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It’s only fitting that City Weekly’s resident Beer Nerd get some love this issue. “One of the things that I love about craft beer, is that there are no limits to what you can create,” Riedel professes. “That being said, the trend on using field vegetables like cucumber, beets and yams really gets me scratching my head.”

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I’m offended by the statesanctioned “In God We Trust.” JOHN GOETTING Via Facebook MERL0T … really? C’mon, Utah. MICHELLE HALLETT Via Facebook

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One of Utah’s

WHILE YOU TOSS BACK SOME BREWS

In the early 1980s, I worked for a V W dealership here in town. By that time, the managers figured out I was a bad salesman, so they set me up as the finance guy (who called in loan apps) and at the same time, doing licensing for new cars. I don’t remember the details of this, but we had a customer who was new to Utah and he bought a car from us. His surname was a version of the word FXXXKER and he had the plate already from the state where he came from. He wanted it on his new V W and Utah took about 24 hours to reject it. He actually went to the DMV, which was in a big office in the capitol building, and took paperwork and legal documents that he’d used with the other state (Delaware? Maryland?) who finally approved his

plate with his surname. So, it took Utah another 24 hours to approve his new plate. I guess they didn’t want to same legal battle he got before, and I was the one who got to tell him and hand them over to him when they finally came in, about three weeks later. He was happy and so was I, in kind of a surprised way. MICHAEL ADAMS Via cityweekly.net So extreme right and pro Trump gets approved ... alcohol and gays get denied. Sounds about right for Utah! SARA BEAUDRY-WILTSE Via Facebook

Citizen Revolt, Aug. 1, “Weigh in on Utah’s new medical cannabis rules”

Hahaha yeah, just wait until the Legislature has their say. DANIEL GRUNDFOSSEN Via Facebook

Keep the Mormons out of it. BO GWIN Via Twitter Legalize it! @SBREWZZ Via Twitter

Crickets

Just in case there are people out there who believe that climate change isn’t actually occurring, has anyone heard the crickets this year? Normally, it starts on July 28-29, but their “singing” has been lessening for the past couple of years. They— and countless other creatures of all descriptions— are in deep peril. Perhaps nature’s revenge for human activities will be our own demise; our nemesis. MALCOLM SHEEHAN, Salt Lake City We encourage you to join the conversation. Sound off across our social media channels as well as on cityweekly.net for a chance to be featured in this section.

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OPINION

The President’s Puppy-Loves

Like a schoolboy beset by the titillation of puppy-love, President Donald Trump’s highly-juvenile heartthrobs have come with predictable regularity. First, it was his darling Putin, and Trumpty Dumpty fell hard. It hadn’t taken much. After all, Putin had shoe-horned him into the presidency but, most important, he’d expressed a warm admiration for his American asset. It was an almost-orgasmic connection, and Trump, for perhaps the first time in his life, had experienced what it means to swoon. For days, Trump doodled Vlad’s name in his spiral notebook, trying hard to do his very best cursive, and sketching arrow-pierced hearts on the backs of congressional bills awaiting his signature. His White House gym locker—with its never-worn athletic shoes—was plastered with Putin’s pics. Trump particularly liked the barechested one and secretly envied Putin’s image as a ruthless, iron-handed ruler. (He loved the Russian’s buff, muscular frame, but most of all, he loved Putin’s long arms, able to eliminate enemies who’d escaped.) Each time Trump looked at Putin in his pinup pose, there was a faint hint of salivation, and, when no one was looking, Trump stood in front of his own mirror, grunting, flexing, and turning red in his attempt to emulate the object of his affection. The reality is that Trump’s puppy love will endure only as long as Putin “keeps the cards and letters coming.” (It’s also dependent on Putin keeping “their little secret”—the denial that Russia engineered Trump’s election.) A narcissist’s love, after all, is pathetically shallow, working on the simple premise, “Tell me what I want to hear, stroke my

BY MICHAEL S. ROBINSON SR. ego, and I will remain smitten.” Enter: another love. (A narcissist can’t have too many worshippers.) It wasn’t long ago that Trump’s locker-room talk included words like chinks and gooks. His low opinion of the “slitty-eyed” Asians was no secret, and his disdain peaked as Kim Jong-un ramped up North Korea’s nuclear weapons program. Trump hated Rocket Man, even threatening annihilating the entire North Korean people. Their first face-to-face meeting changed it all. By his own description, Trump simply “fell in love” with the man, and suddenly there were Kim doodles—some with rich Florentine embellishments—flooding his notebook. (He was particularly taken by Kim’s brazen murders of his half-brother and uncle.) Daytime fantasies merged with nighttime dreams, and Trump had a hard time giving Melania even the perfunctory kisses required by the press. (After all, she did not treat him like he was God.) Trump had a hard time figuring out what qualities he loved most about Kim. As the show commenced, the rest of the world understood; Kim’s cooperative and, in retrospect, fleeting response to the notion of nuclear disarmament made Trump look like a hero. Cupid’s arrows had struck again. Trump beamed after their first meeting, looking into his mirror and repeating, “He loves me; he loves me, and together we will create a new and lasting peace in the Koreas. I will be heralded as the greatest president in American history.” For days, Trump quietly, sweetly repeated Kim’s name, and visualized the two of them walking into the sunset under a rainbow of peace. And, oh yes, Trump picked a daisy from the White House garden, peering wistfully at the flower and systematically removing the petals one by one. Almost inaudibly, he’d repeat, over and over, “He loves me; he loves me not,” and the last petal confirmed that the affection was mutual. But, wait a minute, narcissists cannot have enough admirers. Enter: yet another love. Prince Mohammed

Bin Salman had such a lovely smile, and Trump secretly wished that he too could grow a fine beard, even fantasizing about having his hairdresser change the orange color of his hair. But looks were only part of it. It was essentially the bad-boy attraction that so frequently sweeps school kids off their feet. Trump daydreamed continuously about Bin Salman’s cold savagery, fantasizing about being one of the prince’s 18 meat-saw-carrying-tourist-assassins, and visualizing Jamal Khashoggi’s terror. Each time the Lyin’ King thought about the prince’s masterful, flawless planning, he reveled at the perfection of the murder. “Oh,” Trump mused, “I wonder if those guys would like to vacation in California? Kamala, Nancy ... they’d be history.” And just a bit of saliva dripped on his tie when he considered the sheer genius of how Bin Salman dealt with dissidents. As he drifted off to sleep each evening, Trump visualized Bin Salman’s rosy-cheeked mask, secretly wishing that his own look was just a bit less anemic and that his lips were fuller. Most of all, POTUS imagined how nice it would be to have a harem of subjects who welcomed pussygrabbing, and wouldn’t file lawsuits for sexual harassment. The list of Trump’s infatuations goes on. His fantasies that the world’s worst tyrants love him have created the puppy-love ties to Israel’s Benjamin Netanyahu, Syria’s Bashar al-Assad, Turkey’s Recep Tayyip Erdogan, Brazil’s Jair Bolsonaro and others. His true loves are totally predictable. He’s a grade-schooler who, much like a Labrador retriever, bases his love strictly on who will feed him. Those who actually believe he’s capable of any semblance of mature affection are simply in La-La-Land. Americans should be damned worried that a pathological narcissistic child sits on the D.C. throne. CW

The author is a former Vietnam-era Army assistant public information officer. He resides in Riverton with his wife, Carol, and one mongrel dog. Send feedback to comments@cityweekly.net


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KNOW THE VILLAGE

Fraud Gets a Pass?

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Apathy Among Us

SAFETY AND VIOLENCE PREVENTION

A Job Poorly Done

Here’s a chance for some of you to get out of your comfort zone and meet your neighbors face-to-face. The Village Cooperative characterizes itself as a ragtag team of farmers, healers and artists who want to feed people in a three-block radius of the Rose Park and Fairpark area at Residents Building Roots. “This event is free to anyone and everyone, and is all about sharing the strengths of our community,” the event’s Facebook page says. The Fairpark area has long been seen as a food desert—unless you’re talking fast food. The co-op says it wants to feed souls and minds as well as stomachs, and is all about bringing people together for community health. It’s not limited to those three blocks. All of Salt Lake is invited. 777 W. 500 North, Saturday, Aug. 17, 6-10 p.m., free, bit.ly/2YR54x3.

Here’s your chance to learn why conservatives are the way they are—and maybe something about the changing face of conservatism. Hey, you can also hear Sen. Mitt Romney as he discusses The Case for Conservatism. The event, hosted by the Sutherland Institute, might reveal some of the deep divisions in the conservative movement starting with Romney himself, whom many in the right wing of the GOP see as “liberal.” Of course, there will be talk of the boogeyman socialism. “Following Romney’s remarks, NFL star Burgess Owens will participate in a Q&A session with Sutherland Institute president Rick Larsen discussing Owens’ most recent book, Why I Stand,” the event’s website says. Take this chance to dig deeper into our political divisions. Sutherland Institute, 15 W. South Temple, Ste. 200, 801-355-1272, Monday, Aug. 19, 10 a.m.noon, free/register, bit.ly/33kulzn.

Rep. Chris Stewart’s town hall showed just how frustrated the public has become with gun violence. No, there’s not enough action behind the frustration, and it’s likely that any legislation will be milquetoast solutions at best. Still, you can learn how to help pass at least one bill at Action Utah’s Community Safety and Violence Prevention. The three recent mass shootings revived support for red flag laws, and a push for federal legislation to allow a court to order the temporary removal of firearms from some people in crisis. At this event, you have a chance to learn about Utah’s red flag bill (the Extreme Risk Protection Order bill) and what you can do. State Office Building Auditorium, north building, State Capitol, 350 N. State, Wednesday, Aug. 21, noon, free/register, bit.ly/2KzU6Ty.

—KATHARINE BIELE Send tips to revolt@cityweekly.net

Instead of that voter fraud straw man, let’s talk about “the little woman” and maybe the ecclesiastical patriarchy. The Salt Lake Tribune broke the horrifying news that Mormon moms have been filling out their missionary kids’ ballots—you know, forging their names. Shocking, indeed. Shane Marsh, a Fielding Town Council member, even had to warn his: “I don’t think you better do that.” We don’t know if she did. Did the Trib actually speak to a woman other than county elections directors, one of whom might have called this an “innocent con?” And was it so innocent, really? Republicans have been all over the imaginary case of voter fraud, but Mormon moms get a pass when it’s real. And Mormon dads apparently don’t get caught.

So you’re wondering why we call it “imaginary” voter fraud? Let’s say it started with, or was fueled by, the president’s claims that millions of people voted illegally in the 2016 election. The Brennan Center for Justice has multiple studies that debunk that claim, and even the conservative Heritage Foundation can’t make a great case for it. The foundations claims there were 1,199 proven instances of voter fraud. By the way, that’s out of 113 million voters. In Utah, we’re coddling those clueless Mormon moms, but even they can’t push up voter fraud—unless they themselves are voting illegally. Nearly 300,000 Utah women are eligible to vote but unregistered, according to Voterise. So, the bigger problem is probably voter apathy. Trib columnist Robert Kirby, writing about missionaries voting, seemed to make a case for apathy: “I can’t think of a better way to drive away hope for the world than by following politics that closely.”

Give him a plaque. That should be the public’s message to the Utah Transit Authority, which just gave fired CEO and general manager Jerry Benson lifetime transit passes for him and his wife—along with a nice little severance package of $200,000. Wrap your head around this: Firing Benson was the only way to ensure he nabbed that severance. This didn’t make House Majority Leader Mike Schultz, R-Hooper, very happy. He sponsored the 2018 law that restructured UTA, and figures this was a blatant manipulation of the law. And in what was called a positive report, a federal monitor warned of problems like “confusing powers given to the UTA Advisory Council of local government officials,” according to the Trib. UTA officials are still spending like millionaires, and somehow avoid becoming a full state-run entity.


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NEWS

CANNABIS

Growing Regulations

Inside state efforts to set quality standards for medical cannabis.

PHOTO ILLUSTRATION BY DEREK CARLISLE

BY PETER HOLSLIN pholslin@cityweekly.net @peterholslin

W

hen medical cannabis starts going on sale across Utah early next year, card-carrying patients will have plenty of THC-infused products to choose from. According to the Utah Medical Cannabis Act—the controversial state bill passed in a special legislative session last year—anything from smokable flower to cannabis oils to “gelatinous rectangular cuboids” (aka weed lozenges) will be allowed to hit the market. Still, before anyone gets a chance to roll a doctor-approved spliff or lick a psychoactive Jolly Rancher, state regulators will need to make sure Utahns are getting the best greens possible. “This is a medicinal market and the lawmakers have been very adamant about, ‘Look, if this is a medicine, then we’re going to treat it like a medicine,’” Andrew Rigby, the director of medical cannabis and industrial hemp programs at the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food, tells City Weekly. “Therefore, quality is of the utmost priority.” Eight companies were awarded grow licenses last month. Since then, the Department of Agriculture has been busy developing standards to make sure what patients will be smoking, eating or otherwise ingesting isn’t contaminated with unsafe pesticides or other toxins. Although the plant remains banned on the federal level, the growing popularity of cannabis as a commercial product means that states where medical and recreational cannabis are permitted must also draw up rules for quality and safety—just as they would with any other food or medicine. “The state is essentially a partner, in a way, for every license-holder,” Brandon Lynaugh, the spokesperson for Standard Wellness, an Ohio-based medical cannabis brand that was awarded one of the coveted licenses for cultivating in Utah, says in an interview. “Medical marijuana is one of the most regulated industries in the world. You have to have that type of partnership, that type of working relationship with the state. There’s a tremendous amount of oversight for the right reasons.” To some, the idea of a state-backed effort to maintain cannabis quality might evoke images of bureaucrats in white lab coats, furrowing their brows as they take puffs from a doobie, documenting the effects of multivarious cannabis strains in dream journals embossed with the official state seal. Rigby says this is definitely not how it will work here in Utah. The state wants to make sure the cannabis will meet certain standards—but officials won’t be deciding on what strains to grow or products to sell. “The state is not getting involved in that aspect of quality control,” he says. Last week, the Department of Agriculture held a public hearing to discuss quality assurance standards for the Utah market. In a conference room filled with poster-sized photos of farm animals and kids riding horses, a handful of members of the public—including attorneys representing grow companies—looked over a sheet of proposed rules outlining approved pesticides and limits on solvents and heavy metals in cannabis plants. The rules also covered licensing and

State-licensed private labs will test Utah’s cannabis for toxins like cadmium and lead, which can get into the plants via soil. operating procedures for privately owned labs, which the state will depend on for safety and quality testing of flower and other THC-based medicinals. The hearing was sparsely attended and ended after just 15 minutes, with barely any public input. But even though it didn’t command the same attention as previous government meetings about the state’s medical cannabis market-in-themaking, experts emphasize that safety testing is a crucial step in preparing Mary Jane for public consumption. “That’s fundamental. We can’t do without that, especially in the medical cannabis realm where consumers need this for their health,” Tom Paskett, executive director of the Utah Cannabis Association, says. For many fans of weed, the marijuana leaf has long been associated with free living. It’s a plant, an herb, a blessed miracle from the earth—or so the idea goes. Increasingly, cannabis has become a straight-up commercial product. Eleven states have now legalized it for recreational use, while 33 others have permitted it for medicinal purposes. Its growing ubiquity fuels a fast-growing market of THC-infused edibles, tinctures, topicals, waxes and greens of various qualities and price points. With this flush of merchandise comes a risk for oversights and product recalls, people in the industry say. According to Paskett, even experienced cannabis growers face challenges. Mold is a constant concern, because it can gather on plants during the drying and curing process. Cannabis crops also easily absorb contents from the soil they’re grown in—so if the soil is full of toxins like cadmium and lead, those compounds will contaminate the flower, the smokable part of the female plant. “Soil composition is kind of a big deal in the cannabis cultivation world,” Paskett says. A different set of issues arise when cannabis companies use preservatives, additives and food ingredients to manufacture products like edibles and oils. Last month, Standard Wellness’ Ohio operation scrambled to issue a recall for their THC-infused, water-soluble “Standard Drops” tincture when an employee noticed that the liquid was congealing, possibly due to the presence of a plant material. As Lynaugh recalls, the company noticed the problem on a Friday night. By 8:30 the next morning, employees were sending out a voluntary recall notice to their trade partners and contacting patients to alert them of the issue. The company is now coordinating with Ohio officials as they adjust

their formula and reevaluate their production process, including by adding new sterilization procedures for bottles and droppers, before they manufacture the drops again. “It was an unfortunate issue and not something anyone wants to deal with at 11 o’clock on a Friday night, but it’s important to jump on that,” Lynaugh says. “Any time you think that patient safety—which has to be paramount—is potentially at risk, you have to jump on that.” The rules currently under review by the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food list pesticides that have been determined safe to use on cannabis crops. It also restricts the presence of potentially harmful heavy metals and solvents. If a cannabis sample doesn’t pass muster in a lab test, the cultivation facility will be instructed to dispose of the entire batch or lot from which the sample came. If no public input leads to changes in the language, the rules will go into effect Wednesday, Aug. 21. So far, it seems like these regulations don’t have the same political or moral undertones as the state’s famously strict alcohol laws. Utah places a limit on the percentage of alcohol allowed in beers sold in supermarkets, for example. Other states have taken a similar approach with the THC content of cannabis: Ohio follows a grading system that allows for two “tiers” of cannabis at different levels of potency. Texas is far stricter, only allowing CBD oils with a miniscule THC content of 0.3%, or 0.5% through its Compassionate Use program. According to Rigby, the director of medical cannabis and industrial hemp programs, there are no rules in Utah governing the maximum level of THC permitted in flower buds or cannabis products. However, the Utah Medical Cannabis Act does not permit dabbing—or the smoking of ultra-highconcentrated doses of THC that are heated on a nail or other metal surface—as an acceptable way of using cannabis for medicinal purposes. Rigby expects that Utah will have a limited supply of cannabis products available for patients beginning in March 2020. So far, he’s heard from plenty of Utahns who have voiced concerns about whether the program will rise to the high-flying expectations of cannabis connoisseurs, but in the end, patients will have to accept what’s available on the market. “Cultivators grow the product that they think will sell … The demand will be created by the patients,” he says, adding with a sigh: “Some people have such high standards that it’s like, ‘Bro, that’s not attainable.’” CW


