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IN THIS ISSUE

PAMELA EVETTE GETS POLITICAL // POLICE CHIEF: MORE OFFICERS NEEDED // BRANTLEY GILBERT LIVE

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Chris Sermons of Bio-Way Farm with Evie. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal

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“This has the potential for me to help a much greater group of people. Not because I’m some savant, but I think I come at it with a fresh set of eyes and a fresh perspective.” Pamela Evette, president/CEO of Quality Business Solutions and candidate for S.C. lieutenant governor, on her decision to run for elected office

“Originally, I wanted to be a bass player. I didn’t want to follow my family’s path at all.” Musician AJ Ghent, on his initial hesitation to pick up the lap-steel guitar, an instrument played by his father and great-uncle

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Orchid Trends

LEADING BY EXAMPLE

by Martin Garden Center

There are some hot trends going on with cool orchids right now. Yes, orchids are fabulous in a porous pot by themselves. They like a medium that drains well. (We recommend Espoma Orchid Mix and Espoma Orchid Bark.) Standing all alone, orchids are simply lovely. But the latest trend is to brazenly combine orchids in a pot with other exotic plants to create a fizzy, ooooh-so-nice, showstopping centerpiece. Some fabulous combinations are orchids with bromeliads, small fiddle leaf fig plants, bright kalanchoes, or blooming nonstop begonias to name a few. Or why not try low growing peperomias or a sweet pilea as a green base with a gorgeous orchid taking center stage? The trick to using orchids in combinations with other plants is to keep the orchid in its own “grow pot” within the arrangement. This will allow for the orchid’s unique watering requirements. Pop the orchid out of the container into your sink and water separate from the rest of the arrangement allowing time to drain. Voila! Done. Another hot trend in orchids are the hanging orchid balls. Imagine... suspended in air a bubbly blooming orchid, wrapped in vigorous, lucious green moss, and natural soft twiggery holding the whole thing together? What a fun project! Or skip the project and come by to see our swinging orchid balls. Orchid passion is reaching a new wild high. Are you with us?

Travelers Rest businesswoman Pamela Evette is tackling politics with entrepreneurship and an eye toward strategic solutions WORDS BY JORDANA MEGONIGAL PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Not just your Grandmother’s orchid anymore. Hot combos! Martin Garden Center

Tips & Tricks

• We recommend a water soluble all-

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• Make your orchid extra happy by

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• Orchids like bright, but indirect light. Bright green, healthy leaf color is a good indicator of a happy plant.

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P

amela Evette has never done anything “halfway” in her entire life. According to the entrepreneur, it’s not even in her vocabulary. So it makes sense that when she decided to run for an elected office — something she has wanted to do for a long time — it wasn’t for city council; it was for lieutenant governor. It’s a seemingly big jump for Evette, who is best known for her leadership of Quality Business Solutions, an outsourced payroll and HR benefits firm based in the Upstate. Under her, QBS has become

known for its growth and impact — showing up regularly on lists for fastest growing companies, best places to work, and Top 20 across the state. At the same time, Evette has been recognized for her own work, from the Athena Leadership award locally to the Enterprising Women of the Year award, which recognizes female entrepreneurship globally. That leadership has offered her a number of opportunities, one of which was sitting at a dinner table with then-Gov. Nikki Haley and a few other businesswomen a little more than a year ago. It was there that she asked Haley, “So what’s next for

you?” At that point, prior to her appointment to the United Nations as U.S. ambassador, Haley reportedly shrugged it off and turned the question back to Evette. To which Evette replied, “I want to be you.” Not long after, at an inaugural event for newly elected President Donald Trump, Evette met the incoming Gov. Henry McMaster through mutual friends. They aligned over casual conversation about state issues and business and, with no other agenda, left the event on common ground. Evette was impressed by McMaster, and not long after, McMaster called her to Columbia for a meeting, where he


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 5

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM asked her to run alongside him in the 2018 campaign. While it wasn’t an easy decision, Evette notes, it was one she quickly settled into, and she quickly came to see McMaster as a mentor in this new venture. “I got excited; I’ve always wanted to do something bigger than myself, and with more potential. It’s bigger than just making something for my family,” she says. “This has the potential for me to help a much greater group of people. Not because I’m some savant, but I think I come at it with a fresh set of eyes and a fresh perspective.” With that fresh perspective comes another driving force: the desire to uphold and promote the American dream, something Evette feels has been lost in recent years. Drawing on her own family history of “crazy Polish immigrants,” as she affectionately calls them, the concept of hoping big and working together toward common successes has resonated with her. “I felt like I needed to get more involved because I thought the American dream was something that we’re losing grip of,” Evette says. “My family ... didn’t know the language or the people. They relied on all the people who came before them. It was instilled in them that you can’t get the American dream on your own. Everybody helping helps get you there.” However, she notes, part of attaining that dream has been hindered by business regulation — something she wants to address head on. “I think I bring a great perspective coming from business, because I deal with businesses of all sizes — from large publicly traded companies to small one-man

Who’s Announced They’re Running in 2018? Your cheat sheet for this year’s S.C. Gubernatorial Race • Kevin Bryant (R), lieutenant governor • Phil Cheney (D), director, Oconee County Public Library • Yancey McGill (R), former state senator • Henry McMaster (R), South Carolina governor (incumbent) • Phil Noble (D), co-founder, Envision South Carolina; owner, Phil Noble and Associates • James Smith (D), state representative • Catherine Templeton (R), former director, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control; former director, S.C. Department of Labor, Licensing, and Regulation • John Warren (R), CEO, LimaOne

groups,” she notes. “When you are overburdened and overtaxed, there’s nothing left, and now you can’t offer what you want to give to your employees.” The example is personal, of course, as Evette and her husband, David, have had to address those same issues in their own business — to the point where there were years when they debated growing the business any more, to avoid the additional burdens. “I completely believe that people do not start a busi-

ness to not offer a great environment for their employees,” she says. “I think what happens is you start a business and you have all these amazing intentions, and the bigger you get, you get hit with more and more regulations. Then before you know it, you’re scaling back.” Now, as she faces what will undoubtedly be a significant campaign with at least eight gubernatorial contenders coming to a head this year, Evette’s focus remains on growing the business economy in South Carolina to the benefit of all its citizens. “If you can get more businesses in the state and provide a great place for them to thrive, then you can attract more quality teachers, build infrastructure, and really turn around some of our cities,” Evette says. “But if you can’t get jobs there and you can’t get infrastructure better, how can you help them?” Evette, who firmly believes in the motto “a high tide raises all ships,” knows that such a change will take time, but she is willing to take that time to give back to create a true legacy — not only in honor of her “crazy immigrant” family, but out of respect for the state she calls home. “Small business is what keeps this state going,” she says. “Throwing money at a problem is only going to fix a problem temporarily, so we really have to come up with strategic solutions. I think that’s what I’m passionate about: How do we really make an impact where it’s most needed?” INTERESTED IN FOLLOWING EVETTE’S CANDIDACY? FIND HER ONLINE AT PAMELAEVETTE.COM.

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CHIEF: MORE POLICE NEEDED Increasing pressure on downtown patrol from entertainment district, protestors WORDS BY CINDY LANDRUM Downtown Greenville is attracting more people day and night, prompting Police Chief Ken Miller to ask to create a separate unit to patrol the city’s entertainment district. As Greenville grows and downtown becomes even more popular — for living, working, playing, and protesting — the city’s police department is taxed to keep up. The city’s downtown residential population is increasing — it is estimated that about 7,000 people now live there. There are 1,484 residential units under construction and another 142 in the planning stages. Another 28,800 people work downtown during the day. One hundred twenty-five restaurants and 25 bars operate in the central business district from Beattie Place to Markley Street. Ten hotels are operating now, and four are under construction. Two more are planned. The Greenville Health System Swamp Rabbit Trail attracts more than 500,000 visitors per year; the Cancer Survivors Park is nearing completion; and plans for City Park, the city’s new signature park on the western edge of downtown, are being developed. There were 445 special events held in Greenville last year, and 99 percent of them occurred in the central business district. The Bon Secours Wellness Arena, Peace Center, and Fluor Field increase the downtown population during the day and at night, and sometimes all three venues have events for which the Greenville Police Department has to provide traffic control at the least, Miller said. In addition, downtown Greenville has become the preferred spot for political protests and demonstrations.

“It’s the new norm,” Mayor Knox White said. Sometimes, protests and counter-protests are held at the same time, requiring police to ensure that each side is able to have their say while preventing skirmishes that have turned violent in other places. “Everybody wants to be here to make a statement,” said City Manager John Castile. The police department’s entertainment district unit, which would patrol from Markley Street near Fluor Field in the West End to Beattie Street near the Hyatt, would work from 3 p.m. to 3 a.m. to coincide with downtown’s peak hours. Miller wants two squads of eight officers and one sergeant each. Six officers assigned to Zone 1, which includes downtown, now provide coverage. The department also uses extra-duty officers on their days off, but Miller said those officers are not a consistent, viable solution because they are not trained in the laws specifically affecting downtown such as permits and ordinances pertaining to noise and street performers. “Providing proactive coverage is challenging for us,” Miller said. The entertainment district unit would patrol on foot, bicycles, or electric motorcycles. The cost of the unit hasn’t been determined yet, but Miller said it takes the better part of a year for an officer to hit the street. Miller told City Council members the new unit along with the extra-duty officers hired by downtown establishments would give the department “the right mix and presence.”

DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE BY THE NUMBERS

10

Hotels in operation (four more are under construction and another two are planned)

114

Merchants in central business district

125

Restaurants in downtown between Beattie Street to Markley Street

445

Special events

1,484

Residential units under construction

7,000

Estimated residential population

8,000

Parking spaces

City considers building its own public safety complex The Greenville Police Department needs space. So do the Greenville Fire Department and the city’s Municipal Court. It could cost up to $33 million for the city to build its own public safety complex to house all three. The Greenville Police Department has shared space in the Law Enforcement Center with the Greenville County Sheriff’s Office since it was built in 1976. Space there is at such a premium that Police Chief Ken Miller had to negotiate with Sheriff Will Lewis so the city wouldn’t lose its locker room when the sheriff reorganized his department and needed more space. The fire department’s administration is split between two floors of City Hall and the TD Convention Center. “We’ve not had our headquarters under one roof since it was torn down for the Marriott Courtyard next

door,” Fire Chief Stephen Kovalcik said. Municipal Court is located at 426 N. Main St. in a building constructed in 1946. The building lacks a large gathering space for jury pools. It also has no central heat and air conditioning. It uses window units instead. The police department also uses part of that building. Miller asked the City Council’s public safety and government committee to authorize City Manager John Castile to identify suitable relocation options. Miller said ideally the public safety complex would be located in the city’s central business district because it would be closer to circuit and federal courts, the jail, and the police department’s property and evidence division. It would provide visibility as well. If the complex is located downtown, it’s likely the city would have to renovate an existing building, Miller said.

If the complex is located outside of downtown, Miller said raw land options are more plentiful and the facility would likely be new construction. He said the complex would have to be located on a transportation route and between Interstate 385 and East Faris Road. He identified Pleasantburg as an ideal location. City Manager John Castile said it’s time the consideration of a city public safety complex move from the discussion stage. “I think we’re at a point where we need to elevate this discussion to what this would look like and feel like, the cost associated with it, and how we would fund it,” he said. Castile said it took years for the city to move its public works complex. A new $25 million public works complex opened late last year, paving the way for construction of the new City Park. -Cindy Landrum


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Nat Geo Travel ranks Greenville No. 3 in Best Cities in US Greenville has been named No. 3 on National Geographic Travel’s Best Cities in the United States. The list spotlights the resurgence of cities throughout the U.S., and cities that have focused on revamping their main streets, urban renewal, and development policies that encourage happy residents. The write-up on Greenville reads, “Now known for its start-up spirit and urbane downtown, Greenville makes our hot list for its numbers of butchers, delis, and steakhouses. Savor a steak at Halls Chophouse, then head to Falls Park, where a nearly 40-foot natural waterfall churns just off Main Street, and a pedestrian-only

bridge curves gracefully overhead.” “According to our guests, it’s true,” says Chris Stone, president of VisitGreenvilleSC, on the city’s high ranking. “Greenville has gained a worthy reputation as an unexpected travel surprise for curious discovery seekers! Nat Geo’s accolade is yet another nod from the many global travel brands who’ve written so glowingly about our destination. This list specifically calls out leaders in urban renewal, smart community planning, and metrics pointing out overall happiness. No doubt, Greenville’s a world leader in happiness, surprise, and delight!” —Sara Pearce

Livability names Greenville one of Top 100 Best Places to Live

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Greenville has been named one of the Top 100 Best Places to Live 2018 by Livability. com. Greenville beat out more than 2,100 cities (with populations between 20,000 and 350,000) for a spot on the list, which is an independent editorial ranking by Livability.com that builds on a process initially developed by urban theorist Richard Florida. “The 2018 Best Places to Live list includes a fascinating mix of familiar cities and first-timers that are starting to carve out a reputation as wonderful places to live,” says Winona Dimeo-Ediger, Livability’s managing editor. Greenville ranked especially high in

the categories of education, housing, and economy. “Greenville is a city with a strong job market that helps draw many young professionals to live and work,” the description reads. “Higher education options include Furman, North Greenville, and Bob Jones universities, and this fastgrowing city features two main health care systems along with a downtown district that has become a destination for dining, shopping, entertainment, and increased housing.” In 2016, Livability also named Greenville No. 3 in the Top 10 Best Downtowns in America. —Sara Pearce

Peace Center offers book-lending program for ‘The Color Purple’ The Tony Award-winning Best Musical Revival “The Color Purple” is coming to the Peace Center from March 13-18. To promote this show, the Peace Center is hosting a book-lending program where the public may borrow the classic 1982 Alice Walker novel. The Peace Center has 50 copies available that may be borrowed for two weeks at a time. The books are free, but there is a limit of one book per household. “The Color Purple” follows a young African-American woman who finds love and triumph in rural Georgia during a time when racism runs rampant. The book is often considered to be for more mature

audiences due to the violence portrayed in it. The book covers issues such as race, violence, family relationships, and the culture of the American South in the 1930s. A free book discussion will be moderated by Glenis Redmond, Peace Center poet-inresidence, on Sunday, March 18, at 4 p.m. in the Huguenot Mill, located at 101 W. Broad St. Registration is required by visiting www. peacecenter.org/TCPBook. Tickets for “The Color Purple” are available through the Peace Center box office by calling 864-467-3000 or visiting www.peacecenter.org. Tickets start at $35. —Sara Pearce


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“Race, Sex, and Politics”

Luke 21:5-19 Psalm 82

PRESENTED AND PAID FOR BY WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

I

n the summer of 1971, I went to be co-director of a Salvation Army day camp in Harlem in New York City. To call this cultural shock would be a bit of an understatement. I had never lived and seldom visited above the Mason Dixon line. And, I had never been to New York City. And, of course, there was all the myth, mystery, and mayhem associated with the name Harlem. The only element of this new residence and job that gave me some comfort was the knowledge that I was comfortable around black people. I went to school with African Americans, played church league basketball with them, refereed games between white and black teams, and played on the team coached by my next door neighbor when he integrated the town’s Little League by bringing on the first African American to play baseball. So, I believed I was prepared for this adventure. But, a memory and life lesson that remains with me to this day occurred in my first week in Harlem. I lived on the fourth floor of the Salvation Army building on 125th Street. I had been down to 86th Street, in the posh part of town, where the mayor lived, to visit my codirector. Around midnight, I took the subway back to my room. At each stop between 86th and 125th Streets, I noticed a significant change. My fellow riders went from a mixture of white and black to only black, except for me. All of a sudden, it struck me that everyone I could see, in my subway car, and the adjoining cars, were African American. There was a policeman, but he was also black, which made me wonder how motivated he would be to help me. For the first time in my life, I was in the minority. Unlike being the poorest kid in your class, or the worst basketball player, this was a difference immediately visible to everyone. For the first time I experienced what it was like to be visibly, unmistakably different from everyone surrounding me. And I had no idea if these people who looked different from me would find that offensive, irritating, or threatening. In many ways, America is at a turning point. We continue to divide by ethnicity, wealth, political ideas, or any other way that we differentiate ourselves from others. We often blame politicians for this. And that blame is surely justified as they have exploited these differences for their political ambitions. But they have only been able to do this because we have allowed it, and often encouraged it. Segregating ourselves into our own little tribes of ethnicity, religion, socio-economic status and education, we are losing the desire to understand what it feels like to be a minority, to seek the experience of those different from us, to love one another, to be the Good Samaritan, to eat with tax collectors and sinners, like Jesus taught us. As we begin a new year, I want to discuss three areas where people of faith, you and I, must begin to make a difference for the good of our country, for the future of our children, for our own spiritual lives. This past fall, I was a participant in the Furman Riley Institute’s Diversity Leadership Initiative. Most of the comments and information brought forth were familiar to me. I was aware of the statistics concerning wage disparities between men and women, white, black and Hispanic. Like most of you, I have read about the racial imbalance in the prison population, studies revealing racial prejudice in hiring. But what caught me completely off guard was to hear upper middle class African Americans, people who live in the same neighborhoods as me, drive the same cars, go to the same schools, do the same jobs, talk about how they train their teenage sons to act when stopped by the police. They teach them to put both hands on the steering wheel, make no sudden movements, and ask permission to reach for their registration and license. For African American parents, there is a great fear of a routine traffic stop turning into an act of violence.

Now, my guess is that most of you told your teenage son what I told mine: “Don’t worry about the police stopping you. Your trouble is going to begin when you get home and have to face me.” It never crosses our minds about the police harming our children. Yet, for people of color, statistics and the evening news reveal that this is a legitimate threat.

Questions such as: Do we want our children to breathe clean air and drink clean water? Do we want all of God’s children to have access to health care? Do we want people everywhere to be fed and have shelter?

Now, please don’t take this as a general condemnation of law enforcement. Brave young men and women in blue put their lives on the line every day. But, our tolerance of racial hatred, racial discrimination will manifest itself in all areas of our society, from our churches to those paid to protect us. At the highest levels of government and sometimes in our churches, racism is being greeted with a soft condemnation at best and a wink and a nod at worst.

These should not be hard questions for people of faith to answer. We may differ in how to realize these goals, but people committed to achieving them will find a way to compromise and move forward.

Racism is a cancer on our society. It is contrary to the gospel of Jesus Christ. It is contrary to the American Constitution. It has, and will, sour everything from our schools to our businesses to our churches. It is time for people of faith, for you and me, to vociferously, relentlessly, and loudly declare racism as evil. And we must teach our children this important biblical truth. Seeing and/or treating another human being as inferior is contrary to the divine creation, contrary to the will of Almighty God.

You may believe it is your right to Social Security, Medicare, or a larger defense budget, but what is your responsibility for the federal deficit?

Second, the verbal and physical exploitation of women must be condemned in the strongest terms. Men and women are made in the image of God. As Christians, we see Christ in each person. Otherwise, men and women are equal partners in the Kingdom of God. To be honest, the Christian Church does not have a great record when it comes to gender roles. Too often, when viewing males and females, it has tilted more toward the culture than the Bible. The good news is that elements of the Church have been at the forefront of gender equality, often dragging the rest of the Church kicking and screaming behind it. The biblical truth is that men and women are equal in the sight of God. That doesn’t deny biological differences. But those differences do not produce discrepancies in value, worth, ability, or control of their bodies and destinies. I have to admit I have been stunned by the level of sexual abuse, harassment and violence that is now being revealed. Yet, when you ask women about their experiences, especially at work, you discover this exploitation is not all that unusual.

From every political position I hear people talk about rights. But I never hear anyone speak about responsibility. You may believe it is your right to a tax cut, but what is your responsibility to infrastructure, health care for the poor, military families?

