CityScope® magazine Southern Gentleman

Page 1

$5.95

SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN® featuring Sport & Outdoors Food & Spirits Lifestyle & Attire


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Publisher's Letter “In the South, hospitality is about opening our homes the same way we open our hearts.” - Unknown

In a world that never sleeps, it takes intention to focus on what matters the most. In the South, that seems to come more naturally. The days reinforce a true appreciation for who we are and what we have. Family and good friends are close, and together we embrace a sense of community. We believe in kindness and faith, love for our country, and God-given natural wonders. And, we believe in others. In our fourth issue of CityScope® magazine Southern Gentleman®, we showcase the stories behind the place we call home, told through the lifestyles of Southern men. Highlighting time-honored traditions that make the South truly unique, Southern Gentleman® elegantly presents topics that local men enjoy with their spouses, partners, family, and friends. With stunning photography, we share the experiences of local gentlemen in the great outdoors. Covering land, water, and the blue skies above, we explore life on a local farm, the pastime of bird watching, and the art of flytying. With friendships and family front and center, we venture into camping and why some couples believe it helps them connect to nature and each other. It’s a similar story behind the locals who pilot their own planes. As “Man’s Best Friend” continues to be a favorite feature, you will also enjoy stories from the “Glory Days,” as men share their memories of winning, being on a team, and coaches that shaped their lives. “Musical Men” shines

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light on the melodic journey of many locals as well. Among the most applauded and valued characteristics of the South is the true gentleman – a man who is guided by principles and personal convictions. Hear firsthand from local community leaders about how their past experiences and influences have defined and shaped them into the gentlemen they are today. The South has class, and with glamorous photography, we present the finest fashions and accessories for men, provided by local clothiers. Of course, in the South, we are most known for our generosity when it comes to good food and drink. To capture some of these varied tastes, we feature “Behind the Brew,” where art meets science in the growing local craft beer scene. Combined with the best local bacon recipes and “Making It with Mezcal,” you will be inspired to try new flavors unique to our city. And afterward, we hope that amidst the many worries and concerns that we may often feel today, you will enjoy this beautiful publication and the celebration of our rich traditions and culture and the place we all call home.

George Mullinix, Publisher P.S. Follow CityScope® and HealthScope® magazines and the Chattanooga Resource & Relocation Guide® on Facebook and Instagram!


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Contents

Sport & Outdoors 20

32

42

54

66

78

90 10

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In Full Flight Flying High with Local Pilots

A Tradition Worth Sharing The History of Bendabout Farm & the Growth of Polo

Couples Who Camp Growing Closer in the Great Outdoors

Waiting in the Wings Bird Watching in the Scenic City

Man’s Best Friend Local Hunters & Loyal Companions

Glory Days Area Athletes Share How Sports Shaped Their Lives

Life on the Farm Family, Community, & Embracing a Lifestyle


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Contents Lifestyle 100

The Making of a Gentleman

Guiding Values Discussed by Local Gentlemen

112

Musical Men

Local Musicians & Their Instruments

122

Hosts with the Most The Art of Entertaining

130 Southern

Style Homes

Homes & Properties That Embrace Southern Lifestyles

Style 142

Jacket & Tie

Local Clothiers Spotlight This Beloved Menswear Staple

154

Elevated Essentials

Sophisticated Accessories from Local Retailers

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Contents

Food & Spirits 164

Behind the Brew

Area Brewers Talk Chattanooga’s Growing Craft Beer Scene

174

Any Way You Slice It

184

Locals Share Prized Bacon Recipes

Making It with Mezcal The Rise of This Mexican Libation

Destinations 187 See You on the Slopes A Guide to the Southeast’s Top Ski Destinations

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SOUTH ERN GENTLEMAN ® Vo l u m e 2 7 • I s s u e 5 • 2 0 2 0