PHOTO COLLECTIVE

A decade ago, it felt kind of crazy to be imagining Utah as a place that would host a major celebration of the art of brewing. Now, as the City Weekly Utah Beer Festival hits its 10th anniversary, it stands as a representation of a local beer-enthusiast culture that has given rise to an explosion in new local micro-breweries, and brand-new craft beverages appearing on an almost daily basis. For this year’s installment of the Beer Festival, nearly 60 creators of beers and hard ciders from around the country bring their wares to the Utah State Fairpark—more than 200 different brews in all representing everything from household names like Guinness to newer Utah establishments with exciting new offerings. Whether you want to try a wide variety of 5-ounce sample sizes or settle in with a 12-ounce draft of your favorite frosty beverage, there’s a perfect way for you to enjoy what the vendors have to offer while paying with your reloadable wristband. Even if you’re a non-drinker or a designated driver, there are plenty of ways to enjoy the event. Check out a variety of vendors, or enjoy food from more than a dozen local vendors, including Lucky Slice, Fatty Tuna Sushi, Jamaica’s Kitchen and Dough Gods Edible Cookie Dough. In addition to live music and DJ performances on two stages throughout the two days of the festival, you can even stick around for after-party concerts headlined by Royal Bliss on Saturday and Jagertown on Sunday (see p. 41). Raise your glass to another decade of brewing up this great weekend of frothy frolicking. (SR) Utah Beer Festival @ Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Aug. 17-18, 2-8 p.m., $15$125, utahbeerfestival.com

Utah Beer Festival

AUGUST 15, 2019 | 11

Thanks to a healthy love of the arts and an abundance of historic small-town charms, Helper will more than double in population during the 25th annual Helper Arts, Music and Film Festival. For three days, musicians, food vendors and Utah artisans line up along the town’s historic Main Street. Lenise Peterman, Helper mayor and festival organizer, says the festival is a celebration of the local artist community and the city as a whole. “Frankly, we have seen a downturn economically—we’ve been suffering that for the past 10 years,” Peterman says. “The resilience of coming together to celebrate the arts, and especially getting to our 25th year ... just really exemplifies our community’s commitment to the community itself and also to the arts.” In addition to artisans and musicians livening up Main Street, this year features a performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream by the Grassroots Shakespeare Festival, a traveling theater troupe specializing in encouraging audience interaction and improvisation in the Bard’s plays. They perform in a vacant lot just off Main Street at 11 a.m. on Saturday. Peterman says this year also marks the return of the popular Helper Idol, a local riff on American Idol. While preliminary auditions take place a few weeks before the event, attendees can see the best singers around belt their way to cash prizes. For those interested in watching, the top 10 finalists perform Saturday evening. (Kylee Ehmann) Helper Arts, Music and Film Festival @ Main Street, Helper, 801-712-7622, Aug. 16, 2 p.m.-dusk; Aug. 17, 10 a.m.-dusk; Aug. 18, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., free, helperartsfestival.com

Richard Russo—the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Nobody’s Fool, Empire Falls and Bridge of Sighs—has always written his characters with a generosity that allows them their faults and foibles while recognizing their attempts to keep growing. In his new novel Chances Are … , Russo takes on the tale of three men looking back to a time that changed them all, but without bathing in hazy nostalgia. Lincoln, Teddy and Mickey were best friends at a New England liberal arts college in the 1960s, scholarship students at a place full of wealthy prep-schoolers. Forty years later, the men reunite at the same Martha’s Vineyard beach house where they once spent their pivotal post-graduation summer. It was there that they spent a final time with the fourth member of their unofficial clique: Jacy, the girl that all three of them loved. And it was there that something happened that would change the course of all of their lives. Russo fashions Chances Are … as a kind of cozy mystery, yet the revelations about what took place in the summer of ’71 aren’t ultimately the focus of the story. Instead, it becomes a tale of the natural moments of reflection that come about when people reach the beginnings of old age, and how unsettling the prospect of major change can seem. As these characters wrestle with regret and uncertainty, they emerge through Russo’s simple prose not as annoyingly self-absorbed representations of aging Baby Boomers, but as men trying to understand that it’s not too late to be better versions of themselves. (Scott Renshaw) Richard Russo: Chances Are … @ The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, 801-484-9100, Aug. 16, 7 p.m., free, kingsenglish.com

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SATURDAY 8/17

Richard Russo: Chances Are …

FRIDAY 8/16

The Helper Arts, Music and Film Festival

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There are few challenges in the world of sport that equate with the Tour of Utah, a formidable week-long cycling competition featuring 117 world-class athletes from 24 countries—among them, two riders from Utah. Requiring both daring ability and dexterity, it finds 17 teams tackling one of the most gruelling racing courses in the country, a route that ascends a total of 37,882 feet over the course of 477 miles that stretch from Logan to Antelope Island, and from downtown SLC to Park City. Little wonder that after 15 years, it’s earned the title of “America’s Toughest Stage Race.” Although the scenery itself could prove distracting, the Tour of Utah, like other renowned races, is more than a mere spectator sport. It’s an opportunity to share pride in our surroundings with veterans of some of the most prestigious competitions the world of bicycle racing has to offer. “The Tour of Utah brings world-class, professional cycling teams to Utah, and showcases our beautiful state as a postcard to the world,” John Kimball, managing director of the Tour of Utah, says via email. “The start and finish lines are a hub of activity that include giveaways, autographs from the riders, entertainment, kids’ bike races, live big-screen broadcast coverage of the entire race and an interactive festival area. It’s all free and a great way to enjoy race day.” It might be family-friendly, but the skill shown by these athletes certainly is much more than kid stuff. (Lee Zimmerman) Tour of Utah @ various state-wide venues, through Aug. 18, concluding at upper Main Street, Park City, free, tourofutah.com

FRIDAY 8/16

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Tour of Utah

Complete listings online at cityweekly.net

CAT PALMER

JONATHAN DEVICH

THURSDAY 8/15

ENTERTAINMENT PICKS, AUG. 15-21, 2019

ELENA SEIBERT

ESSENTIALS

the


August 17, 2019 8:00pm

Lose yourself in the magic and imagination of an Aerobatics Circus Show...Aerial Silks, Trapeze, Corde Lisse, and a variety of other mesmerizing acts! Featuring:

DUO TRANSCEND

For tickets and more information:

DraperAmphitheater.com

A&E

THEATER

Building a Wall

A Utah world-premiere continues the development of A Wall Apart. BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

hen you think of a world-premiere musical, with songs by a composer boasting multi-platinum sales success, Salt Lake City probably isn’t the first location that comes to mind. For the creators of A Wall Apart, however, it’s an obvious place, because it’s home. With a book by Utah residents Sam Goldstein and Craig Clyde, and songs by Air Supply co-founder Graham Russell—a 25-year resident of Summit County—A Wall Apart tells a story opening in 1961 Berlin of three brothers, orphaned during World War II, who find their relationships strained and tested by the political upheaval in their divided country. It also evolves into a Romeo & Juliet-esque love story, spanning the history of Berlin Wall-era Germany. For Goldstein and Clyde, this show is only the most recent in a professional partnership that spans more than 40 years. They met when Goldstein, a neuropsychologist, began a regular stint on a KSTU-TV talk show hosted by Clyde. They started collaborating on screenplays for familyfriendly movies, but as Goldstein says, “I started keeping a file of movies we wanted to make but couldn’t afford to make, that would take $50-$80 million to make. And this was on my list of stories.” Russell entered the picture four years ago, when Goldstein was playing occasionally in a band with Russell’s one-time bass player. Russell had previously written some songs for an off-Broadway musical that had closed after two weeks, and he was disappointed with the show. Goldstein said he could come up with a better story to make use of Russell’s talents, and showed him his list of ideas. A Wall Apart jumped out to him. “I thought the premise was really interesting,” Russell says, “with two people on opposite sides of the Berlin Wall. I was just pulled in by that. I’d like to see how that story develops.” In May 2015, Goldstein and Clyde began working on the script, in their familiar style of Goldstein focusing on the story elements, and Clyde handling character and dialogue. Yet as experienced as they were at writing screenplays, they discovered that a theatrical script was uniquely challenging. “I’ve done 22 films as a writer-director,” Clyde says, “and this is much harder in some ways.” Goldstein adds, “I don’t

MICHAEL SCHOENFELD

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A NIGHT TO REMEMBER

think there’s any writing where you have to be as precise.” Russell, too, acknowledges that writing songs for a musical required stretching different creative muscles than writing the kind of stand-alone pop songs for which he is best known. “I have to push the story further along with music,” he says. “It’s very different from a pop or rock and roll song, where you have a free canvas. Here, you’re more confined, and every note carries a weight.” With Goldstein and Clyde crafting scenes and sending them to Russell for songs to be added, the first draft of A Wall Apart was completed in about four months. But as hard as the process for writing a musical might be, getting one produced is even harder. “With the average show, it takes 3-5 years for it even to get seen,” Clyde says. “The average cost is $10 million. It’s incredibly expensive.” The development process, then, has involved multiple steps. In 2017, a strippeddown version of A Wall Apart played for a week at the New York Music Festival, serving as a kind of “proof of concept;” four additional songs have been added since then, along with story revisions to bring the focus more on the family than on the politics. They’ve also done staged readings locally, before the Grand Theatre offered the production its season-opening slot. Yet even as they continue tweaking the script throughout rehearsals, Goldstein and Clyde look at this premiere as just another step in that development process. “This production is going to lose money, even if we sell out,” Goldstein says. “The idea is to put it on in such a way that anyone

The cast of the 2017 New York Music Festival production of A Wall Apart

who comes to see it”—including potential “angel” investors—“can envision what it’s going to be.” All three co-creators, however, are excited to be bringing this part of the long journey— the first full production of A Wall Apart—to Utah audiences first. “Utah and Salt Lake City is a very cultural place,” Russell says. “We wanted to do it here to tell everyone, ‘Hey, it is possible to create a show in Utah.’ That’s a big thing that we’re very proud of.” “I think Utah audiences very much value and appreciate live theater,” Goldstein says. “They generally support it well, whether it’s a big touring show or smaller local companies.” And they can support the show even knowing that a next step, with other finetuning, might be down the road for A Wall Apart. “At the moment I love it,” Goldstein says of the version that will play at the Grand. “When I saw the New York production, I loved it. For me, it’s ‘can I make it better?’ Yes. Am I happy with where it is? Yes. You can be happy with where you are, but know you can make it better.” CW

A WALL APART

Grand Theatre 1575 S. State 801-957-3322 Aug. 15-Sept. 7 $12-$23 grandtheatrecompany.com


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AUGUST 15, 2019 | 13


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moreESSENTIALS

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This week marks the 90th anniversary of the Weller family’s history with books in Salt Lake City. A special celebration will be held at the current Weller Book Works (607 Trolley Square, wellerbookworks.com) on Saturday, Aug. 17, from 4-6 p.m., featuring refreshments, special remarks by guests including Terry Tempest Williams and live music.

PERFORMANCE THEATER

Barefoot in the Park Egyptian Theatre, 328 Main, Park City, through Aug. 18, times vary, egyptiantheatercompany.com The Book of Mormon Eccles Theater, 131 S. Main, through Aug. 25, times vary, artsaltlake.org Cinderella Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy through Sept. 7, showtimes vary, hct.org Freaky Friday Hale Centre Theatre, 9900 S. Monroe St., Sandy through Aug. 24, dates and times vary, hct.org Hamleton: To Be or Not to Be The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Sept. 7, Friday, Saturday & Monday, 7:30 p.m., theobt.org Little Women: The Musical Murray Park, 296 E. Murray Park Ave., Murray, through Aug. 17, Friday & Saturday, 8 p.m., murray.utah.gov Matilda The Ziegfield Theater, 3934 Washington Blvd., Ogden, through Aug. 31, times vary, theziegfeldtheater.com Saturday’s Voyeur Salt Lake Acting Co., 168 W. 500 North, through Sept. 15, dates and times vary, saltlakeactingcompany.org Sunday School Musical Desert Star Playhouse, 4861 S. State, Murray, through Aug. 25, desertstar.biz The Sino-American Culture & Performance Extravaganza Peery’s Egyptian Theater, 2415 Washington Blvd., Ogden, Aug. 15, 7:30 p.m., egyptiantheaterogden.com A Wall Apart The Grand Theatre, 1575 S. State, Aug. 15-Sept. 7, times vary, grandtheatrecompany.com (see p. 12)

CLASSICAL & SYMPHONY

Stephen Beus Park City Community Church, 4501 Highway 224, Aug. 16, 7:30 p.m., pcmusicfestival.com

DANCE

Repertory Dance Theater: The Festival Gala Concert Rose Wagner Center, 138 W. 300 South, Aug. 17, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org Repertory Dance Theater: The Student Choreography Showcase Rose Wagner Center,

138 W. 300 South, Aug. 16, 7:30 p.m., artsaltlake.org

COMEDY & IMPROV

Dumbbroads Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Aug. 18, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Fortune Feimster Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Aug. 16-17, 7 & 9:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com JR De Guzman Wiseguys West Jordan, 3763 W. Center Park Drive, West Jordan, Aug. 16-17, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Laughing Stock Improv Comedy The Off Broadway Theatre, 272 S. Main, through Oct. 12, Fridays & Saturdays, 10 p.m., theobt.org Marcus and Guy Wiseguys Ogden, 269 25th St., Ogden, Aug. 16-17, 8 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Open Mic Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Wednesdays, 7 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com Random Tangent Improv Comedy Draper Historic Theatre, 12366 S. 900 East, Saturdays, 10 p.m., randomtangentimprov.org Tyler Boeh Wiseguys SLC, 194 S. 400 West, Aug. 15, 7:30 p.m., wiseguyscomedy.com

SPECIAL EVENTS FARMERS MARKETS

9th West Farmers Market Jordan Park, 1000 S. 900 West, Sundays through Oct. 13, 10 a.m.2 p.m., 9thwestfarmersmarket.org Downtown Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Saturdays through Oct. 19, 8 a.m.-2 p.m., slcfarmersmarket.org Fleet Nights, Little City, 855 S. 400 West, every Saturday, 4 p.m., littlecityinc.com New Roots of Utah Neighborhood Farm Stand Valley Regional Park, 4013 S. 700 West, Saturdays through mid-October, 1-3 p.m., slco. org Ogden Farmers Market 25th Street, Ogden, Saturdays through Sept. 15, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., farmersmarketogden.com Sugar House Farmers Market Farimont Park, 1040 E. Sugarmont Drive, second Sundays through September, 8:30 a.m.-noon, sugarhousefarmersmarket.org


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AUGUST 15, 2019 | 15


moreESSENTIALS Tuesday Farmers Market Pioneer Park, 350 W. 300 South, Tuesdays, through Sept. 14, 4 p.m.dusk, slcfarmersmarket.org Wheeler Sunday Market Wheeler Farm, 6351 S. 900 East, Murray, Sundays through Oct. 27, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., slco.org/wheeler-farm

FESTIVALS & FAIRS

LGBTQ

SEPTEMBER 6, 7 & 8

279 SOUTH 300 WEST

16 | AUGUST 15, 2019

1 to 5 Club Brunch Squatters, 147 W. 300 South, third Saturdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m., utahpridecenter.org 1 to 5 Club: Radical Reading Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, third Mondays, 7:30-9 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Beyond a Night of Music Encircle Salt Lake, 331 S. 600 East, every Thursday, 6:30-8 p.m., encircletogether.org Leather and Gear Night Club Try-Angles, 251 W. 900 South, second Fridays, 4 p.m.-1 a.m., clubtryangles.com Men’s Sack Lunch Group Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Wednesdays, noon-1:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org TransAction Weekly Meeting Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, Sundays, 2-3:30 p.m., utahpridecenter.org Utah LGBTQ+ Chamber of Commerce Breakfast Utah Pride Center, 1380 S. Main, third Thursdays, 7:30-9 a.m., utahgaychamber.com

LITERATURE

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Box Elder County Fair County Fairgrounds, 320 N. 1000 West, Brigham City, Aug. 21-24, times vary, boxeldercounty.org Davis County Fair Legacy Events Center, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, through Aug. 18, times vary, daviscountyutah.gov Helper Arts, Music and Film Festival Main Street, Helper, Aug. 16-18, times vary, helperartsfestival.com (see p. 11) Hot Air Balloon Glow Night Davis County Fair, 151 S. 1100 West, Farmington, Aug. 15, 8:30 p.m., daviscountyutah.gov Latino Fest University Place, 575 E. University Parkway, Orem, Aug. 16-17, noon, universityplaceorem.com Main Street Art Festival Main Street, 2700 S. 8950 West, Magna, Aug. 17, 10 a.m., magnautah.org Oktoberfest Snowbird Resort, Highway 210 Little Cottonwood Canyon, Snowbird, Aug. 17-Oct. 20, snowbird.com Tour of Utah Various state-wide venues, through Aug. 18, tourofutah.com (see p. 11) Utah Beer Festival Utah State Fairpark, 155 N. 1000 West, Aug. 17-18, utahbeerfestival.com (see p. 11)

AUTHOR APPEARANCES

WWW.SALTLAKEGREEKFESTIVAL.COM

Cassie Kircher: Far Flung Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Aug. 15, 6:30 p.m., wellerbookworks.com Dennis Schleicher University Crossings Plaza, 330 E. 1300 South, Orem, Aug. 16, 7 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Joe Sacksteder: Make/Shift The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 E., Aug. 15, 7 p.m., kingsenglish.com Jean Lant: Redemption Commons at Sugarhouse, 1104 E. 2100 South, Aug. 21, 5 p.m., barnesandnoble.com Richard Russo: Chances Are ... The King’s English Bookshop, 1511 S. 1500 East, Aug. 16,

COMPLETE LISTINGS ONLINE AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

7 p.m., kingsenglish.com (see p. 11) Weller Books 90th Birthday Weller Book Works, 607 Trolley Square, Aug. 17, 4-6 p.m., wellerbookworks.com (see p. 14)

VISUAL ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS

3SMITHS Alice Gallery, 617 E. South Temple, through Sept. 6, artandmuseums.utah.g 15th Face of Utah Sculptural Exhibit Utah Cultural Celebration Center, 1355 W. 3100 South, West Valley City, through Aug. 28, culturalcelebrationcenter.org 45th Annual Statewide Competition, Bountiful Davis Art Center, 90 N. Main, Bountiful, Aug. through Sept. 14, bdac.org Abstraction Is Just a Word, But I Use It UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Jan. 4, utahmoca.org Andrew Dadson: Roof Gap UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 7, utahmoca.org Andrew Alba: Gas Station Honeydew UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Aug. 24, utahmoca.org Animalia Urban Arts Gallery, 116 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 1, utaharts.org The Art of Islam from the Met and the Louvre Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Aug. 17, noon, umfa.utah.edu Calligraphy Self-Portraits Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 Campus Center Drive, Aug. 17, 1-4 p.m., umma.utah.edu De | Marcation Granary Arts, 86 N. Main, Ephraim, through Sept. 27, granaryarts.org Deanna & Ed Templeton: Contemporary Suburbium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Sept. 7, utahmoca.org [DIS]PLACED Downtown Artist Collective, 258 E. 100 South, Aug. 16-Sept. 15, downtownartistcollective.org Donald Yatomi: True Beauty A Gallery, 1321 S. 2100 East, through Aug. 17, agalleryonline.com Form, Line and Color: Modernism and Abstraction David Dee Fine Art, 1709 E. 1300 South, Ste. 201, through Aug. 30, daviddeefinearts.com Greater Merit: The Temple and Image in South Asia Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, ongoing, umfa.utah.edu I, your glass Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Sept. 20, saltlakearts.org League of Reluctant Bicyclists UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Love Letters The Gateway, 24 S. Rio Grande St., through Sept. 1, lovelettersmuseum.com Paper & Thread Modern West Fine Art, 412 S. 700 West, through Aug. 31, modernwestfineart.com Power Couples Utah Museum of Fine Art, 410 Campus Center Drive, through Dec. 8, umfa.utah.edu Ryan Lauderdale: Glazed Atrium UMOCA, 20 S. West Temple, through Nov. 2, utahmoca.org Spencer Finch: Great Salt Lake and Vicinity Utah Museum of Fine Arts, 410 S. Campus Center Drive, through Nov. 28, umfa.utah.edu Time + Materials Rio Gallery, 300 S. Rio Grande St., through Aug. 30, artsandmuseums.utah.gov Tiny Portraits, Big Connections Holladay City Hall, 4580 S. 2300 East, Holladay, through Aug. 30, holladayarts.org Untold Aftermath Finch Lane Gallery, 54 Finch Lane, through Sept. 20, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., saltlakearts.org


I

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t was a sobering moment last month in Boulder, Colo., during the Association for Alternative Newsmedia’s annual awards ceremony. City Weekly placed in all three categories it was nominated in, with last year’s Beer Issue nabbing first place in the Best Special Section bracket. Surprised by the recognition, I got onstage to receive the plaque and said in front of a room full of alt-weekly cohorts, “Salt Lake City just won a national award for booze coverage. Let’s all take a moment to soak that in.” Yes, our fair town is known for a lot of things, but our burgeoning craft beer market is not usually on top of anyone’s list. Enter the Utah Beer Festival, which for the past decade has been showcasing and uplifting the Beehive’s brew scene. Wanting to really drive the message home, and apropos of the round number anniversary, we thought that elevating the local beer scene to art seemed fitting, given the crafty Pollocks, Fridas and da Vincis who have acted as conservators of its frothy swell. The result is a curated love letter to all things Utah beer—from a museum-worthy brewery out to leave its signature in Utah County to a permanent exhibit of ale pairings that can be found in your grocer’s freezer and a brewer collaboration that would make Andy Warhol and Jean-Michel Basquiat proud. It’s not all highbrow, though. This being a City Weekly pop-up, we also took the lot of SLC mayoral candidates out for a frosty one (Diet Coke counts, right?), continued our foray into the #FakeBeer movement, assembled the perfect playlist to get sloshed to and rounded up our staff’s most trusted hangover cures (Velveeta, anyone?) So raise a glass to (and place a red sticker on) this issue and all those featured in it. Our carbonation installation is now open to the public.