You may believe it is your right to own a gun. But what is your responsibility to keep them out of the hands of those who should not have that right? You may believe it is your right to decide what to do with your body. But what is your responsibility to the unborn? You may believe it is your right to demand rights for the unborn. But what is your responsibility to the already born – medical insurance for the poor, adequate food for the hungry, childcare for the indigent? You may believe it is your right to run your business as you please. But what is your responsibility to your employees about fair wages and benefits? You may believe people have a right to affordable health care. But what is your responsibility when it comes to paying more taxes to fund that? There, I tried to step on everyone’s toes. If I left you out, email me, I’m sure I can come up with something just for you. These issues are not Democrat, Republican, Independent, liberal, or conservative. They speak to basic Christian values – the worth of every single person as a child of God and our responsibility as Christians in building the kingdom of God.

It is time for Christians, people of faith, to reaffirm in their own lives the value of all of God’s children. We must teach our sons and daughters, and ourselves, that “No” means No. That no one possesses the right to make physical demands of another person. That no gender is superior, or inferior, to the other. That the hopes, dreams, aspirations, abilities, and goals of women are just as important as those of men. It is time for people of faith to be role models in how men and women interact at work, at home, and at church.

As Christians, we acknowledge our sinfulness, our imperfections. This basic confession enables us to see that we are not always right, that sometimes we make bad choices, which means we are open to hearing other suggestions. Understanding our own inadequacies, we decide to work with others, to hear the views of those with whom we disagree, always in the context of asking ourselves, “What would Jesus do?”

Third, it is time for our faith to have a say in our personal politics. I believe it can safely be said that we now value politics over faith. When given a choice between a person of Christian principles or someone who agrees with our politics, we are increasingly choosing politics. The manipulation of religion for personal political goals or power is likely as old as humanity itself. Which is all the more reason for us to resist it. The Bible constantly warns us about the pursuit of money and power over God.

We often forget that Jesus dealt with these issues all the time. Race – a Samaritan helping a Jew. Sex – preventing the stoning of the woman taken in adultery. Politics – eating with government tax collectors.

We have witnessed the emergence of a corrosive political environment. At its heart rests a belief that I am right and anybody who does not agree with me is wrong and must be rejected. This arrogance has clouded our vision, produced leaders whose allegiance is to political party, and drawn us into positions refusing compromise, or even discussion.

WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

2310 Augusta Road • 864-232-2424

That is Christian leadership. “Race, Sex, and Politics”

The struggles of race, sex, and politics are not new. Nor are the consequences of ignoring them. Starting with creation, right up through Jesus and the Apostle Paul, the Bible is very clear concerning each and every human being having been made in the very image of God. Therefore each and every human being is to be loved, nurtured, fed, clothed, cared for, and treated as if he or she was God. The Kingdom of God, God’s plan for humanity will only come when we decide those very principles of love, justice, respect, and responsibility must, and will be spoken, lived, and voted through each one of us. Today, are you ready to begin?

The full text or YouTube video of this sermon can be found at www.wpc-online.org.

Parking is available at the Augusta Commons Mall and the Uniform Shop.

WORSHIP SERVICES: 9:00 & 11:15am | CHURCH SCHOOL: 10:00am Pastors: Ludwig L. Weaver, Barbara Stoop, Leigh Stuckey, Mary Kathleen Duncan, Jean Weaver, Amos Workman Ludwig L. Weaver

www.wpc-online.org | facebook.com/wpcgreenville | youtube.com/c/wpcgreenville


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 11

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A FRESH FACE AT FLUOR FIELD

Former minor league shortstop Iggy Suarez ready for new job as Drive manager

WORDS BY ANDREW MOORE | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Iggy Suarez is no stranger to the world of professional baseball. The New York native spent just over a decade on the diamond as a minor league infielder and quickly worked his way up the Boston Red Sox coaching ladder after retirement. Now he’s looking to mold the Greenville Drive’s young ball players into potential major leaguers. Last month, the Drive, Boston’s Class-A South Atlantic League affiliate, announced that Suarez, 36, would become the team’s eighth manager in franchise history this spring and replace Darren Fenster, who was recently promoted to manager of the Portland Sea Dogs in Maine. “I couldn’t be happier to join the Drive organization for the upcoming season,” Suarez said. “Fluor Field is a first-class venue, and to have the opportunity to continue the outstanding work this organization has done on and off the field is very special.” Growing up in the borough of Queens in New York City, Suarez discovered his love for baseball at an early age and eventually earned a starting spot on the varsity team at John Bowne High School. He also spent several seasons with the Youth Service League, a community sports organization in Brooklyn that’s produced notable major leaguers such as former Boston Red Sox outfielder Manny Ramirez, who is among baseball’s all-time best hitters. Following a stellar senior season, Suarez, a 5-foot-10 shortstop, was selected in the 34th round of the 1999 MLB Draft by the Texas Rangers. Suarez, however, opted to get an education and play college baseball at Texas State University, where he quickly became a standout player. In 2002, Suarez had a breakout junior season and hit .323 with 37 runs, 22 runs batted in, and 15 bases stolen.

That summer, he joined the elite Cape Cod League and helped the Wareham Gatemen to a championship win alongside current Atlanta Braves pitcher Scott Kazmir. “Those years in college helped tremendously. It helped me grow as a ball player and as a person,” Suarez said. “But there were times when I regretted not signing after high school. When I went undrafted my sophomore and junior years of college, the idea of not playing baseball after my senior year started to kick in, and it took a toll mentally. That feeling of not knowing was going on in my head. But it all worked out.” Suarez continued to demonstrate a strong bat and reliable glove throughout the remainder of his collegiate career, earning a reputation as one of the nation’s top collegiate prospects. He was ultimately selected by the Boston Red Sox in the 24th round of the 2003 MLB Draft and assigned to the Lowell Spinners, a short-season affiliate in Massachusetts. After toiling for three seasons, Suarez was promoted to the Portland Sea Dogs, Boston’s Double-A affiliate. His most productive season came in 2008 when he hit .242/.307/.328 with five home runs, 15 steals, and 50 runs batted in. In 2009, Suarez was promoted again and sent to the Pawtucket Red Sox, Boston’s Triple-A affiliate. But he only appeared in 20 games. Suarez’s contract with the Boston Red Sox was terminated following the 2009 season, so he decided to join the independent Atlantic League. In 2013, after playing four seasons with six different teams, Suarez was forced to call it quits when his hand was broken by a pitch. “It got me on my left hand and broke two bones,” Suarez said. “But that wasn’t the deciding factor. The grind of multiple baseball seasons was taking [a] toll [on my] body and it became difficult to prepare for a full season.

… That’s when I knew that my time was up.” After his playing days, Suarez settled down in Texas and began coaching third base for a local youth baseball team. But it wasn’t enough to keep him away from the big leagues. Luckily, when Suarez wanted to return, he had the connections in Boston to make it happen. Suarez returned to the Boston Red Sox in 2014 as a hitting coach and assistant instructor for the Lowell Spinners. He was then promoted to manager during the offseason. In 2016, Suarez led the team to a 47-29 record and first-place finish in the New York Penn League.

DID YOU KNOW?

The Greenville Drive was the only Boston Red Sox affiliate to make it to the playoffs last year. The team faced off against the Kannapolis Intimidators in September to take home its first South Atlantic League Championship in franchise history. When he comes to Greenville, Suarez will have likely managed most of the Drive team at some point in their career. “As of right now, our roster is not set. But most likely I will have a lot of players I had last year in Lowell, which is good because having familiarity can be easier for players making that jump to the next level,” Suarez said. Suarez added that his experience as a minor league player will help him tremendously as he takes over the Greenville Drive. “Grinding through a baseball season is tough,” he said. “I just try to always remind myself that at some point I was in their shoes … and I try to let players know that I understand the hard times.”


12 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

PEOPLE BUY FROM PEOPLE.

Our Community

Community news, events, and happenings

COMPETITION

Smith Moore Leatherwood announces winner of Furman art competition

91% of people buy from people they know or have heard of. Let people get to know you — it will make a lasting impression.

CHARITY

Upstate SC STEM Collaborative chosen as a 2018 BMW Charity Pro-Am recipient

Smith Moore Leatherwood LLP hosted the third annual Furman University Juried Art Competition, which began Dec. 15 and concluded Jan. 11. John Derek Parsons, a senior at Furman, was selected as the winner. Parsons created a series of woodblock prints entitled “On the Trail” and “Summertime on the Trail.” Parsons’ work depicts “an American landscape in illustrative compositions that highlight ways that human interaction with nature exists in today’s world.” The winning pieces were purchased by the firm and will become part of its permanent art collection. Another student, Jackson Goode, was awarded honorable mention for his collection of acrylic paintings, “Olivia: 0,” “Jeff: 17,” and “Rickie: 14.” “It is such a privilege to host the third annual Furman University Juried Art Competition,” said Tami McKnew, attorney at Smith Moore Leatherwood. “We are honored to encourage young artists in the Upstate and to continue this relationship with the university. Congratulations to John, Jackson, and to all the students who participated this year.”   PHILANTHROPY

United Housing Connections, Birds Fly South complete MLK Day service project

Behind The Counter has been the most popular business publication in the Upstate for the past 15 years. Featuring large, full bleed photos and interesting insights, the 2018 Behind The Counter promises to be a great read on great local businesses. Don’t miss the opportunity to feature your business in the upcoming edition – publishing on April 13.

For more information, call Community Journals at 864.679.1205

inspiration this morning with UHC. Small efforts can have big and lasting impacts,” said Ames Webb of Birds Fly South. The bags were distributed to those in need during the annual Point in Time Count, which measures homelessness.

United Housing Connections partnered with Birds Fly South Ale Project to host a donation drive for the homeless of Greenville. The drive took place on Jan. 13-14, and collected items such as socks, hats, gloves, and blankets. On Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 25 volunteers came to Birds Fly South to organize the donations and put together bags for those in need. The bags were distributed over the following week. “MLK Day reminds us, especially in this current political climate, to advocate for our diverse community and for social justice and equality. We’re full of hope and

Upstate SC STEM Collaborative has been announced as one of the Upstate nonprofit organizations to benefit from funds raised at the 2018 BMW Charity Pro-Am presented by SYNNEX Corporation. Upstate STEM Collaborative promotes and supports STEM education in the Upstate through partnerships and community engagement. The Collaborative works to leverage resources to increase STEM opportunities for K-12 students and better prepare them for high-demand careers. The Upstate SC STEM Collaborative is best known for its annual iMAGINE Upstate STEAM Festival, one of the largest festivals of its kind in South Carolina, which emphasizes science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics. The iMAGINE Upstate STEAM festival is free and will be held April 7 at Fluor Field. NONPROFIT

Twenty graduate from Goodwill’s YouthBuild Greenville Goodwill Industries of Upstate/Midlands South Carolina held a graduation ceremony on Friday, Jan. 12, to recognize 20 members who have successfully completed the YouthBuild Greenville program. YouthBuild Greenville, which is funded by the United States Department of Labor, offers out-ofschool youth from ages 17-24 free services, including GED instruction by certified teachers, occupational skills, training for the construction industry, and the opportunity to receive certification. Additionally, participants receive paid work experience at Habitat for Humanity build sites, leadership training, and community service activities, as well as other supportive services. The curriculum includes three months of GED instruction and classroom construction training, and three to five months of build site work experience. Once the program is successfully completed, participants are equipped to enter the workforce or pursue further education. Out of the 20 graduates, 11 completed the GED, 14 have earned the HBI PACT certificate from the Home Builder’s Institute, and eight members are already employed and working.


WWW.LEGACY.COM/OBITUARIES/GREENVILLEJOURNAL

OBITUARIES & MEMORIALS Langhorne Cooke Hipp 1934-2018

Margaret F. Limbaugh

GREENVILLE – Langhorne Cooke Hipp, 83, wife of Thomas Allison Hipp, Sr. died Friday, January 26, 2018. Born in Lynchburg, Virginia she was daughter of the late Virginia Kinnier Cooke and Wylie Rountree Cooke and a proud Virginian throughout her life. She loved her church, her family and her heritage. After graduating from Converse College in 1956 she taught 4th grade in Greensboro, N.C. during her early married years. She owned and operated The Racquet Shop in Greenville with friends Frances Apperson and Betty Kulze for 15 years. She enjoyed sports and was an avid tennis player. When she wasn’t busy with work or with one of her many clubs, including the National Society of Colonial Dames, Junior League of Greenville, Elsie Haynesworth Garden Club, she loved taking art classes, spoiling her grandchildren and spending time at her family cabin located on the Maury River in the Shenandoah Valley where she would catch up her many cousins. She is survived by her husband of sixty years and children; The Reverend Al Hipp and wife Karen Bruning Hipp of Landrum, S.C., and Virginia Hipp Phillippi and husband Paul Phillippi of Simpsonville, S.C.; grandchildren; Thomas Allison Hipp III, Kenneth Jackson Hipp, Samuel Rodgers Hipp, and Virginia Langhorne Phillippi; and brothers; Thomas Russell Cooke and wife Virginia Cooke of Richmond, Virginia, and Wylie Rountree Cooke, Jr. and wife Holly Ward Cooke of Norfolk, Virginia. A service will be held at the chapel at Christ Church Episcopal Saturday, February 3, 2018 at 3:00pm with a reception following the service. The family would like to express sincere gratitude to Charlene Ramsey, the entire Palladium Hopsice team and the NHC Mauldin staff for their wonderful assistance and care. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations be made to: Alzheimer’s Association (www.alz.org/sc/); Christ Church Episcopal (www.ccgsc.org/); or Palladium Hospice (palladiumcare.com/locations/greenville/).

A Lasting Legacy | Submit to: obits@communityjournals.com The Greenville Journal is pleased to announce the addition of obituaries to our weekly print publication. Online obituaries and memorials will be shared on our website via a Legacy.com affiliation. Obituaries can be placed in person at our office located at 581 Perry Ave., Greenville; via email at obits@communityjournals.com; or our website, GreenvilleJournal.com. Feel free to email or visit for more information about deadlines, space restraints, and editorial requirements.

EASLEY – Margaret Foster Limbaugh, 89, wife of the

late Ammon Matthew Limbaugh, Jr., passed away Sunday, January 28, 2018. Born in Anderson County, she was a daughter of the late Columbus Ransom Foster and Myrlie Black Foster. Mrs. Limbaugh was a homemaker and member of Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church. Surviving are her children, Douglas Limbaugh, Matt Limbaugh, Bryan Limbaugh all of Easley, Brenda Cooper, of Hallsville, TX, Andrew Limbaugh of Fort Mill, Michael Limbaugh of Mauldin, Dianne Limbaugh of Kernerville, NC, Deborah Boynton of Greenville and Gwen Shipman of Powdersville; nineteen grandchildren; twenty nine great grandchildren; two sisters, Edith Day of Easley and Dellena Wilson of Piedmont; and a brother, Vealon Foster of Greenville. In addition to her husband and parents, Mrs. Limbaugh was also predeceased by a sister, Endel Roberts, a brother, Eston Foster, and a grandson, Timothy McKinney. Funeral services were held on Wednesday, January 31, 2018, at 2:00 p.m. at Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church with burial following the service at Corinth Baptist Church Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Mt. Pisgah Baptist Church, Building Fund, 101 Pisgah Road, Easley, SC 29642. Condolences may be expressed online by visiting robinsonfuneralhomes.com or in person at Robinson Funeral Home-Powdersville Road, which is assisting the family.

DEATH NOTICES FOR JAN. 24-29 LEO MICHAEL JOYCE, Mauldin, 80, died Jan. 27. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes.

CHARLES ALLEN CARTER, SR. “Red”, Greenville, 86, died Jan. 26. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes.

BERNIE ROBERT KOLTON, Greenville, 86, died Jan. 27. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes.

BETTY R. LONG, Greenville, 88, died Jan. 29. Arrangements by Mackey Mortuary.

WARREN EARL COGGINS, SIimpsonville, 63, died Jan. 25. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes. DONNIE ‘’DONNA’’ COURTEMANCHE, Greenville, 73, died Jan. 26. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes. MARGUERITE PITTMAN WHITTED, Greenville, 93, died Jan. 24. Arrangements by Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes.

MARY JAMES PEPPLE, Greenville, 98, died Jan. 27. Arrangements by Mackey Mortuary. KENNETH SALTZ, Greer, 86, died Jan. 26. Arrangements by Wood Mortuary. BETTY B. PRINCE, Greer, 79, died Jan. 25. Arrangements by Wood Mortuary. VELMA TINSLEY, Greer, 80, died Jan. 25. Arrangements by Wood Mortuary.

Plan for “someday” today.

Thomas McAfee Funeral Homes can help you plan ahead, allowing you to design personalized arrangements that are a reflection of you. Contact us to receive complimentary information about the following: Funeral Planning Guides Cost Estimates & Payment Plans Cremation Services

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14 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM SOCIAL SERVICES

Don Corleone had Tom Hagen Han Solo had Chewbacca Indiana Jones had Marcus Brody Aladdin had the Genie Holmes had Watson Batman had Alfred Dr. Evil had Number Two Maverick had Goose Damon had Affleck Chuck D had Flava Flav Lewis had Clark Cagney had Lacey Affleck had Damon Timmy had Lassie Wilbur had Mr. Ed Mr. Burns had Smithers Stan had Kyle Rod Tidwell had Jerry McGuire Biggie had Puff Murtaugh had Riggs Statler had Waldorf Kermit had Fozzie Zoolander had Hansel Bran had Hodor Swearingen had Dan Dority Goldfinger had Oddjob

SC Upstate Continuum of Care completes 2018 PIT Count The SC Upstate Continuum of Care held the Annual Point in Time (PIT) Count, which is a count of sheltered and unsheltered persons experiencing homelessness on a single night in January. This was conducted nationwide by HUD-designated Continuums of Care. Volunteers surveyed participants, provided each with a bag full of cold weather supplies, and offered to connect them with needed services. The purpose of the count is to take a snapshot of homelessness on a given night to better understand the resources needed to help secure housing, better allocate funding and resources, meet HUD reporting obligations, and generate detailed reports on the state of homelessness in our communities. The event occurred each night from Jan. 24-30. EDUCATION

Laurens Electric offers students free trips and scholarship opportunity Laurens Electric is offering two options of expense-paid scholarship trips for students in their junior year of high school. The Washington Youth Tour is a six-day fun and educational trip to Washington, D.C., and the Cooperative Youth Summit is a three-

day trip to Columbia. Participants will get the opportunity to meet with legislators in the House of Representatives and Senate in Washington, D.C., as well as tour historic sites and meet other students their age. During the state capital trip, students will go on a private tour of the S.C. Statehouse, meet with the governor or lieutenant governor, engage in team-building exercises, and learn about electric cooperatives and the co-op business model. While SAT scores, grade point averages, class standing, and other honors are considered, the primary considerations will be character and community involvement. The Washington Youth Tour will be June 9-14, 2018, and the Cooperative Youth Summit will be July 10-13, 2018. To apply, visit https://www.laurenselectric. com/YouthTour-YouthSummit or email LaurieR@LaurensElectric.com. Applications will be reviewed and up to 10 applicants will be selected for a personal interview. Four winners will be chosen among the 10 applicants. All four winners are also eligible to compete for a $5,000 scholarship. The scholarship winner is chosen based upon an essay, a personal interview, and the amount of interest and participation shown during the tour. The deadline for applications is Friday, Feb. 9. Submit community news items to www.greenvillejournal.com/submit.

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Real Estate News

Michelle Coleman Joins Coldwell Banker Caine in Greenville Coldwell Banker Caine recently welcomed Michelle Coleman as a residential sales agent to its Greenville office. Michelle joins Coldwell Coleman Banker Caine with previous experience as a U.S. Army Captain. During her time in the military, Michelle became Air-

borne and Air Assault qualified. From her military experience to now, as a licensed REALTOR, Michelle’s passion has always been helping people. When it comes to her business, Michelle strives for excellence, integrity, and diligence. She relocated to the Upstate over 8 years ago, and loves calling Greenville home with her husband and children. Michelle is active in her local church, and volunteers with her children’s school and the March of Dimes in her spare time. “We are honored to have Michelle

join our team,” said Stephen Edgerton, President and CEO of Coldwell Banker Caine. “Her proven leadership, and passion for people will make her an excellent addition to our office.”