Raising the Bar

64

Tackle Box Takeover

Top Flies for Chattanooga’s

Fly Fishing Fanatics

Your Cocktail Creations

152

Dapper Details

182

Camping Cookware

172

Learn This Subtly

Stylish Necktie Knot

160

Ask the Gentleman

Top Tools to Customize

Prepare a Chef-Worthy Meal in the Great Outdoors

Etiquette & Style for the Modern Gent

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On the Cover: Sharply styled in a jacket and tie, Dallas Joseph enjoys a drink at The Dwell Hotel’s Matilda Midnight. For more takes on the classic “Jacket & Tie” pairing, see page 142. PHOTO BY LANEWOOD STUDIO

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Cailey Mullinix Easterly

Sales & Business Development

Katie Faulkner

Art, Creative, & Design

Emily DelMarie Long

Design

Lauren Robinson

Managing Editor

Amy Clarke

Editors

Christina Cannon Lucy Morris Mary Beth Wallace

Marketing & Events

Jillian Updegraff

Digital Marketing

Heather Lee

SEO

Michael Miller

Distribution, Sales & Marketing Support

Natalie Schweizer

Photographers Karen Culp Rich Smith

Nathalie DuPré Lanewood Studio

To receive advertising information, change your mailing address, or share your views on editorial: Call 423.266.3440 or visit cityscopemag.com or healthscopemag.com and click “Contact.”

Departments

George Mullinix

Subscribe to CityScope ® or HealthScope ® magazines: Call 423.266.3440 or visit cityscopemag.com or healthscopemag.com and click “Subscribe.” A one-year subscription for CityScope® or HealthScope® magazine costs $18.

Contents

Publisher Sales & New Business Development

SOUTHERN GENTLEMAN® featuring Sport & Outdoors

CityScope ® and HealthScope ® magazines and the Chattanooga Resource & Relocation Guide® (the magazines) are published by CMC Publications, LLC, a Chattanooga, Tennessee company. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is strictly prohibited. Views expressed herein are those of the authors or those interviewed and not necessarily those of the publisher, editors, or advertisers. The publisher, editors, and advertisers disclaim any responsibility or liability for such material. All content associated with and included in advertisements (ads, advertorial, and special promotional sections) placed in the magazines are the responsibility of the respective advertiser. CMC Publications, LLC, cannot and does not assume responsibility for any material contained within or associated with any advertisement. CityScope® magazine Copyright, CMC Publications, LLC, 1993 CityScope® magazine is a trademark owned by CMC Publications, LLC

Food & Spirits Lifestyle & Attire

HealthScope® magazine Copyright, CMC Publications, LLC, 1989 HealthScope® magazine is a trademark owned by CMC Publications, LLC Chattanooga Resource & Relocation Guide® Copyright, CMC Publications, LLC, 2011 Chattanooga Resource & Relocation Guide® is a trademark owned by CMC Publications, LLC


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Sport & Outdoors In Full Flight / A Tradition Worth Sharing / Couples Who Camp / Waiting in the Wings / Tackle Box Takeover / Man’s Best Friend / Glory Days / Life on the Farm

“Nature gives to every time and season some beauties of its own.” – Charles Dickens

Photo by Lanewood Studio

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I N

“Once you have tasted flight, you will forever walk the Earth with your eyes turned skyward, for there you have been, and there you will always long to return.” - Leonardo da Vinci Although da Vinci wasn’t talking about a trip in a modernday aircraft, anyone who has

F U L L

experienced the miracle of flight will tell you that his words hold much truth. For those who spend their time soaring in the sky, aviation isn’t just a way to get from one place to another. It’s a way to connect with loved ones, find inner peace, and experience nature’s splendor. Meet the men who have a passion for piloting and know what it’s like to be flying high. By Christina Cannon Photography by Lanewood Studio

FLIGHT


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Jim Coltrin and Andy Bailey

[

IN FULL FLIGHT

]