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Illustrations by Andy Hood

AUGUST 15, 2019 | 17

—Enrique Limón, docent


OWNED

SINCE

1968

competition can be good for the beer biz. BY MIKE RIEDEL

O italianvillageslc.com (801).266.4182 | 5370 S. 900 E. SLC

Celebrat i

26 y ears

!

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18 | AUGUST 15, 2019

Cohoperation How teaming up with the

Chad Hopkins and Jordan Schupbach

ver the last 14 years, I’ve spent a good chunk of time working the Utah beer beat. During that time, there’ve been a lot of changes—some good, some bad—but the one thing that’s been constant is the sense of community that exists among local brewers. I’m not out here saying Utah’s beer culture is unique in its brotherly and sisterly love for craft beer. But let’s face it, we operate under a whole different set of alcohol rules here, and those unique hurdles can naturally bring Shades Brewing’s people together in unexpected, familiar ways. Nowhere else Trent Farger do you see brewers dumb down centuries-old beer styles just to keep thirsty customers satisfied. Another odd situation is that, at one time or another, many Utah brewers have worked for a competing brewery or have coworkers who’ve come from breweries across town. This creates a tight kinship that just adds to a harmonious beer culture. Toward the end of last year, an odd situation arose where Epic Brewing Co. was having difficulty maintaining their Sugar House brewpub. Utah’s largest locally owned brewery was kicking ass in the beer game, but was having a hard time finding focus at their brick-and-mortar Sugar House location. “The Salt Lake City and Denver breweries were taking up most of our attention and resources,” says Jordan Schupbach, Epic’s head of brewing and operations. As luck would have it, Chad Hopkins, a local home brewer, was looking to up his game. “It was pretty much always our dream to have a brewpub in Sugar House,” Hopkins says. “When the opportunity came up to manage this property instead of me,” Trent Farger, Shades Brewing owner says. “ I knew exactly what the building [one] from the ground up—that was huge.” Huge sounds about Park City guys were going through, and I wanted to help.” Shades’ original right, as the neighborhood continues to boom. “We probably couldn’t have location was in the heart of Park City, but growth and rent had driven them pulled it off if [otherwise],” Hopkins notes. “Taking over the lease saved to South Salt Lake. “We had the space, and a large enough brew system us a lot of money for sure.” Along with rent being paid and careers being that could handle both operations,” Farger says. “I’m glad they took us forged, partnerships were also solidified at the new Hopkins Brewing Co. up on it.” If you go into Shades, it’s obvious there’s a lot going on. In one “Epic wants to see Hopkins succeed.” Schupbach says. “We’ve seen how corner, you see cans of PC beer being filled, while pallets of Shades’ suds they operate, and we know that the place is in excellent hands.’’ roll on by. “It’s funny how understanding and perspective brought all of In South Salt Lake, a similar situation is brewing. Earlier this year, this together,” Farger chuckles. “I’d hate to see the Park City guys go under Park City Brewery lost its lease in Kimball Junction and needed a new loover a raw deal. It sure is different, but I’m glad they’re around.” cation tout suite. If you’re familiar with the area, you know that real estate While it might seem these two symbiotic relationships are merely busiand rent in that part of Summit County is, for lack of a better term, outraness-oriented, there’s no denying they’re also a testament to the camaradegeous. “If anybody understands the headaches of beer and real estate it’s rie of breweries in the Beehive. Cheers to sudsy collabs! CW MIKE RIEDEL

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FAMILY

ng

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Scoot on over for the Italian taste you love!

10 Years of Beers! kickback to the state’s largest beer-a-palooza.

How the Utah Beer Fest went from an informal BY RAY HOWZE

Pre-summer 2010

In a virtual beer wasteland, Utahns were kept to bars and their homes to enjoy their hops. Times were bleak for some, as camaraderie and collective morale could have used a frothy boost. Luckily, the craft beer craze was picking up steam.

September 2010

ninth & ninth 254 south main

City Weekly hosts its inaugural beer festival at Washington Square outside the Salt Lake City & County Building. The first year features a single-price all-you-candrink model because of the pesky Legislature. Despite only selling 300 tickets in advance, more than 3,000 thirsty beer drinkers show up, creating some chaos. But it’s a promising sign for the future. Ten local breweries participate.

August 2011

In the festival’s second year, organizers move it to the third week of August, where it remains today. The Legislature had recently passed a new law requiring drinkers to pay as they quaffed, creating the token-like system used today.

August 2012

The festival moves to Gallivan Plaza and for the first time was held on a Sunday (proof Utahns drink on the Sabbath). Regional breweries join in.

August 2013

More beers are added, as well as an “International Beer Row” on Gallivan Avenue.

August 2014

The festival moves back to Washington Square and expands to include more food vendors along 200 East.

August 2015

No longer permitted at Washington Square, the festival picks up and moves across the street to Library Square. For the first time, tickets sell out.

August 2016

The festival moves to Utah State Fairpark and with it, more room for beer tents and, wait for it … more beer! Tokens bid their adieu and drinkers can now get their suds via wristbands.

August 2017

Double your pleasure, double your fun. The state’s largest beer bash is now a two-day event.

August 2018

Perhaps its best-ever event, the festival continues its two-day run. This time, it features an outdoor gear and beer tent—proving once again that recreation and beer go together—responsibly, of course.

August 2019

Finally reaching its 10-year vintage, the fest now features concerts at the end of each day with bands such as Royal Bliss and Jagertown. It also hosts nearly 60 beer vendors. Time to drink up, dance and be merry, fellow Utah beer enthusiasts! CW


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Three Qs and a Beer City Weekly sits down

1. 5.

for a drink with this year’s eight mayoral candidates. BY PETER HOLSLIN AND RAY HOWZE

T

his year’s SLC mayoral race has been a doozy. Between sheepish mailers, claims of “dark money” and Rainer Huck’s festive debate headwear, it’s easy for a voter to get bogged down with election noise. Enter the great regulator: Beer (and in one instance, tea). In candid chats with City Weekly, all eight candidates as of press time sat down, talked shop—and suds. Want to know which mayoral hopeful used to get hopped up on Thunderbird? Read on.

Meeting place: Beer Bar (161 E. 200 South, 385-259-0905, beerbarslc.com) Brew of choice: Hefeweizen

What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learned about Salt Lake City while campaigning? “When I’ve run before, it’s just sort of been my neighborhood [Penfold is a former District 3 council member]. What’s been pretty amazing is discovering these sort of really cool little clusters of streets. We were down somewhere west of Liberty Park on this short little street, big old original trees, great little houses and it was almost one of those caricatures of a neighborhood. It’s been fun to discover these pockets of really cool neighborhoods.”

Meeting place: Murphy’s Bar & Grill (160 S. Main, 801-359-7271, murphysbarandgrillut.com) Brew of choice: Diet Coke

What’s the most surprising thing you’ve learned about Salt Lake City while campaigning? “Just how little interest the media has in candidates. I guess because

of polling numbers. I got in the race kind of late. The reason I did was because all the other candidates seem to be monolithic. You could really elect any of them and I don’t think you’d get anything different. So I thought I’d focus on issues that affect the people of Salt Lake, especially the working people.” What are some of those issues? “Police violence. Justice system abuse of poor people and the homeless. I’m the only candidate that has a real solution for the homeless problem, which is a homeless campus. I can build that homeless campus in the Northwest Quadrant that will provide every service the homeless people need. The new homeless shelters are going to be 100% inadequate. My homeless campus will accommodate 5,000 people and it will have every service they need.” (RH)

3. DAVID GARBETT

Meeting place: Kiitos Brewing (608 W. 700 South, 801-215-9165, kiitosbrewing.com) Brew of choice: Kiitos Amber Ale Do you remember your first drink? “Yes. I didn’t like it at first. I started drinking later in life—late 20s when I started. It was a bit more of an acquired taste early on.” What’s been the most surprising thing you’ve learned while campaigning? “I think the coolest thing about this campaign is going throughout the city and having conversations—seeing people are interested in their city, passionate in their city and that they want to have these conversations. They want to talk about ways to make it better. Air quality is a big one. I say it unsurprisingly, but I have thought during this campaign, ‘Today is the day I go to a neighborhood that doesn’t care about air quality.’ And I have yet to find it.” What’s been the most challenging part for you? “It was a first-hand experience on what it takes to raise money in a race. Especially coming from someone with no name recognition, the only way I can change that is raising money to get out and talk to voters. Sometimes it reminds me of that idea about if a tree falls in the forest and no one’s around. You can have the best policy ideas in the world, and if you can’t get those to voters, can’t do some advertising, can’t pay for some material, it doesn’t really matter.” (RH)

4. DAVID IBARRA

Meeting place: Dick N’ Dixie’s (479 E. 300 South, 801-994-6919) Brew of choice: Bud Light. “I like Coors Light but that is a Bud Light, because they don’t have Coors Light [on draft].”

Do you remember your first drink? “It gave me a headache and I still can’t drink it to this day, but who would want to. It was a gallon that our friends got called Thunderbird wine. It was cheap wine and, my heavens, after you drink a little bit of that, we’d put it in Kool-Aid to make it drinkable. And, oh my, would you get sick.” What’s been the most interesting thing you’ve learned while running for mayor? “I’m really surprised the order of things are pretty much the same no matter where you’re at. The environment is the biggest issue. It’s interesting that most believe the environment has gotten worse when factually, that’s just not the case. We’ve had two good mayors. Mayor [Rocky] Anderson who really started the ball of paying attention and making our city a leader in battling what a city could do for the environment. Then we come in with [Ralph] Becker and the implementation of our bike lanes. That’s such an important part of our infrastructure. I think the next phase is going to work itself out. Clean energy is a given in 10 years because the old equipment we have that brings in dirty coal generated electricity will be retired.” What’s been the most challenging part of the campaign? “The irresponsible way we view the shelter-resistant population. Doing the easy thing is [letting them] sleep in public space. They’re my brothers and sisters. I won’t turn my back on them but you just did when you don’t do something to remove them from the street. We’re a better society than what we’re showing right now.” (RH)

5. JIM DABAKIS

Meeting place: Murphy’s Bar & Grill (160 S. Main, 801-359-7271, murphysbarandgrillut.com) Brew of choice: Golden Spike Hefeweizen, Uinta Brewing Do you remember your first drink? “I was about 23 years old before I had a sip of alcohol. I was a gold star BYU student. I moved to Salt Lake and discovered, among other things, beer.” What has been the most interesting thing you’ve learned while running for mayor? “I’ve learned how basically good the people of Salt Lake are. I mean, I’ve knocked on a lot of doors, and with one or two exceptions, people have been genuinely nice. A lady the other day, I got to the door—a senior citizen woman, had a big, long cigarette dangling. I said, ‘Hi, I’m Jim Dabakis, I’m running for mayor.’ She says [Dabakis mimes taking puffing on a cig], ‘I know who you are. I watch you on television. I hate you … Now that I’ve met you, I hate

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Do you remember your first drink? “Well, I’m not Mormon or anything. I used to drink a little bit when I was a young guy, but it never did anything for me. It just put me to sleep. So, it’s never been a factor in my life. But again, it’s not because of any religious beliefs.”

3.

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2. RAINER HUCK

2.

What do you think residents are looking for in a candidate this election? “I think people are being unusually serious about this race— they’re really checking into the candidates and are concerned about how they want to vote. It feels very deliberate about it. Most of our responses when we talk to people are they’re undecided, but undecided in an, ‘I’m trying to find out who to vote for’ kind of way.” (RH)

7.

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Do you remember your first drink? “It wasn’t beer, it was a margarita. Which is kind of funny, because people don’t usually start with tequila. My experience has been, people will say, ‘I can’t drink tequila.’ I love tequila but my theory is tequila was the first alcohol they had and got really sick so they have this bad association with it.”

8.

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1.STAN PENFOLD

4.

6.


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22 | AUGUST 15, 2019

you even more!’ And she slams the door. But that was rare. Almost everybody else has been fun.” What’s been the most challenging part of the campaign? “Asking for money. I hate it, it’s awful. I like to go to the Broadway Theater on Sunday afternoons. I have some friends I usually go with. [Recently] I texted, ‘Hey, how is everybody today?’ Nothing came back at all. I said to my husband, Stephen, ‘This is weird.’ Stephen grabs my phone, texts, ‘I’m not going to ask for money, I just want to go to a movie.’ Everybody goes, ‘Oh, OK!’” (PH)

6. LUZ ESCAMILLA

Meeting place: Creek Tea (155 E. 900 South, 385-275-8827, creektea.com) Brew of choice: Green tea lemonade I take it you don’t drink beer? “I don’t. I’ve never had a drink of alcohol in my life. I love tea. Chamomile is my favorite one— warm and cold. I love lemonade, but with lime.” What did you learn the most about Salt Lake during the campaign? “Just how passionate people are for their city. Usually people get passionate when something goes wrong for them—there’s this sense of, ‘I will complain more when something is not working well.’ But actually, people love Salt Lake City. Everyone wants Salt Lake City to get better. Everybody has a vested interest, not only for them but for their neighbors.” What’s been challenging about campaigning? “Raising money. It’s brutal. Brutal! We’re a grassroots campaign, I’m not personally wealthy. I work really hard, I’ve always had two jobs. The hardest part with this race is, because it’s local, out-of-state people have no interest obviously. When I ran for Congress, I had tons of people giving me contributions from California. We don’t have that in a municipal race. And when you have eight candidates? This has been a crazy, divided race.” (PH)

7. ERIN MENDENHALL

Meeting place: T. F. Brewing (936 S. 300 West, 385-270-5972, tfbrewing.com) Brew of choice: American Avenue Pale Ale, Templin Family Brewing Do you remember your first drink? “I do remember my first half bottle of wine. I was actually quite of age. I was in my mid-20s. I sat at my kitchen table with my childhood best friend and she walked me through it. Then she told me to take two Tylenol, drink a glass of water, and sleep well. It was a very shallow-end introduction. Nice and easy.”

What’s the most exciting thing about the campaign so far? “It feels right. I’m a realist that verges into a pessimist at night and wakes up an optimist and back to realism by noon. I didn’t have any fancy notions of having the time of my life on the campaign trail necessarily. I knew it would be hard work. I’ve run for office before at a council level, but I also knew there were a lot of other candidates and it would be an intense race. The closer we get to the end, the more I’m loving it. I feel very much at home doing this.” What’s been challenging about campaigning? “I’m never not campaigning. Even when I’m relaxing, I’m campaigning. I’m on. Like, if you got up to go to the bathroom right now, I’d probably check my campaign’s Instagram and make a post. I surely have some questions from voters waiting in my inbox, so I want to jump on that. And that’s what I’ve been doing for six years. I’ve stood up in front of community councils for the last seven years, starting as a candidate, giving people my cellphone number and inviting them to reach out to me.” (PH)

8. RICHARD GOLDBERGER

Meeting place: Beerhive Pub (128 S. Main, 801-364-4268) Brew of choice: Samuel Adams lager, served with a personal-pan pizza topped with onions, raw crushed garlic, squeezed lemon, plenty of pepper and no cheese. Do you remember your first beer? “My late father was from New York, from the Bronx and Scarsdale. He always gave me a tiny taste of his beer. It was good. No beer like Rheingold today, and no beer like Schaefer. Two wonderful beers—New York beers. It’s an art and a science to make a wonderful beer.” What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned about Salt Lake City so far? “I’ve been in Salt Lake a long, long time. I was here when West 2nd South was open for prostitution. I mean, it was wild. This was back in the ’60s. There were some places people wouldn’t even walk into, they smelled of urine and twomonths-old beer. I used to frequent these dives and dumps. But there are no dumps anymore.” What’s the hardest thing about campaigning? “I use the media and I use forums, because I have no money. I’m running this campaign on a subshoestring. But I’m doing a good job. My slogan is ‘GBO’—government by objectives. I work for the people. I’m totally a public servant. I don’t like politicians. I want to get the politicians out of politics. I want to get the politics out of politics!” (PH) CW Editor’s note: Interviews were edited for clarity and length.

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Almost Ales

Our continuing exhibition of #FakeBeers.

