, 2017, Twin Chimneys Landfill, 11075 Augusta Road, Honea Path, SC 29654. RFP# 66-05/03/17, Janitorial Services for Greenville County Facilities, May 3, 2017, 3:00P.M., E.D.T. A pre-proposal meeting and site visits will be held at 8:30 A.M., E.D.T., April 20, 2017. Site visits will be held at selected facilities. RFP# 67-05/09/17, Veterinary Services, May 9, 2017, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. IFB# 68-05/03/17, Courthouse Lobby Renovations, May 3, 2017, 3:30P.M., E.D.T. A prebid meeting and site visit will be held 9:00 A.M., E.D.T., April 19, 2017, Greenville County Procurement Services Division, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601. A site visit will follow the meeting. RFP# 69-05/04/17, Professional Pharmacy Consulting Services and Prescription Medications, May 17, 2017, 3:00 P.M., E.D.T. A mandatory pre-proposal meeting will be held at 9:00 A.M., E.D.T., April 24, 2017, Greenville County Detention Center, 20 McGee Street, Greenville, SC 29601. RFQ# 70-04/26/17, Engineering Design Services for Dillard Road Bridge Replacement Project, April 26, 2017 3:00P.M., E.D.T Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement or by calling (864) 467-7200.

SUMMONS NOTICE 2016-CP-23-06846 STATE OF SC GREENVILLE COUNTY COURT OF COMMON PLEAS DENIS ALBERT and MARLYSE ALBERT v. WILLIAM WIGGINS TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and notified that an action has been filed against you in the Greenville County, SC court in action number 2016CP-23-06846. You have thirty (30) days from the last date of publication of this notice to answer the complaint. You must also serve a copy of your answer upon the Plaintiff or the Plaintiff’s attorney at the address shown below. If you fail to answer the Complaint, judgment by default could be rendered against you for the relief requested in the Complaint. S. Lindsay Carrington Bell Carrington & Price, LLC 408 East North Street Greenville, SC 29601 864-272-0556

ESTADO DE CAROLINA DEL SUR CONDADO DE GREENVILLE EN LA CORTE DE FAMILIA C.A. No.: 2017-DR-23-0675 NOTA DE ACTOS A: FRANCISCO JUAN MARTINEZ Usted ha sido notificado de acuerdo al Código de Carolina del Sur Ann Sec. 15-9-710. Que actos de divorcio han sido iniciados bajo el caso arriba mencionado por Perpetua Crisanto Perez. USTED HA SIDO NOTIFICADO COMO SIGUE : 1. Que dentro de treinta (30) días de haber recibido la notificación usted responderá la clasificación por escrito a nuestra oficina localizada en 201 W. Stone Ave., Greenville, SC 29609 o con la Corte del Tribunal que se encuentra localizada en el 301 University Ridge, Greenville, SC 29602 la nota y las razones para refutar intervenir ó de otro modo responder: 2. Que el Tribunal debe ser informado de su dirección actual y cualquier cambio de domicilio durante el proceso legal de divorcio. 3. Que si no presenta una respuesta dentro de (30) días de recivir el edicto constituye juicio de manera predeterminada rendido contra usted para el alivio demandado en el reclamo. Nathalie M. Morgan (69848) Nathalie M. Morgan, LLC 201 West Stone Avenue Greenville, SC 29609 (864)242-6655 (864)242-6111 (facsimile)

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Greenville Pool Club intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 600 S. Main Street Suite 700, Greenville SC 29601. To object to the issuance of this permit/ license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 23, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that AG Holdings, LLC /DBA Golden Brown and Delicious intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1269 Pendleton Street, Greenville SC 29611. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 23, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

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864.679.1205

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email: aharley@communityjournals.com

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that SAI Krupa 2017, LLC / DBA Energy Mart, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/ permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3226 Wade Hampton Blvd., Taylors, SC 29687-2804. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 16, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Basil Greenville LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1 North Laurens Street Suite A, Greenville, SC 29602. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 16, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that WWC ,LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 1025 Woodruff Road K04, Greenville, SC 20607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 9, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Harris & Harris Enterprises LLC /DBA The Corner Wine & Spirits, intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF premises consumption of LIQUOR at 400A Laurens Rd., Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than April 16, 2017. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