In Charge of Highlands Sotheby’s International Realty in Western North Carolina has partnered with our office for her South Carolina Real Estate license. Owner and CEO Joan Herlong said, “this collaboration uniquely positions Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s Joan Herlong & Associates International Realty and Highlands SoSotheby’s International Realty theby’s International Realty to deliver partners with Highlands unparalleled Client Service, Local ExperSotheby’s International Realty tise, and Global Exposure to our listing Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s and buyer clients in SC’s Upstate, Lake International Realty is pleased to an- Keowee, Lake Hartwell, Lake Jocassee, nounce that Jody Lovell, Owner & Broker continued on PAGE 16


16 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

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Coldwell Banker Caine Hosting Artist Reception Exhibit, “A Marriage of Mediums”, Featuring Meredith and Douglas Piper

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and to NC’s luxury mountain communities of Highlands & Cashiers.” Jody has been a leader in the Highlands/Cashiers market for the last seventeen years. Formerly a lawyer with King and Spalding in Atlanta, she uses her high energy and attention to detail for her clients. A graduate of The Ohio State College of Law, she did postgraduate work at Oxford University in England. She received her LLM from King’s College in London. She was in the first class of US attorneys to qualify as English Solicitors. Jody is the top producing broker in Highlands/Cashiers entire MLS from 2010 through 2016. Jody has her Georgia Real Estate license with Atlanta Fine Homes Sotheby’s International Realty, and now has her South Carolina Real Estate license with Joan Herlong & Associates Sotheby’s International Realty. Says Lovell, “I look forward to leveraging this partnership to better serve my clients in South Carolina, and Joan Herlong & Associates’ clients in Western North Carolina’s luxury mountain communities. I am thrilled to be partnering with Joan Herlong’s company.”

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Coldwell Banker Caine will host an exhibit opening for its next resident artist(s) Meredith and Douglas Piper. The event will be held at the Main Street Real Estate Gallery at 428 South Main Street in Greenville on Thursday, January 25, from 6 – 8 p.m. The reception is free to attend and open to the public. Husband and wife duo, Meredith

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NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION TRAVELERS REST NEW LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS LOCATION 2111k North Pleasantburg 3245C Wade Hampton Dr Blvd 3245C Wade11Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy (just offREST Hwy 25) 3598 Hwy 11 (just 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr Wade Hampton Blvd 3598 Hwy 11 (just off Hwy 25) Greenville, Taylors,SC SC29609 29687 3245C Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 Travelers Rest, Greenville, SC 29609 Taylors, SC 29687 Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-241-3636 864-292-8207 864-292-8207 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 864-292-8207864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) 864-241-3636 (for

• New larger showroom

Greenville, SC 29609

••Experienced staffstaffstaff Experienced • Experienced

• 100’s of the latest styles

• 100’s • 100’s of the oflatest the latest styles styles

Maggie Aiken 2111k North Pleasantburg Dr NEW LOCATION

• New larger showroom

Remember

• FREE estimates

LOCATION TAYLORS LOCATION TRAVELERS REST LOCATION • Financing available • 1000’s 2111k ofNEW beautiful North Pleasantburg Dr colors 3245C Wade HamptonDeserve Blvd 3598 HwyOur 11 (just off Hwy 25) Your Feet Floors

Remember Remember Your Feet Deserve Your Feet OurDeserve Floors Our Greenville, SC 29609 864-241-3636

NEW LOCATION NEW LOCATION 2111k North 2111k Pleasantburg North Pleasantburg Dr Dr Greenville, Greenville, SC 29609 SC 29609 864-241-3636 864-241-3636

Taylors, SC 29687 864-292-8207

TAYLORS TAYLORS LOCATION LOCATION 3245C 3245C Wade Hampton Wade Hampton Blvd Blvd Taylors, Taylors, SC 29687 SC 29687 864-292-8207 864-292-8207

Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-241-3636 (for appointment)

TRAVELERS TRAVELERS REST LOCATION REST LOCATION 3598 Hwy 359811Hwy (just11off(just Hwy off25) Hwy 25) Travelers Travelers Rest, SC Rest, 29690 SC 29690 864-241-3636 864-241-3636 (for appointment) (for appointment)

Remember Your Feet Deserve Our Floors


OPEN SUNDAY, FEB. 4 from 2-4PM HERITAGE POINT

DILLARD CREEK ESTATES

http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/ZPAFGC/337-Heritage-Point-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1359312

http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/33895D/223-Ermon-Court-Greer-SC-1351214

337 Heritage Point Dr. • 5BR/4BA

223 Ermon Ct • 4BR/2.5BA

$400,000 · MLS# 1359312 Ramona Braun · 678-207-8537 CODE 4803428

MAGNOLIA PARK http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/5CMGR5/3-Spanish-Moss-Lane-Greer-SC-1359634

100 Gemstone Tr. • 4BR/3BA

$329,900 · MLS# 1351214 Lillian Lever · 979-7002 CODE 4555925

RIVERWOOD FARM

EASLEY http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/W7FRN4/100-Gemstone-Trail-Easley-SC-1359154

3 Spanish Moss Ln • 4BR/2.5BA

$309,900 · MLS# 1359154 Liz Cox · 266-0021 CODE 4798478

$284,900 · MLS# 1359634 Christopher Toates · 360-6696 CODE 4812175

OPEN NEW COMMUNITIES

ALSO OPEN

http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/N4C2X5/403-Clare-Bank-Drive-Greer-SC-1359646

HERITAGE POINT

http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/ZPAFGC/337-Heritage-Point-Drive-Simpsonville-SC-1359312

337 Heritage Point Dr. • 5BR/4BA $400,000 · MLS# 1359312 CODE 4803428 Ramona Braun · 678-207-8537

403 Clare Bank Dr. • 3BR/2.5BA $245,000 · MLS# 1359646 Trish Aston · 275-5452 CODE 4812185

COTTAGE GROVE

OAKS AT WOODFIN RIDGE

http://www.upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/AZPWJ7/100-TUPELO-Lane-LOT-25-Easley-SC-1356786

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/HAPBF2/112-Southern-Oaks-Drive-Inman-SC-240983

100 Tupelo Lane • 3BR/2.5BA

Sat. 10 am-4 pm Homes starting @ $247,900 112 Southern Oaks Dr. | CODE 4165177 Don Hazzard 909-0141

$249,900 · MLS# 1356786 CODE 4735645 Liz Nunnally · 415-7617

KENSINGTON CREEK

upstateschometours.cdanjoyner.com/home/CNG8RY/630-Cub-Branch-Drive-Spartanburg-SC-241013

Text each property’s unique CODE to 67299 for pictures and details.

Sat. 10 am-4 pm Homes starting @ $233,100 603 Cub Branch Road | CODE 4165183 Don Hazzard 909-0141

The Upstate's #1 real estate company has a new home on Main Street.

Agents on call this weekend

Jackie Garcia 818-397-8618 Pelham Road

Kimberly Arnold 616-7310 Garlington Road

Regina L. Salley 979-9646 Easley

Rhonda Kingen 918-2859 Simpsonville

Whitney McMeekin 270-1957 Augusta Road

John Paul Gilllis 252-5180 N. Pleasantburg Dr.

Jessica Glahn 879-4239 Greer

Avril Caviness 201-6860 Prop. Mgmt.

Rhett Brown 915-9393 Main Street

Interested in Buying or Selling a home? Contact one of our Agents on Call or visit us online at cdanjoyner.com


18 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

SOLD: Greenville Transactions For the week of Jan. 1 – 5, 2018 SUBD.

PRICE SELLER

$18,350,000 $2,500,000 $830,000 MONTEBELLO $630,000 BENNETTS CROSSING $590,000 PALAZZO DI MONTEBELLO $565,550 STONEWOOD MANOR $547,698 CLEAR SPRINGS $440,764 BELHAVEN PARC $409,900 WOODLAND PARK@CLEVELAND FOREST $400,000 CLEAR SPRINGS $380,000 TINSLEY PLACE $373,450 CLEAR SPRINGS $369,500 WESTHAVEN $358,544 SUMMIT AT PELHAM SPRINGS $325,000 MOUNT VERNON ESTATES $307,000 HIGHCREST TOWNES@HOLLINGSWORTH $291,065 $289,900 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $289,195 KINGSFIELD $283,915 LONGLEAF $272,156 AUTUMN TRACE $270,000 MOUNTAIN WATCH $269,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $267,428 HOLLIDAY HILLS $258,000 VICTORIA PARK $256,334 BRYSON MEADOWS $251,578 $250,000 WATSON CROSSING $249,900 VICTORIA PARK $248,626 BRYSON MEADOWS $240,743 COVENTRY $239,375 WINDERMERE $235,000 RAVENWOOD $235,000 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $235,000 ORCHARD FARMS $232,470 BRUTON WOODS $232,000 THE CLIFFS AT MOUNTAIN PARK $230,000 $227,400 FOX TRACE $220,000 WILLOW GROVE $211,120 SUMMERFIELD $208,000 TIMBERLAND TRAIL $205,000 PLANTERS ROW $200,000 WILLOW GROVE $198,990 JONES CREEK GARDENS $197,500 CEDAR RIDGE $194,000 WILLOW GROVE $190,885 SKYLAND SPRINGS $188,000 PIEDMONT PARK $186,750 WILLOW GROVE $185,000 $175,000 WOODS AT BONNIE BRAE $171,500 MEADOW FARMS $170,000 JONES CREEK GARDENS $170,000 WOODS AT BONNIE BRAE $170,000 PEACE HAVEN $165,900

DANIEL INTERNATIONAL COR RRS PROPERTIES L L C SIMMONS DANIEL L HYDE GARY K (JTWROS) DOLL DANIELLE (JTWROS) BLOOMER LAWRENCE J MERITAGE HOMES OF S C IN MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH ROSEWOOD COMMUNITIES INC BEATTIE PARK INC JONES HARRY N (JTWROS) SORENSON DONALD C MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH D R HORTON-CROWN LLC SIACHOS MARSHA OSBURN JONATHAN G (JTWRO NVR INC SOUTH CAROLINA ONE LLC NVR INC SK BUILDERS INC D R HORTON INC CRAIG FAMILY LIVING TRUS WILLIAMS JOANN P NVR INC BRIGHT CHRISTINA (JTWROS MERITAGE HOMES OF SC INC MUNGO HOMES INC HEARD JON D KRANSTEUBER JAKE (JTWROS MERITAGE HOMES OF SOUTH MUNGO HOMES INC SK BUILDERS INC MORGAN VICTOR L MCGEE DAVID URBANA CLIFFS RE LLC HOCHMUTH LINDA LEE SMITH JONATHAN URBANA CLIFFS RE LLC RENAISSANCE CUSTOM HOMES ALI AHMAD SHAH D R HORTON INC SPELLMAN JENNIFER L SECRETARY OF HOUSING AND ISRAEL DANIEL L (JTWROS) D R HORTON INC TOWNES AT JONES AVENUE P FURNISS JASPER D (JTWROS D R HORTON INC SULLINS MELINDA (JTWROS) PELLETIER AMANDA P (JTWR D R HORTON INC JAMES ANITA M RHODES H ANTHONY DAVIS TODD S TOWNES AT JONES AVENUE P HANLEY MEGAN PAKKALA BROTHERS CONSTRU

Real Estate News cont. and Douglas have drawn inspiration from their every day lives for their art. Their individual and unique styles complement one another – which is why this reception is named, “A Marriage of Mediums.” The use of various mediums gives their work a unique feel, especially when their art is shown together. Meredith’s work consists mostly of acrylic and oil paintings on wood panels, as well as woven textile pieces. Douglas’ art is shared through photography, woodworking, and printing. The Pipers have received much local recognition for their art. They are glad to call Greenville, a city that supports and appreciates the arts, home. Along with admiring the Piper’s

BUYER

ADDRESS

SUBD.

TEMPUS AXIS PARTNERS LLC REALSOUTH IHC LLC MSM HOLDINGS LLC ZIEGLER BEATRICE REDFERN BRANDON B (JTWRO REID CHERYL A SANDERS GINA E CLINKSCALE JOHN (JTWROS) VANDERSLOOT DENISE E (JT GREENWELL IRL DOUGLAS (J MOTHERSHEAD JAY S SIMMONS DANIELLE L (JTWR SMITH JONATHAN QAZI TARIQ MULLEN KEVIN A WATERS BETH C HAYES JASON (JTWROS) COOMBS DAVID P (JTWROS) JUMPER JEROME (JTWROS) EVANS ROBERT F (JTWROS) RIVERA CARLOS M (JTWROS) SUMPTER VANDY III JOHNSON JANET LYNN (JTWR MCDONALD JAMES (JTWROS) MCDOWELL DINA M (SURV) HERROLD MATTHEW J (JTWRO GILLILAND KIMBERLY MACIA ALVARO A ZANNINI JESSICA TRAMMELL TRIBBLE KEMECA LASHA LUMANG ARCHIE BEN C RICE JASON B (JTWROS) BLOWERS NICOLE SHANNON KAHN GALE M (JTWROS) ARH MODELS LLC NAVUMENKA ALIAKSANDR (JT LIGON JOHN P AMERICAN EAGLE BUILDERS STRADER DAVID M WENZLAFF JUDITH A GRAHAM ERIC JR (JTWROS) KISER JULIE SOYON (JTWRO LEWIS KYLE (JTWROS) THRIFT DANIEL R (JTWROS) WIDEMAN KEVIN L (JTWROS) WJH LLC DISBROW HOLLY QUEEN JACKIE E BROKAW DONNA (JTWROS) KUGLER HENRY (JTWROS) HUNT SHAMEKA L (JTWROS) ARMSTRONG PHILLIP RYAN SIMMONS GENTRY LEE (JTWR CHASTINE CHRISTOPHER T WJH LLC HOLT SEAN (JTWROS) VELASQUEZ HERNAN D FRANC

ONE ALLIED DR STE 1500 16 HYLAND RD 531 S MAIN ST STE 207 8 MONET DR 484 S BENNETTS BRIDGE RD 701 MONTEBELLO DR UNIT 204 415 COLERIDGE LN 14 SUNRAY LN 220 ROUND STONE WAY 107 ANSLEY CT 213 ANGELINE WAY 112 TINSLEY CT 313 ANGELINE WAY 321 MANSFIELD LN 52-B SWEETBRIAR RD 110 BURLWOOD DR 248 ROCKY SLOPE RD 2826 STANDING SPRINGS RD 3 RADLEY CT 4 KINGSFIELD PL 18 REDMONT CT 32 SPRINGLEAF CT 4810 STATE PARK RD 5 RADLEY CT 806 MARY GROVE LN 10 GLENMORA RD 11 BURGE CT 22 SHALE CT 205 KILBURN LN 19 DUNBROOK DR 16 HOWARDS END CT 211 LONGFELLOW WAY 510 STONE SHIELD WAY 15 RAVEN FALLS LN 13922 58TH ST N 110 SENTINEL CT 5 CORONA CT 46 PARKWAY COMMONS WAY 903 HARNESS TRL 190 MILLERS CROSSING 111 WILLOW GROVE WAY 4 SHAIRPIN LN 147 TRAILWOOD DR 10 FRIENDSPLOT CV 511 HEATHRIDGE LN 3300 BATTLEGROUND AVE STE 230 101 CEDAR RIDGE LN 200 WILLOW GROVE WAY 62 JUDE CT 15 MAPLECROFT ST 202 CHARTERHOUSE AVE 451 DALTON RD 55 BROCKMORE DR 3 WILLOW WOOD CT 3300 BATTLEGROUND AVE STE 230 211 INOLI CIR 102 LYLE DR

MONTCLAIRE $165,000 CASTLEBROOK $164,840 $163,000 POWDERHORN $156,000 VICTOR MONAGHAN $155,000 MAPLE GROVE $152,180 STALLINGS HEIGHTS $148,000 WESTWOOD $143,000 FAIRWAY @ GREEN VALLEY $137,500 $135,000 WATERS RUN $133,036 WILLIMON ESTATES $132,990 ANNACEY PARK $132,200 WILLIMON ESTATES $130,490 $125,000 WILLIMON ESTATES $124,000 WILLIMON ESTATES $123,490 ADAMS MILL ESTATES $121,000 WILLIMON ESTATES $120,990 COUNTRY CHASE $120,000 WILLIMON ESTATES $118,990 JONES CREEK GARDENS $118,500 WILLIMON ESTATES $116,990 JONES CREEK GARDENS $102,000 ABNEY MILLS RENFREW PLANT $98,000 SPRING STATION $95,000 YORKTOWN CONDOS $93,000 WOODSIDE MILLS $90,000 BEREA FOREST $88,500 SHERMAN PARK $87,108 BRECKENRIDGE $87,000 PARIS HEIGHTS $80,000 $75,000 $70,323 STILLWATERS $68,500 $57,700 CLEARVIEW ACRES $57,500 WOODSIDE MILLS $53,350 DUNEAN MILLS $50,000 MILL POND AT RIVER SHOALS $45,250 GREYTHORNE $42,000 THE VILLAGE AT FOUNTAIN INN $41,500 NORTH SUNSET HILLS $38,500 RIVERSIDE $36,000 $35,000 $35,000 $34,500 CLIFFS VALLEY $30,000 $28,000 GREYTHORNE $26,500 HAYNESWORTH POINTE $26,000 $25,000 RIVERSIDE $23,000 REMINGTON FIELDS $23,000 NORWOOD HEIGHTS $20,000 CLIFFS AT GLASSY $9,000 LINDA ACRES $7,000

work on display, guests are invited to enjoy refreshments. WHAT Coldwell Banker Caine artist opening exhibit reception for Meredith and Douglas Piper WHEN Jan. 25, 6–8 p.m. WHERE Coldwell Banker Caine Main Street Real Estate Gallery at 428 South Main St. COST Free and open to the public

Anderson Office Of C. Dan Joyner, Realtors Adds Two New Associates Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices C. Dan Joyner, REALTORS is pleased to announce the addition of Jonathan Fricks and Stephanie Williamson as sales associates. They will serve their clients’ real

PRICE SELLER ORIOLE PROPERTIES LLC MARK III PROPERTIES INC PONDER IRENE ADCOCK MARCIA K STERR TIMOTHY KRIEGER TARA M JAMES KATHLEEN M MASTERSON MICHAEL BDM REAL ESTATE LLC WATERS HERBERT G MARK III PROPERTIES INC WJH LLC WELLS FARGO BANK N A WJH LLC PATTON MARGARET FAYE WJH LLC WJH LLC THOMPSON CLAIRE V WJH LLC FOR 8 CORPORATION INC WJH LLC TOWNES AT JONES AVENUE P WJH LLC TOWNES AT JONES AVENUE P SANTAMARIA JESSICA NRZ REO V-2 CORP CALDWELL JAMES GARY MORGAN BRUCE THOMAS MARY J ACE SECURITIES CORP HOME TIGERVILLE ROAD VENTURE STOKES SHANNON S SOLESBEE RICHARD JPMORGAN CHASE BANK NATI BE STILLWATERS LLC BURNETT JANET ALEXANDER RUBIO GABE F BALMER JUDY DIANNE GAULT ROBERTSON JAMES OLIN JR MARK III PROPERTIES INC ALLEN DONALD W Y AND Y DEVELOPMENT CORP TAULBEE BARBARA LYNN MAR MARTIN GARY DOWNS GWYN D FORD TARA MARTIN (SURV) SECRETARY OF HOUSING & U BOECKLEN CONSTANCE LYNN FLORES SAUL J CARTER ENTERPRISES INC GRIFFIN LINDA V (JTWROS) MARTIN GARY MARTIN GARY EDWARDS STEPHEN ROBERT DAVIS INGRID BURKETT GLENDA R MOUNTAIN SPRINGS HOLDING

estate needs out of the company’s Anderson, SC office. Born and raised in the Upstate of South Carolina, Fricks now enjoys helping famiFricks lies find the perfect home in the area he knows so well. When not assisting his clients, Jonathan enjoys spending time with family, entertaining friends and playing the guitar. Also a lifelong native of the Upstate, Williamson joins the office as a member of The Clever People. She brings a strong skill set from her first career as office manager for her family business, Williamson Golf Car Accessories. For 19 years, she refined her