BY AMANDA ROCK ART BY DEREK CARLISLE

If drinking beer is your coping mechanism for the sad state of current events, we have the fake brews you need …

Equal Pay IPA

Until women get paid the same as men, we’re only paying 79 cents for every dollar this beer costs.

Inland Port Porter

This beer either provides thousands of jobs, elevating Utah from “Crossroads of the West” to the “Crossroads of the World,” or it’ll contribute to climate change and make our air quality even worse. Depends on who you ask, and who’s profiting. Drink up? AS SEEN ON “ DINERS, DRIVE-INS AND DIVES”

Orange Man Bitter

This beer is free until he is either impeached or replaced. Cheers!

Why Is the Air Brown? Ale

Salt Lake County earned an “F” on the American Lung Association’s “State of the Air” report this year. The inversion is so bad you can’t see 10 feet in front of your face, or breathe on some winter days. Why not have a beer?

No Drivin’ Hefferveisen

Statistically, Utah is one of the least dangerous states for DUI fatalities, but that didn’t stop our Legislature and governor from lowering the blood alcohol content to .05 from .08%. Although they’ve likely never touched a beer, they sure like to stay involved with those of us who enjoy an occasional adult beverage. Thanks for looking out for us guys—this one’s for you!

No Abortion For Amber Ale Open Border Porter Every time a man tries to take away a woman’s constitutional right to reproductive autonomy, take a drink!

Let’s open the borders if they promise to bring beer. Problem solved!

AOC IPA

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COURTESY PHOTO

Night at the Brewseum Enter Strap Tank’s delicately curated brewery. BY MIKE RIEDEL

B

ack in 2016, Rick Salisbury turned Utah County on its head when he opened up the first brewery that Happy Valley had seen since the late 19th century. The Springville brewery featured a motorcycle theme that draws heavily from Salibury’s passion for bikes and Americana. Today, Salisbury again is turning the establishment upside down with a second Utah County location, right in the heart of Lehi’s technology corridor. This second iteration is very much reminiscent of Salisbury’s original brewery—but with its own twist. “It’s hard to describe that Strap Tank vibe,” head brewer Shawn Smith says, “but when you see it, you know what it is.” He’s right. The Lehi brewery has an industrial art deco exterior that transitions into a quasi-1940s carnival themed interior, complete with authentic relics from America’s past. “It keeps similar themes as the Springville brewery,” Smith adds, “but it definitely has its own unique identity.” The museum-quality décor (along with the beer) competes for main attraction status. The details are extraordinary: the servers’ station is an actual old circus ticket booth, and old Ferris wheel chairs and cars from long-dead carnival rides

also call the place home. However, this is just one small chunk of the new space’s identity as the existing architecture also adds to the charm. As I walked around the brewery’s exterior, I noticed the building has many faces: from the west, it looks like a large 1900s urban factory; and from the east, it looks like a cross between a 1930s movie theater and a full-service garage. But this isn’t all about looks. “I love what Rick and his people have created here, but I’m more focused on the brewery and making sure that we have the best process possible,” Smith says, and I quickly begin to get it. As we stand in the threestory glass terrarium that is Smith’s new brewhouse, the possibilities of what’s to come makes both our mouths water. “We’re going to get our core brands done first,” Smith points out. The lineup includes their Flathead American lager, Highside American wheat beer, Sportster Session IPA, Bonkers English Brown ale and the Sgt. Holtz Irish stout. Beer nerds who like their suds a little less ordinary, will also be covered. “On opening day, we’ll also have a Smoked German Helles, a Brut IPA, Watermelon Gose and Gulia, a brown sour ale with plum and raspberry,” Smith teases. The artist’s eye gets a bit of a twinkle as he segues from what has already been brewed to what he hopes will roll out in the future. “I’d love to do a Nitro Bitter, a Hazy IPA, of course, and get a few German lagers going for the Oktobest season.” Furthering the cohoperation vibe, Smith says Strap Tank will also offer two guest taps from other Utah brewers on the regular. “We want to support some of the other local breweries, so we’ll have Uinta’s Baba and Fisher beer as well,” he says. Strap Tank’s new Lehi brewhouse includes a 15-barrel brew system, two 30-barrel and four 15-barrel fermenters—just the amount of capacity to keep a thirsty beer enthusiast happy. The space also boasts a special tasting room for those on brewery tours, and also for special events. Is this place unique for Utah? “I think it’s unique for the United States,” Smith responds. “You’d be hard-pressed to find another brewery that comes close to this.” CW


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Curator, Cure my Hangover! Newsroom staffers share their post-rager tips and tricks. BY CITY WEEKLY STAFF

I

t’s no secret journalists are professional drinkers. To quote our great governor, we’re known to drink till our eyes bug out, and still manage to meet our deadlines the following morning (most of the time). So, if you’re looking for help in appearing semi-normal post Beer Fest—or any other weekend for that matter—you’ve come to the right place. Take it from the experts: The road to pickled livers is filled with regret, V8, Velveta and … more booze?

“My favor ite hang over cure generally starts with a deep regret of lack of water consumption. W hat follows is my attempt to be healthy (salad s, veggies, the work s) ending wi th carb -filled entrées including , but not limited to, Velveeta Mac & Cheese (the microwave cups ON LY ). Dr ink water, kid s.” —K ara Rhodes, contr ibutor t nktow n mus t stay in Dru agh w ni of er s ov se n “A le glas w ith a coup thing always end ter, the first and af ng ni or er at w e ter. The m or m r is coffee, nt that w ill I’m dy ing fo food nutr ie of nd ki h. Vietnam some ac om st in my I order . -to ideally stay go e h the ultimat e menu w it ese pho is bowl on th ze d si an t e, es ip gg the bi on, and tr br isket, tend odles heal my beef flank , no h and rice let the brot .” ul so wounded riter slin, staff w —Peter Hol

“Well, if yo u don’t have too many responsibilit ies the next day, sometimes it’s be st to keep th e part y go ing. The first beer might be ha to get throug h, but it’s sm rd sailing af ter ooththat. Call it rollover minutes or a shampoo part y. W hy? Wash, rinse, repeat —you don’t need as much th e second time around . Every hear d of Sunday Funday ? So I gues s I’m just saying put off the hangover … sigh.” —R ay Howze , editorial as sistant I trek over to the Ice Haus (7 E. 4800 South, Murray) and order a bloody mary from Andrew barkeep Burt. Served with asparagus pickled spears (and bacon, if you request it), olives and a lemon wedge and, of course, 1 1/2 ounces of Tito’s vodka— the headache-banishing beverage isn’t too bland or too spicy … it’s just right. If you need more zest. Andrew’s always sassy commentary fills the bill. Did I mention the bar’s open at 10 a.m. on weekends? CW —Lance Gudmundsen, proofreader

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

jourl b e er ssiona et hangfe o r p g “I’m a e don’t ra re and w r, on those e nalist v e eling w fe o H ’m . en I ov e r s tle ns wh d a lit occasio it mor tal an lled for, b a a wee the dog’ is c r, a can f lage t h g ‘hair o li leve for a ree A I reach V8 and th ic.” g a m y e of Spic oing! It’s lik lumnist .B r co tablets R iedel, bee —Mike

“It’s been many years since I really had to worry about a hangover— par enting and try ing to tur n into a responsible citizen wil l do that to a guy—but it’s easy for me to remem ber the worst one I eve r had. And it happened to be the day of my col lege graduation cerem ony, when the celebrator y revels of the night before caught up with me, I had to put on a sm iley face for my proud parents (and grandpare nts), and it was 90 degrees for the outdoor commencement walk. How did I deal with it? I don’t ever remember drinking so much water in my life, and I could neither tell you any thi ng our commenceme nt speaker said, nor how I made it through two hours without peeing.” —Scott Renshaw, A& E editor

A liquid diet is what gets me going again after a night of imbibing too many liquids of the toxic variety. If I’m hungry, a sweet, sour thai soup does the trick for me, but more frequently, if I’m on the go and don’t have time to dine, my go-to is another cocktail of sorts. I like stopping at the Harmons by my house to pick up my holy trio of coconut water, refreshing ginger or lavender kombucha and cold brew. Yep, all three, back to back. Coconut water does what Gatorade does with electrolytes, but better, and zaps a headache while also rehydrating my poor, dried up veins. Kombucha settles an upset stomach and restores appetite. And the coffee? Well, coffee is coffee and it does what it does, but I always save it for last, when my body feels almost normal again. —Erin Moore, music editor

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The Fine Art of Food Trucks

Enjoy an edible gallery stroll with 10 of our most esteemed mobile dispensaries. BY ALEX SPRINGER

I

Fuego Mexican Grill

Miso Yum

While it’s easy to write off a rice bowl as an unimaginative attempt to combine protein and starch, the combo cup ($8) at Miso Yum is fertile with possibilities. Red pepper pork and honey glazed chicken offer corresponding spicy and sweet notes as a foundation, but the consumer can choose to enhance one flavor over the other by selecting sweet, mild, medium or hot sauces. Romaine lettuce and steamed veggies add a complementary crunch to the whole piece, creating a textural foil to soft rice and glass noodles. A balanced work through and through. misoyum.com

Umani

Like many of the cuisines featured on this list, Greek food has benefited from centuries of practice and evolution. The gyro itself represents a milestone in meat delivery that can only be challenged by the previously mentioned burrito. Gyros served from within food trucks like The Local Greek are unique in that gyro meat somehow tastes better when it has been shaved into thin slices by wandering professionals. Their gyro ($8.99) stands among the best because of its customizable options and traditional Greek flavor. thelocalgreek.com

Dough Gods

Also hailing from the Mediterranean—at least in concept— comes the cookie dough vendors known as Dough Gods. Boasting a Herculean menu of cookie dough flavors named for the deities of Olympus, Dough Gods has made a name for itself with its celestial compositions. While each flavor evokes the god or goddess for which it was named, the Hades Milkshake ($6.99) is among the most decadent. Hades cookie dough is comprised of cinnamon chocolate cheesecake and chocolate chips, which is dark and rich as the god of the underworld himself. In a shake, this dough blends with locallymade vanilla ice cream that is worth the six months you have to spend in Hades’ kingdom for a taste. doughgods.com

Jamaica’s Kitchen

Caribbean cuisine is known for being cooked long and slow

It’s common practice for pizza artisans to adopt a less-is-more approach to their pies, and many do so with great success. The renegades at Lucky Slice, however, have become masters of excess. The Fire Island pie ($3.49 per slice) is an unlikely combination of several geographical flavor profiles that don’t typically show up in the same space. The garlicky cream sauce, mozzarella and capicola ham ground the pie in its Italian roots, but the addition of caramelized onions, sliced jalapeño peppers and pineapple hearken to the more tropical areas of Central America. Regardless, this pie is replete with strokes of heat and tantalizing sweet acidity. theluckyslice.com

Balabé

Those connoisseurs that prefer a plant-based experience should definitely sample the Senegalese cuisine at Balabé. Their finest piece is a dish known as mafé ($10). It’s a savory stew made with peanut butter, and Balabé makes theirs with vegetables. Served over rice, the taste buds tingle with the familiarity of perhaps a massaman curry or even something along the lines of tikka masala. As close as these flavors are, however, mafé provides flavors just beyond the boundaries of familiarity. facebook.com/balabeslc

Fry Me to the Moon

What food truck stroll would be complete without a stop to appreciate something deep fried to a golden brown? Fry Me to the Moon specializes in this technique, and the fish and fries ($11.50) is their magnum opus. Thick slices of cod, deep fried in a crispy batter and served alongside piping hot fries is summery and satisfying. Those interested in a sweet conclusion to their food truck experience can also experience gourmet doughnuts ($6 for 10) three ways—traditional glaze, cinnamon sugar and Nutella. Regardless of what your appetite longs for, a priceless piece of deep-fried wonder awaits you here. frymetothemoonslc.com CW

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Any soup ordered from a mobile dispensary should only be considered if the experience is worth the risk of spilling boiling hot liquid on you or those around you. The tonkotsu ramen ($8) at Fatty Tuna is worth such a risk. Their pork bone broth ruminates for at least 24 hours before it is poured over a delicious blend of chashu pork and noodles, spiked with bean sprouts, corn and seaweed. It’s a fullbodied dish comprised of rich flavors. facebook.com/fattytunafood

The Local Greek

Lucky Slice

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Fatty Tuna

There’s a certain Warholian tendency surrounding the corn dogs from The Corn Dog Co. Often considered childish or pedestrian, corn dogs might never reach the upper echelons of “high art,” but that doesn’t mean they should be overlooked entirely. For example, the artisans at The Corn Dog Co. have added complexity to the contemporary corn dog by infusing the cornbread-style batter with hints of honey. It’s quite disarming on its own, but their traditional corn dogs ($4-$6, pictured) can also be topped with a drizzle of raw honey for an added element of sweet-meets-savory—or perhaps it’s more accurate to say nostalgia-meets-sophistication. thecorndogco.com

in order to get the most flavor. The beef oxtail ($13) at Jamaica’s Kitchen is a master class in such preparation. Meat that has been stewed or braised on the bone develops a heightened flavor profile and can easily be pulled from its attached osseous matter. It can be a daunting task for those unfamiliar with oxtail, but this should be undertaken nonetheless. Such comforting flavors are uncharacteristic in the summer months, but this is something that can be enjoyed regardless of the season. jamaicaskitchenslc.com

Pizza has been interpreted by several masters for hundreds of years, yet the medium continues to evolve. The artisans at Umani have composed a pie called the Amber ($10) that combines the universal appeal of bacon and the acquired taste of Roquefort cheese by including a measured dose of cranberries. Bacon and Roquefort are often present on the palettes of renowned burger artisans, but including them on pizza offers an interesting contrast that the cranberries delineate for the consumer. The tart sweetness of the cranberries creates a catalyst for the salty, smoky flavors imparted by the bacon and the creamy sharpness of the Roquefort cheese to converge into something altogether unfamiliar and exciting. umani.us

The Corn Dog Co.

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The burrito is an achievement in aesthetic and engineering perfection, so adopting this method is a paradox—burrito artisans are simultaneously wise and foolhardy. The wisdom comes from the burrito’s natural ability to achieve the holy triumvirate of flavor, texture and convenience, but dallying in such perfection often requires more effort for the artisan’s soul to truly shine. The Beehive Burrito ($6) from Fuego Mexican Grill masterfully treads the knife’s edge between these two poles. The artisan paints brisk strokes of crisp bacon, velvety cheese and fresh pico de gallo across a canvas of carne asada and wraps the masterwork in a warm tapestry of tortilla. Pure symmetry between form and function. tacosfuego.com

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ENRIQUE LIMÓN

n America’s culinary history, there’s been no gastronomic medium so controversial as the food truck. Some scholars argue that they’re the natural evolution of mobile eateries found in ancient Chinese and Roman civilizations, but contemporary critics believe they’re a novelty, and that their popularity will inevitably fade. Regardless of which camp modern restaurant connoisseurs tend to find themselves, the continued presence of food trucks in our community is worth further contemplation. To truly assess their cultural value, you must evaluate the fruits—be they deep fried, caramelized or dipped in chocolate—of their labor. In an effort to better conduct this important artistic study, City Weekly has invited several local culinary artisans to demonstrate their contributions at this year’s Utah Beer Festival. Based on my preliminary observations, these are the entrées that will please the palates of local food truck aficionados.


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Ice Cold Beer Pairings

What beer artfully complements corn dogs, you ask? Read on. BY AMANDA ROCK

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he next time you choose quality time with yourself over a busy restaurant with friends, head to the grocery store. Pick out your favorite frozen food, whether it’s Totino’s pizza or Morningstar Farms Veggie Corn Dogs, then peruse the beer aisle for its perfect pairing. Hell, hit Red Box on your way out and call it a date, because #selfcare.

Brunch

Any beer with fruit or coffee in the name is fair game for brunch. Try Kiitos Coffee Cream Ale, a light beer heavy on coffee flavor and aroma, paired with warm, toasted waffles or freshly microwaved pancakes. The Grapefruit Revolution IPA from Shades Brewing is a brunch no-brainer. With a flavorful and grapefruity finish, this refreshing beer is divine paired with greasy, salty fare like breakfast sandwiches and hashbrowns.

Pizza, pot pies & corn dogs

Wash your cheese pizza down with a cold can of Uinta’s Cutthroat Pale Ale. The slight bitterness is a delicious contrast to the rich cheese. Squatters Provo Girl Pilsner pairs well with pepperoni pizza. The maltyness grooves with the crust, and the carbonation cuts through the grease and quenches your thirst. Whether you opt for a vegan pot pie, or prefer the $1 Banquet variety, grab a Squeaky Bike Nut Brown Ale from Moab Brewery. Slightly sweet with roasted malts and a medium body, this beer stands up to the rich pot pie flavors. I posed the question of what beer pairs with corn dogs on Twitter. Tim Haran from the Utah Beer News website and podcast suggested a clean and hoppy American Pale Ale. Squatters Full Suspension Pale Ale fits the bill. He also proposed a German-style Pilsner or Helles. Local celebrity chef Tom Woodbury suggested pairing corn dogs with Kiitos Rimando Pale Ale, promising it to be “… perfect a pairing as could be.” My friend from work suggested root beer. Wasatch Brewery’s Brigham’s Brew sounds like a tasty pairing to me!

Beer floats

Think root beer float, but with alcohol! Use a dark, heavy-ish beer like Uinta’s Baba Black Lager, Wasatch’s Polygamy Porter or Kiitos Coconut Stout. Choose an ice cream without any bits or chunks because ... ew. Pick up a quart of vanilla, coffee, or chocolate ice cream and float away! CW


BY ALEX SPRINGER

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COURTESY PHOTO

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s a teenager, I wasn’t very interested in acquiring beer. I was, however, quite taken with the minutiae that is part and parcel of drinking beer—I owe most of this to Bob and Doug McKenzie in the film Strange Brew. Frosty long-neck bottles; the carbonated hiss of a newly popped cap; pillowy foam lazily bobbing on a golden surface. Like smoking, butterfly knives and Marilyn Manson, something about the appearance of beer seemed cooler than it actually was. When I first discovered Apple Beer at the local Albertson’s, I was a little apprehensive. I figured that since it was shelved with all the other sugary swill that I adored as an adolescent, that I wasn’t going to get arrested if I brought it to the cashier. Even so, something about the caramel-colored bottle and the word “beer” made me think I was violating the moral code that my LDS upbringing had instilled. I bought the bottle without incident, twisted off the cap and introduced my taste buds to something that I would love for the rest of my life. As most root beer is cloyingly sweet and most ginger beer tastes like gasoline, there’s a welcome crispness to Apple Beer’s flavor that cuts through the traditional soda-pop sugar rush. Perhaps it’s because this particular recipe dates back nearly a century. According to local history, Apple Beer president and CEO Larry

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For more than half a century, Apple Beer has been one of Utah’s finest exports.