SUMMONS TO COMPLAINT STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CHEROKEE CASE NO.: 2017-DR-11-015 Marsha Andrejzchick and Wilma Swink, Plaintiffs, Melissa Gooch, Michael Carter, and John Doe, Defendants. TO: THE DEFENDANT ABOVE NAMED: You are hereby summoned and required to answer the Complaint in this action, of which a copy is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer to the said Complaint on the Subscriber at her office at 122 N. Petty Street, Gaffney, South Carolina 29340 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, the Plaintiff(s) in this action will apply to the court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. Dated at Gaffney, South Carolina on the 28th day of December, 2016. COMPLAINT for CUSTODY STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CHEROKEE CASE NO.: 2017-DR-11-015 Marsha Andrejzchick and Wilma Swink, Plaintiffs, Melissa Gooch, Michael Carter, and John Doe, Defendants. The Plaintiffs respectfully alleges the following to this Court: 1. The Plaintiffs and minor children are residents and citizens of Cherokee County, South Carolina and have so resided for more than one year prior to the filing of this action. The whereabouts of the Defendants are unknown. It is believed Defendant Gooch may be in Cherokee County, South Carolina. It is believed Defendant Carter may be in Greenville County, South Carolina. 2. Defendant Melissa Gooch is the natural mother of the minor children, Stephen S., born June 2006; and Gabriel S., born September 2008. It is believed Defendant Carter is the natural father of the child, Stephen S. The natural father of the child, Gabriel S., is unknown. 3. The Plaintiffs have had physical custody of the minor children for several years. The Plaintiffs are informed and believe they are the de facto custodians of the children. The Plaintiffs have been the caretakers and providers for the children. 4. The Plaintiffs are informed and believe that it is in the best interest of the children that the Plaintiffs be granted custody, pendente lite and permanently. The Plaintiffs are informed and believe the Defendants are in agreement for the children to remain in the custody of the Plaintiffs. If the Defendants are not in agreement, the Plaintiffs are informed and believe the Defendants cannot provide a safe, stable and appropriate home for the child(ren), and the Defendants lacks the fitness necessary for them to have the child(ren) in the Defendants’ care and control. 5. The Plaintiffs are informed and believes that any visitation between the Defendants and child(ren) should as agreed upon by the Plaintiffs, pendente lite and permanently. 6. In the event the Defendant contests this matter, the Plaintiffs seek the appointment of a Guardian ad Litem on behalf of the children. 7. The Plaintiffs request the Court address the issues of child support, health insurance; and uncovered medical/dental expenses of the children, pendente lite and permanently. 8. In the event the Defendant contests this matter, the Plaintiffs are informed and believe the Defendants should be required to pay the Plaintiffs’