BUYER

ADDRESS

MOORE MICHELLE S (JTWROS NVR INC SIMPLE EASY LAND MANAGEM WIRTZ KEVIN MARTIN (JTWR EMERY NATHAN MIDDLEBROUGH ANDREW S BICKHAM BRANDY (JTWROS) WILSON ALISHA (JTWROS) LEDONNE DIANNE E CABIN 14 LLC NVR INC FULLER JAVAS L (TICWROS) WILSON D CARY TUCKER KENNETH L BECK CARLIE D (JTWROS) DIEHL HEATHER E BAKEMAN BRANDON T (TICWR STROMBERG STEVEN W FRIEDRICH KELLY (JTWROS) COUNTRY CHASE LAND TRUST HARRIS RACHEL LAUREN WJH LLC THOMPSON KIZZA T WJH LLC KELLEY ASHLEY L ARNOLD JOEL DOUBLE OAK TECHNOLOGIES IREY CHRISTOPHER M STROMBERG STEVEN GENESIS AFFORDABLE HOUSI SK BUILDERS INC JOY HORACE JACK G&A MANAGEMENT LLC INDEPENDENCE ASSET LLC WATSON J CRAIG (JTWROS) SOLESBEE RICHARD LAMB PROPERTIES LLC BROWN HOPE M CASSELL JOSEPH EDWARD NVR INC ELLYS CONSTRUCTION LLC NVR INC COLE SONNY ALLEN SR (JTW CRUZ DANIEL MENDOZA HARRIS TONYA FORD TARA MARTIN RKL ENTERPRISES LLC COBBLESTONE HOMES LLC GATLIN PAUL ELLYS CONSTRUCTION LLC ALBRIGHT DARWIN KERRY CORDOBA OSCAR BARTOME ARMANDO HERNANDE QUINTANA ISAAC JAMES WHITE ENTERPRISES DYE JASPER MARSHALL KEETER WANDA

PO BOX 4068 11 BRENDAN WAY 2910 BRUSHY CREEK RD 216 CHICKAMAUGA LN 6 HAYNESWORTH ST 46 TUSCARORA AVE 108 TERILYN CT 112 REDGUM CT 6063 GREAT DANE DR 6 LISTER RD 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 101 KATRINA CT 84 VILLA RD STE 200 401 ARTRAGE CT 520 W MCELHANEY RD 311 NAPELS CT 302 NAPELS CT 1605 LAURENS RD 407 ARTRAGE CT 2123 OLD SPARTANBURG RD STER 1 103 KATRINA CT 3300 BATTLEGROUND AVE STE 230 419 ARTRAGE CT 3300 BATTLEGROUND AVE STE 230 11 CIRCLE ST 502 SHANNON DR 201 LAVINIA AVE 115 ISELIN ST 1605 LAURENS RD 14 W ANTRIM DR 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD STE 7 16 TRAXLER ST 313 WILMINGTON RD 32263 SANDPIPER DR 6N110 MEDINAH RD 111 PINECREST DR PO BOX 1221 202 ISELIN ST 172 SANDALWOOD DR 11 BRENDAN WAY STE 140 107 SADDLEBROOK LN 651 BROOKFIELD PKWY STE 200 203 STATE PARK RD 105 EDGEMONT AVE 879 NE MAIN ST STE B 2036 CLEVELAND STREET EXT 900 PALISADE AVE 955 W WADE HAMPTON BLVD 3111-A WHITE HORSE RD 107 SADDLEBROOK LN 1411 HAYNESWORTH RD 9 WACO ST 303 NEW DUNHAM BRIDGE RD 143 WHITE HORSE ROAD EXT 124 N LEACH ST 220 N MAIN ST NOMA TOWER STE 2 200 WEST DR

communication skills, resolving concerns for the public; and she protected her family’s interests with her notable attention to detail and excellent anaWilliamson lytical skills. Outside of work, you can find her enjoying HGTV and spending time with her two daughters, Brooklyn and Drennon. “Being natives of the Upstate, Jonathan and Stephanie will both prove to be assets to anyone looking to sell or buy in or around the area. Their passion to help people achieve their dream of homeownership is contagious,” said Rusty Garrett, Broker-InCharge of the Anderson office.


Luxury Service at Every Price Point 23 ACRE EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

275 Montgomery Drive, Spartanburg $2,750,000 MLS#1350714 Damian Hall Group 828-808-8305

136 High Rock Ridge Drive, Cliffs at Glassy $1,395,000 MLS#1346118 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

4 Grouse Drive, Cliffs at Glassy $1,195,000 MLS#1346114 John “Clark” Kent 864-784-9918

UNDER CONTRACT

1011 Mountain Summit Road, Cliffs Valley $1,159,000 MLS#1356167 Spencer Ashby 864-344-0333

UNDER CONTRACT

5 Autumn View Ridge, Natures Watch $699,000 MLS#1346304 Lonnie Adamson 864-385-4659

6 Chipping Court, Kellett Park $649,900 MLS#1354930 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

240 Grandmont Court, Charleston Walk $475,000 MLS#1341159 Holly May 864-640-1959

8 Chipping Court, Kellett Park $460,900 MLS#1359315 Zach Herrin 864-990-1761

329 Harkins Bluff Drive, Dillard Creek Crossing $399,000 MLS#1354586 Annell Bailey 864-346-0598

427 S. Pendernale Drive, Millbrook $299,900 MLS#1353918 Debra Owensby 864-404-8295

105 Shefford Court, Silverleaf $298,500 MLS#1356748 Erin Colman 864-940-9709

310 Garnet Valley Drive, Inman $260,000 MLS#1359770 Spencer Ashby 864-344-0333

UNDER CONTRACT

202 Donybrook Avenue, Greenville $239,900 MLS#1358819 Kris Cawley 864-516-6580

300 Chariot Lane, Squires Creek $239,900 MLS#1359454 Kennie Norris 864-608-0865

UNDER CONTRACT

309 Wicker Park Avenue, Oneal Village $234,900 MLS#1359372 Joseph Gobbett 864-553-1998

BlackStreamInternational.com | 864-920-0303

18 Twinings Drive, Twin Creeks $205,000 MLS#1359421 Jen De Groot 864-380-0240


www.MarchantCo.com (864) 467-0085 | AGENT ON DUTY: Charlotte Faulk (864) 270-4341 RENTAL PROPERTIES AVAILABLE • MarchantPm.com (864) 527-4505 ! n tai 0 ft un 300 o t M ta a tre Re

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126 Caesars Pointe - Caesar’s Head

59 Grand Vista Dr. - The Ridges at Paris Mountain

821 Crescent Avenue - Alta Vista

15 Jervey Road - Greenville

$1,700,000 • 1346370 • 6BR/6BA/1Hf BA

$1,270,500 • 1357141 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

$859,000 • 1352217 • 5BR/4BA/1Hf BA

$799,000 • 1353214 • 4BR/3BA

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

w/ me r GCC o h ck nea Bri ates d up

Kendall Bateman • (864) 320-2414 • Kendall@marchantco.com

ia! cad HS! A G n i ild . to Bu Mins 10

Tom Marchant • (864) 449-1658 • tom@tommarchant.com

w/ s illa ishe V n can l Fi Tus utifu a Be

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karen@marchantco.com

/ ew om lore! H s a u ulo s G Fab rade g Up

127 Marshall Bridge Dr. - Brookside Forest

150 Fathers Drive - Acadia

19 Arezzo Drive - Montebello

107 Player Way - Sycamore Ridge

$629,000 • 1357622 • 4BR/4BA/1Hf BA

$549,000 • 1358696 • 3BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$499,900 • 1355432 • 3BR/2BA/2Hf BA

$475,000 • 1359766 • 5BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

Valerie Miller • (864) 430-6602 • vmiller@marchantco.com

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karen@marchantco.com

/ k w in! ric n Ma B All ter o s Ma

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Barbara Riggs • (864) 423-2783 • barbriggs@marchantco.com

or Flo nus! t c rfe Bo Pe n w/ a Pl

104 Pleasant Meadow Ct. - Pleasant Meadows

10 Monet Drive - Montebello

900 N. Main Street - Northgate Trace

202 Blue Sage Place - Fairview Meadow

$309,500 • 1357398 • 4BR/2BA/1Hf BA

$289,000 • 1329091 • Lot

$287,500 • 1360007 • 3BR/2.5BA

$244,747 • 1357692 • 5BR/3BA/1Hf BA

Shannon Cone • (864) 908-6426 • Shannon@MarchantCo.com

in Lot nity! s u u cio mm Spaat Co Gre

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com Karen W. Turpin • (864) 230-5176 • karenturpi@aol.com

ot e L orks! k a L ve F i in F

Mary Praytor • (864) 593-0366 • marypraytor@gmail.com

ot sL ou ggio! i c a Sp Villa in

75 Montague Drive - Montague Lakes

203 Chestnut Pond Lane - Chestnut Pond

301 Arezzo Drive - Montebello

$38,500 • 1273322 • Build your dream home

$135,000 • 1358794 • Lot

$119,000 • 1357304 • Lot

Anne Marchant • (864) 420-0009 • anne@marchantco.com Brian Marchant • (864) 631-5858 • brian@marchantco.com

Mikel-Ann Scott • (864) 630-2474 • mikelann@marchantco.com Lydia Johnson • (864) 918-9663 • lydia@marchantco.com

Nancy McCrory • (864) 505-8367 • nancy@marchantco.com

Joan Rapp • (864) 901-3839 • joan@marchantco.com

e siv s! res View p Im tain un Mo

Bear Cove Trail, Lot 17 - Cedar Rock Colony $99,500 • 1357740 • Lot

Charlotte Faulk • (864) 270-4341 • charlotte@marchantco.com

RESIDENTIAL | COMMERCIAL | NEW HOME COMMUNITIES | PROPERTY MANAGEMENT | VETERAN SERVICES | FORECLOSURES | LAND & ACREAGE | MOUNTAIN PROPERTIES


ARTS & CULTURE A C.S. LEWIS CLASSIC AT LOGOS THEATRE page

ANIMAL LOVERS UNITE AT GLOW LYRIC THEATRE page

27

A Q&A WITH BRANTLEY GILBERT page

24

28

Sam Singleton stars as Prince Caspian in the Logos Theatre’s production of the C.S. Lewis novel. Will Crooks/Greenville Journal COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 21


22 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

Animal Care’s

Correspondent

FAMILY LEGACY Taking after his father and great-uncle, AJ Ghent embraces the sacred steel musical tradition VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Featuring Ruff Reporter:

Romeo

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sound. “I got started and it just developed,” he says. “Before I knew it, I was 18, and I’d been doing it for years. I didn’t have a choice but to continue.” As for his songwriting, that was encouraged by an English teacher who read one of Ghent’s poems and was so impressed by it, she was convinced it was plagiarized. “She gave me an F on it because she didn’t believe I’d written it!” he says with a laugh. “So I took it home to my mom and said, ‘I don’t understand. I did write this.’ My mom called the school and said, ‘My son wrote this!’ From that point on, that encouraged me to write, and before I knew it I was writing songs.” Despite his love of sacred steel, Ghent

AJ Ghent’s history with sacred steel, the blend of Southern gospel music and the lap-steel guitar, goes back almost as far as the genre itself. The alternately crying and joyful wail of the guitar is in his blood. His grandfather, Henry Nelson, is one of the founders of the sacred steel rhythmic style, made most famous by Robert Randolph and the Family Band. His father, Aubrey, and great-uncle, Willie Eason, are two of sacred steel’s most revered players. It has to be that history that’s shaped Ghent’s own mastery of the instrument; but his grasp extends far past the gospel music of sacred steel. On his new EP, the “The Neo Blues Project,” Ghent’s reach and control are astounding. He flows from churning mood pieces (“Do the Rump”) to lithe, slinky funk (“Wash Ya Hair”) to massive-sounding hard-rock stomp (“Power”) to intimate balladry (“Long Lost Friend”) with ease. His fluid, dizzying solos are stunning, but his secret weapon might just be his voice; AJ Ghent. Photo provided it’s a deeply soulful instrument that shines especially brightly when he duets with his wife, Maria, part didn’t think of any specific genres when of his namesake band. he began writing songs. “I was writing The combination of no-boundaries ex- from the heart because when you’re that ploration and lap-steel skill exists because young, you’re not writing from any specifGhent was both resistant to and then ic format,” he says. “You’re thinking about drawn toward his family’s legacy. what you’re going through.” “Originally, I wanted to be a bass playAbout six years ago, Ghent moved from er,” he says with a laugh. “I didn’t want to his native Florida to Atlanta to pursue mufollow my family’s path at all. I guess as a sic full time. It wasn’t long before word kid, people would ask me, ‘Well, why don’t got out about the 25-year-old phenom, you do what your family’s doing?’ And I and he landed a gig as the singer for the didn’t want to do that. I saw myself be- legendary Southern jam-rock titan Col. ing some form of entertainer, but I didn’t Bruce Hampton (no slouch on the lap want the responsibility.” steel himself). That, in turn, led to Ghent In his early teens, however, Ghent was sharing the stage with the Allman Brothgiven a lap-steel guitar by his cousin and ers Band (he played “One Way Out” with began to fall in love with the sacred steel them at the Beacon Theatre in New York),

Derek Trucks, and the Zac Brown Band. “It was a crazy whirlwind,” he says. “It didn’t happen overnight, and it took a lot of dedication, but before I knew it I was playing with all these incredible artists. I think I was just in the right place in the right time being seen by the right people. To some it may seem like, ‘Who is this guy? Does he deserve to be up there?’ But it was something that I’m proud of, and I learned a lot.” One of the things that Ghent learned was when NOT to play, and that tasteful approach paid off in spades on “The Neo Blues Project.” “When I first started playing, I wanted to do every move I could think of on that

guitar,” he says. “After more experience I understood how important it was to take my time instead of playing whatever fast lick I can play. And that goes along with the songwriting. I ask myself, ‘If I were having a conversation with this person, what would I say next?’ I think it really helps me a lot.”

AJ GHENT W/ APRIL B. & THE COOL WHEN Saturday, Feb. 3, 9 p.m. WHERE Gottrocks, 300 Eisenhower Drive TICKETS $8 adv/$10 door INFO 864-235-5519, www.gottrocksgreenville.com


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 23

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STUDIO PARTY Amigo’s latest album was completed with a little help from their friends VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

Even if it wasn’t a rollicking, 10-song collection of country-tinged rock ‘n’ roll full of cranked guitars, honky-tonk piano, and unvarnished real-world lyrics (with a couple of hushed, intimate ballads for good measure), the new Amigo album would still sound like a hell of a good time. The album, called “Amigo & Friends,” augments the core trio of singer/ guitarist Slade Baird, bassist Thomas Alverson, and drummer Adam Phillips with a studio full of friends and collaborators, including producer/engineer Mitch Easter (R.E.M.), pedal-steel player Nathan Golub, keyboardist Jay Shirley, mandolin and fiddle player John Teer (from Chatham County Line), and guitarist Eddie Garcia. The effect is that of a big ol’ party in the studio, a warmly produced record with great gang-vocal harmonies, horns, and gritty guitar solos all over the place. Golub’s crying pedal steel is a highlight, particularly on the slower songs, and Shirley brings a distinctive touch, especially on organ, but everyone involved seems to be having a blast. Baird says that the band planned to bring in a big group of musicians from the beginning, before they even headed into Fideltorium Recordings in Kernersville, N.C., to make the album. “I think we pretty much knew when the songs were being written,” he says. “Certain songs had these vibes that spoke to me from some of my favorite records. So if a song called for a ’70s L.A. kind of sound with pedal steel and a whole bunch of instrumentation, then that’s what we were going to do. Some songs are simple guitar songs, and some we wanted everybody playing on to make it sound as big as possible.” The band already knew that Shirley would be involved, because he provided the keys on Amigo’s first album, “Might Could.” The rest of the cast was brought in as the sessions progressed. “Jay just has a real sense of whatever we need at the time,” Baird says. “His instincts are perfect. We knew he was in from the beginning. We ended up getting John Teer on mandolin and fiddle because he happened not to be on the road at the

AMIGO (ALBUM RELEASE SHOW) W/ SHAUN WILLIAMS AND THE EXCONS WHEN Saturday, Feb. 3, 8 p.m. WHERE Radio Room, 110 Poinsett Highway TICKETS $7 INFO 864-609-4441, www.radioroomgreenville.com, www.amigotheband.bandcamp.com

time and lived pretty close to where we were recording. Nathan Golub was close by, too. So we were just lucky.” Even people who didn’t plan to be on the record ended up being part of “Amigo & Friends.” “There’s one story that really plays into this idea of making a record with your friends,” Baird says. “My friend Eddie plays guitar on the album; he was coming to Kernersville just to hang out with some pizza and beer. And I told him that if he was gonna come by, he had to bring his guitar, too, because he was gonna play.” Beyond the satisfaction of working with a group of great musicians, another reason that the album sounds so joyful is that Amigo, who will play an album-release show this Saturday at the Radio Room with guests Shaun Williams and The Excons, felt a lot more sure-footed this time. “The first record, we had just gotten the studio time booked and we lost our bass player,” Baird says. “A friend of ours from the band Sinners & Saints was able to jump in and do the recording with us. And then we found Thomas after the record came out. Just having all that time on the road with a consistent group, playing two or three years before going into the studio, we were ready. We’d made these songs and written this stuff together. I hear that when I listen to it. We’d just evolved and gelled as a group.”


24 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM know where we stand, and that’s right on the outside of it. All I do is try to share songs about my life, and different chapters of my life. And you’d think that the songs that are the most personal to you would end up being the ones that are the hardest to relate to, and that ends up not being the case at all. My whole career, it seems like those personal songs are more relatable to other folks.

‘IF IT AIN’T BROKE, DON’T FIX IT’ A Q&A with Brantley Gilbert Brantley Gilbert. Photo by Lyn Sengupta VINCENT HARRIS | CONTRIBUTOR

vharris@communityjournals.com

In an age where people don’t seem to be buying albums, country music star

Brantley Gilbert has been the exception to the rule. Blending cranked-up rock guitars with gritty country twang, Gilbert’s hybrid sound has propelled him to back-to-back million-selling al-

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bums, not to mention nine best-selling singles, including “Country Must Be Country Wide,” “You Don’t Know Her Like I Do,” “Bottoms Up” and “One Hell of an Amen.” Gilbert writes virtually all of his material and has also helped other artists strike gold with his songs, including Jason Aldean (“My Kinda Party”) and Colt Ford (“Dirt Road Anthem”), and he’s also won an Academy of Country Music award, two CMA awards, and an iHeartRadio award. Gilbert is coming to the Bon Secours Wellness Arena on Thursday, Feb. 8, with Aaron Lewis and Josh Phillips as part of his “The Ones That Like Me” tour, and we spoke with him recently about the new tour, his songwriting, and his comfortable spot between rock and country. Your new single is called “The Ones That Like Me,” but I feel like the name of the tour is meant as a tribute to your fans, right? It’s for all those people who followed me through the years and know there’s more to me than tattoos and chains. [Laughs.] You’ve had back-to-back platinum albums in a time where records aren’t selling like they used to; what do you think is resonating with people? I’m kind of on the tip of, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” As a songwriter, I try to get outside the lines a little bit. I always say that as long as there’s a box, we

Your newest album, “The Devil Don’t Sleep,” is your heaviest, musically speaking. What led you to move in that direction? I think every record we’ve made stands on its own. It wasn’t really my intention to make it more or less heavy; I just try to go in and match the mood of the song with the sound and capture the feeling I had when I wrote it, the same intensity. That ends up a little heavier from time to time. And we have a guitar player who’s new since the last record, and he’s a heavy player. Every one of these band members bring their own, and that comes through in the music by default. Do you consider yourself influenced as much by rock as by country? I’ve always listened to everything across the board, whether it’s R&B or country or rock. I’ve been like that all my life. Whatever it may be, I listen to and enjoy and lot of it. What do you think of the state of country music right now? I really try my best to stay focused on our deal and making sure we’re doing our thing, but I can tell you from listening to the radio that the country music genre is a melting pot right now. Chris Stapleton’s doing some really country stuff, and then you’ve got other folks who lean a little more towards pop. I think it just means that everyone’s pushing themselves to explore other things as songwriters and artists. I think it’s a good thing.