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Tasty to the Core

Stillman encountered a nonalcoholic drink called fassbrause in the early 1960s while serving an LDS mission in Germany. The beverage made an impression that Stillman wished to share with family and friends—so Apple Beer was born in 1964. It’s remained a family-owned company since. The product’s distributed as far as the Caribbean, where it’s become popular to serve at weddings. Locally, Apple Beer continues to earn accolades from consumers and business leaders alike. It’s won multiple awards, and members of the Stillman family have delivered lectures and speeches to up-and-coming entrepreneurs across the state. Over the years, Apple Beer has introduced a few new products that have diversified its lineup. I was at the Utah State Fair when I discovered the first of these—the low-cal cousin called Apple Beer Five. It maintains the same crisp taste, but it’s sweetened with açaí and packs a ginseng kick, which is how it keeps the calorie count to just five per bottle. The full-octane version tastes a bit better because of cane sugar, but you could do much worse for a lighter soda. The company has also expanded its roster to include ginger beer—of the non-gasoline variety, of course. With all this variety flooding local grocery stores, I felt that a definitive taste test was in order. I grabbed a four-pack of original Apple Beer and Apple Beer Five—both bottles and cans, in case you were wondering—and a four-pack of ginger beer. By far, an icy cold original Apple Beer in a glass bottle is the best way to experience this beverage. Apple Beer out of the can is still tasty, but something about the aluminum can mutes the drink’s natural bite. The ginger beer is a mild brew—none of that chest-ripping ginger found in other varieties. In this case, the mild flavor of the ginger is overpowered by an abundance of sweetness. Regardless of what you’re after in a beverage, Apple Beer’s selection has something that most fans of nonalcoholic beverages will enjoy, which is quite impressive considering the chokehold that international megacorporations have on the soft drink industry. Its continuing success is one of many examples of Utah’s ability to hang with the big guys—especially when it comes to nonalcoholic beverages. CW


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Sudsy Sonnets Get tipsy to these 10 songs about beer. BY NICK McGREGOR

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rinking songs date back to at least the 13th century, when the German manuscript Carmina Burana included a medieval drinking tune that began, “In the boozer/ You’re a loser.” Since then, odes to alcohol have been penned by artists across all genres, all geographies and all socioeconomic levels. But it’s the beer ballads that really resonate with those of us in the brew crew—songs about drinking beer, looking for beer and lamenting the effects it has on our love lives and our livers. In honor of City Weekly’s annual Beer Issue and forthcoming 10th annual Utah Beer Festival, we collected our favorite songs about beer from across the last 75 years or so.

Jimmy Witherspoon, “Drinkin’ Beer (Havin’ a Ball)”

It’s criminally und e r ap p r e c i ate d , but this 1950 deep cut might just be the best song about beer ever written. Our man imbibes at all hours: “Yes, early in the mornin’/ Yes, in the afternoon/ Yes, in the evenin’”—“even till the rooster crows at dawnin’.” Even better is Witherspoon’s pre-craft beer breakdown of the endless varieties of beer: “Now lite beer is real beer/ Dark beer’s real gone too/ You drink too much ale, you get put in jail/ So I think I’ll stick to home brew/ Drinking in the mornin’, had a little stout/ A little stout’ll make you poke way out.” We’re not sure about the science behind that, but it sure makes us laugh every time we hear it.

Flaco Jiménez, “En El Cielo No Hay Cerveza”

A staple of polka bands far and wide, this weepy exhortation to imbibing while still on earth was first written for a German film (figures) in 1956. Warped and molded over the decades by concertinas, trumpets and clarinets, it might have reached its artistic apex in 2003, when acclaimed accordionist and conjunto legend Flaco Jiménez gave it a Tejano spin. Even better, Jiménez gave it the trilingual treatment, singing the famous verse—”In heaven there is no beer/ That’s why we drink it here/ And when we’re gone from here/ All my friends will be drinking all the beer”—in English, Spanish and German.

Hank Williams Sr., “There’s a Tear in My Beer”

The country song about beer that laid the template for all other country songs about beer, this 1950 heartbreaker finds ol’ Hank in quite a pickle: “I’m gonna keep drinkin’/ Until I’m petrified,” “I’m gonna keep drinkin’/ Till I can’t move a toe,” and “I’m gonna keep drinkin’/ Till I can’t even think.” Why’s our man with the nasally hillbilly whine so blue? “There’s a tear in my beer/ ’Cause I’m crying for you, dear/ Into these last nine beers/ I have shed a million tears.” Three years later, Hank Sr. died in the back of his Cadillac limousine, surrounded, unsurprisingly, by empty beer cars. And in 1989, his son, Hank Jr., revived dad’s old demo, adding his youthful voice in duet to lay the blueprint for modern music’s posthumous tribute.

Bob Wills, “Bubbles in My Beer”

But wait! The king of Western swing wrote this jaunty number in 1947, and in the tightknit circle of postwar country performer, surely Hank Williams Sr. heard it a time or two. But we say the more the merrier—when it comes to beer itself and songs about beer. And shoot, wouldn’t you rather have bubbles in your beer than tears? Wills went a little deeper than Williams with his lyrics, too, starting off with, “Tonight in a bar alone I’m sitting/ Apart from the laughter and the cheers/ While scenes from the past rise before me/ Just watchin’ the bubbles in my beer.” His “Life’s been a failure,” his road is “Paved with heartaches and tears,” and he’s “Seeing the past that I’ve wasted/ While watchin’ the bubbles in my beer.” Consider it an early example of reverse psychology—now get out of the bar and start living!

People Under the Stairs, “Beer”

Don’t think beer songs are only a country and blues trope. Hiphop has long celebrated a laundry list of intoxicating beverages, from St. Ides to Hennessy to vodka and milk. But this Southern California rap duo kept it simple, stupid, on this 2009 banger, which seems to have been written strictly for a house party the kids would now describe as “lit.” And give Thes One and Double K credit for working early digs at social media into their rhymes: “To my liver and my kidneys, your time is near/ You like hangin’ on Twitter/ And we like beer.” Chalk that up to the first prescient takedown of the platform we all love to hate and hate to love.

Tom Waits, “Warm Beer Cold Women”

Our favorite frogg y-voiced folk troubadour penned this noi r - d r enche d gem in 1975, revealing the dark underbelly of big-city life in his favorite “last ditch attempt saloon.” Waits accepts his plight—”Warm beer and cold women/ I just don’t fit in/ Every joint I stumbled into tonight/ That’s just how it’s been”—while keeping his distance from “All these double knit strangers with/ Gin and vermouth/ And recycled stories/ In the naugahyde booths.” (Extra points for that lip-smacking rhyme scheme.) Waits even reveals his love of classic country, locking eyes with the band in the dive as they play forgotten hits by Tammy Wynette and Johnnie Barnett. But guess what? Tonight, Waits croons, “I’ll be drinking to forget you.”

Bowling for Soup, “Hooray for Beer”

Finally, a song celebrating beer for its pick-meup purposes, not just its blackoutinducing properties. Pop-punk specialists Bowling for Soup named their whole 2009 album Sorry for Partyin’, but “Hooray for Beer” makes no apologies about its unabashed love: “Hooray for beer!/ I’m really glad you’re here/ Let’s make this moment last / You feel so right/ Wanna be with you all night.” At least the boys acknowledge the fact that, “Sometimes when I wake/ You seem like a mistake/ My stomach’s turning circles/ My head is pounding.” But, come 5 o’clock, “You say it’s time to rock/ And I can’t resist/ I gotta be around you.” Dependency? Check. Thinly veiled alcoholism? Check. But celebration, too? Check, check, check!

“One Beer” by MF Doom

Unlike the previous rap song on the list, this boom-bap banger by British MC Daniel “MF Doom” Dumile provides ear candy for underground hip-hop heads. Famous for hiding his identity behind a superhero’s silver mask, MF Doom proceeds to scorch sucker MCs by (spoiler) getting them drunk: “There is only one beer left/ Rappers screaming all in our ears like we’re deaf/ Tempt me, do a number on the label/ Eat up all their MCs and drink ’em under the table.” Those are just four lines of a free-form 60 or so, with MF Doom also talking Teletubbies, derrieres, robberies and more. Oh, and he’s got no use for your bubbly: “I get no kick from Champagne/ Their alcohol doesn’t thrill me at all/ So tell me why shouldn’t it be true?/ I get a kick out of brew.”

“March of the Drunkards” and “I’m Still Drunk” by Folk Hogan

We’re cheating a bit here by including two songs by local hellraisers Folk Hogan. But what’s beautiful about these two standouts from the band’s 2012 album Band of Mighty Souls is that one tracks the joy of a night on the town while the other shines a harsh light on the consequences that follow the next morning. “March of the Drunkards” doesn’t discriminate, lifting hosannas to whiskey, rum and rye. But you can really feel the love on the verse that reads, “We illuminate like fire/ Bring the whole damn bar to its knees/ Each a keg of beer we require/ With a thirst so great, it’s bigger than the seas.” Meanwhile, a few hours later, “It seems the dawn has come/ Before the hangover has kicked in/ Well never fear, just have a beer/ ’Cause I’m still drunk.” Words of wisdom, friends—words of wisdom.

“Beer Run” by Todd Snider

The best beer songs mix wideeyed reverence for the frothy beverage with snide sarcasm about its inebriating allure. And slackerfolk icon Todd Snider hit the nail on the head with this 2002 ditty, which follows “A couple of frat guys from Abilene/ [Who] drove out all night to see Robert Earl Keen.” A modern version of the classic talking blues, which tell a ribald story with humor and hubris, Snider keeps spirits high by injecting the sing-along/spell-along chorus often: “B double E double R UN/ All we need is a ten and a fiver/ A car and a key and a sober driver.” The boys might get a fake ID confiscated, but they still manage to score their brewskis and savor their night: “They were feelin’ so good it shoulda been a crime/ The crowd was cool and the band was prime/ They made it back up front to their seats just in time/ To sing with all their friends/ ‘The road goes on forever and the party never ends.’”

BONUS: “Tubthumping” by Chumbawumba

How on God’s green earth could we not include this 1997 earworm? Love it or hate it, you know you’re gonna sing along when vocalist Dunstan Bruce launches into the line “He drinks a whiskey drink/ He drinks a vodka drink/ He drinks a lager drink/ He drinks a cider drink.” Written to commemorate the strength of the ordinary people that gathered at Chumbawumba’s Leeds local, Fforde Grene, the payoff comes when the subject (and, really, everyone) “Drinks a song to remind him of the good times” and “Drinks a song to remind him of the bad times.” We all get knocked down, but it’s how often we get up again—and we don’t let anybody hold us down—that really matters. CW And to that, we say cheers to all the great beer songs written down through the years.


the

BACK BURNER BY ALEX SPRINGER @captainspringer

Strap Tank Brewery Opens

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If you’ve done any recent mall shopping at Traverse Mountain in Lehi, you’ve likely seen the colorful brick building with the words “Strap Tank” plastered across the wall and wondered what it was. If you’ve done some Harley-Davidson shopping in Springville, however, you’d know that this building is the new home of Strap Tank Brewery (3661 N. Outlet Parkway, Lehi, straptankbrewery.com). As evidenced by this issue, the second location promises the same craft beers and tasty pub fare that put its Springville location on the map—and I’m sure one or two vintage Harleys will make an appearance.

Families Belong Together Bake Sale

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Quote of the Week: “Food is symbolic of love when words are inadequate.” —Alan D. Wolfelt

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The award-winning team at Tin Angel (365 W. 400 South, 801-328-4155, thetinangel.com) is opening a new location inside the Eccles Theater (131 S. Main), where they’ll serve up tasty bites and drinks before, during and after each show. It’s an exciting development because Tin Angel has always offered one of Salt Lake’s more aesthetically pleasing dining spaces, and their menu reflects that artsy vibe. Pairing their artistic instincts with the Eccles Theater will only enhance the overall experience—who doesn’t want a classy bite to eat while soaking up a bit of culture?

Bröst!

Tin Angel at the Eccles

. . . e r e h is r e m m Su

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Need something to soak up the brews—and score some brownie points along the way?? Last year, Chef Adalberto Diaz helped raise thousands of dollars with a bake sale designed to support The Refugee and Immigrant Center for Education and Legal Services (RAICES) and families impacted by the border crisis. While the dilemma is far from over, Diaz and his team at Fillings and Emulsions (1475 S. Main, 385-2294228, fillingsandemulsions.com) are selling all manner of delicious baked goods to donate to RAICES and the Texas Civil Rights Project and assist families being separated at the southern border. Last year’s event was a huge success, and the bakery donated $30,000 to the cause. If you’re looking for a way to contribute to the border crisis and don’t mind getting something sweet in return, check out the bake sale at Fillings and Emulsions on Sunday, Aug. 18, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.


The World’s End

I enjoy the first half of Edgar Wright’s weirdo sci-fi end-ofworld fantasy when it’s a funny but surprisingly serious look at alcoholism and broken relationships. But as Wright’s movies are wont to do, The World’s End takes a left turn into the absurd (and in this case, absurdly stupid) and never returns. I’ve wondered what this movie would feel like if it didn’t take that android-filled bathroom break, but I’ve never wondered too much because who gives a shit? The first half is great, and you can salvage the second half by turning it into a drinking game: Chug each time one of the characters does, and by the time you get to the bathroom scene you’ll be having your stomach pumped at the local hospital and the dumb plot twist will be the last thing on your mind.

ORION PICTURES

Drinking Buddies

I’m no Joe Swanberg fan (in fact, some of his movies, such as Happy Christmas and Digging for Fire, I downright loathe), but Drinking Buddies isn’t just a great movie; I consider it one of the best movies ever made. This story of will-they-or-won’t-they friends and co-workers (Olivia Wilde and Jake Johnson) and their significant others accurately portrays the perils of keeping some friendships platonic and others … not. It doesn’t earn its happy ending, but it earns everything else, including my undying respect.

DE LAURENTIIS ENT. GROUP

A documentary about the personal problems of a bunch of asshole millionaire spoiled musicians? Who wants to watch that? For starters, me, over and over. After all, our problems, no matter what they are, are real to us, and directors Joe Berlinger and Bruce Sinofsky humanize the until-that-point larger-than-life band that looked like it had everything. In fact, in 2001 Metallica’s members hated each other and the band was on the verge of breaking up, their fragility fueled in large part by frontman James Hetfield’s descent into full-blown alcoholism. Only downside? Learning Metallica’s song “Sweet Amber” isn’t about beer, but moral trade-offs and betrayal. Best (unintentionally?) funny moment: Lead guitarist Kirk Hammett, after imploring Hetfield and drummer Lars Ulrich to stop sniping at each other, slapping his forehead when Ulrich tells Hetfield, “You’re just sitting here being a complete dick.”

Beerfest

Broken Lizard, the vampires of comedy groups—because they suck the fun from everything—made a movie about drinking games. Much like their other films, it’s laugh-free. (Super Troopers is held in high esteem by some people; those people are idiots.) I guess you could make a drinking game out of Beerfest, though. Each time a good actor appears on screen, clearly slumming it, chug a pint. Considering Nat Faxon, Will Forte, Mo’Nique, Jürgen Prochnow and Cloris Leachman act in this dog shit, you’ll do a faceplant by the one-hour mark.

Beer

Not to be confused with Beer: The Movie (no, really), this hohum satire of the advertising industry features a young and a not-young but then-little-known Rip Torn. Plus, Loretta Swit makes one of her few memorable non-Hot Lips Houlihan performances. The only reason I’m listing it here is because I’m hoping it will eventually end up on the “How Did This Get Made?” podcast. Unfortunately, there are considerably worse movies that will come before it.

Blue Velvet

You could argue David Lynch’s last linear screenplay (and first masterpiece) is about beer the same way Denis Villeneuve’s Enemy is about spiders, but you’d be missing the point. Lynch’s tale of justbeneath-the-surface suburban evil is a wild ride of sex, violence, abduction, but above all, PABST. BLUE. RIBBON! Plus, any movie that puts Dennis Hopper back on the map and treats Heineken with unironic affection must be great.

Metallica: Some Kind of Monster

WARNER BROS. PICTURES

Strange Brew

Few seem to remember Strange Brew, but we can probably blame that on blacking out, too. Anyway, what’s not to love about this tale of two moron Canadian brothers, Bob and Doug Mckenzie (Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas), trying to swindle free beer? Consider this: The villain is played by Max von Sydow (fucking Max von Sydow!); there’s a dog named Hosehead who flies like Superman; and significant chunks of the plot are lifted from Hamlet. (I’m not even kidding. The beer in it is called “Elsinore.”) Plus, Bob pees in a vat of beer and then drinks the whole thing. This movie is the best.

FOCUS FEATURES

MGM/UA ENTERTAINMENT CO.

What’s funnier than Prohibition-era movies about illegal breweries? Lots of things, but few of them star Buster Keaton and Jimmy Durante in pre-Code comedies. Buster and Jimmy get into all sorts of shenanigans when they mistakenly think Prohibition is over and start a brewery. Tragically ironic, possibly apocryphal anecdote: Keaton showed up drunk for filming most days because his personal life was in the toilet. Bonus: His character’s name is “Butts,” which frankly, always makes me laugh. Non-Durante fans would be best off avoiding this. People who mistake Jimmy Durante for Danny DeVito can go ahead and look.

IFC FILMS

What! No Beer?

Smokey and the Bandit

It’s less about beer (illegally hauling Coors across the country) and more about Burt Reynolds’ body hair, but for a Reynolds

SONY PICTURES

Y

ou know what they say about beer. You’re not buying, you’re renting. HA HA HA HA HA. GET IT? Look, I don’t know a lot of beer jokes. Or at least I don’t know a lot of beer jokes that are funny. Here’s what I know: Drink too much and the evening that begins innocently enough at The Other Room in Tribeca ends six weeks later with you in a rural Kansas motel room cooking heroin on a switchblade because you accidentally melted your spoon. So how about we leave the beer jokes for the movie peeps? I combed through my extensive drinking history—may it rest in peace—and between blackouts found some flicks that manage to make beer funny (and some that don’t).

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

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METRO GOLDWYN MAYER

BY DAVID RIEDEL

MAGNOLIA PICTURES

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nay, belch—beer!

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Frosty Flicks Here’s 10 movies that scream—

racing vehicle (ha), the first Smokey entry is the apex. No joke, it’s actually funny when it means to be! It’s not the cinematic equivalent of brain surgery, but it’s the best car-race movie of its era (a low bar, but still). Plus, it was nominated for an Oscar for best editing (also not a joke) but lost to Star Wars. With the it’s-not-shit exception of Sharky’s Machine, this is the last watchable movie Burt made before Boogie Nights, a spectacular 20-year dry spell unrivaled by anyone. (Even Stallone broke things up with Cliffhanger.)