Although they have different experiences with aviation, a passion for piloting is what brought friends and business partners Jim Coltrin and Andy Bailey together. The duo met in 2019 when a mutual friend introduced them, and they instantly bonded over flying. Their love for aviation has come to take center stage, and they even named their company, True North Advisors, after their passion for flying. “Only about 2% of the population can fly a plane,” explains Coltrin. “It’s always pretty cool when you meet someone and share a hobby with them that not everyone can do. Piloting played a big role in our friendship in the beginning, and it has also brought us closer as business partners.” Coltrin’s father first taught him to fly when he was just 10 years old, and by age 17, he had already received his pilot's license. Bailey, on the other hand, was first introduced to flying several years after joining the Army in 2002. Upon leaving the military in 2014, Bailey learned to fly fixed-wing aircraft after years of flying helicopters. “I enjoy traveling more than flying,” admits Bailey. “Being able to fly allows for a great lifestyle. I get to meet so many people, and it’s always great getting to meet other pilots. Not to mention, you don’t have to deal with traffic.” This ability to network and also visit clients plays a major role in the lives of Bailey and Coltrin, but the duo derives a lot of personal pleasure from piloting as well. Coltrin currently flies a Piper Cherokee Six 300, which he co-owns with his father, and while he does note that it’s a bit on the slower side when in cruising speeds, the plane can carry a lot of weight and is very stable. One of Coltrin’s favorite places to visit is the Abaco Islands in the Bahamas, and piloting also allows him to regularly visit his daughter in Columbia, South Carolina. Bailey’s aircraft of choice is his Piper Arrow, which he notes is highly efficient and aerodynamic. Although Bailey only travels with family for about 10% of his trips, he recalls the time he flew his daughters to Crystal River, Florida, as one of his most memorable. “They wanted to swim with manatees, and it was a special trip because I was able to do that for them,” Bailey remembers.

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Andy Bailey

Bailey also likes to take in the warm weather at the beach and notes that he can get to Destin, Florida, in about two hours. It’s a trip he makes regularly. Regardless of where and why they travel, flying has had a major impact on Coltrin and Bailey’s relationship both professionally and personally. “Flying is very special to me. I have a network of family and friends that I like to fly with, and it helps to grow our bond,” says Coltrin. “I enjoy it because it helps me relax from a demanding job and provides me with a certain sense of freedom that I can’t get any other way.”

Jim Coltrin


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IN FULL FLIGHT

]

Jay Jolley

[

When he was a teenager, Jay Jolley’s father would spend quality time with him by taking him out to fly radio-controlled airplanes. Several years later, on his 17th birthday, Jolley received his pilot’s license, making it clear that his love of aviation wasn’t to be left behind with his childhood. Today, Jay owns several aircraft and uses them as a way to create, strengthen, and nurture his relationships in life. “The aviation community is very welcoming and engaging, and flying opens the doors to so many new and long-term relationships,” explains Jolley. “I love to take someone flying who hasn’t experienced the personal nature of general aviation, and flying family and friends around brings them a whole new perspective on flight and aviation.” But flying doesn’t just bolster Jolley’s relationships with his family and friends. It also is somewhat of a personal endeavor. Jolley notes that there is a certain peace and tranquility that comes with flying solo, but his self-discovery doesn’t stop there. While Jolley also owns a Carbon Cub and Cirrus Vision, his pride and joy is his amphibious AirCam, nicknamed The Road Runner largely due to its paint job, which is inspired by the 1970 Plymouth Road Runner Superbird automobile. When Jolley purchased his AirCam in 2012, it came in two 24

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Jay and Kelly Jolley

large, wooden crates that contained thousands of pieces. It took him 20 months to build the AirCam, but the process has been well worth it. “Flying an aircraft that I built is one of my most rewarding achievements,” elaborates Jolley. “My father taught me more than anyone else, and when he was steering me toward aviation, he left an indelible mark on my life for which I am so thankful. I would love to see his smile if he were here to experience a flight in The Road Runner!” When it comes to his most memorable flight, Jolley recalls the time he flew The Road Runner, in concert with three other AirCams, across the United States with a detour over the Grand Canyon. “Flying has provided so many awesome memories, but flying over the Grand Canyon at 12,000 feet in an open cockpit aircraft that was built with my own hands is the winner,” says Jolley. The trip took 14 days and 72 flight hours, and it consisted of stops in 12 states and at 56 different airports. “Being a pilot and having the privilege of flying is a very rewarding experience and, in many ways, a relaxing experience,” says Jolley. “To me, flying is peaceful, and the view is breathtaking. Flying requires focus and allows me to isolate myself from the rest of life’s distractions and pressures.”