attorney fees and costs, pendente lite and permanently. Wherefore, Plaintiff prays for an Order of this Court as follows: A. Granting the Plaintiffs custody of the minor children, pendente lite and permanently; B. If contested, appointing a Guardian ad Litem on behalf of the minor children; C. Addressing the issues of child support, health insurance and uncovered medical/dental expenses of the children, pendente lite and permanently; D. If contested, requiring the Defendants to pay the Plaintiffs’ attorney fees and costs, pendente lite and permanently; and E. For such other and further relief as this Court may deem just and proper. Beth M. Bullock Attorney for Plaintiffs 122 North Petty Street Gaffney, South Carolina 29340 TEL.: (864) 488-9690 FAX: (864) 488-9689 NOTICE OF FINAL HEARING STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA IN THE FAMILY COURT SEVENTH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT COUNTY OF CHEROKEE CASE NO.: 2017-DR-11-015 Marsha Andrejzchick and Wilma Swink, Plaintiffs, vs. Melissa Gooch, Michael Carter, and John Doe, Defendants. TO ALL INTERESTED PARTIES NAMES ABOVE: PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that FINAL HEARING has been scheduled in the above entitled action for May 17, 2017 at 9:00 am. in the Family Court located at the Cherokee County Courthouse, 125 East Floyd Baker Boulevard, Gaffney, South Carolina. STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS SUMMONS AND NOTICE OF FILING OF AMENDED COMPLAINT AND NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION (NON-JURY MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE) C/A NO: 2016-CP-23-02959 DEFICIENCY WAIVED The Bank of New York Mellon f/k/a The Bank of New York as successor trustee for JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the benefit of the Certificate holders of Equity One ABS, Inc. Mortgage Pass-Through Certificates, Series 2003-3, PLAINTIFF, vs. Christopher Harrell; Greenville County DEFENDANT(S) TO THE DEFENDANTS, ABOVE NAMED: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, or otherwise appear and defend, and to serve a copy of your Answer to said Complaint upon the subscriber at his office, Hutchens Law Firm P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202, within thirty (30) days after service hereof, except as to the United States of America, which shall have sixty (60) days, exclusive of the day of such service, and if you fail to answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, or otherwise appear and defend, the Plaintiff in this action will apply to the Court for the relief demanded therein, and judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity for Greenville County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. TO MINOR(S) OVER FOURTEEN

YEARS OF AGE, AND/OR TO MINOR(S) UNDER FOURTEEN YEARS OF AGE AND THE PERSON WITH WHOM THE MINOR(S) RESIDES, AND/OR TO PERSONS UNDER SOME LEGAL DISABILITY: YOU ARE FURTHER SUMMONED AND NOTIFIED to apply for the appointment of a guardian ad litem within thirty (30) days after the service of this Summons and Notice upon you. If you fail to do so, application for such appointment will be made by the Plaintiff immediately and separately and such application will be deemed absolute and total in the absence of your application for such an appointment within thirty (30) days after the service of the Summons and Complaint upon you. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that should you fail to Answer the foregoing Summons, the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference of this case to the Master in Equity in/for this County, which Order shall, pursuant to Rule 53 of the South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure, specifically provide that the said Master in Equity is authorized and empowered to enter a final judgment in this case with appeal only to the South Carolina Court of Appeals pursuant to Rule 203(d)(1) of the SCAR, effective June 1, 1999. NOTICE OF FILING OF SUMMONS AND AMENDED COMPLAINT TO THE DEFENDANTS ABOVE NAMED: YOU WILL PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the foregoing Summons, along with the Complaint, was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina, on May 12, 2016; and the Amended Complaint was filed with the Clerk of Court for Greenville County, South Carolina on January 14, 2017. NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION PLEASE TAKE NOTICE THAT pursuant to the South Carolina Supreme Court Administrative Order 2011-05-02-01, (hereinafter “Order”), you may have a right to Foreclosure Intervention. To be considered for any available Foreclosure Intervention, you may communicate with and otherwise deal with the Plaintiff through its law firm, Hutchens Law Firm, P.O. Box 8237, Columbia, SC 29202 or call 803726-2700. Hutchens Law Firm, represents the Plaintiff in this action and does not represent you. Under our ethical rules, we are prohibited from giving you any legal advice. You must submit any requests for Foreclosure Intervention consideration within 30 days from the date of this Notice. IF YOU FAIL, REFUSE, OR VOLUNTARILY ELECT NOT TO PARTICIPATE IN FORECLOSURE INTERVENTION, YOUR MORTGAGE COMPANY/ AGENT MAY PROCEED WITH A FORECLOSURE ACTION. If you have already pursued loss mitigation with the Plaintiff, this Notice does not guarantee the availability of loss mitigation options or further review of your qualifications. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, except as stated below in the instance of bankruptcy protection. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY.