BRANTLEY GILBERT W/ AARON LEWIS AND JOSH PHILLIPS WHEN Thursday, Feb. 8, 7 p.m. WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. TICKETS $27-$57 INFO 864-241-3800, www.bonsecoursarena.com


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 25

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ARTISTIC JOURNEY Cancer survivors and those undergoing treatment participate in MAC’s ‘Direct Experience: Cancer and Art’

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE FEBRUARY 16

CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Before she sat down for her first round of chemotherapy for breast cancer six years ago, Cheryl LeCroy had never attempted to make a piece of jewelry. “I knew I wanted to focus on something outside of myself,” she said. “I wanted to focus on something other than the chemo chair.” Using a kit that a couple of artist friends had put together for her, she spent the hours she was hooked up to chemo working with beads and wrapping wires. At the end of her six treatments, she had finished six pieces of jewelry, which she calls her “triumph jewels.” LeCroy, who is now cancerfree, enjoyed making jewelry so Art by Carole Tinsley much that she continues to today. “A lot of cancer survivors think about how do we most enjoy the time something — whether it’s art or yoga or we have,” said LeCroy, who is a part of 6 music — to try something to help them Hands Studio, a creative collaborative in get through it.” Christina Laurel had just returned to Easley. “For me, I love to spend time doing Greer from her first artist residency in Pathe things I love to do. There’s not enough ducah, Ky., when she discovered a mass in time in this world to be doing something her breast. that doesn’t bring joy.” Before she had left for her residency, LeCroy is one of 14 artists participating Laurel had set aside a large door panel for in “Direct Experience: Cancer and Art,” an a project when she returned. After her diexhibition at the Metropolitan Arts Counagnosis, she did a collage and paper project cil through Feb. 23. All of the artists are on the panel. The piece, called “Pushed to either cancer survivors or going through the Periphery,” had a lot of neutral space treatment. The other 13 artists include and all of its color was around the edges. JoAnne Anderson, Ellie Daniels, Jamie “Dealing with cancer had become my fullDavis, Carol Funke, Elisa M. Golden, Sutime job. I felt all the rest of my life was sanne Floyd Gunter, Christina Laurel, pushed to the periphery,” she said. Monita Mahoney, Linda McCune, Joanna Within the last year, she began to use Morgan, Marilyn Murrell, Mike Stoner, the panel as a worktable. “It feels transand Carole Knudson Tinsley. formative,” she said. “My art is no longer Tinsley, who curated the exhibit, said pushed to the periphery. I’m actually usthe idea for “Direct Experience” came ing it to create new art.” when she told another artist that she had completed eight paintings that had to do with her own cancer journey. Tinsley’s “DIRECT EXPERIENCE: breast cancer was discovered in 2015 durCANCER AND ART” ing her annual mammogram. The pieces she has in the exhibit reflect the emotions WHERE Metropolitan Arts Council, 16 Augusta St. she felt during her treatment. WHEN Through Feb. 23 “There’s not anybody who hasn’t been affected by cancer in some way,” she said. ADMISSION Free “I hope this show motivates people to try INFO 864-467-3132 or www.greenvillearts.com

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26 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

RON CARNEGIE GOES TO WASHINGTON Actor portrays the first president in Greenville’s Winter Chautauqua CINDY LANDRUM | STAFF

clandrum@communityjournals.com

Ron Carnegie knows a thing or two about George Washington. The nationally acclaimed historical interpreter’s full-time job is playing the military leader and president at Colonial Williamsburg. This weekend, he’ll portray the man known as “The Father of His Country” at Greenville’s Winter Chautauqua. Chautauqua has been described as “history that can’t stay in a book.” Historical figures are portrayed through a part-actor, part-scholar in costume. After the actor performs a monologue, the floor is opened to audience questions. Because of that, Chautauqua is not just an actor working from a script. In order to be able to answer the questions, the performers immerse themselves into the lives of the figures by reading biographies and historical writings. Chautauqua originated as an adult-education program for Sunday school teach-

ers at a campsite on Chautauqua Lake in Upstate New York. Tent Chautauquas toured the United States until the Great Depression. One stopped regularly in Greenville. Chautauqua was revived in the 1970s as a way to promote humanities education. Greenville’s Chautauqua started in 1999. This year’s Greenville Chautauqua theme is courage. Winter Chautauqua will feature Carnegie as George Washington. The June History Alive Festival will feature Francis Marion, Harriet Tubman, Clara Barton, Alice Paul, and Winston Churchill. George Washington will not appear at the June Festival. Carnegie says Washington can provide a number of lessons that are relevant to today’s political climate. “Washington tried very hard to develop and maintain a reputation for public virtue, and in the end, he mostly succeeded in this. He tried through most of his public life to do the correct thing, often making very difficult and sometimes unpopu-

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Ron Carnegie as George Washington. Photo provided

lar decisions,” Carnegie said. “He had the trust of much of the nation because he had earned it. His example is a good example for anyone to follow, more especially anyone in public office.” Carnegie said many of the maxims Washington gave in his farewell address — that political parties would tear the union apart; that a system of checks and balances was needed, because they will cause divisive factions; that permanent alliances with foreign countries should be avoided; and that taxes were a necessary evil — are just as applicable today as they were at the end of his presidency. “Most of them were forgotten almost as soon as he had said them,” Carnegie said. Carnegie, who has been a historical interpreter since 1979, said it is difficult for him to say what he finds most interesting about Washington. “I suppose it is the great things he achieved all the while being wracked by some serious self-doubt, and his incredible self-control that enabled him to recreate himself in his preferred image,” he said. When Carnegie is portraying Washington, he often has to debunk many myths, including the story about him cutting his father’s cherry tree with a hatchet and when confronted saying, “I cannot tell a lie.” The cherry tree myth is the most well-known and longest enduring legend about Washington. It was also invented by

one of his first biographers. Next to the cherry tree tale, the story that Washington had wooden teeth is arguably the next most widespread and enduring myth. Washington did have dental problems and had multiple sets of dentures made of a variety of materials, including ivory, gold, and lead. But wood was not used in Washington’s dentures, nor was it commonly used by dentists of his era. Carnegie started his career as a historical interpreter at California’s Living History Center portraying various people of Elizabethan England. He also worked for various museums and sites in California as an independent contractor. Some of those sites include Fort Tejon State Park, the Los Angeles Master Chorale, the Los Angeles Museum of Natural History, and Pío Pico Adobe. He has portrayed Washington at Colonial Williamsburg for about 12 years.

WINTER CHAUTAUQUA, “GEORGE WASHINGTON, COURAGE” WHEN Saturday, Feb. 3, and Sunday, Feb. 4, 2 p.m. (Sunday’s performance will be sign language interpreted) WHERE Wade Hampton High Auditorium, 100 Pine Knoll Drive ADMISSION Free INFO www.greenvillechautauqua.org


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 27

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A CAUSE FOR PAWS GLOW Lyric Theatre’s ‘All Creatures Great and Small’ celebrates pets of all kinds MELODY WRIGHT | EDITORIAL INTERN

Calling all animal lovers: “All Creatures Great and Small” pays tribute to pets in a fun musical performance presented by GLOW Lyric Theatre. The joint fundraiser between GLOW and rescue group Saved by the Heart aims to raise awareness for animal welfare through song, dance, and spoken word. The show will give attendees the opportunity to ask questions and learn more about adopting animals and the missions of SBTH as well as Concerned Citizens for Animals SC at the 6 p.m. free pre-show reception. Attendees can also engage with a panel during the post-show talkback. Jenna Tamisiea, artistic director and co-founder of GLOW, said to think of the show as an event. “Expect much more than a performance,” Tamisiea said. She described the show as “collections of a lot

step, Tamisiea said. “Our main goal is to get people more invested in causes that they care about,” she said. GLOW wants animal lovers to learn more about these nonprofit organizations and help these causes by donating their time or money. “All Creatures Great and Small” will benefit SBTH by raising funds to find homes for abandoned animals and making the community aware of the programs available to them through SBTH. Co-founder Jessica Monroe said they are hoping to inform those unfamiliar with SBTH of how they can get involved with animal welfare and better their community. “We are so excited about this event, because it’s a completely new way to raise awareness about animal welfare issues,” Monroe said. “SBTH faces many animals needing vet care due to injuries, age, neglect, or owners that just can’t afford the cost of vet care,” Monroe said. SBTH tries to help as many of these animals as they can. The other partnering organization, CCA, is the oldest no-kill shelter in the Upstate and offers a safe place for animals awaiting their forever homes. “We look forward to two evenings full of fun and an opportunity to provide more information about CCA and our programs,” CCA vice president Su-

“ALL CREATURES GREAT AND SMALL” WHEN Feb. 5 and 6, 7 p.m. (Pre-show reception at 6 p.m. and post-show community talk back at 8:15 p.m.) WHERE The Warehouse Theatre, 37 Augusta St.

TICKETS $25 INFO glowlyric.com/event/creatures-greatsmall, 864-235-6948

“All rescues hope that one day there won’t be a need for shelters as every animal will have a home.” – Susan Lyerly, vice president, Concerned Citizens for Animals SC of different art forms to talk about animals’ importance in our lives.” Six singers will tell personal stories in a cabaret-form performance through song and dance, including hilariously adorable musical numbers such as Rossini’s “Cat Duet.” “We might even have a few songs performed from the perspective of the animals,” Tamisiea said. As part of GLOW’s “Raising Voices” series, “All Creatures Great and Small” speaks on behalf of voiceless animals who have wants and desires just as humans do. “GLOW produces operetta and musical theater in direct response to the political and social climate of South Carolina,” Tamisiea said. “What we look to do is provide a megaphone to marginalized animals in society.” Starting the conversation by raising awareness for these animals is only the first

san Lyerly said. As well as raising funds, Lyerly said they are hoping to gain new volunteers through the “All Creatures Great and Small” performances, as volunteers are the heart of CCA’s work. “We hope to bring a higher awareness to the importance of spaying and neutering pets,” Lyerly said. Many low-cost options are available including CCA’s spay and neuter program. CCA also hopes to stress the trap-neuter-return approach as a humane way to help lessen the local feral cat population. “Responsible pet ownership is also a topic that needs to be addressed, as it is more than providing food and water for a pet,” Lyerly said. “All rescues hope that one day there won’t be a need for shelters as every animal will have a home.”

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28 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

A SENSE OF JOURNEY Epic production of ‘Prince Caspian’ returns to Logos Theatre Elise Snow as Susan and Abby Cannon as Lucy in “Prince Caspian.” Will Crooks/Greenville Journal NEIL SHURLEY | CONTRIBUTOR

Arrows flying and swords clanging during an epic battle. A valiant prince galloping his horse deep into the foreboding woods. A wrecked ship and an exploding bridge. It sounds like something you’d watch on a movie screen. Yet this time it’s happening right in front of you, live on stage. The Logos Theatre’s popular production of the C.S. Lewis classic “Prince Caspian,” the second book in “The Chronicles of Narnia,” returns on Feb. 2 for a three-month run. “It’s got an extremely cinematic feel,” says Zac Johnson, who serves as an assistant director on the production and also plays Dr. Cornelius. “One of the reasons why very few theatrical companies in the world have ever attempted to do ‘Prince Caspian’ is because it’s so full of what I can only describe as magic tricks. It is loaded with special effects.” To writer and director Nicole Stratton, that cinematic feel sprang naturally from the source material. “That really was born out of me just trying to stay really true to C.S. Lewis’ creativity,” she says. “In the

book, he tells you what happens over here and then what happens over here, but really it’s all happening at the same time. That’s what spurred on my creative thinking to try to mix them together when I showed the transitions, so you’re watching time being layered on itself. To be able to do that on stage, to make you feel like you’re watching several things happening at the same time — well, it was a lot of fun trying to think up how to do it.” Fidelity to the book was of paramount importance to Stratton, which resulted in many creative challenges. “In the book, Caspian makes this dramatic exit from his castle, and of course he makes it on his horse, Destrier, which can’t really be written out of the script, in my opinion, if you’re going to do it justice, because he goes through the woods, with trees coming up in front of him, and he falls off his horse and hits his head. So there isn’t really a way for him to fall off and hit his head if he’s not on a horse.” That led to the creation of one of many impressive puppets that figure in the production. “We’ve built a full-on rideable horse puppet,” Johnson says. “Three pup-

peteers man him, and the actor who plays Caspian actually hops up on the horse and rides around on the stage.” “You actually hear the clopping of the horse,” Stratton says. “Puppetry is very visual, but you have to take into consideration the other senses that people have — for instance, hearing — and they’re used to the sound of a horse, and I think that’s what really helps make Destrier even more convincing. His eyes and his face are so realistic, but the clomping of his feet and the weight of him make him seem like he’s really real.” Stratton says that another challenge of staging a beloved story like “Prince Caspian” is the fear of leaving things out. “It doesn’t seem like he has anything excess in the book. Everything is so needed, and you’re really trying to make sure that you craft it in a way that people don’t have to sit there for four hours.” It’s also a very personal project for her. “The Narnia books have been life-changing for me, and I want to do them justice. I want young people to be inspired to read them again so that they can be part of their lives forever and really help sculpt their thinking. We’ve got so much negativ-

ity around us right now, and young people are burdened with a lot of that, and they need to read something that gives them hope, that gives them courage, that helps them to see that they can be more than what they’re thinking they can be.” The production debuted in late 2016 with a second run last year. The current run is the last one scheduled for the foreseeable future. “We’re going to run it for three months, then it has to go away because we’re debuting the next Narnia book,” Stratton says. “When people come to see ‘Caspian,’ they get to see a really cool live reveal of the next book that we’re doing.” “It’s just one awesome thing after another,” Johnson says.

“PRINCE CASPIAN” Written and directed by Nicole Stratton Performed with permission by the C.S. Lewis Co.

WHEN Feb. 2-April 28; times vary (performance runs about 2 ½ hours) WHERE The Logos Theatre, 80 School St., Taylors TICKETS $30-$40 INFO 864-268-9342 or thelogostheatre.com


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Sidewall is at it again

The third and newest concept from Sidewall owners Andy O’Mara and Loren Frant is the comically named barbecue joint Monkey Wrench Smokehouse, which is just days away from opening in the former Martha’s Hardware, 21 S. Main St., in Travelers Rest. O’Mara says to look for an opening announcement after Feb. 5 inspections.

A SEAT AT THE TABLE

One step closer to breakfast tacos

The production, sale, and consumption of local food brings significant economic and health benefits to communities. But the next step is securing greater accessibility for all, including underserved populations WORDS BY AARON VON FRANK | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS It’s a cool morning at Bio-Way Farm, a small certified organic operation in Ware Shoals. Chris Sermons, the farm’s owner, instructs his new helpers how to properly pick the produce they’ll be harvesting and selling that day. “You want to loosen the carrots like this before you pull them, or they’ll snap off in the ground,” he says as he demonstrates. Sermons’ helpers are participants in the Worldwide Opportunities on Organic Farms program. Often referred to as WWOOFers, they perform short internships on organic farms around the country or even the world, learning on the job before eventually taking fulltime paid positions or starting their own organic farms. On this morning, the team is harvesting Nantes carrots, an heirloom French carrot originally bred in the late 1800s and revered for its flavor. Chefs also love it because rather than tapering from large to small, the roots are a uniform width all the way from top to bottom. A short while later, coolers are stuffed full of a diverse and colorful selection of

carrots and seasonal greens that were — until a few hours ago — still pulling moisture and nutrition from the rich, living soil on Sermons’ farm. “Good soil is the foundation of organic farming,” Sermons says. “It’s what grows healthy plants and helps give my produce a better flavor.” Recent research supports this oft-heard claim, showing that organic food is more nutritionally dense than conventional food and that soil on organic farms around the U.S. has much higher soil organic matter and carbon sequestration capacity. The coolers are loaded into Sermons’ truck and are soon making their way toward nearby restaurants. First stop: Stella’s Southern Bistro in Simpsonville and Stella’s Southern Brasserie in Greenville, whose menus boast local produce and meats. Jason Scholz, Stella’s owner and chef, greets Sermons in the kitchen and checks off the items that he ordered by email earlier in the week. The two have worked together for more than a decade, ever since Scholz worked at High Cotton

and was looking for area farmers from whom to buy local produce. “Throughout my career, I always worked in kitchens where using local food was as natural as breathing. When I moved here in 2007, it was hard to find anyone selling local produce. Chris was pretty much the only game in town,” Scholz says. After getting his check, Sermons continues to a handful of other upscale restaurants in the Greenville area, but his carrots’ journey is nearly complete. That evening, Scholz and his team work magic on the carrots, transforming them into carrot souffle, carrot soup, carrot pudding, and other delicacies. Each dish is beautifully plated and whisked out to the restaurant’s patrons, where it’s happily received. Although this local farm-to-table story no doubt stirs your appetite, it’s hardly representative of where most of the food in restaurants and grocery stores throughout the Upstate comes from. Despite the increasing popularity and success of the now decades-old “local «

We’ve all been waiting more than a year for Neo Burrito to open in the Village of West Greenville, and we’ll have to wait just a bit longer. The hazardous sidewalk along Pendleton Street in front of Neo has been ripped up by the City of Greenville (thank you!), and construction is underway to replace it, along with the addition of some lovely new streetscaping. Sign us up for seven days a week of burritos, tacos, y mas.

Speaking of tacos…

Tickets for the all-you-can-eat (but not all-you-can-drink, guys) second annual Tacos ‘n Tequila Fiesta are on sale now. The event sold out last year, so better make those #SundayFunday plans now for March 25 at The Old Cigar Warehouse. Festivities include local bartenders and chefs competing to create the best Lunazul tequila cocktails, tacos, and side dishes. But really, we’re the real winners. Snag tickets at tacotequilafiesta. com.

Burgers, bourbon, or beer (oh my)

Tuesday isn’t just for tacos anymore. At Roost, it’s all about the three B’s, and it’s a steal. Every Tuesday night at the restaurant inside the Hyatt, pick a burger and a craft brew or bourbon from a select list, and pay $11.99. After that, you can enjoy heavily discounted pours from the list.

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of many factors contributing to the U.S. having the highest per capita health-care costs in the world. Can the local food movement reverse these trends? The answer is unclear, and is debated by economists, sociologists, policy makers, and farmers alike. In an ideal world, everyone — regardless of socioeconomic status — would have access to fresh, minimally processed, local, organic foods. However, doing so would require a societal transformation that is unlikely to happen overnight.

What’s Organic?

To be labeled “certified organic,” a farm or product must adhere to strict federal guidelines under the USDA’s National Organic Program. Participants are inspected annually by third-party agencies, such as Clemson’s Department of Plant Industry, to verify program compliance.

Two decades ago, unless you were a gardener, getting local or organic food in the Upstate was virtually impossible. Now, there are weekend and weekday farmers markets and opportunities to buy CSA shares from local farmers.