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[

IN FULL FLIGHT

]

Mike Brown

Flying is and has always been a family affair for Mike Brown. With a father who worked for Delta, Brown was fascinated with aviation from an early age. As a young boy, he loved sitting in the observation tower, where he would watch DC-3s pull into Lovell Field. Today, Brown has passed along his love of flight to his son, Michael, who obtained his pilot’s license while he was still in high school and is now pursuing a career in aviation law. “I love flying because it provides freedom of escape. There are no interruptions. It’s just the machine and you,” explains Brown. “When you fly, it’s like nature, man, and machine are working perfectly in tandem to achieve a property known only by the birds and the angels.”

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Brown, who took his first flight lesson in 1989, has owned a multitude of single-engine planes over his 31-year piloting career, but he’s since settled down with two aircrafts, each with their own purpose. The family’s 2011 amphibious American Legend Cub, referred to as the Little Yellow Cub, is best suited for low-level sightseeing and can land and take off on water, grass, and asphalt. The plane can be flown from the front or back seats, and during warm weather, the side doors and windows can be opened, providing for an even more scenic experience. On the other end of the spectrum is the Browns’ 2003 Cessna T182T. This aircraft is a great all-purpose, cross-country plane that can reach speeds of 161 miles per hour and heights of 20,000 feet.


Michael and Mike Brown

Pursuing Passion Brown took his first flight lesson in 1989 and has owned many singleengine planes over his 31-year piloting career.

“We jokingly call the Cessna, Big Iron,” says Brown. “In aviation circles, the name Big Iron is used to describe really big, complex airplanes. Our Cessna is hardly Big Iron worthy, but compared to the Cub, it is certainly Big Iron to our family.” Brown enjoys his fleet because it allows for both slow flight and cross-country travel, but he notes the scenic opportunities in Chattanooga are hard to beat. “There is just something special about flying over Chattanooga, Chickamauga Lake, and the Tennessee River at a low level early on a summer morning,” says Brown. “People may not realize it, but Chattanooga is one of the most beautiful places to fly in the country. We have mountains and rivers and low-traffic airspace. A smooth water landing at the Chickamauga Dam on a crisp winter evening before nightfall is indescribable.”

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Morty Lloyd

[

IN FULL FLIGHT

]

For Morty Lloyd, aviation is in his DNA. Lloyd, whose father was also a pilot, took his first flight when he was only 2 weeks old. “As a child, I basically grew up in an airplane and was immersed in aviation from a very early age,” explains Lloyd. “God created me to fly. When I do so, I feel His pleasure. It’s a part of who I am.” With a wife who is a retired Delta flight attendant, the miracle of flight has been a constant in Lloyd’s life. Lloyd and his wife, Joyce, live just off of a local airport, where they can be close to their hangar and the joy that flying brings to both of them. “Flying for Joyce and me is a lifestyle,” says Lloyd. “We simply enjoy airplanes and the people who fly them.”

Joyce and Morty Lloyd

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The duo loves aviation so much that they even got engaged 1,000 feet in the air. “I asked my wife to marry me during a sunset flight over Lake Ocoee. It is a beautiful flight that we often still take in the evening,” explains Lloyd. Lloyd has owned a handful of planes over the years since he first purchased his Steen Skybolt at the age of 29, but his Cirrus SR22, nicknamed Cirri, is by far his favorite. “I currently own my second Cirrus SR22, and it has been my favorite aircraft to own,” says Lloyd. “The Cirrus is a wonderful plane for long-distance travel. It’s fast, comfortable, and is manufactured with a ballistic parachute.” Lloyd notes that, in the event of a really bad day, he can pull a handle and a parachute will deploy, which provides some added peace of mind to him and his passengers.

“Joyce and I really enjoy seeing various parts of the United States and the Caribbean, and the Cirrus provides a lot of fuel for long-range travel,” explains Lloyd. “In addition, the Cirrus provides great situational awareness in all types of weather. Flying in inclement weather is just part of general aviation, but this plane makes bad weather much safer with all of its safety features. Above all, the Cirrus is a delight to fly.” From hosting fly-ins with friends to recreating the night he proposed, aviation takes center stage in Lloyd’s life. “I just love seeing God’s creation from the air,” says Lloyd. “This area has some of the prettiest topography of anywhere, and seeing it from above is such a special blessing.”