50 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 04.07.2017

GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

JoJo

Hating on Heartworms Hate is a strong word. That’s why I very intentionally use it to describe how I feel about heartworms. They’re the worst. This April, heartworm awareness month, I’m telling everyone why. We live in the south, which means there are a lot of mosquitos here. Mosquitos transmit heartworm disease, which kills pets if not treated. Even if it is treated, it’s very, very painful. So keeping your dog on heartworm preventative every single month is extremely important. South Carolina has the 6th highest rate of heartworm disease in the nation. In fact, 25% of dogs who come to Animal Care already have heartworms. They didn’t have owners protecting them from it. But you can help these dogs by donating towards their treatment at GreenvillePets.org

GreenvillePets.org

Eight Vocalists Left ACROSS 1 Phase 7 Animals with two legs 13 Eyelash makeup 20 1960s space program 21 Earhart in a cockpit 22 Hires 23 218 or more seats in Congress [BROWN] 25 Simple tunes 26 16th-cen. nun of Avila 27 Bird of New Zealand 29 Magazine for a fashionista 30 “SCTV” bit 31 Heart-tugging facet of a media story [SIMONE] 36 Oral health org. 39 Wed 41 Heighten 42 Verses using visual devices [GABRIEL] 48 Golden Arches sandwiches with barbecue sauce 52 Person held in custody 53 — -dieu (prayer bench) 54 Seoul’s region: Abbr. 55 King, in Nice 56 Certain Greek 57 “— dare?” 59 2010 Kevin Spacey film [MITCHELL] 62 Sleuth’s tidbit 64 Hailed car 66 Bus. honcho 67 Wrist wear 68 Cod or koi 71 Romanian tennis great [SEDAKA] 75 Letters after wyes 76 Artist for a comic book 78 Up — point 79 Dieter’s target, often 80 Dr. — (1990s TV therapist) 82 Substantial number [CALLAS] 85 “... — iron bars a cage” 87 Salad staple 91 Farm mother 92 Solder stuff 93 Gulf republic 95 Switchboard worker 97 Balkan republic 99 Warning message [BENNETT] 101 Lover boy 103 A bit warm 104 Bovine call 105 Setting of hearings for minors [DION] 110 — -tat-tat 114 Algerian port 115 Purim’s month 116 Lover’s tune 120 Ocelot, e.g. 123 Supporting vocalists (or an apt alternate title for this puzzle) 127 Jack of fitness fame 128 Wisdom goddess 129 Ogle 130 Climbed, as a rope 131 Not so fat 132 Disco effect DOWN 1 Oohs and — 2 Jaguar mark

3 Look sulky 4 Nobody — (only mine) 5 Store assistant 6 Marisa of Hollywood 7 Cabo’s peninsula 8 “I believe,” to texters 9 — diem 10 Wallach of Hollywood 11 NFL great Mike 12 “Know what I’m —?” (“Get it?”) 13 City north of Mecca 14 Vocalist DiFranco 15 USMC NCO 16 Provider of dishes 17 Quick-footed 18 Film rolls 19 Thing of use 24 Sagacious 28 Slim and muscular 31 Mod 32 Idealistic 33 Painter Jan van der — 34 The Bard’s “— of Athens” 35 Place in trust 36 “Black Ice” rock band 37 Active sort 38 Stud fee? 40 It’s a must 43 One behind a batter 44 Oman’s currency unit 45 Blah feeling 46 Muscle jerk 47 Wince at, e.g. 49 Mad as heck 50 Lawn bowling game 51 Many Punjabis, religionwise 54 Mall station 58 Nauru and Fiji’s area 60 Pirate realm 61 Guy playing bebop, say 63 John at the piano 65 Purse 68 Shrill flutes 69 Dazzled 70 T-bar user 72 Bettor’s slip 73 Less cloudy 74 Diner 77 Allotment 81 Whig’s rival 83 Florida city 84 Capote, to friends 86 Rice-A- — 88 Thing split in fission 89 Dog in Oz 90 Dunkable treat 94 Aleutian island 96 San Diego ball team 98 Actor Fraser 99 Not single-sex, as a school 100 Decide (to) 102 Jubilant 105 Lower cheeks

106 — the Hittite 107 Vocalist Frankie 108 Rebels’ ring 109 Sermonize 111 Seed cases 112 Basic belief 113 Fury