« food movement” both here and across the nation, very little of what a person typically eats is produced by local farmers. Instead, most Americans get the majority of their calories from cheap, highly processed foods. Sodas, fast food, and TV dinners are derived from soybeans, corn, and various commodity crops grown on huge farms hundreds or thousands of miles away – farms that bear little resemblance to operations like Sermons’ Bio-Way Farm. Raw products from those farms then go through a string of middlemen and processors before making their way into either the middle aisles of a grocery store, a fast-food restaurant, animal feed, or ethanol fuel. The results of this food system? On average, U.S. citizens spend less on food per capita at the cash register than any other country in the world – which is exactly what the system was designed to deliver. Between then and today, despite a general population increase from 205 million to 323 million, the number of

U.S. farms has dropped from about 3 million to 2 million. The primary strategy for making a profit when you have little control over input costs and no control over the final market value of your product is to get even more acreage under management (a farm netting $10 per acre per year can operate only if it has lots of acreage, lots of subsidies, or both). Our ability to produce cheap food comes at a high price. As the Organization for Economic Development (OECD) reported in 2017, the U.S. now has the most overweight population in the world, with 38.2 percent of adults obese and nearly 75 percent of the population falling into the “overweight or obese” category. Preventable diet-related diseases such as heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and many types of cancer are also rampant. The Center for Science in the Public Interest estimates that preventable diet-related diseases and illnesses cause close to 700,000 premature deaths each year and may cost us close to $1 trillion annually. This health crisis is also one

For decades, subsidies, research and development funding, and public policy have focused on building the food system we currently have, not one focused on supporting smaller, local farms growing diversified specialty crops and animals raised outdoors on pasture. As such, it’s largely the affluent who can afford such high-quality foods from local farms. Many point out that poor and minority populations in the Upstate and beyond often live in “food deserts” where the only place to buy food nearby is a gas station or convenience store. Not to mention, even if fresh food were available, cooking is largely a folk art in 2018, a practice few have the knowledge, time, or tools to do. Driving to Swamp Rabbit Cafe & Grocery to get groceries or a meal isn’t a viable option when you don’t have a vehicle and have to take public transportation to work two minimum-wage jobs just to make ends meet. These realities are especially problematic for children who develop flavor preferences and eating habits very early in life – patterns that will impact both their long-term health and their school and career performance. (Any teacher will tell you that a hungry child or a child who has had a soda for breakfast is not going to perform optimally in the classroom.) Farmers like Chris Sermons recognize these systemic problems but are largely helpless to do much about it — they have to earn a profit, and doing so requires them to sell their produce to the highest bidder.

small plates ‘A Night in Evrytania’ Ji-Roz, which recently celebrated its one-year anniversary at the Main + Stone development, will host its first Greek Supper Club on Feb. 11 at 5 p.m. The evening will feature a five-course wine dinner inspired by chef and owner John Makkas’ heritage in the mountainous area of Central Greece. Tickets are $50. Visit goo.gl/hncR7v or call 864-373-9445.

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Page pairings

Another great foodie event will be held on Feb. 11 at 7 p.m. The next Sunday Sit-Down Supper at M. Judson Booksellers & Storytellers will feature Fork & Plough chef Shawn Kelly and John T. Edge, author of “Potlikker Papers.” Just to whet your appetite: It’ll include a ham biscuit, fried chicken, pickled shrimp, sweet tea-brined Greenbrier Farms pork, and a bourbon pecan pie. Tickets are $75, and they will sell out fast. Go to mjudsonbooks.com/sunday-suppers.

Coffee, coffee, coffee Excuse the “Gilmore Girls” reference, but it’s difficult to not get excited about another chance to sit in on the new International Coffee Course from Greenville History Tours. This time, Leopard Forest Coffeehouse in Travelers Rest is the host location, and the dates are Feb. 10 or Feb. 24 at 10 a.m. Sounds like the perfect start to a Saturday morning. Visit greenvillehistorytours.com for more info.

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The Local Food Timeline • 1970 T  here are 340 farmers markets in the U.S. • 1984 T  he first CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) operation opens. • 1990 T  he number of CSAs in the U.S. grows to 60. • 1994 T  he number of U.S. farmers markets grows to 1,755. • 1996 F  irst farm-to-school programs start in California and Florida. • 2003 T  D Saturday Farmers Market opens in downtown Greenville. • 2004 T  he number of U.S. farmers markets grows to 3,706. • 2005 T  he number of CSAs in the U.S. grows to 1,046. • 2006 H  ub City Farmers Market opens in Spartanburg. • 2007 O  xford’s Word of the Year is “locavore,” and the National Farm to School Network is established. • 2008 U  .S. local food sales reach $5 billion.

Thankfully, there are positive trends that provide a ray of hope. As the demand for local and organic produce increases, private investment and public policy are slowly working in lockstep to develop better food options that are more accessible to everyone. Two decades ago, unless you were a gardener, getting local or organic food in the Upstate was virtually impossible. Now, there are multiple weekend and weekday farmers markets. You can buy CSA (community supported agriculture) shares from local farmers, paying them up front for produce that will be harvested and delivered throughout the season. Chefs and restaurant owners recognize that the higher quality of fresh local produce combined with consumer demand means they also need to offer local food on their menus to stay competitive. Grocery stores, schools, and hospitals are also sourcing from local farmers. Feed & Seed is scheduled to open later this year, becoming the area’s first “food hub,” a critical piece of infrastructure that aggregates, markets, and distributes local farmers’ produce to local and regional institutional buyers, wholesalers, and retailers. (Grow Food Carolina, based in Charleston, is the Lowcountry’s food hub.) This will allow Upstate farmers who partner with Feed & Seed to focus solely on production rather than also having to handle marketing and sales. Scholz’s experience is indicative of what’s happening in the Upstate: “In 2007, I was begging people to bring local produce to us. Now, I have to tell these newer local farmers, ‘No, I’m already in a committed vegetable relationship.’”

These encouraging local trends are also happening in virtually every urban center around the United States. Studies on the impact of local food systems generally show positive effects for local economies: Rather than money leaving the area and going to support nonlocal farmers, brokers, wholesalers, and corporate shareholders in an increasingly centralized and consolidated system, the dollars are kept circulating in the local economy. This translates to more local jobs, higher incomes, more local investment, and healthier food options. If these local farms are also certified organic or sustainability-minded, there are also a host of ecosystem service benefits to boot (cleaner water and air, low/no pesticide contamination, etc.). In an increasingly polarized political climate, local food might just be one issue that we can all unite behind. Whether you’re a hipster looking for an unforgettable dinner for an Instagram post or a weather-worn farmer looking for a market that will value generations-old family heirloom produce, the local food movement provides a beneficial solution. However, the challenge for all participants in this growing movement won’t be how to get quality food into the hands of those who can currently access and afford it, but how to ensure that underserved demographics can enjoy the economic and health benefits of local food, as well. The seeds to that future are being planted today, but there’s still much work to be done.

Bee A BETTER P R E S E N T S

GREENVILLE A D U L T

A spelling competition among corporate teams of 4 featuring emcee JDew. Bring your enthusiasm! Create team costumes/themes to help your spellers stand out! Prizes to the first place team.

S P E L L I N G

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THREE WAYS TO ATTEND:

Thursday, March 22 from 6-9 pm at Larkin’s Sawmill

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• BEE a corporate sponsor • BEE an individual fundraiser • BEE an audience member ($25/person) To BEE involved, contact Eleanor Vaughn at (864) 467-3458 or vaughn@greenvilleliteracy.org.

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Sponsored by Greenville Journal 1/18/18 9:24 AM


Symphony Photo by: stephen houseworth photography

A Romantic Pops Concert Featuring Edwin McCain and the Greenville Symphony Orchestra Edvard Tchivzhel, Conductor

February 14, 2018 | 7:30pm | The Peace Center GreenvilleSymphony.org PRINCIPAL SPONSORS

SUPPORTING SPONSOR


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02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 34

A R T S C A LE N DA R FEB. 2- 8 2018

Various Greenville galleries/studios

First Friday Feb. 2 ~ 467-3132 Greenville Center for Creative Arts

The Artists of Studio South Feb. 2-Mar. 28 ~ 735-3928 North Greenville University

Senior-Directed One Acts

THE FAMILY FARM Reedy River Farms’ Sarah Maxwell traveled to Stone Barns in New York to learn more about creating a farming community WORDS BY ARIEL TURNER | PHOTO BY WILL CROOKS

Feb. 3 ~ 977-7085 Peace Center

Rebels On Pointe Feb. 3 ~ 467-3000 Greenville Chautauqua Society

History Alive: George Washington Feb. 3-4 ~ 244-1499 SC Children’s Theatre

Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook Through Feb. 4 ~ 467-3000 Centre Stage

The Christians Through Feb. 7 ~ 233-6733 Centre Stage

Rockin’ the Keys Through Feb. 10 ~ 233-6733 The Warehouse Theatre

A Moon for the Misbegotten Through Feb. 10 ~ 235-6948 Peace Center

The Phantom of the Opera Through Feb. 11 ~ 467-3000 Metropolitan Arts Council

Direct Experience: Art and Cancer Through Feb. 23 ~ 467-3132 SC Children’s Theatre

Balloonacy Through Feb. 27 ~ 235-2885 Metro. Arts Council @ Centre Stage

Wet Paint: Works by Glory Day Loflin Through Mar. 4 ~ 233-6733 Greenville Chamber of Commerce

Works by Danielle Fontaine Through Mar. 12 ~ 242-1050

Keeping our ARTbeat strong w w w.greenvillearts.com

16 Augusta Street

864. 467.3132

Statistically speaking, very few of us will have the privilege of dining at one of the exclusive restaurants featured on the captivating Netflix series “Chef’s Table,” which highlights celebrated chefs around the globe. By sheer luck of the draw, however, Reedy River Farms farmer Sarah Maxwell not only

got to dine at one – Blue Hill at Stone Barns featured on season one, episode two – but she also recently spent four days immersed in the environment of Stone Barns Center for Food and Agriculture in Pocantico Hills, N.Y., learning from the top farmers, chefs, scientists, and activists in her industry. It was likely a once-in-a-lifetime educa-

tional excursion that will inform the continued growth of the urban farm started by George DuBose and Chris Miller in 2015. Maxwell, who had no prior experience in agriculture, joined the effort a few months later as a way of volunteering and giving back to the community, and she immediately fell in love with it. Miller has since left


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“The conference opened my eyes to the network and ‘family’ that is farming. Working together and creating a relationship is going to take us far in this venture.” –Sarah Maxwell

to start his own urban farming business, That Garden Guy. On Dec. 5, Maxwell flew to New York for the Young Farmers Conference held at the Hudson Valley educational center. Led by chef Dan Barber and director Jack Algiere, the center has become the gold standard of farming practices in the farm-to-table restaurant movement. Maxwell’s inclusion in the conference was by lottery – every application had the same chance of winning a spot. She hadn’t even told DuBose she was applying because she thought there was no chance she’d actually get in after entering only her email address and a few facts about herself. But then she did. Once that reality set in, Maxwell chose classes to attend, many of them based on DuBose’s recommendations and some to satisfy her own curiosity. Among those were a class on cut flowers — something she plans to dabble in — a class on balancing a landscape to promote honeybee health, a slow tools course where she learned that large power tools are not always necessary, whole-grain bread baking instruction in the famous Blue Hill kitchen using centuries-old starters, and a how-to on planning for profit. To combat the information overload, since even meals were accompanied by some discussion or presentation, Maxwell took copious notes she continues to reference. But before the first keynote began, the conference unofficially opened just after many of the farmers had arrived from Germany, the Midwest, and the majority from the New England and Mid-Atlantic Regions, with a dinner in a former hayloft of an old barn that was unlike anything Maxwell had ever experienced. “It literally looked like Hogwarts,” she says.

She describes a scene with rustic wooden community tables stretching across the room set for 400 people. Candles and ambient lighting set the mood. The tables were covered in banana leaves, and there was not one table setting. It was a handpick dinner, which meant the guests were to serve one another and eat using only their hands to transfer each bite from the table to their mouths. The dinner was prepared by critically acclaimed global nomadic chef Yana Gilbuena, a 2017 Stone Barns Exchange Fellow, from the Philippines. Gilbuena started the Salo Project, which hosts Filipino Kamayan dinners, in which food is served on communal tables decked with banana leaves, and guests are asked to eat with their hands. “It was the best five-course meal I’ve ever had,” Maxwell says. The next morning, the conference officially kicked off, and Maxwell found herself immersed for three days in a community of farmers and advocates, who by the end of the week felt more like family than strangers she’d just met. It also reinforced farming practices DuBose was already using in Reedy River Farms’ now-three locations, and further impressed on Maxwell the importance of the relationship between farmer and consumer. “The relationship with the local community is so crucial if we’re going to convince [people] our future is in farming,” she says. Those relationships extend to local chefs who partner with the farm to grow specific crops they need to run their restaurants, such as Husk, The Anchorage, and Golden Brown & Delicious. “The conference opened my eyes to the network and ‘family’ that is farming,” she says. “Working together and creating a relationship is going to take us far in this venture.”

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02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 36

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Why does that burger cost $12?

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Chef Alex George of GB&D (Golden Brown & Delicious) in the Village of West Greenville, a block and a half from Reedy River Farms, has pattied and assembled approximately 16,000 of his delectable burgers since he opened in August 2016. And when the season’s right for all the produce to be sourced locally, just about every item on the plate comes from a local, organic farm – including the dill and garlic for the pickles. To farm-to-table connoisseurs, that’s a dream, but it also comes with a cost – a much higher cost in terms of time, convenience, and actual price. He, and other similarly minded Greenville chefs, could order ingredients from an international food delivery service that sources ingredients from larger, conventional farms around the globe, but the quality isn’t to their liking, and in many cases, their consciences simply won’t let them. They’re committed to the local food movement.

The Julie Valentine Center works to stop sexual violence and child abuse.

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you’re invited to the

$6.60/lb.

Providence Farms Eggs

JULIE VALENTINE LUNCHEON Guest Speaker: Allison Black Cornelius

BUN

Anson Mills Benne Seeds

PLEASE JOIN US ON INGREDIENTS THURSDAY, FEBRUARY Bib lettuce from Tyger River 11TH Farms 11:30 CHECK-IN $2/head TD CONVENTION CENTER Tomatoes from Hurricane Creek $3/lb. RSVP BY JANUARY 31 Red onion from Swamp Rabbit Café & Grocery

GUEST SPEAKER$1/lb.

us on February 11th for the 6th Annual MercedesJoin Ramirez Johnson GUEST SPEAKER

Julie Valentine Center Luncheon to hear the Mercedes Ramirez Johnson narrowly survived a serious remarkable story of an amazing woman. Monika accident in 1995 that left her hospitalized for nearly three Korra from Norway to Dallas on a track months. She has turnedmoved this tragedy into her life’s mission through her Second Chance Living™ an innovative scholarship withprogram, Southern Methodist University. mindset and approach with a proven track record used in During her sophomore year she was kidnapped professional development programs around the world. presented by at gunpoint and brutally Silentraped Tears by three men. Mercedes and her story have been the subject ofLisa considerable Bob Castellani After assisting with the and convictions of her national and international media coverage. She was recognized assailants, Monika tragedy into a as one of the country’s top young Hispanic up-turned and-comers by People Magazine’s Spanish edition, People en Español. message of survival and hope. She founded the Monika Korra Foundation with a mission to Kill RESERVEthe YOUR SEAT NOW @ JULIEVALENTINECENTER.ORG Silence surrounding rape and abuse and make it possible for survivors to seek the help needed for complete healing. Monika’s book of the same name “Kill the Silence” was released this fall.

(sourced from North Carolina)

Beef from Providence Farms

$6/lb. PICKLES

Cucumbers from Crescent Farm

$2/lb.

Dill from Tyger River Farms

$2/bunch

Garlic from Crescent Farm

$4/lb.


02.02.2018 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 37

COMMUNITYJOURNALS.COM

IN THE SPOTLIGHT

FEB. 2-3

PERFORMING ARTS

FEB. 2-4

FAMILY

Marvel Universe Live! “Legally Blonde the Musical” The Furman University Pauper Players will be putting on their rendition of “Legally Blonde the Musical” this weekend. Based on the book and movie of the same name, “Legally Blonde the Musical” is about Elle Woods, a sorority girl who enrolls at Harvard Law School to win back her ex-boyfriend, Warner. Bradwin Amos, a senior at Furman, brought up the idea of producing “Legally Blonde the Musical” because of its powerful message. “The girl … at the start of the musical defines herself by the men she was with,” Amos says. “Yet when she discovers her own self-worth and the power she has to impact others, she learns that she doesn’t need men to define who she is.” Hannah Houck, president of the Pauper Players at Furman, said the production will be filled with the iconic moments from the “Legally Blonde” movie, combined with the Pauper Players’ unique style. “Our dynamic cast of Furman students brings a new energy and excitement to the show that will make you want to dance in your seat all night long,” Houck said. “You don’t want to miss it!” –Robert Hull

WHEN Feb. 2-3, 7:30 p.m. WHERE McAlister Auditorium, 3300 Poinsett Highway ADMISSION $5 students, $8 Furman faculty and staff, $10 adults INFO www.bit.ly/2ElIznz

FEB. 3

Marvel Universe Live! is a superhero stunt spectacular. Join the Avengers, Spider-Man, and the Guardians of the Galaxy as they team up with Doctor Strange in a battle against Loki and other super-villains from the Marvel Universe. Loki has his eyes set on the Wand of Watoomb, an ancient mystical artifact that would make him ruler of the universe. Marvel superheroes join forces to retrieve the powerful Wand before Loki can get his hands on it. This show will have the heroes fight against foes such as the Green Goblin, Electro, Yondu, and Nebula. The show will feature many parkour-style stunts, martial arts, aerial maneuvers, motorcycles, and pyrotechnics. –Robert Hull

WHEN Feb. 2-4; times vary WHERE Bon Secours Wellness Arena, 650 N. Academy St. ADMISSION $15–$66 INFO www.bonsecoursarena.com/events/detail/marvel-universe-live

Fall in Love with Your Hearing this Valentine’s Day! Bring in a loved one and you will receive a FREE hearing evaluation. If you purchase a pair of the Widex BEYOND midrange or premium aids by Feb 15th, you will get our Valentine’s promotion!

$500 off, plus a FREE recharging battery system ($300 value) for your new hearing aids.