Dazed and Confused and/or Superbad and/or Booksmart

Each of these movies is about the end of the school year (Superbad and Booksmart about graduating seniors, Dazed and Confused about incoming seniors hazing incoming frosh), and each has its share of super drunkenness. Two of them are also drug movies (Dazed and Confused and, to a degree, Booksmart), but as any good alcoholic will tell you, the alcohol is the gateway to everything else, man. Each of these movies is laugh-out-loud funny, whether oddly nostalgic (Dazed and Confused), kinda gross (Superbad) or surprisingly sweet (Booksmart). My suggestion: Plan a night in with a sixer and all three flicks. There are worse ways to spend a Saturday. CW Enjoy your IPAs, everyone! Save the hoppiest for me.


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MUSIC JOHNNYSONSECOND.COM FUNKIN’ FRIDAY

The headliners for Utah Beer Festival’s after-parties know how to bring the good times.

BAD BOY BRIAN

SPINNIN THE FRESHEST FRIDAY NIGHT JAMS

BY ERIN MOORE music@cityweekly.net @errrands_

WITH SPECIAL GUEST DJ EVERY FRIDAY NIGHT

W

ith the nights coming on sooner, and the days reaching the fever pitch of August heat, why not have a beer about it? At City Weekly’s own Utah Beer Festival, you can enjoy a vast selection of beers and local music. But if even that isn’t enough entertainment? Get a ticket for one of the festival’s after-parties, and cap your day off with the music of locals Royal Bliss on Saturday, Aug. 17, and Jagertown on Sunday, Aug. 18. As the sun sets over the desert, and your fine drinks settle warmly in your body, let these tried and true acts wind you back up.

Left to right: Royal Bliss’ Taylor Richards, Sean Hennesy, Neal Middleton and Jake Smith

Royal Bliss

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Utah State Fairpark 155 N. 1000 West Saturday, Aug. 17: Royal Bliss, 9:30-11 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 18: Jagertown, 8-9:30 p.m. $10 for each after-party show (not included with festival ticket); 21+ utahbeerfestival.com

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Both after-party nights at the festival feature bands who know what it means to sit back with some friends and drink a cold beer. Any country-loving Sunday festival-goers can get excited about the headliner of the night, Jagertown (yes, like the booze). Made up of members Preston Creed (who’s worked with the likes of Pink), seasoned fiddlest Liz Anderson, country-styled bassist Jesse Brooks, drummer Demitri “Meter” Mannos, and lead guitarist Scott Dixon—a man who has gotten around in the country world by touring with artists like Neal McCoy and Jo Dee Messina—Jagertown is possibly Utah’s premier country band. Since their first album, 2012’s Sleepin’ With My Boots On, they’ve released four other full-lengths, inserting themselves with ease into the modern country genre. Their fifth album, Blacktop, recorded by Grammy-nominated producer Matt McClure, has climbed the country charts with the single “Rearview,” the kind of forlorn, wrestling-with-love song that has always been at the heart of country. “Working with Matt really drew the best out of us,” frontman Creed says. “After that release, we had a chance to go back to Nashville and co-write with some hit writers. What we’ve got coming is going to take us further than we’ve even come to this point.” Creed credits the band’s fans for this growth, and for their longevity. “I think the fact that we’re pushing to take our brand of country on a national level is something that everyone here has really gotten behind and is a huge part of why we’ve had the success we’ve had so far. The ultimate goal is to put Utah on the map but for country music.” Come out to this show before Jagertown’s name is in every town in America; you can brag to your friends about it later. Find their tour dates and music at jagertown.com. CW

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Salt Lake locals Royal Bliss fit right in at an event where drinking and having a good time are the focus. They’ve long dealt in the kind of rock music that seeks a wily audience to rage along to their tortured-yet-defiant, tough-but-tender-guy music that picked up speed in the late ’90s and early aughts. The first track of their 2019 self-titled album, “Hard and Loud” starts with frontman Neil Middleton’s bold proclamation, alongside electrifying guitar riffs from guitarist Taylor Richards that almost step over into classic metal territory: “Whiskey/ Women/ Rock and Roll/ I like it hard/ loud/ out of control.” Active for more than 20 years, this classic rock vibe has been their bread and butter over that long stretch of time, throughout their albums, life and label changes. They began releasing music in 1998, and continued until the successful response to their 2006 album After the Chaos II garnered them a signing with Capitol Records, who assisted them in releasing their first major label album, Life In-Between in 2009. Fusing sounds of alt-rock, Southern rock, metal and post-grunge, the band has held true to their particular sound over the years, right up to their new self-titled 2019 release. “This album was made very casually,” Richards tells City Weekly. “We started actually jamming again in our little rehearsal space like the old days of being a band. Then once a few song ideas came of it we would go into the studio, and just crank out a song or two as we wrote them. After about a year, we released a good batch of them.” When asked how this summer has treated them, he says it’s been an easygoing summer of having fun and playing music. “But also, having a single back on the radio charts is pretty amazing, too,” he adds. “We hit the top 30 [on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock Songs chart] this week with our new single ‘Pain.’ First time in 10 years since we had a single crack the top 30.” Their devotion to their music hasn’t changed, nor has their status as proud Utahns. Not satisfied with being hometown heroes, they opened their own venue—fittingly named The Royal—a few years back, and the space has served as one of Salt Lake’s better spots for catching big acts since then. Make sure not to miss this storied band before they head out on a tour that includes dates with Hinder, and a cruise-ship stint with the one and only Kiss. Tour dates and music can be found at royalbliss.com

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Flying Lotus, Brandon Coleman Spacetalker, Salami Rose Joe Louis, PBDY

On July 23, 2012, Flying Lotus released “Between Friends” on Adult Swim’s Singles block, a normal move for him as a regular producer for Adult Swim’s iconic late-night bumps. The song featured Earl Sweatshirt and a previously-unheard-of rapper, Captain Murphy, who together created one of the best tracks of that year. A week later, a second Captain Murphy song appeared, and the internet sleuthing machine percolated. Is it Tyler? Earl slowed down? Rejjie Snow claimed the identity to snatch some celebrity. Of course we couldn’t rule out FlyLo himself as a suspect, but Captain Murphy also seemed unlikely to be just one person. Then November 2012 came, and the Duality mixtape hit. It was good—like really good, featuring Jeremiah Jae, Teebs, Samiyam, Lotus and more. Eventually, Captain Murphy decided to come out, at a live set in LA’s Low End Theory (RIP). At this show, FlyLo revealed “I am Captain Murphy,” an identity he took to avoid identity altogether. “I want to see if it’s any good first without any co-signs,” he told XXL in 2013. “I want to see if motherfuckers are really gravitating towards it.” Flying Lotus has rarely rapped since, mostly sticking to producing, but the Captain Murphy minisaga is evidence of his thoughtful place in this decade’s evolution of rap production. Since then, Flying Lotus has remained one of the most interesting producers to work with, as evidenced by his 2019 release Flamgra, which features collaborations with Solange, Little Dragon, David Lynch and more. It’s also a stage performance you don’t want to miss. (Parker S. Mortensen) Union Event Center, 235 N. 500 West, 8 p.m. $27.50-$30, all ages, theunioneventcenter.com

Courtney Barnett, Snail Mail, Choir Boy

This trifecta might just be the crown jewel of the 2019 Twilight Concert Series. Start with headliner Courtney Barnett, one of indie

Courtney Barnett

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rock’s sharpest purveyors of self-deprecation and, currently, heavy touring: In 2019 alone, she’s visited South America, Mexico, Eastern Europe, the U.K. and Asia, making her oneoff summer stop in Salt Lake City cause for celebration. Her ability to narrate daily minutiae with a deadpan lyrical delivery, while contrasting it with scorching guitar freak-outs, makes her something to witness. Her albums Sometimes I Sit and Think, And Sometimes I Just Sit (2015) and Tell Me How You Really Feel (2018) are bona fide voices of the millennial generation. “I like exploring the little things and putting a magnifying glass over them,” Barnett tells City Weekly. Opening is Snail Mail, hailing from the same spiritual and stylistic tree as Barnett. Frontwoman Lindsey Jordan might have just turned 20, and her debut full-length Lush might be less than a year old, but Jordan relates her ever-evolving tales of teenage indifference with a mournful worldliness that highlights the importance of mental health. Local openers Choir Boy double down on this focus, with frontman Adam Klopp flipping the insult he copped as a Cleveland teen playing punk with an angelic voice into a heartbreaking run of romantic releases like 2016’s Passive with Desire and 2017’s Sunday Light. After this hometown show, Choir Boy keeps up the star-studded itinerary, playing Denver, Phoenix, San Diego and Los Angeles with Snail Mail, before joining hybrid hardcore hellraisers Ceremony for a run of cross-country shows. (Nick McGregor) Gallivan Center, 239 S. Main, 6 p.m., $10 presale; $15 day of show; $50 VIP, all ages, twilightconcerts.com

Flying Lotus he underscores his reputation through an insurgent stance and an uncompromising attitude. He is, in every sense, an authentic outlaw, evidenced by the fact that he once described himself on his website as “like a stab wound in the fabric of country music in Nashville. See that bloodstain slowly spreading? That’s me.” The man doesn’t mince words. Then again, his influences say it all, given that he derives his sound from such iconic originals as Hank Williams, Hank Snow and Jimmie Rodgers. He’s established a style that’s best described as “countrypolitan”—a mix of roots, rockabilly and western swing. It’s retro-sounding for sure, but out of this world as well. And for good reason: A Hancock CD was once brought along on the space shuttle. As for Hancock himself, he puts in plenty of long-distance travel here on Earth—he once claimed that his van had racked up nearly half a million miles. “My mission was to make good music,” he told The Daily Times of Tennessee in 2018. “I never intended to make music for money. There’s nothing wrong with making money, but when that’s all you’re looking for, there’s something wrong with that. I believe in playing for the people, not for the money.” That’s a notion that we frugal folks can appreciate. (Lee Zimmerman) The Urban Lounge, 241 S. 500 East, 7 p.m., $18 presale; $20 day of show, 21+, theurbanloungeslc.com

Wayne Hancock

FRIDAY 8/16

Wayne “The Train” Hancock, Lean Canteen

They don’t call Wayne Hancock “The Train” for nothing. His affinity for Texas traditions has been an essential part of his musical mantra ever since he won his first performance competition at the age of 18. Now known as a champion of authentic juke-joint honkytonk,

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DRINK ON THE PATIO! TUESDAY 8/20

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard, Stonefield, ORB

SPIRITS . FOOD . LOCAL BEER 8.14 MYTHIC VALLEY

8.15 CHIP JENKINS

8.16 MEANDER CAT

8.17 SCOUNDRELS

It’s undeniable that rock music in the 2010s has stagnated somewhat in comparison to previous decades, but any music fan worth their salt can still name a handful of younger acts pumping fresh life into the genre. With each passing year, it’s increasingly evident that King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard is one of those acts. The Melbourne-based septet is one of the most prolific and ambitious creative forces in rock today, with each album veering off into wildly different styles and sounds while still retaining the band’s distinct brand of psychedelic quirkiness. From the fuzzedout garage punk of 12 Bar Bruise to the jazz fusion noodling of Quarters! to Flying Microtonal Banana’s dive into Middle-Eastern tuning systems, there doesn’t seem to be a single shade of rock music Stu Mackenzie and co. won’t enthusiastically absorb and bend to their will. In addition to averaging two full-length releases a year since 2012, the band has plenty else going on—their record label, Flightless Records, is quickly becoming one of Australia’s foremost indie labels, and they’ve been organizing their own Gizzfest music festival since 2015. King Giz is currently gearing up for their second release of 2019, an excursion into thrash metal and stoner rock called Infest the Rat’s Nest, as well as touring, which includes a stop here in Salt Lake City. Fellow Australians, the psych-rockers Stonefield, and ORB open. (Nic Renshaw) The Depot, 13 N. 400 West, 7 p.m., $25, 21+, depotslc.com

WEDNESDAY 8/21

Iron & Wine, Calexico, Orville Peck, 8.19 OPEN BLUES & MORE JAM

8.21 LORIN WALKER MADSEN

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Iron & Wine

King Gizzard and the Lizard Wizard

Sammy Brue

The paths of Iron & Wine and Calexico have crossed once before. In 2005, Sam Beam took the first tentative step toward expanding the hushed bedroom-folk palette of his Iron & Wine project with In the Reins, a seven-song album recorded with jazz-influenced Arizona desert-rock outfit Calexico. A decade-anda-half later, their collaboration leaves behind the dustbin of record-geek nostalgia for the here-and-now of big summer festivals, thanks to new album Years to Burn. Written collectively, Beam trades choruses with Calexico’s frontmen John Convertino and Joey Burns as the project builds to a cathartic climax. Take the harmonious verses on lead single “Father Mountain,” which deserves to be canonized as an American classic, or the soulful “What Heaven’s Left,” which indulges Beam’s evolving love of soul music. It’s as if these longtime musical friends are no longer just working together, but working as one. Opener Orville Peck, a Sub Pop Records labelmate, is equally intriguing, but a far more mysterious figure. Recently described by Billboard as “the masked gay crooner revitalizing classic country’s spirit,” Peck performs in leather face fringe and has assiduously kept his true identity under wraps. But as he relayed in that Billboard interview, “I don’t feel like I’m hiding behind a mask at all. It’s actually quite the opposite—the mask and all of that has allowed me to be a lot more exposed.” Peck’s debut full-length Pony mixes the nostalgic traditionalism of Roy Orbison and Chris Isaak with a kaleidoscopic view of American subculture a la Lavender Country and Roselit Bone, cult outsider acts from either end of alt-country’s generational spectrum. (NM) Ogden Amphitheater, 343 E. 25th St., 5 p.m., $10 presale; $15 day of show, all ages, ogdentwilight.com

PIPER FERGUSON

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WEDNESDAY 8/21

CONCERTS & CLUBS

JULIAN COUSINS

Denzel Curry, $uicideboy$, Shoreline Mafia, City Morgue, Germ, Night Lovell, Trash

THURSDAY 8/15 LIVE MUSIC

Changing Lanes Experience (Canyons Village) Chip Jenkins (Hog Wallow Pub) Christian Mills Band (Gracie’s) Courtney Barnett + Snail Mail + Choir Boy (Gallivan Center) see p. 42 The Cured + Arena (Metro Music Hall) Flying Lotus + Brandon Coleman Spacetalker + Salami Rose Joe Louis + PBDY (Union Event Center) see p. 42 Fur Foxen (Rye) Honky Blue Tonky (Dejoria Center) Ivouries + Villa Theatre Co. (Kilby Court) James Robin + Tal Haslam + Mia Hickens + Devin Knight (Velour) Jordan M. Young (Lighthouse Lounge) Marina Marqueza + June Pastel + Jazzy Olivo (Urban Lounge) Matthew Bashaw (Lake Effect) Reggae at the Royal (The Royal) Ryan Shupe & the RubberBand + Changing Lanes Experience (Canyons Village) Willie Waldman + Terry Saffold + Norton Wisdom + Brian Jordan + Andy Calder (Garage on Beck)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dueling Pianos (The Spur)

Denzel Curry, one of the best artists in hip-hop under 25 in the country right now, returns to Salt Lake City after playing just last year at The Complex—this time in support of hip-hop duo $uicideboy$, who are also accompanied by a stacked lineup of artists. Curry just released a new album Zuu back in May, a title which references his hometown of Carol City, Fla., a place where Curry experienced violence and tragedy, both of which he rises above. His work, including this album, is colored with lyrics and melodies that play to his deeper ambitions. So far, each project in his discography has been well-rounded, soulful and introspective, though Zuu is a bit more upbeat than his debut, Ta13oo. His new single, “Ricky,” might sound aggressive, but if you take away the booming production, he is really talking about people deftly—a concept that hip-hop could always use. In fact, Curry represents a movement of young rappers who respect the conventions that hip-hop purists hold so dear while still pushing the genre forward with fresh perspectives, new ears and a clearer vision of a future that they are charged to shape. Young-blooded artists like Curry are what keep hip-hop culture surviving and thriving, and fans and artists alike are better for it. Make sure to take the time to witness the future of hip-hop out in the desert air of Saltair. (Keith L. McDonald) Great Saltair, 12408 W. Saltair Drive, 6:30p.m., $39.95–$59.95, all ages, thesaltair.com

Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Dusty Grooves (Twist) Jazz Jam Session (Sugar House Coffee) Jazz On The Patio (Twist) Pitch Control Thursdays w/ DJ Victor Menegaux (Downstairs) Synthpop + Darkwave + Industrial + Goth w/ DJ Camille (Area 51) Therapy Thursdays feat. Space Yacht (Sky)

KARAOKE

Burly-Oke (Prohibition) Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ DJ Benji (A Bar Named Sue) Karaoke That Doesn’t Suck (Chakra Lounge) Live Band Karaoke (Club 90)

FRIDAY 8/16 LIVE MUSIC

Andrew Goldring & Bronco (The State Room) Attempted Moxie (The Yes Hell) The B-52s + OMD + Berlin (Red Butte Garden Amphitheater) Bill n’ Diane (Harp and Hound) Brothers Brimm (Lighthouse Lounge) Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) DAS Energi Festival (Great Saltair) Dirty Birdies (The Royal) Emby Alexander + Texture Guests (The Rad Shack)

Gabino Flores (Gallivan Center) Gone West feat. Colbie Caillat (Eccles Center Theater) Jake & The Heist (Kilby Court) L.O.L. (Club 90) Meander Cat (Hog Wallow Pub) Meat (Ice Haüs) Mozzy + ALLBLACK (The Complex) Nate Robinson (Snowbird) Phantogram + Bob Moses (Alleged) Railtown (Outlaw Saloon) Silent Disco (The Depot) SLC Busker Fest (Regent Street) Stompit + Honey Hounds (ABG’s) Swantourage + Robot Dream (Gracie’s) Teresa Eggertsen Cooke (Legends) The Vitals (Garage on Beck) Wayne Hancock + Lean Canteen (Urban Lounge) see p. 42 Year of The Dog (HandleBar) Zion Riot + DJ Liam (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

All-Request Gothic + Industrial + EBM + and Dark Wave w/ DJ Vision (Area 51) Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) DJ E-Flexx (Downstairs) DJ Sneeky Long (Twist) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Funkin’ Friday w/ DJ Rude Boy & Bad Boy Brian (Johnny’s on Second) Mi Cielo feat. Dirty Dave (Sky) New Wave ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51)

Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Club 48) Karaoke (Cheers to You SLC) Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge)

SATURDAY 8/17 LIVE MUSIC

Amy Obenski (Miner’s Plaza) Bluegrass Saturday Night (Gallivan Center) Book On Tape Worm + Shay Smith (Velour) Burlesque & The Beats (Prohibition) The Brightslide (Lighthouse Lounge) Brooke Mackintosh (Harp and Hound) Che Zuro (Snowbird) DAS Energi Festival (Great Saltair) Dr. Bob (PayDay Pad) Electric Moose Band + DJ Jskee (The Spur) Haley Kirkland & Company B (Holladay City Hall Park) Head Portals + Savage Daughters + Patio Fires + Foxtrot (Kilby Court) Honey Hands (Canyons Village) Ivie Brie (HandleBar) John Butler Trio + St. Paul & The Broken Bones (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater)