By Frank Longo

116 Argue (with) 117 Streamlined, for short 118 Uncolorful 119 Punta del — 121 Channel for Jake Tapper 122 Meth- ender

Sudoku

Easy

124 Third of a dance move 125 Writer Kesey 126 Article in Arles Crossword answers: page 20

by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan

Sudoku answers: page 20


04.07.2017 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 51

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

BACK PAGE Community Voices

Life Is So Daily with Steve Wong

Over Coffee

Talking about nothing much can mean everything “Hey, Bruce,” I say every Tuesday at about 9:30 a.m., as my friend ambles into the coffee shop, arcing toward the back of the room by way of the counter. I usually get there first, probably because of my deep-seated fear of being late for anything. My New York-style “regular” coffee (two sugars, one cream) and iPhone are laid out on my side of the table, and I’m settled, ready for our weekly conversation about… well, just about anything. Over the months, the barista has come to recognize our faces and anticipate our orders. Bruce always gets coffee and at least one refill; sometimes he gets a pastry or muffin. Except for his coffee, he likes sweets. I usually get coffee, but it all depends on if I’ve been having problems sleeping again or if I’ve been anxious about something. If caffeine is giving me the jitters, I opt for lemonade. “Hey,” he returns as he sits down across from me. I don’t think Bruce is a morning person. His eyes are glassy, and his normal laid-back demeanor is in low gear. He’ll perk up once his coffee arrives. He’s addicted, he admits, drinking about eight cups per day. We never know where the conversation will go or even how it will start, but that’s okay. Just silently sitting, drinking, and thinking for a few moments is fine. There’s no pressure to say anything at all, but there is the unspoken truth that we really enjoy our coffee klatch of two adult men. We casually but methodically touch base with each other during the week to make sure we both can make the appointment. If something comes up for either of us, we adjust our schedules accordingly. That’s no biggie, but we will meet at some time that week — it’s a priority. We have our old standbys: national politics, food, Trump, social media, religion, literature, science fiction, cinema, local news, current social issues, family, personal setbacks, and triumphs since last week. Sports, wives, and work hardly ever get on the agenda. Topics segue into each other seamlessly. We are both prone to endlessly surfing the internet for different and deviant news sources and comparing how the media presents a topic. Somehow we always manage to take a current world issue — like national leadership or transgender people — and relate it to a “Star Trek” episode, the Bible, or a classic novel. We don’t always agree with each other, but then we don’t disagree either. Among other things, he’s a minister, firm in his faith. I’m a backslider of the worst kind, among other things. We are both pretty liberal in

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a conservative kind of way. And that’s okay. Actually, that is very okay. He’s never offered to pray for me or with me, but he often uses scripture to illustrate a point. I often share my negative experiences with religion with him, but in a respectful and logical frame. If he does pray for me (and I bet he does), I don’t mind and respect him even more for not saying so. Man-to-man friendships have been a trendy social concern in recent years. How many times have statistics said that having a “friend” is likely to extend a man’s life? About as many times the statistics have said it is nearly impossible for a man to make or have a true

If it weren’t for the workplace and the sports arena, men would probably never gather. friend once he enters adulthood. I believe it. If it weren’t for the workplace and the sports arena, men would probably never gather. And even then, they gather for a reason other than to just be with each other. They gather to “do something,” like work, watch a sport, fix a car, or accompany their wives to a social function.

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The word “bromance” has become an official word in the dictionary, after making the social media and entertainment rounds. Unfortunately, it carries all sorts of goofy, sexual, and “Dumb and Dumber” connotations. American society is so uncomfortable with men being simple friends that we make it the butt of every convenient, cheesy, and pathetic joke. “I wonder why that is the case?” I might ask Bruce next week. He probably won’t really know, but he’s very likely to compare it to a Bible story or tell me about how two superheroes in a comic book once handled the situation. What are real friends for if they can’t at least attempt to answer one of life’s most unimportant questions? I believe it’s my turn to pay for the coffee. Steve Wong is a writer living in the peach orchards of Gramling in northern Spartanburg County. Reach him at Just4Wong@gmail.com.

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April 7, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

April 7, 2017 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.