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Sweetheart Charity Ball

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Meals on Wheels of Greenville will have their annual Sweetheart Charity Ball, which raises money for the homebound in the Greenville community. The ball will be the first event to kick off Meals on Wheels’ 50th anniversary celebration. Amanda Osborne, director of development, said there will be some exciting changes to this year’s event, including a video that celebrates the organization’s history and future plans. She added that some of the changes would be a surprise. “Anyone who has attended in the past will see some exciting changes when they arrive,” Osborne said. Last year, the ball was able to raise $237,000, which funded more than 53,800 meals for the homebound in Greenville. Osborne said she hopes that because this is the 50th anniversary of the organization, they will be able to set a fundraising record. The event will include a threecourse meal, dancing, and a silent auction with over 100 items. Some of the items up for auction include artwork, electronics, and special vacation getaways. –Robert Hull

WHEN Saturday, Feb. 3, 6 p.m. WHERE Hyatt Regency, 220 N. Main St. ADMISSION $150 individual, $300 couple INFO www.mealsonwheelsgreenville.org/mow-event/sweetheart-charity-ball/

“Jennifer and Sound Hearing Care are always there for me and my wife. She even wrote a letter for me to help get my disability for hearing with the VA. You will not find better people to work with. I started working with Jennifer when she worked at another location and followed her. I would never go to anyone else! I definitely recommend Sound Hearing Care!” - Jerry L

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38 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FEB. 2

O-CHA Unplugged featuring Travis Smith O-CHA Tea Bar | 300 River St., Suite 122 | 8 p.m. | Free

CONCERT

Upstate singer-songwriter Travis Smith’s debut LP, “Thinking of You,” is largely made up of slickly produced modern soul and dance-funk, so it’s difficult to think of him playing a set with just his voice and acoustic guitar. But as it turns out, the unplugged setting is a comfortable one for Smith. “I write my songs on acoustic guitar originally,” he says, “and the band and the full production are built around that.” In addition, Smith says he likes the idea of being in close proximity to his audience in an intimate setting. “Thehttp://www.thetravissmithproject.com/audio/ people are right in front of you,” he says. “It allows you to be a storyteller about your own songs. I can talk to the audience and tell them where the songs come from, as opposed to a bigger production, where you can talk, but you’ve got to get to the next song!” And where do Smith’s songs typically come from? “People I know, both fortunately and unfortunately,” he says with a laugh. “They’ll tell me their story or I’ll write about a shared experience we had together.” —Vincent Harris FRI

02

PERFORMING ARTS

Chautauqua Benefit Show: George Washington

Greenville Chautauqua South Carolina Governor’s School for Arts & Humanities | 15 University St. 7:30-9:30 p.m. | $30 Join us for a spectacular dessert reception and private conversation with “George Washington” in the intimate setting of Smith Recital Hall. Ron Carnegie is not to be missed as George Washington. He will personally answer all your questions. 864-244-1499 www.greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org caroline@greenvilleCHAUTAUQUA.org VISUAL ARTS

Twisted Moulin Rouge

Studio Unknown | 914 Easley Bridge Road 6-9 p.m. | FREE Underground Arts invites you to attend the Twisted Moulin Rouge themed art exhibit. The event is about love and romance. Celebrate Valentine’s Day early and in a new way. FAMILY

Parent’s Night Out

The Children’s Museum | 300 College St. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Members: $25 first child / $15 per additional sibling | non-members: $30 first child / $20 per additional sibling Bring your little loves to TCMU so you can enjoy a night on the town. Kids will be invited to play in the museum’s exhibits, eat dinner, create Valentine’s crafts, and decorate cookies. For children ages 4-10. Drop off between 5:30-6:15 p.m. Pick-up between 8:30-9:30 p.m. Bring dinner and a cookie for those with food allergies. Register online. www.tcmupstate.org VISUAL ARTS

GCCA Exhibit Openings

GCCA Main Gallery | 25 Draper St. | 6-9 p.m. Join GCCA on First Friday for the opening of two new exhibitions. “Making Our Mark: The Artists of Studio South” brings together 17 artists of the Studio South painting group and “Chasing the Unexpected” highlights explorations in collage by Cecelia Feld. 864-735-3948 | www.artcentergreenville.org

SAT

03

RECREATION

Carolina Dance Collaborative

First Baptist Greenville AYMC Building 10:30-11:30 a.m. | Saturdays through April 28 $50/month or $15/class Come move with Carolina Dance Collaborative. Classes have begun and will follow the Greenville County School Calendar until April 28. info@carolinadancecollaborative.com COMMUNITY

2017 Martin Luther King Youth Program and Rudolph Gordon College Fair

Furman University | 3300 Poinsett Hwy. Burgiss Theater and Watkins Room Trone Student Center | 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sponsored by Alpha Phi Alpha Greenville Foundation. 864-441-9067 | www.Furman.edu/mlk mlkfair@alphagreenville.org SCIENCE & TECH

South Carolina FIRST Tech Challenge Robotics Championship

South Carolina Robotics Education Foundation Gaffney High School 149 Twin Lake Road, Gaffney 9:30 a.m. | FREE The FIRST Tech Challenge robotics season will culminate with the South Carolina Robotics Education Foundation hosting the South Carolina State Championship. Two teams will advance to the South Super-Regional Championship being held March 8-10 in Athens, GA. 864-490-8863 | www.scref.org pedersen@scref.org LESSONS & TRAINING

Youth Job Program

Mauldin United Mauldin Church 100 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. | FREE Kayla Alewine, youth director at Mauldin United Mauldin Church, and Bill Vicary, founder of Life Skills U, have developed a program and are hosting the second annual upcoming community program for youth: “What you need to know to get a job.” 864-621-0224 bill@vicarymanagementgroup.com mauldinmethodist.com/youthjobprogram

TOURNAMENT

2018 T-H Marine FLW Bass Fishing League tournament season opener

Lake Keowee | South Cove County Park 1099 S. Cove Road, Seneca The 2018 T-H Marine FLW Bass Fishing League (BFL) tournament season will open for anglers in the Savannah River Division with a tournament on Lake Keowee presented by Navionics. Up to 400 boaters and co-anglers will be competing for top awards of up to $8,000 and $3,000 respectively in the one-day tournament. www.FLWFishing.com FILM SCREENING

Free Film Screening: “Rebels on Pointe”

Peace Center | Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. 5 p.m. | FREE The Peace Center will present a free screening of the documentary film “Rebels on Pointe.” The ballet company that is the subject of the film, Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo, will perform in the Peace Concert Hall on Feb. 16. Exploring universal themes of identity, dreams, and family, “Rebels on Pointe” is the first-ever documentary film celebrating the world famous Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo. The notorious allmale, drag ballet company was founded more than 40 years ago in New York City on the heels of the Stonewall riots and has a passionate cult following around the world. The film runs for 90 minutes. To view a trailer, visit www.vimeo. com/220336309. Tickets are required. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org THRU SUN

04

PERFORMING ARTS

“Junie B. Jones Is Not a Crook”

South Carolina Children’s Theatre Peace Center, Gunter Theatre 300 S. Main St. $18-$27 She’s back. Junie B. Jones is ecstatic about her brand new mittens – until a dirty, rotten thief steals them. So when she finds a fantastic pen on the school floor, she should get to keep it. Right? 864-235-2885 or 864-467-3000 www.scchildrenstheatre.org www.peacecenter.org MON

05

COMMUNITY

Saving South American Giants: Giant Armadillo and Giant Anteater

The Children’s Museum 300 College St. 7 p.m. | FREE Two formidable giants from another era still roam the lands of South America: the giant armadillo and the giant anteater. Come hear about them in this one-hour talk. Our guest speaker is Dr. Arnaud Desbiez, Project Coordinator for Anteaters and Highways. www.greenvillezoo.com/lecture LITERATURE

Min Jin Lee to Talk About Latest Korean Novel

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 3 p.m. $16.95 - each ticket admits one and includes a paperback copy From national bestselling author Min Jin Lee comes her latest novel, “Pachinko,” a finalist for the National Book Award. This page-turning

saga follows four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fighting to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan while exiled from a home they never knew. Lee will discuss her new book at a book talk, followed by a Q&A session, and a book signing. Tickets and books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling. 864-675-0540 www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com TUE

06

HOBBIES & SPECIAL INTEREST

Pokemon League

The Red Barn 2333 N. Pleasantburg Drive 6-8 p.m. | Tuesdays | FREE Pokemon League is a fun and accessible way for fans to get together and have fun. League events are open to all Pokemon TCG and video game players. Using your own cards and Pokemon video games, you can play, trade, and even earn cool prizes. 864-324-2369 www.easleypokemongym.ml easleypokemongym@gmail.com COMMUNITY

Greenville Downtown Line Dancing

Sears Rec Center | McPherson Park 100 E. Park Ave. 6:15-8 p.m. | Tuesdays $5 (Greenville City Residents -$4) Greenville Downtown Line Dancing is a fun way to exercise. No partner or dance knowledge required. Dances are taught in a fun and easy way with a variety of music including hip hop, R&B, rock ‘n’ roll, Latin, country, shag, and swing. Party dances include Electric Slide, Cupid Shuffle, Bikers Shuffle, and Cha Cha Slide. Second hour moves into more advanced dances — fireball, footloose, R&B boogie, and more. Two left feet are fine. Bring your friends and have some fun. 864-467-4326 www.greenvillesc.gov FAMILY

“Giraffes Can’t Dance” by Giles Andreae

South Carolina Children’s Theatre 1200 Pendleton St. 9:30 and 11 a.m. | $1 A chance for wee ones (Pre-K) to hear a favorite story read and acted out. The material may include audience participation segments or simple audience interaction. The performance will last no more than 30 minutes – perfect for young, wiggly patrons. Traysie Amick, SCCT’s principal teaching artist, brings her high energy and child-friendly interpretation of favorite children’s stories to you for a fun weekday performance. 864-235-2885 www.scchildrenstheatre.org TUE-TUE

06-27

LITERATURE

Emry’s Magazine Writing with John Jeter

6:30-7:30 p.m. | Tuesdays $100 Week 1 - What’s a magazine article? How’s it structured, what’s included? What makes it different from a blog or newspaper/online featurelength (long-form) story? What are some types (genres) of magazine pieces? Week 2 - Starting a magazine piece from scratch – from idea to


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FEB. 2

Diamond Rio

PERFORMANCE ARTS

Blind Horse Saloon | 1035 Lowndes Hill Road | 8 p.m. | $18 adv/$20 door

CONCERT

The Blind Horse Saloon has somehow become one the most popular clubs in Greenville while also remaining its best kept secret. With a bare minimum of advertising, the venue has been bringing a mix of the big new country artists (like next month’s already-sold-out performance by Kane Brown) and veteran multiplatinum acts like Tracy Lawrence and the headliners of this weekend’s show, Diamond Rio. Between their formation in 1982 and 2006, the band landed 32 singles on the country charts and sold over 10 million albums. Hits like “Meet in the Middle,” “In a Week or Two,” “Night Is Fallin’ in My Heart,” and “That’s What I Get for Lovin’ You” were marked by the band’s pop polish, perfectly arranged vocal harmonies, and just enough country twang, and they garnered the group three platinum and five gold albums, along with five Country Music Associationhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWKpCmPdGmM awards, an Academy of Country Music award for Best Vocal Group and, most recently, a Grammy award for their gospel album, “The Reason.” —Vincent Harris completion ... based on an editor’s assignment or a self-generated pitch. Week 3 - Looking into markets, how to pitch to an editor, and establishing relationships with editors. Week 4 -Polishing/revising/editing and completing and preparing to send out a publishable magazine story. Local legend John Jeter is the author of three books, a musical, and a play — and has worked as a copy editor and assistant city editor at two major metropolitan daily newspapers. He writes for various magazines and marketing companies and is currently a contract stringer for The New York Times. www.emrys.org/writing-room-workshops/ THRU WED

07

PERFORMANCE ARTS

“The Christians”

Centre Stage | 501 River St. Tuesdays and Wednesdays | $15, $10 Pastor Paul decides he no longer believes in hell, and today, he’s going to preach a sermon that finally says what he really believes. He thinks all the people in his church are going be happy to hear what he has to say. He’s wrong. 864-233-6733 | www.centrestage.org WED

07

COMMUNITY

Outshine Homework Help Program

Center for Developmental Services 29 N. Academy St. 3-4:45 p.m. | Wednesdays | FREE Outshine is a free community homework help program offered by the Center for Developmental Services. Volunteers and CDS staff will assist children ages 5-13 with any homework subject through May 9. 864-331-1445 | leslie.salazar@cdservices.org THU

08

FAMILY

Storytime Thursday

Fiction Addiction 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 10:30 a.m. | FREE Fiction Addiction hosts a free children’s storytime each Thursday. This week’s featured book is “Love” by Matt de la Pena and illustrated by Loren Long. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com

MUSIC

Tom Wright’s Cat and Mouse Ensemble

The Wheel 1288 Pendleton St. 7:30 p.m. | 2nd and 4th Thursday of the month $10 The “Wheel Sessions” is a jazz performance series hosted at the Wheel. The entrance fee includes complimentary beverage and two sets of music; all proceeds go to the artists. Attendees may also BYOB. To reserve a seat, call or text. 312-520-2760 FRI

09

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Faith at Work Business Symposium

North Greenville University | Tigerville 1-5 p.m. | FREE North Greenville University is pleased to host its third annual Faith at Work Business Symposium. The event is open to all students, faculty, and community. The Symposium is comprised of a series of lectures by three Christian business professionals. Faith at Work gives the speakers an excellent opportunity to share their experiences as Christian business professionals who integrate Christ-centered values in business with students and local business leaders. www.eventbrite.com/e/third-annualfaith-at-work-business-symposium-tickets-41238763251 THRU SAT

10

MUSIC

“Rockin’ The Keys”

Centre Stage 501 River St. $35, $30, $25 Centre Stage’s annual hit rock show features the music of legendary piano greats like Billy Joel, Elton John, Stevie Wonder, Ray Charles, and so many more. Featuring iconic songs like “Somebody to Love,” “Rocket Man,” and of course, “Piano Man,” “Rockin’ The Keys” will have you singing along and feeling the magic from these Grammy Award winning powerhouses. 864-233-6733 www.centrestage.org

A Moon for the Misbegotten

Warehouse Theatre 37 Augusta St. Reserved $40, General Admission $35 In this O’Neill classic, James Tyrone Jr., the son from “A Long Day’s Journey Into Night” visits the home of his tenant farmer, Phil Hogan. There he encounters Hogan’s magnetic daughter, Josie. During one moonlit night, as the lovestruck Josie seems to claim him as her own, the drunken Jamie drowns in a wave of remorse. When dawn comes will both the moon and the man be gone, leaving Josie with a new challenge to her dauntless spirit? Or will love finally bring these two together? 864-235-6948 www.warehousetheatre.com SAT

10

PERFORMANCE ARTS

9th annual 24 Hour Play Festival

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College Str 8 p.m. | $15 The Greenville Little Theatre is excited to announce it’s 9th annual 24 Hour Play Festival, a much anticipated favorite for anyone who loves to see creative genius at work. Local writers, directors, actors, stage managers, and technicians will write, stage, and perform 3 short plays, all within 24 hours. GLT’s 24 Hour Play Festival has earned a reputation for it’s hilarious and exhilarating performances over the past 9 years. One play performed will be selected as the winner based on votes cast by audience members. The night is completed with a set by Laughing Stock Improv, a popular comedy troupe that performs regularly at the Coffee Underground in Downtown Greenville. 864-233-6238 www.greenvillelittletheatre.org PERFORMANCE ARTS

Disney’s “James and the Giant Peach” auditions

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 E. Butler Road, Mauldin 9 a.m. | FREE The Mauldin Youth Theatre will be holding open auditions for its April production of Roald Dahl’s “James and the Giant Peach, Jr!” Featuring a wickedly tuneful score and a curiously quirky script, you won’t want to miss being a part of this “masterpeach.” This production has nine principle roles available and numerous ensemble roles. Roles are for youth in 5th through 12th grade. There is no fee to participate in this audition or production. Registeronline. www.mauldinculturalcenter.org www.bit.ly/2pSFnw4 LITERATURE

Writing Class

Coldwell Banker Caine Building 111 Williams St. Saturdays | $85 Author Carol Baldwin will be hosting a monthly writing class for new and intermediate writers. Feb. 10 class will focus on point of view. Class time will include writing activities, critique, and discussion. Please see her blog for a list of upcoming topics. Class size is limited to 10 students. www.carolbaldwinblog.blogspot.com cbaldwin6@me.com

JAN 18 - FEB 10 Thursday- Sunday


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Magnificat-Greenville Prayer Breakfast Greenville Hilton | 45 West Orchard Park Drive 9 a.m.-noon Magnificat-Greenville, a ministry to Catholic Women, is hosting its next speaker and breakfast event. All women are welcome to join us for fellowship, praise, and worship, and be inspired by our guest speaker Donna Buzzell. Come hear how the Lord turned Donna from a bitter and rebellious woman to a woman full of the Holy Spirit and devoted to serving Him. www.Magnificat-Ministry.org magnificatgreenvillesc@gmail.com THRU SUN

11

THEATER

“The Phantom of the Opera”

Peace Center | 101 W. Broad St. starting at $65 Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s “The Phantom of the Opera” will return to Greenville as part of a brand new North American tour. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org PERFORMANCE ARTS

“5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche”

Converse College | Laird Theatre 580 E. Main St., Spartanburg $10 general/$5 students The award-winning Proud Mary Theatre Company, South Carolina’s first and only theatre company devoted exclusively to LGBTQ+ stories and voices, is proud to announce its second MainStage show, “5 Lesbians Eating a Quiche” by Evan Linder and Andrew Hobgood. www.proudmarytheatre.com SUN

11

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Valentine’s Pole Party

The Pole Academy 637 Congaree Rd, Suite G 6-9 p.m. | $10 Single? Couple? Whether you celebrate Valentines Day or not - join The Pole Academy for the love of pole. Bring your other half, bring a friend, or just be with the one you love most pole. There will be single and doubles moves, food, and three hours of pole shenanigans. 864-520-2834 | Kilo.kitty.tpa@gmail.com www.thepoleacademy.com TUE

13

VISUAL ARTS

Galentine’s Vision Book Event (for gals only)

GCCA | 25 Draper St. 6-8 p.m. | $20 / $10 Members Join Suzanne Woolf to create your own vision book. A mash up of a planner, vision board, and journal: all combined in an altered book that you make with guidance from a published art journal author. Use your book to record your story, goals, special events, art techniques, personal messages, or ideas. The book and supplies will be provided for you along with templates to use to create your personal vision. Bring your sister, mother, daughter, friend, and also BYOB. 864-735-3948 | www.artcentergreenville.org SCIENCE & TECH

Free presentation of the Netflix documentary “Chasing Coral”

McKissick Theater | Hendrick Student Center Clemson University | 720 McMillan Road, Clemson 7-9 p.m. | FREE Clemson University is sponsoring a free showing of “Chasing Coral,” a film by Jeff Orlowski. The movie

is about how coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. Divers, photographers, and scientists set out on an ocean adventure to discover why the reefs are disappearing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world. Free copies of Clemson World magazine will also be given out at the event. And our scientists will be there to discuss the movie and answer questions. www.clemson.edu

MAR THU

01

VISUAL ARTS

“Caliente Cuba: A Night of Hot Art and Cool Culture”

Upstate International Artist’s Guild Gallery | 200 N. Main St. 6-9 p.m. Upstate International is kicking off the sixth year of its month-long international festival, Upstate International Month, with a unique night blending the art and culture of Cuba right here in the Upstate. Don’t miss “Caliente Cuba: A Night of Hot Art and Cool Culture.” Showcasing 16 master artists from Eastern Cuba, this will be the first exhibition of the Clyde Hensley Collection in the Upstate after having traveled to 14 cities throughout the U.S. Plan to enjoy an evening of delicious Cuban fare provided by La Habana, Afro-Cuban music by the Jazz Collective, plenty of Sangria, Cuban beer, and a Cuban art raffle. Upstate International Month 2018 is a showcase of internationally-themed events that celebrate and promote the rich global diversity of the Upstate. The purpose of Upstate International Month is to provide opportunities to experience the world right here at home. This community collaboration features over 100 events and activities hosted by businesses, nonprofits, and civic groups across our region. On March 1 experience the art, music and food of Cuba. Upstate International Month is a program of Upstate International, a nonprofit dedicated to fostering the dynamic exchange of international cultures and ideas. The Cuban art will be for sale and the Artist’s Guild Gallery is donating its 35 percent commission to Upstate International. www.upstateinternational.org LITERATURE

Laura Leigh Morris to Celebrate Launch of Debut Short-Story Collection

Fiction Addiction | 1175 Woods Crossing Road, #5 6-8 p.m. | FREE Greenville author Laura Leigh Morris will be celebrating the launch of her debut short story collection, “Jaws of Life,” at an in-store book launch party. Books can be purchased online, at the store, or by calling. 864-675-0540 | www.fiction-addiction.com info@fiction-addiction.com MON

05

CONCERT

Willie Nelson & Family

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $65-$95 Willie Nelson & Family are coming to the Peace Center. With a six-decade career and more than 200 albums, Willie Nelson is the creative genius behind the historic recordings of “Crazy,” “Red Headed Stranger,” and “Stardust.” The iconic Texan has earned every conceivable award as a musician and amassed reputable credentials as an author, actor, and activist. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

FEB. 6

Sam Hadfield

Smiley’s Acoustic Café | 111 Augusta St. | 6:30 p.m. | Free

When Paducah, Ky., resident Sam Hadfield released his debut album, “Livin’ Free With Livin’ on My Mind,” in 2013, he came across as a straight-ahead acoustic folk singer in the tradition of early Bob Dylan or Woody Guthrie. His new EP, “Finders Never Sing the Blues,” is a completely different animal, stacked with full-band rock ‘n’ roll arrangements and a bouncing rhythm section, even on the ballads. “When I wrote the first album, I really wanted to be a folk singer,” Hadfield says, “and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAjaT1hyI_Y I wanted people to see me as such. And the results were a bit contrived. The songwriting was more about me emulating people than really being myself. These new tunes came from a place of not trying to write like anyone, and the results just wound up being rock ‘n’ roll.” They also came from a period of serious transition for Hadfield, who got sober in the four years between releases. “I couldn’t get out of my own way for a long time,” he says. “I was chasing this idea that the crazier you acted, the more pure you were as an artist because you were living outside of societal rules. It was really just an excuse I made for myself so I could keep partying. I got sober and realized I can still live outside of societal norms while actually pursuing my dreams.” —Vincent Harris