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AUGUST 15, 2019 | 47

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AUGUST 14

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sunday 8/18

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48 | AUGUST 15, 2019

T.F. BREWING

PARKER S. MORTENSEN

BAR FLY

Jordan Matthew Young (Garage on Beck) Katya & Moodlite (Miner’s Plaza) L.O.L. (Club 90) Manila Luzon (Metro Music Hall) Martian Cult + 90s TV + One-Eyed Girl (Urban Lounge) Matthew & The Hope (Johnny’s on Second) Railtown (Outlaw Saloon) Royal Bliss (Utah State Fairpark) see p. 41 Spazmatics (Liquid Joe’s) Young Professionals Salt Lake + DJ Chaseone2 (Gracie’s)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Dance Music (Chakra Lounge) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) DJ Brisk (Bourbon House) DJ Curtis Strange (The Yes Hell) DJ Karaoke (Club 90) DJ Latu (Green Pig) Gothic + Industrial + Dark ’80s w/ DJ Courtney (Area 51) Sky Saturdays w/ Jay R The Superstar (Sky) Top 40 + EDM + Alternative w/ DJ Twitch (Area 51)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Willie’s Lounge) Karaoke w/ B-Rad (Club 90) Karaoke (Club 48)

My night out to T.F. Brewing would be round two on a weekend where my introverted ass had already shot its wad for being out and social. As I parked around the back of the brewery and left my car, I grabbed my nose, thinking I smelled manure. But on second whiff the smell was actually pleasant, pungent and earthy. Walking around the back, I passed large windows into rooms full of brewing machinery. Like at many breweries, you can see all of it by design, through T.F.’s large windows, which delights me. My favorite part of any brewery’s bar is the simultaneously transparent and opaque glimpse into the guts of brewing. Enthusiasts probably look at these vats and appreciate the craft, but I suspect most are like me—unequipped to parse the knot of tanks and tubes as anything other than the factory floor aesthetic they lord over the bar. They remind me of a summer I worked graveyard shifts at Procter & Gamble, packaging toilet paper to be cut and sent to California. The aesthetic is alienating but one T.F. Brewing runs with: The interior is stately with a black-and-white cinderblock presentation. A row of unbranded, wooden draft spouts are bookended by shelves of glasses, backed by white marble. The bartender helps me choose a Northern Red Pale Ale, canned at 7.5%, and in my tired state I am happy to hear someone talk about beer intelligently, to feel comfort in the cadence of someone who knows what’s going on. (Parker S. Mortensen) 936 S. 300 West, 385-270-5972, tfbrewing.com

SUNDAY 8/18 LIVE MUSIC

Brooke Mackintosh (Deer Valley Grocery Cafe) Faster Pussycat & Bang Tango (The Royal) Gorgeous Gourds (Gracie’s) Hot Flash Heat Wave + Adult Prom + Dad Bod (Kilby Court) Jagertown (Utah State Fairpark) see p. 41 Lash LaRue (Billy Blanco’s) Steve Shuffert (Legends) Patrick Ryan (The Spur)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Live Bluegrass (Club 90)

KARAOKE

Karaoke (Cheers To You) Karaoke (Highlander) Karaoke (Tavernacle) Kerry O’ Kee (Piper Down Pub) Ultimate Karaoke (The Royal)

MONDAY 8/19 LIVE MUSIC

Amanda Johnson (The Spur) Elway + Ramona + Sam Russo + American Humor + The Hung Ups (The Loading Dock) Gary Hansen (Gallivan Center) Mal Blum + Housewarming Party (Kilby Court)

Steve Miller Band + Stuart and his Fabulous Superlatives (Red Butte Garden Amphitheater)

WEDNESDAY 8/21

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Big Brave + Deafkids & Due Trim (Diabolical Records) Burly University (Prohibition) Community Jam Session (Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater) Doc Young + Night On Broadway (Gallivan Center) Dressy Bessy + Potty Mouth + NSPS (Urban Lounge) Iron & Wine + Calexico + Orville Peck + Sammy Brue (Ogden Amphitheater) see p. 44 Melinda Kirgin-Voss + Brian Stucki + Jared Pierce (Gallivan Center) Mountain Country (Gracie’s) Nick Jordan + Jaehross + Rugio + Wiltavious + Cera Gibson (Kilby Court) Riley McDonald (The Spur) Shannon Runyon (Park City Library) $uicideboy$ + Denzel Curry + Shoreline Mafia + City Morgue + Germ + Night Lovell + Trash (Great Saltair) see p. 46 Talia Keys + Iron & Wine (The Yes Hell)

Monday Night Open Jazz Session w/ David Halliday & the JVQ (Gracie’s) Open Blues Jam (Green Pig) Open Mic (Outlaw Saloon)

TUESDAY 8/20 LIVE MUSIC

Daniel Torriente (The Spur) David Dondero (Rye) King Gizzard & The LIzard Wizzard + Stonefield + ORB (The Depot) see p. 44 Northlane & Era + Currents + Crystal Lake + Low Life (The Complex) Outersite & Zenith (Gallivan Center) Phoenix Jazz & Swing Band (Gallivan Center) Prince Daddy & The Hyena + Kississippi + Retirement Party (Kilby Court) Slashers + Sabbra + Barlow + Sunchaser (Metro Music Hall) 311 + Dirty Heads (Usana Amphitheatre)

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE

Groove Tuesdays (Johnny’s on Second) Open Jazz Jam (Bourbon House) Tuesday Night Bluegrass Jam w/ Pixie & The Partygrass Boys (Gracie’s)

LIVE MUSIC

DJ, OPEN MIC, SESSION, PIANO LOUNGE Dark NRG w/ DJ Nyx (Area 51) Dueling Pianos (Tavernacle) Energi Wednesdays feat. Wooli (Sky) Open Mic (Velour) Top 40 All-Request w/ DJ Wees (Area 51)


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AUGUST 15, 2019 | 49

KARAOKE!!!

MEAT’S 15 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW W/ BALANCE OF POWER

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Year of the Dog

Friday August 16th

THE GIANT

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KITCHENS OPEN UNTIL MIDNIGHT FULL VEGAN & OMNI MENUS • WEEKEND BRUNCH

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FILM REVIEW

Born in the UK

CINEMA

Blinded by the Light tries a tricky mix of crowd-pleasing and messy reality.

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

BY SCOTT RENSHAW scottr@cityweekly.net @scottrenshaw

W

Viveik Kalra in Blinded by the Light slowdown that costs Javed’s father his job, while we see Javed and his family facing the threat of violence from the country’s anti-immigrant neo-Nazi National Front. While Chadha rarely gets heavy-handed in linking the film’s 1980s setting to contemporary white nationalist movements around the world—though a rumble of rueful laughter rolled through a Sundance screening audience when Javed insists to his father that in America, “nobody cares where you come from”—it’s not always easy to connect a much more existential challenge for Javed to his personal and professional dreams. That edgier content provides a tonal challenge for a movie that ultimately wants to leave you cheering for Javed’s chance to follow his heart; we live in a time where it would seem almost insulting not to acknowledge the reality of anti-immigrant sentiment. But that’s the tricky thing about a crowd-pleaser: People like them largely for their ability to make reality disappear for a while, and imagine a world where underdogs win with a song in their heart. CW

BLINDED BY THE LIGHT

| CITY WEEKLY |

BB.5 Viveik Kalra Kulvinder Ghir Nell Williams PG-13

PAIRS WITH Bend It Like Beckham (2002) Parminder Nagra Keira Knightley PG-13

The Namesake (2006) Kal Penn Irrfan Khan PG-13

Crazy Rich Asians (2018) Constance Wu Henry Golding PG-13

AUGUST 15, 2019 | 51

Bhaji on the Beach (1993) Kim Vithana Sarita Khajuria R

| MUSIC | CINEMA | DINING | A&E | NEWS |

want to live their own lives. And for a while, it looks like Chadha and her husband/cowriter Paul Mayeda Berges are going to lean into that dynamic, including having Javed fall for a white girl named Eliza (Nell Williams). Ultimately, they opt to complicate things in ways that feel authentic, but not before making sure there are arguments where we can clearly be on Javed’s side, and at least one rousing applause moment. On top of that basic framework, you’ve got the conventions of a movie musical—heavy on the Springsteen tunes, so think of it as a juke-Boss musical—to provide even more giddy audience response. Chadha stages several scenes with the lyrics visible on the screen, emphasizing the impact they’re having on Javed with a stylish intensity. And a couple of songs turn into infectiously appealing all-out production numbers, including Javed wooing Eliza in a public marketplace to “Thunder Road,” and the kids blasting “Born to Run” over the school radio station. Blinded by the Light effectively conveys the way creative work can connect with people in unexpected ways, while still respecting that such connections can come in a variety of forms, like when Javed sees his younger sister joyously dancing to traditional Pakistani music. Blinded by the Light also wants to touch on politics, and the attempt to find the same populist energy in those sub-plots clangs uncomfortably against its simpler pleasures. The backdrop of Thatcher-era England manifests itself in the economic

| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

hat makes a crowd-pleaser? Sure, that’s a loaded question, akin to asking, “What makes something funny?”—a response as individual as there are human beings. Yet it’s clear that certain movies have in their DNA the desire to leave an audience smiling—and maybe even cheering—as the closing credits roll. That should feel like the noblest of goals in this broken world—simply offering satisfying entertainment on the way to a happy ending— but it’s also easy to over-complicate things. Blinded by the Light should be a crowd-pleasing slam-dunk, and for a whole lot of people it’s probably going to be just that. Yet, it also feels like it’s trying so hard to be a crowdpleaser that it’s not entirely sure what exactly the crowds are supposed to be pleased about. The story is set primarily in 1987 in the English industrial town of Luton, where Javed Khan (the charming Viveik Kalra) is heading into his final year of high school. A somewhat nerdy kid who feels isolated not just by his status as the child of first-generation Pakistani immigrants, but by his fondness for writing poetry, Javed finds an unexpected muse for his life challenges when a friend turns him onto the music of Bruce Springsteen. And despite the seeming disconnect between the lives of the American rock star and a minority kid in England, Javed is inspired to pursue dreams that run contrary to the wishes of his traditionminded father (Kulvinder Ghir). If the bare bones of that “rebellious teen takes on traditional parents” narrative strikes you as familiar, that’s because you’ve probably seen it many times before, including in 2002’s Bend It Like Beckham by Blinded co-writer/director Gurinder Chadha. Such tales often turn the conservative parent into the obvious villain, thwarting kids who just


| CITYWEEKLY.NET |

MOVIE TIMES AND LOCATIONS AT CITYWEEKLY.NET

NEW THIS WEEK Film release schedules are subject to change. Reviews online at cityweekly.net 47 METERS DOWN: UNCAGED [not yet reviewed] Young divers face a man-eating threat in an underwater cave system. Opens Aug. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13) THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2 B Why an Angry Birds 2? Because the first one made some money, and there’s built-in name recognition thanks to the popular mobile game. That’s the only reason. This time out, the Birds That Don’t Fly (except by catapult) join forces with the enemy green pigs from another remote island—seriously, don’t ask—to repel an assault by the eagles of yet another island none of them knew about before. This assault is led by Zeta (Leslie Jones), for no apparent reason other than a jilted romance that left her bitter. Just like a woman! Angry bird Red (Jason Sudeikis) will lead the attack, the entire purpose of which is, apparently, to prove that he should have, in fact, left all leadership duties to smart, capable Silver (Rachel Bloom). But never fear! Male-coded animated characters remain resolutely at the center of this faux-woke narrative, which wants to have its male protagonist and its nods to feminism at the same time. Speedy bird Chuck (Josh Gad), even gets to police his sister Silver’s romantic access to Red. Hoo-freakin’-ray. Opens Aug. 14 at theaters valleywide. (PG)—MaryAnn Johanson BLINDED BY THE LIGHT BB.5 See review on p. 51. Opens Aug. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

GOOD BOYS BBB A decade-plus after the distasteful celebration of toxic male teenhood that was Superbad, here’s a Seth Rogen-driven movie (he’s a producer) that’s supergood—an unexpectedly sweet, surprisingly edge-of-innocence celebration of modern ascendant malehood. (Rogen’s recent wokeness seems genuine. Folks can learn!) Three sixth-grade boys (Jacob Tremblay, Keith L. Williams and Brady Noon) spend a day ditching school to vie against older teen girls (Midori Francis and Molly Gordon)—whom, thankfully, they are not middle-school-romantically interested in—in a plot involving drones, the mildest sort of party drugs and making their way toward a grade-school “kissing party.” Mostly it’s about worrying that, at the tender age of 11, one might become a “social piranha,” about securing consent to engage in any physical contact with another kid, and about ensuring that nothing one is doing constitutes bullying. These kids today, with their concrete physical and psychological boundaries! “We’re not kids, we’re tweens!” they declare, staking a claim on a developmental boundary that we adults never even realized existed. Opens Aug. 16 at theaters valleywide. (R)—MAJ HONEYLAND BBB.5 Hatidze is the only female beekeeper in Europe (specifically, Macedonia), and honey supply outstrips demand. Plus, she looks after her invalid mother. The abandoned town they live in has no electricity or running water, so when itinerant Hussein and his large family arrive, Hatidze is keen to welcome them and give them the inside dope on survival. Hussein, unfortunately, is something of a bastard: After Hatidze shows him how to keep bees and harvest honey, he does everything in his power to screw her out of her living. Of course, things aren’t so simple; the word “destitute” falls well short in describing Hatidze’s and Hussein’s living situations, so perhaps it’s unfair to call him a bastard because he has to provide for his family (though they all clearly hate him). Directors Ljubomir Stefanov and Tamara Kotevska make him sympathetic even as you want to strangle him—or at least be stung repeatedly. But this is Hatidze’s story, a fascinating document of a tough, resilient woman. Her ultimate reaction to Hussein’s

underhanded behavior is priceless, just like Honeyland. Opens Aug. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (NR)—David Riedel

MULTIPLE MANIACS At Tower Theater, Aug. 16-17, 11 p.m. & Aug. 18, noon. (R)

MIKE WALLACE IS HERE BBB.5 Avi Belkin’s documentary about the legendary TV newsman takes an approach that easily could have come off as forced, but instead makes for a terrifically entertaining profile. He frames the narrative almost entirely through interviews—not just Wallace’s own infamously probing interrogations of political figures and celebrities, but occasions when Wallace himself (who died in 2012) was in the hot seat, fielding questions from fellow journalists. The result is revealing, as we often see Wallace dodging the same tough queries he’d put to his own subjects, which makes it even more surprising when he does let his guard down about personal struggles, like his failures as a parent or his experience with depression. Mostly, it’s a revealing look at a man always trying to prove himself as a legit journalist after an early career doing commercials, and whose legacy is a complex mix of hardhitting investigation and turning journalism into dramatic theater. If he remains a bit enigmatic, it’s only because he never stopped being better at asking questions than answering them. Opens Aug. 16 at Broadway Centre Cinemas. (PG-13)—Scott Renshaw

CURRENT RELEASES

ODE TO JOY BB.5 I’m not sure my first choice for adapting an NPR story about a rare neurological disorder would be turning it into a romantic comedy, but the result is at least moderately effective. Martin Freeman plays Charlie, a man whose condition, called cataplexy, short-circuits his brain and renders him unconscious when he feels strong emotions—including joy. As a result, he’s purposefully organized a bland, tame life for himself—which is complicated when he meets and falls for the effervescent Francesca (Morena Baccarin). An odd romantic square forms when Francesca instead begins dating Charlie’s brother, Cooper, (Jake Lacy), while Charlie hooks up with a more low-key woman (Melissa Rauch, by far the movie’s MVP), and there’s some solid material as director Jason Winer juxtaposes Charlie’s sedate dates with those of his rambunctious bro. It all just feels more built on the quirkiness of the condition rather than its profound impact, despite the best intention of the performances; if it’s supposed to seem tragic that Charlie needs to avoid babies and cute puppies, here it plays strictly as a punch line. Opens Aug. 16 at Megaplex Jordan Commons. (R)—SR WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE [not yet reviewed] Opens Aug. 16 at theaters valleywide. (PG-13)

SPECIAL SCREENINGS AND WITH HIM CAME THE WEST At Main Library, Aug. 20, 7 p.m. (NR) MOONLIGHT SONATA: DEAFNESS IN THREE MOVEMENTS At Rose Wagner Center, Aug. 21, 7 p.m. (NR)

52 | AUGUST 15, 2019

DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD BB This live-action adaptation of the kiddie cartoon is ... fine. Raiders of the Lost Ark lite, for kids? Nothing wrong with that. But it takes Lost City a solid 35 minutes to get there, first indulging in a pointless detour with the teenaged Dora (Isabela Moner) forced to attend high school in Los Angeles, where she doesn’t fit in at all. Then it’s back to her South American jungle home to rescue her explorer parents (Michael Peña and Eva Longoria) from treasurehunter kidnappers bent on finding a fabled lost Incan city. Even once Lost City settles into itself, it’s still poop and fart jokes and kiddie-style slapstick that drives grownup viewers to distraction, though kids might not notice or care. This live-action Dora remains a great role model for girls and boys alike, but her movie should better. (PG)—MAJ

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW BB.5 Two supporting tough guys from the Fast & Furious franchise get a blithe spinoff that keeps with the F&F aesthetic by disregarding the laws of physics and ultimately declaring itself to be about “family.” The CIA recruits government agent Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and British ex-spy Shaw (Jason Statham) to work together—though they ostensibly hate each other—along with Shaw’s siter/rogue MI6 agent (Vanessa Kirby) to stop a deadly virus from falling into the hands of a semi-bionic bad guy (Idris Elba). Shaw used to be a villain, but all is forgiven now, I guess. He and Hobbs squabble amusingly, and director David Leitch carries off wellchoreographed fight sequences and chases. But everything in between, especially Hobbs’ tacked-on family issues, is tedious, and it overstays its welcome by a good 30 minutes. Like I said, it’s a Fast & Furious movie. (PG-13)—Eric D. Snider

THE KITCHEN BB The 2014-15 graphic-novel series becomes writer-director Andrea Berloff’s story of three wives of late-1970s Irish mobsters in Hell’s Kitchen—Kathy (Melissa McCarthy), Ruby (Tiffany Haddish) and Claire (Elisabeth Moss)—who decide to run the operation themselves. There’s certainly a kick of energy in watching the previously put-upon trio take charge, though the moments of you-go-girl sentiment are rarely subtle. But none of the three leads feel particularly like ideal casting choices, resulting in a narrative that often just barely escapes the most obvious gangster clichés. More frustrating still, there’s rarely a chance for the key character beats or narrative arcs to breathe in the rush from one key plot point to another. Instead of a stand-alone feature, this feels more like a breathlessly-paced pilot for a series—one that might have had a chance to pack more of a wallop. (R)—SR

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Moray eels have two sets of jaws. The front set does their chewing. The second set, normally located behind the first, can be launched forward to snag prey they want to eat. In invoking this aggressive strategy to serve as a metaphor for you in the coming weeks, I want to suggest that you be very dynamic and enterprising as you go after what you want and need. Don’t be rude and invasive, of course, but consider the possibility of being audacious and zealous.

with astrological omens, I’m authorizing you to say something similar to anyone who is interested in you but would benefit from gazing more deeply into your soul and entering into a more profound relationship with your mysteries. In other words, you have cosmic permission to be more forthcoming in showing people your beauty and value. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In his Anti-Memoirs, author André Malraux quotes a toughminded priest who served in the French Resistance during World War II. He spent his adult life hearing his parishioners’ confessions. “The fundamental fact is that there’s no such thing as a grown-up person,” the priest declared. Even if that’s mostly true, Pisces, my sense is that it is less true about you right now than it has ever been. In the past months, you have been doing good work to become more of a fully realized version of yourself. I expect that the deepening and maturation process is reaching a culmination. Don’t underestimate your success! Celebrate it!

1. Balkan native 2. Voice of the Apple Watch 3. Highlighter color 4. Vehicle with caterpillar treads 5. World Cup skiing champ Lindsey 6. Leave out 7. "Video Games" singer Del Rey 8. Hypnotic state 9. Outfielder's cry 10. "Frankenstein" and "Dracula," for two 11. Protected while sailing

54. Reed section member 55. Golfer's front or back 56. "We should totally do that!" 57. "Manhattan Beach" author Jennifer 58. Baseball Hall of Famer Early 59. Mexican Mrs.

Last week’s answers

AUGUST 15, 2019 | 53

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Look into my eyes. Kiss me, and you will see how important I am.” Poet Sylvia Plath wrote that, and now, in accordance

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Today the city of Timbuktu in Mali is poor and in the throes of desertification. But from the 14th to 17th centuries, it was one of the great cultural centers of the world. Its libraries filled up with thousands of influential books, which remained intact until fairly recently. In 2012, al-Qaida jihadists conceived a plan to destroy the vast trove of learning and scholarship. One man foiled them. Abba al-Hadi, an illiterate guard who had worked at one of the libraries, smuggled out many of the books in empty rice sacks. By the time the jihadists started burning, most of the treasure had been relocated. I don’t think the problem in your sphere is anywhere near as dire as this, Cancerian. But I do hope you will be proactive about saving and preserving valuable resources before they’re at risk of being diluted, compromised or neglected.

DOWN

12. Florida's ____ Beach 13. Company that once owned Capitol and Virgin Records 21. "Dónde ___ los Ladrones?" (1998 platinum album by Shakira) 22. 24 horas 25. Deceive 26. "True Detective" and "True Blood" airer 27. "Charlotte's Web" author's monogram 28. ____ ball soup 29. It measures less than 90º 30. He married Kim 31. Baseball Hall of Famer Slaughter 32. Tweeter's "Then again ..." 37. Carpool lane initials 38. Poetic "before" 39. Smartly dressed 42. A book collector might seek a first one 46. Available 47. "Rocks" 48. "Stop bugging me!" 49. Raise 52. Start of Popeye's credo 53. "Punky Brewster" star Soleil Moon ____

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CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “For though we often need to be restored to the small, concrete, limited, and certain, we as often need to be reminded of the large, vague, unlimited, unknown.” Poet A. R. Ammons formulated that shiny burst of wisdom, and now I’m passing it on to you. As I think you know, you tend to have more skill at and a greater inclination toward the small, concrete, limited and certain. That’s why, in my opinion, it’s rejuvenating for you to periodically exult in and explore what’s large, vague, unlimited, unknown. Now is one of those times.

1. XXX-XX-XXXX nos. 5. V, in physics 9. Words on some blood drive stickers 14. Tax ____ 15. Ilhan ____, one of the first two Muslim women elected to Congress 16. Figure in Jewish folklore 17. Suffix with buck 18. Ship of 1492 19. '90s "SNL" regular Cheri 20. Tale of an impressionist painter's experience with #15 of 26? 23. "____ queen!" (slangy affirmative) 24. High fever for Caesar? 25. Allow #13 of 26 to have some dessert? 32. Vinegar's partner 33. "Take a Chance on Me" group 34. Glance over 35. ____ Aviv 36. Statement when it's #14 of 26's turn? 40. Numero ____ 41. Siouan people 43. First name in Harlem Renaissance literature 44. TV's Burrell and Pennington 45. Expression of one's adoration for #5 of 26? 50. Ancient speakers of Quechua 51. Madre's hermana 52. Duplicitous comment from someone cheating on #25 of 26? 59. Turkey neighbor 60. Off-Broadway award 61. Like French toast 62. Fabric name since 1924 63. Times New Roman, e.g. 64. ____ Bator, Mongolia 65. Tweak, as text 66. Withdrawal annoyances 67. ____ & Teller

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VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): It’s relatively rare, but now and then people receive money or gifts from donors they don’t know. Relatives they’ve never met might bequeath them diamond tiaras or alpaca farms or bundles of cash. I don’t think that’s exactly what will occur for you in the coming weeks, but I do suspect that you’ll garner blessings or help from unexpected sources. To help ensure the best possible versions of these acts of grace, I suggest that you be as generous as possible in the kindness and attention you offer. Remember this verse from the Bible: “Do not forget to show hospitality to strangers, for by so doing some people have shown hospitality to ARIES (March 21-April 19): How did sound technicians create the signature roar of the ficangels without knowing it.” tional monster Godzilla? They slathered pine-tar resin on a leather glove and stroked it against the strings of a double bass. How LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libra-born Ronald McNair was an African American who grew about the famous howl of the fictional character Tarzan? Sonic up in a racist town in South Carolina in the 1950s. The big- artists blended a hyena’s screech played backward, a dog’s growl, otry cramped his freedom, but he rebelled. When he was 9 years a soprano singer’s fluttered intonation slowed down and an actor’s old, he refused to leave a segregated library, which prompted yell. Karen O, lead singer of the band Yeah Yeah Yeahs, periodiauthorities to summon the police. Years later, McNair earned cally unleashes very long screams that might make the hair stand a Ph.D. in physics from MIT and became renowned for his up on the back of her listeners’ necks. In accordance with astroresearch on laser physics. Eventually, NASA chose him to be logical omens, I’d love to see you experiment with creating your an astronaut from a pool of 10,000 candidates. That library in own personal Yowl or Laugh or Whisper of Power in the coming South Carolina? It’s now named after him. I suspect that you, weeks: a unique sound that would boost your wild confidence and too, will soon receive some vindication, Libra: a reward or bless- help give you full access to your primal lust for life. ing or consecration that will reconfigure your past. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “If your dreams do not scare you, they are not big enough,” said SCORPIO (Oct. 3-Nov. 21): Scorpio author Zadie Smith wrote, “In the end, your past is not Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, ex-President of Liberia. In accordance with my past and your truth is not my truth and your solution—is not astrological imperatives, I propose that we make that your watchmy solution.” I think it will be perfectly fine if sometime soon word for the foreseeable future. From what I can tell, you’re due you speak those words to a person you care about. In delivering to upgrade your long-term goals. You have the courage and vision such a message, you won’t be angry or dismissive. Rather, you necessary to dare yourself toward an even more fulfilling destiny will be establishing good boundaries between you and your than you’ve been willing or ready to imagine up until now. ally; you will be acknowledging the fact that the two of you are different people with different approaches to life. And I bet that GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How did our ancestors ever figure out that the calendula flower will ultimately make you closer. can be used as healing medicine for irritated and inflamed skin? It must have been a very long process of trial and error. (Or did SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Nothing fruitful ever comes when plants are forced to flower in the plant somehow “communicate” to indigenous herbalists, the wrong season,” wrote author and activist Bette Lord. That’s informing them of its use?) In any case, this curative herb is only not entirely true. For example, skilled and meticulous gardeners one of hundreds of plants that people somehow came to adjudge can compel tulip and hyacinth bulbs to flower before they would as having healing properties. “Miraculous” is not too strong a naturally be able to. But as a metaphor, Lord’s insight is largely word to describe such discoveries. According to my analysis of accurate. And I think you’ll be wise to keep it in mind during the the astrological omens, Gemini, you now have the patience and coming weeks. So my advice is: don’t try to make people and pro- perspicacity to engage in a comparable process: to find useful cesses ripen before they are ready. But here’s a caveat: you might resources through experiment and close observation—with a hardy assist from your intuition. have modest success working to render them a bit more ready.

ACROSS

No math is involved. The grid has numbers, but nothing has to add up to anything else. Solve the puzzle with reasoning and logic. Solving time is typically 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your skill and experience.

Go to realastrology.com for Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. Audio horoscopes also available by phone at 877-873-4888 or 900-950-7700.

THEE

BY DAVID LEVINSON WILK

Complete the grid so that each row, column, diagonal and 3x3 square contain all of the numbers 1 to 9.

B R E Z S N Y

© 2017

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54 | AUGUST 15, 2019

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The news lately, grim as it’s been, has a few positive notes. The new Geraldine E. King Women’s Resource Center is opening soon, followed by the new men’s resource center and a coed shelter. The opening dates are in question due to delays in construction and lack of funds, to wit: the South Salt Lake men’s resource center at 3380 S. 1000 West is facing a possible state takeover. South Salt Lake has drawn a line in the sand and won’t give permits to the new shelter if clients show up without a referral; if background checks aren’t done by police; and if shelter stays aren’t limited to a maximum of 90 days. Despite all the squabbling, two other MediaBids_190103_24.indd 1 12/28/2018 5:15:20 shelters are working just fine (and quietly) in Salt Lake City and South Salt Lake. You don’t hear much about them because, frankly, they’re run so well. The Center for Women & Children, run by the Volunteers of America in Murray, is a small shelter helping women who need to complete the detoxification process, while taking care of their children, and moving toward self-sufficiency. They are desperate for individuals or groups to help provide any meal there, seven days a week, three times a day. Hell, you can order pizza for lunch and the 30 or so women and kids would be delighted to THIS WEEK’S FEATURED not eat the usual food bank fare. Go to voPARTLOW RENTALS: aut.org for more info. The VOA also runs the Youth Resource Center for homeless youth at 888 S. 400 West. Again, you never hear about this shelter because the staff and volunteers do a kick-ass job feeding the kids, getting them showers, clothes and menTAYLORSVILLE DOWNTOWN tors. They need volunteers and are always Darling Duplex! 2 bdrm. 1 bath, looking for donations of new or gently used Delightful 1 bdrm Vintage Charmer! central A/C, custom tilework, clothes for kids and young adults 15-22 Hardwood floors, on-site laundry, next hook-ups, multi-level decks & to TRAX, window A/C! $845 outdoor living areas! PRICE DROP! years old. $900/$1295 Finally, there’s The Inn Between. Salt Lake’s charity is boundless. Imagine if you’re dying from cancer and you’re living on the streets. This shelter enables you to have a room, food and love. It’s helping end the tragic history of vulnerable people dying on HOLLADAY DOWNTOWN our streets. Personally, I think the staff and volunteers there all need to be nominated Charming 2 bdrm Single family Dreamy 1+ bdrm w/ A/C! On-site for sainthood, but some cranky-ass neighhome! Hardwood floors, central air, laundry, covered parking, hardwood bors went all NIMBY when the shelter moved washer dryer include, garage! $1595 floors, stinkin’ cute! $945 to a formerly licensed nursing home facility just west of 1300 East on 1300 South. They complained that drug dealers and other undesirables were hanging around the facility. It makes anyone who’s been to The Inn Between laugh, because many clients can barely walk out of their rooms to get food. HIGHLAND PARK The rest of the neighbors had hundreds of Perfect 1 bdrm. duplex! Central Air! signs made that said, “The Inn Between Is Washer/Dryer included, shared patio & yard, eclectic detail work! $995 Welcome!” as a response to those raising a ruckus, and the hospice goes on, quietly doVIEW OUR RENTALS ONLINE AT ing its good deeds.  n

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Least Competent Criminals If you’re trying to smuggle a half-kilo of cocaine through airport security, you might want to try harder than an unnamed middleaged man from Colombia, who was detained in late June at Barcelona-El Prat airport in Spain, according to Spanish police. The man arrived at the airport on a flight from Bogota and seemed nervous—and no wonder, what with a comically “oversized toupee” under his hat, Reuters reported. Spanish police searched him and found a bundle of cocaine, worth about $34,000, taped to his head.

WEIRD

Precocious Four Australian kids took running away from home to a new level on July 13 when they wrote a goodbye note and absconded with cash, fishing gear and an SUV belonging to one of their parents. The three boys and one girl, aged 10 to 14, left Rockhampton in Queensland and headed south to Grafton, a trip of more than 600 miles. Along the way, they twice bought gas without paying and survived a short police chase in New South Wales, which was terminated by the highway patrol “due to age of the driver and road conditions,” acting police inspector Darren Williams told Fox News. Around 10:30 p.m. on July 14, police finally caught up with the kids, who locked the doors and refused to exit the car. An officer broke a window with a baton to gain entry. The young thieves will be charged, but they couldn’t be questioned until their parents showed up.

n  When Flagler County (Florida) Sheriff’s officers pulled over Derick McKay, 36, for speeding on July 11, they noticed he seemed ... uncomfortable, and although the deputies smelled marijuana, he denied having anything illegal. But when McKay got to the police station (having been arrested for driving on a suspended license), he admitted that he did have some narcotics

Techno-Weird The New York Post reported on July 14 that more than 4,000 Swedes have willingly had microchips implanted in their hands to replace credit cards and cash. The chips also help people monitor their health and can be programmed to allow access into buildings. Jowan Osterlund, a former body piercer who pioneered the chips, says the technology is safe. But British scientist Ben Libberton, based in Sweden, said he worries that people aren’t considering the potential dangers, including the unwitting dissemination of data about a person. “Do I get a letter from my insurance company saying premiums are going up before I know I’m ill?” he wondered.

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Bright Idea Rapper, sports agent and self-proclaimed “Mr. Alabama” Kelvin James Dark, 37, of Talladega, Ala., was arrested in Atlanta, Ga., on July 10 after allegedly throwing multiple kilograms of suspected methamphetamine off a high-rise balcony onto a street below. In a news release titled “It’s Raining Meth,” the Georgia Bureau of Investigation said its agents were searching the property as part of a smuggling investigation when the drugs went overboard. Agents were able to recover the drugs, valued at an estimated $250,000, and also found two semi-automatic rifles, a handgun, marijuana valued at $60,000 and a “substantial” amount of cash, al.com reported. Dark and 33-year-old Tiffany Peterson of Atlanta were arrested for trafficking meth and marijuana, among other charges. Really, If You’re Going to Get Drunk, Just Stay Home Roger Bridenolph, 49, of Springdale, Ark., was arrested on July 15 after a puzzling series of events. First, Bridenolph verbally assaulted a cashier at a Dollar Tree store, then stole a box of OreIda Bagel Bites, pushing a manager out of the way to get out of the store, according to an arrest report. When the manager followed him, KFSM reported, Bridenolph hit him in the head with the box of frozen snacks. Taking his show on the road, Bridenolph headed next door to a Wendy’s restaurant, where he slapped a woman. When police arrived, they struggled to handcuff Bridenolph, but ultimately arrested him for robbery, second-degree assault, resisting arrest, public intoxication and disorderly conduct. Ewwwww This summer’s “who’s pooping in the pool?” mystery is taking place in the Buckingham Woods neighborhood pool in Macomb Township near Detroit. The serial offender has caused the pool to close several times, and the neighborhood association is taking action—and taking names. “We are reviewing attendance logs and recorded video,” a July 12 statement read, according to the Detroit Free Press. And the Macomb County Health Department is working with the pool to keep the water free of pathogens such as E. coli. Further, the association has hired a pool attendant to be on-site through the end of summer. (Update: On July 18, the association announced the offending swimmer had been identified and banned, saying it is now “looking at the various options for restitution.”) Send tips to weirdnewstips@amuniversal.com

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Crime Report Police in Seguin, Texas, arrested Delissa Navonne Crayton, 47, on July 10 in her home after finding her mother’s skeletal remains lying on the floor in one of the home’s bedrooms, CNN reported. Investigators believe that Jacqueline Louise Crayton died in 2016 a few days after falling in her room and hitting her head. She would have been about 71 years old at the time of the fall, and officials charge her daughter did not “provide adequate assistance,” resulting in the woman’s death. The younger Crayton and her daughter, who at the time was under 15 years old, lived in other rooms of the house for about three years while the mother’s body deteriorated. Crayton was charged with “injury to a child under 15 through recklessly, by omission, causing a serious mental deficiency, impairment or injury.” Seguin police and Texas Rangers expect other charges to be filed.

Creepy Creepers Creeping People Out Women—and men—in Claverham, Somerset, England, are watching their backs as they walk at night, thanks to a man wearing a rubbery “gimp suit” who has been approaching and chasing people, according to the BBC. On July 11, an unnamed woman in her 20s was “walking along with my torch and looked up to see someone charging at me in a full black rubbery suit,” she told the news service. “He kept coming toward me and was touching his groin, grunting and breathing heavy.” She pushed and screamed at the man, who turned and ran in the other direction. Avon and Somerset police have increased patrols in the area in order to identify the man responsible.

DIRT HIPPIES!

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n  In southwest London, as an unidentified man sunbathed in his backyard on June 30, he was startled by the body of another man that apparently fell from an airplane, landing just three feet away in his garden. Police believe the body was that of a stowaway on a Kenya Airways flight, who fell out as the plane lowered its wheels on the approach to Heathrow Airport, some 10 miles away. The resident “didn’t even realize what it was to begin with. He was asleep and then there was a huge impact,” a neighbor told Reuters. A Kenya Airways spokesperson said the 4,250-mile flight from Nairobi takes about nine hours, and upon arrival at Heathrow, workers found a bag, water and food in the plane’s landing gear compartment. The stowaway has not been identified.

hidden between his buttocks. Indeed, Fox 43 reported, McKay produced more than a dozen small baggies, including: a baggie of crack, eight baggies of heroin, two baggies of Molly, a baggie of marijuana, 12 Lortab pills and 12 Oxycodone pills.

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The Not-So-Friendly Skies A Delta Airlines flight from Puerto Rico to New York was forced to return to San Juan on July 3 after Carlos Ramirez, 30, “became unruly,” Reuters reported. “I am God!” Ramirez shouted, according to Puerto Rican police. “San Juan is going to disappear tomorrow. I came to save the world, and I am going to end terrorism.” Flight attendants and passengers restrained the man until the plane could land, then Puerto Rico police took him into custody. The cockpit remained secure during the fracas.

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The Beer Issue Beer As Art