CONCERT

RELIGION/SPIRITUALITY

SAT

LITERATURE

Thirteen Ways (Plus 10 Emry’s or Minus) of Looking at a List Poem with Celisa Steele

10 a.m.-3 p.m. | $75 In this workshop, we’ll explore how lists can be deployed in—and even across—poems and to what end. Using example poems, we’ll discuss: numbered lists and unordered lists, announced lists and revealed lists, subgenres, and related phenomena (such as abecedarians). Workshop participants will be asked to do the following: select a single short (no longer than a page) poem they want feedback on (the poem need not be a list poem), e-mail the poem in advance to the workshop leader (closer to the workshop date, directions for doing this will be provided), and bring hard copies of their poem to the workshop to share with the other participants. The workshop will be limited to thirteen participants. www.emrys.org/writing-room-workshops/ SUN

18

CONCERT

9 String Theory at Music on Sunday Series

Temple of Israel | 400 Spring Forest Road 3 p.m. | $20/adult, $5/student 9 String Theory is the unique collaboration of Russian domra virtuoso Angelina Galashenkova, and award-winning American guitarist John Huston performing music of great variety and intense virtuosity. Music features Latin American rhythms, Russian Gypsy fire, Spanish Flamenco, and songs from America. There will be a complimentary wine and cheese reception. THU

22

BUSINESS

The PIQUE 2018: Young Professionals Elevating the Upstate Summit

Taylors Mill | 250 Mill St. 1:15-5 p.m. | $25 Hosted by Ten at the Top, approximately 200300 young leaders from across the 10 counties of the Upstate are expected to attend. Ten at the Top board members and executives

representing Upstate businesses and organizations will also be in attendance. The event will feature six workshops: Executive Networking Roundtables (Repeated), Networking & Building Relationships, Driving Innovation Through Engagement & Inclusion, Navigating Workplace Politics, Structures and Cultures, and Young Professional Development and Success. www.eventbrite.com/e/the-pique-2018-tickets-42210424516 WED

28

CONCERT

The Pretenders

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 7:30 p.m. | $45-$55 The Pretenders are coming to Greenville with special guest Lowlight. The Pretenders became New Wave legends with chart-topping hits like “Back on the Chain Gang,” “I’ll Stand By You,” and “Don’t Get Me Wrong.” Now, nearly four decades from their 1980 debut album, Chrissie Hynde’s beautifully distinctive voice is perhaps more emotional and aggressive than at any other time in her career. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org

APR MON

09

CONCERT

An Evening with Gillian Welch

Peace Center | 300 S. Main St. 8 p.m. | $35 Gillian Welch will play the Peace Center. At this concert, Welch and her musical partner, David Rawlings, will perform two full sets of music with no opener. 864-467-3000 | www.peacecenter.org FRI

13

CONCERT

Greenville Blues Festival

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 8 p.m. | $79, $64, $54 Greenville Blues Festival will feature Sir Charles Jones, Theodis Ealey, Pokey Bear, Nellie “Tiger” Travis, Lacee, and Lenny Williams. 800-745-3000 | www.ticketmaster.com


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LITERATURE

Write What You Know 14 Emry’s (Well Enough To Lie About) with Scott Gould 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. | $75 This one-day workshop will explore how to use autobiographical incidents and information as the basis for writing fiction, specifically, a short story. There will be a no-fail, 100 percent guaranteed prompt designed to shake loose some long lost memories. There will be nuts-andbolts discussions about conflict and character and setting. You will be required to tell some lies about the truth. The only things you need to bring to the workshop are your memory and a pencil. www.emrys.org/writing-room-workshops/ TOURNAMENT

New Fishing Tournament Hopes to Reel in Money for Eye Care

Lake Robinson | Greer $100 The Greer Centennial Lions Club hopes to bring new excitement of fishing for big bass with a tournament. The event, which is open to the public and sponsored by Greer CPW, will provide outdoor enthusiasts the opportunity to win $1,000 for the biggest fish and other top prizes. Registration is now open and applications can be found at the Lake Robinson warden’s office, Greer CPW and various bait and tackle shops around the Upstate. Participants must have a fishing license through the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and a boating and fishing permit through Greer CPW. www.document.li/bvaR | www.document.li/ DZYq FRI-SUN

20-22

PERFORMING ARTS

“James and the Giant Peach”

Mauldin Cultural Center 101 East Butler Road $6-10 Come for Mauldin Youth Theatre’s production of Roald Dahl’s “James and the Giant Peach, Jr!” When James chops down an old fruit tree, he discovers a magic potion that results in a tremendous peach. Suddenly, James finds himself on a journey of enormous proportions, accompanied by human-sized insects with equally oversized personalities. Featuring a wickedly tuneful score and a curiously quirky

script, you won’t want to miss seeing this “masterpeach!” 864-335-4862 www.mauldinculturalcenter.eventbrite.com events@mauldinculturalcenter.org SUN

22

RELIGIOUS

OUTCRY: Spring 2018 Tour

Bon Secours Wellness Arena 650 N. Academy St. 7 p.m. $64.95/Experience; $99.95/Collective; $26.95/registration; $22.95/group & 4 pack; $35 at the event Featuring a unique combination of artists and worship leaders, OUTCRY: Spring 2018 Tour provides a rare opportunity to worship with a wide variety of artists and hear a message from one of the renowned speakers of the day. Artists teaming up for the OUTCRY: Spring 2018 Tour are Elevation Worship, Bethel Music, Mosaic MSC, and Vertical Worship, with speaker Christine Caine. Caine’s primary concern is Jesus’ final commission. Her priority is to see the lost saved and to build the local church – around the world. She also has a passion for justice, and together with her husband, founded the anti-human trafficking organization The A21 Campaign. www.outcrytour.com SUN

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CONCERT

Poinsett Piano Trio at Music on Sunday Series

Temple of Israel | 400 Spring Forest Road 3 p.m. | $20/adult, $5/student Poinsett Piano Trio features pianist David Gross, violinist Deidre Hutton, and cellist Christopher Hutton, three members of the Furman University faculty who have performed on chamber music series in the US and have made international tours to New Zealand and Germany. The program will include works by Beethoven, Rachmaninoff, and American composer Amy Beach. There will be a complimentary wine and cheese reception.

WANT TO SEE YOUR EVENT HERE? Send your event information and images to calendar@ communityjournals.com by Wednesday at 5 p.m. to be considered for publication in the following week’s Journal.

ONE OF THE LARGEST COLLECTIONS OF SUNGLASSES IN THE COUNTRY – SINCE 1955

1908 Laurens Road, Greenville 864-288-5905 www.FowlersPharmacy.com Crossword puzzle: page 42

Sudoku puzzle: page 42


42 | GREENVILLE JOURNAL | 02.02.2018 GREENVILLEJOURNAL.COM

FIGURE. THIS. OUT.

A Sound Conclusion ACROSS 1 Live online workshop 8 Public poster 15 Malcolm- — Warner (“The Cosby Show” actor) 20 14th-century music style 21 Arrives leisurely 22 Belittle 23 Certain frat member receiving his diploma? 25 Sing sweetly 26 Cove 27 Assuage 28 Muddy mixture 29 Met melody 32 Took way too much, for short 34 Gyro bread with lots of extra hidden calories? 37 Heavenly food made from very hot peppers? 41 — -garde 42 Sauna stuff 43 Singer Acuff 44 Stew 45 Toon pic 48 San Francisco’s — Hill 50 Target number of coverage policies? 54 Download for an iDevice 57 Denmark’s — Islands 59 High trains 60 Detach, as a lapel mic 61 Randomly mixed stack of Bing Crosby and Bill Haley albums?

65 Folded a line into, say 67 With 24-Down, reducedcost product 68 Glam rocker Brian 69 Lav 70 Aviary locale 71 Bridge, in France 72 Florida city 74 Fish dish that’s a chef’s specialty? 77 Rizzo in “Midnight Cowboy” 78 Platform that runs on iDevices 79 Ran easily 80 La. neighbor 81 Brass instrument with a dental product smeared all over it? 86 “O Sole —” 88 Sheepish 89 “— well that ends well” 90 Alias initials 91 Idiot box 95 Provide 97 Hair dye produced in a county in southwest England? 101 Chatty bird with shiny gray plumage? 105 Pirate chant starter 106 Took a train, e.g. 107 Pilot a plane 108 Prefix with skeleton 111 Thin iPods 113 Swiss chocolate brand

By Frank Longo

114 Sitcom title woman living in a wasteland? 120 Actor Jason 121 Energize 122 Algebra rule 123 Totally love 124 Toronto Blue Jays’ stadium, before 2005 125 Salzburg site DOWN 1 Joking sort 2 Be mistaken 3 Gp. with merit badges 4 Hoosier 5 Verb go-with 6 “Why” singer Frankie 7 Like a very clean film 8 Maven 9 Solitary 10 — -Seltzer 11 Top-level 12 Fluttery tree 13 Tear 14 Stuff in the gene pool 15 “Charlie’s Angels” co-star Smith 16 Rudely brief 17 Native New Zealander 18 Of — (somewhat) 19 Lotte of film 24 See 67-Across 28 Glide (over) 29 Belly muscles 30 Groove 31 Fury

Celebrate a local tradition! Do you know a special child turning 6 this month?

For details, visit WMYI.com or WSSLFM.com Keyword: BIRTHDAY

If you live in Greenville or Laurens County and your child will be 6 years old in FEBRUARY, bring your child’s birth certificate to the Pepsi Plant and receive a FREE Pepsi Birthday Party Package! February 5th-9th, Mon.- Fri. 1pm-5pm & February 10th, Sat. 10am-12pm 751 State Park Road, Greenville, SC • 864-242-6041

33 Mended, as a sock 95 Dodging type 110 City in Utah 35 Works to get 96 Irk 112 Iron sources 36 With, to Luc 97 Forthright 114 Film director Craven 38 “Toodles!” 98 Skye of film 115 Ballpoint fill 39 Rebels’ yells 99 California mountain 116 La.-to-Ill. dir. 40 Sch. in the Big Apple 100 Japan’s largest island 117 Bruin Bobby 44 FDR’s terrier 101 Zesty dip 118 Agnus — (Mass part) 45 Reneges 102 Vine-covered 119 Drs.’ org. 46 — Aigner (fashion brand) 103 Group jargon 47 Real-estate levy 104 Nervous — (worrywart) Crossword answers: page 41 49 Bundled up, as hay 109 “Whip It” rock band 50 Prefix for an element used in antiseptics 51 Mission to gather by Myles Mellor and Susan Flannigan intel 52 “— pasa?” 53 Not likely 54 Classifies 55 Ramses II, for one 56 Plaything dragged on a string 58 City in Nevada 62 Mega-meal 63 “Für —” 64 Gear piece 65 Brilliant move 66 Composer Ned 70 Reverse alphabetical order 73 Japanese drama style 74 Tosspots 75 New York’s capital 76 Singer Piaf 78 R&B’s — Brothers 82 San Diego ballplayer 83 One reuning 84 Asian “way” 85 Loc. of Kiev 87 Exceeded, as a target 92 — -Cat 93 Put a stop to 94 — Bo Sudoku answers: page 41 Hard

Sudoku


THE DESIGNATED LEGAL PUBLICATION FOR GREENVILLE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SOLICITATION NOTICE Greenville County, 301 University Ridge, Suite 100, Greenville, SC 29601, will accept responses for the following: RFQ # 17-02/26/18, AUTOMATED TRANSPORT NETWORK (ATN) SYSTEM FEASIBILITY PLANNING STUDY on, February 26, 2018, 3:00 P.M. E.D.T. Solicitations can be found at www.greenvillecounty.org/ Procurement/ or by calling (864) 467-7200.

LEGAL NOTICE RATES ABC Notices

$165

SUMMONS STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE FAMILY COURT 2017-DR-23-4705 KAREN LEIGH, PLAINTIFF, -vsTABITHA LEE CONDREY-FULLER AND JOHN DOE, DEFENDANTS. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to Answer the Complaint herein, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Reply to said Answer on the subscriber, at his office at 16 Whitsett Street, Greenville, South Carolina 29601 within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service and if you fail to Answer the Complaint within the time aforesaid, Defendant will apply to the Court for the relief demanded in the Complaint. C. Carlyle Steele Attorney for the Plaintiff 16 Whitsett Street Greenville, SC 29601 Telephone: 864-271-4360 SC BAR No.: 005316

All others

$1.20 per line

864.679.1205 email: aharley@communityjournals.com

PUBLIC HEARING A PUBLIC HEARING WILL BE HELD ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 2018, AT 6:00 p.m., (or as soon thereafter as other public hearings are concluded), IN COUNCIL CHAMBERS, 301 UNIVERSITY RIDGE, GREENVILLE, SC, 29601, FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING WHETHER THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT BOUNDARIES SHOULD BE ENLARGED TO INCLUDE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED OFF OF WEST GEORGIA ROAD AND ROCKY CREEK ROAD. THE NEW BOUNDARY LINES TO RESULT FOR THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT WOULD INCLUDE THAT AREA KNOWN AS GREENVILLE TAX MAP NUMBER (TMS#) 0575.03-01-004.01. A MAP OF THE NEW BOUNDARIES AND LEGAL DESCRIPTIONS ARE AVAILABLE IN THE COUNTY COUNCIL OFFICE. THE REASON FOR THE PROPOSED ENLARGEMENT IS TO PROVIDE FOR THE ORDERLY COLLECTING OF SEWAGE AND WASTE. NO ADDITIONAL BONDS WILL BE ISSUED BY THE SUBDISTRICT, NOR WILLTHERE BE ANY CHANGES IN THE COMMISSION OR THE PERSONNEL OF THE PRESENT COMMISSION OF THE METROPOLITAN SEWER SUBDISTRICT. BUTCH KIRVEN, CHAIRMAN GREENVILLE COUNTY COUNCIL

SUMMONS AND NOTICE STATE OF SOUTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF GREENVILLE IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS C.A. No: 17-CP-23- 04845 Millwood Homes, LLC, Plaintiff, vs. Michael O. James, Roxie S. Bowan, Francis Allman, Lucinda Blue, Juanita Carstearpher, Calvin L. Bowen and Matthew TO THE DEFENDANTS NAMED ABOVE: YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED and required to appear and defend by answering the Complaint in this action, a copy of which is herewith served upon you, and to serve a copy of your Answer on the subscribers at 134 Oakland Avenue, Spartanburg, South Carolina, 29302, within thirty (30) days after the service hereof, exclusive of the day of such service; and if you fail to do so judgment by default will be rendered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. YOU WILL ALSO TAKE NOTICE that the Plaintiff will move for an Order of Reference or that the Court may issue a general Order of Reference of this action to a master/special referee, pursuant to Rule 53, South Carolina Rules of Civil Procedure. TALLEY LAW FIRM, P.A. Scott F. Talley, Esquire (SC Bar 70364) 134 Oakland Avenue Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-595-2966 Attorneys for Plaintiff

FEBRUARY

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Taqueria Rosalinda, LLC, DBA / Fonda Rosalinda’s intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 1124 North Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Parkway Grill LLC intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 103 South Batesville Rd., Greer, SC 29650. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 4, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

Community Journals - 581 Perry Ave., Village of West Greenville

FE B R UA RY 2 018 TOWNCAROLINA.COM

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NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that WINGS ON THE RUN intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and OFF AND ON premises consumption of BEER & WINE at 3010 B EAST NORTH STREET, GREENVILLE, SC 29615. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 11, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110

1/22/18 4:05 PM

OR ONLINE: towncarolina.com When you finish reading this paper, please recycle it.

GREENVILLE COUNTY ZONING AND PLANNING PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE There will be a public hearing before County Council on Monday, February 19, 2018 at 6:00 p.m. in County Council Chambers, County Square, for the purpose of hearing those persons interested in the following items: DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-09 APPLICANT: NAI Earle Furman, c/o Hunter Garrett for Southchase Wilson Bridge, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: huntergarrett@naiearlefurman. com or 864-232-9040 PROPERTY LOCATION: 218 Wilson Bridge Road PIN: 0335000100601 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: I-1, Industrial ACREAGE: 21.27 COUNTY COUNCIL: 26 – Ballard DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-10 APPLICANT: Pamela Butler Boehme for Votto Otto Boehme and Pamela Gayle Butler CONTACT INFORMATION: pamelaboehme@gmail.com or 864-752-8432 PROPERTY LOCATION: 290 Rockcrest Drive PIN: T026000100201 EXISTING ZONING: R-20, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: R-S, Residential Suburban ACREAGE: 2 COUNTY COUNCIL: 18 – Barnes DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-11 APPLICANT: Lynn A. Solesbee for 4100 Pelham, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: lynn@bluewatercivil.com or 864-735-5453 PROPERTY LOCATION: 4100 Pelham Road PIN: 0533040100709 EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: C-3, Commercial ACREAGE: 1.10 COUNTY COUNCIL: 21 – Roberts DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-12 APPLICANT: Ryan Rosenfeld for Robert and Janet Kim CONTACT INFORMATION: rrosenfeld@cbcaine.com or 864-561-3557 PROPERTY LOCATION: 2913 Old Buncombe Road PIN: 0155000300100 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: R-7.5, Single-Family Residential ACREAGE: 0.46 COUNTY COUNCIL: 19 – Meadows DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-13 APPLICANT: Russell B. Poole for David Hartness

CONTACT INFORMATION: russpoole@bellsouth.net or 864-325-2915 PROPERTY LOCATION: 1202 Fairview Road PIN: 0567010101600 EXISTING ZONING: C-1, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: S-1, Services ACREAGE: 3 COUNTY COUNCIL: 26 – Ballard DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-14 APPLICANT: David Reid Rosenberg for Bad Company III, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: david@districtdevllc.com or 864-363-2274 PROPERTY LOCATION: 90 Allen Street PIN: 0103002200103 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: S-1, Services REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 1.16 COUNTY COUNCIL: 23 – Norris DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-15 APPLICANT: Michael Evette for Caissa III, LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: michael.evette@gmail.com or 864-884-1305 PROPERTY LOCATION: White Horse Road PIN: B014000101800 EXISTING ZONING: R-10, SingleFamily Residential REQUESTED ZONING: C-1, Commercial ACREAGE: 0.19 COUNTY COUNCIL: 19 – Meadows DOCKET NUMBER: CZ-2018-16 APPLICANT: Jonathan C. Nett for Central Realty Holdings LLC CONTACT INFORMATION: jnett@ civilsd.com or 864-373-9662 PROPERTY LOCATION: N. Pleasantburg Drive and Claremont Drive PIN: P009020201300, P009030100103 (portion) and P009030100104 (portion) EXISTING ZONING: R-20, SingleFamily Residential and C-2, Commercial REQUESTED ZONING: FRD, Flexible Review District ACREAGE: 8 COUNTY COUNCIL: 20 – Cates All persons interested in these proposed amendments to the Greenville County Zoning Ordinance and Map are invited to attend this meeting. At subsequent meetings, Greenville County Council may approve or deny the proposed amendments as requested or approve a different zoning classification than requested.

NOTICE OF APPLICATION Notice is hereby given that Chiefs Roadhouse LLC/DBA Chiefs-Wings-Firewater intends to apply to the South Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit that will allow the sale and ON premises consumption of BEER, WINE & LIQUOR at 723 Congaree Road, Greenville SC 29607. To object to the issuance of this permit/license, written protest must be postmarked no later than February 18, 2018. For a protest to be valid, it must be in writing, and should include the following information: (1) the name, address and telephone number of the person filing the protest; (2) the specific reasons why the application should be denied; (3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a hearing (if one is requested by the applicant); (4) that the person protesting resides in the county where the proposed place of business is located or within five miles of the business; and, (5) the name of the applicant and the address of the premises to be licensed. Protest must be mailed to: S.C. Department of Revenue ATTN: ABL;P. O. Box 125, Columbia, SC 29214 or faxed to: (803) 896-0110


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February 2, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.

February 2, 2018 Greenville Journal  

Weekly newspaper with, for, and about Greenville, South Carolina. Published by Community Journals.