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] IN FULL FLIGHT [

Mani Ravee When Mani Ravee was a young boy, it wasn’t unusual for his father to drive out to the local airport and drop him off. “I would sit on the fence post and watch airplane after airplane come and go. I would watch them take off and just keep watching until I couldn’t see them anymore,” says Ravee, who currently serves as a colonel in the military. “Ever since I was 5 years old, all I wanted to do was fly.” While Col. Ravee’s love for airplanes never fell to the wayside, it wasn’t until he was in school completing his medical residency that his dream to become a pilot turned into a reality. After driving by a small airport and seeing a sign for a flight school, Col. Ravee took the plunge and enrolled. “On weekends I would go and take flight classes, and I would just hang out at the airport,” explains Col. Ravee. “After I had taken a few lessons, I was talking with some guys about learning to fly, and coincidentally, they were trying to sell a plane.” 30

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It was then that Col. Ravee purchased his 1974 Cessna 172M. Even though he has made many customizations and upgrades to his purchase, 20 years later his Cessna is still going strong and has helped his family make many precious memories. “This is absolutely true, and my wife will tell you, when we had our daughter Anjali, the first word out of her mouth was not mama or dada – it was ‘appy.’ She was trying to say airplane,” says Col. Ravee. “Every Saturday when she was a little girl, she would be up and have her teeth brushed by 6:30 in the morning, because she knew that wheels were up at 7:00. That little girl just loved to fly.” Col. Ravee notes that Anjali wasn’t even tall enough to see over the glass shield, but they would frequently take off to visit different airports or go out to eat in some faraway city. The duo still takes to the skies whenever Anjali comes home from medical school to visit. In addition to taking trips with his family, Col. Ravee is also in the midst of building a plane from the wheels up and conducts and teaches drone piloting for search and rescue missions. “It's all about learning and creating something, and there’s something special about how God lets you see his perspective of looking down,” says Col. Ravee. “There’s this freedom you get from being up in the sky. You just have to feel it. It's a completely different perspective.”

Photos by Rich Smith


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“I THINK THE BENDABOU T FIELD AND ANNUAL MATCH IS THE ROOT OF IT ALL FOR US – OUR WHOLE FAMILY. AND IT ’S A SPECIAL THING THAT GRANDAD WANTS TO KEEP UP. IT ’S THE TRADITION OF IT. IT ’S FAMILY AND FRIENDORIENTED-STYLE POLO. WHEN YOU LOVE SOMETHING, YOU WANT TO SHARE IT WITH PEOPLE, AND IT ’S SO GREAT TO SEE HOW MANY PEOPLE COME OU T.” WILL JOHNST ON, FOURTH-GENERATION POLO PL A YER

A Tradition Worth Sharing How generations of the Johnston family sparked a worldwide interest in polo through their annual polo weekend at Bendabout Farm By Katie Faulkner | Photography by Lanewood Studio

Here in the South, what could be more important than family? More iconic than sweeping landscapes? More engrossing than outdoor sports? For the Johnston family, these honored elements blend together to create a rich history of how they have enlivened polo in the South and at an international level, all while building friendships and encouraging the growth of the sport. From their beginnings at the family farm – Bendabout – to a worldwide reach, the Johnstons have been sharing their beloved tradition for the better part of a century.

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] A TRADITION WORTH SHARING

The History of the Home Field

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Founded in the 1830s on 4,000 acres of lush game habitat and farmlands, Bendabout has always prioritized good stewardship of the land. While nearly 2,500 acres are meticulously maintained as authentic habitat for native wildlife, the family’s property also boasts a signature feature that has become synonymous with Bendabout over the years: the 300 x 160-yard polo field. Tended tirelessly yearround, the pristine playing ground has stood as a symbol of the family’s love for the game, as well as an open, annual invitation to the community to come learn more about polo at the end of every summer season. The idea to create a polo field at Bendabout came three generations ago, through friendships and a fascination. James F. Johnston, the current generation’s great-greatgrandfather, was a forward-thinking entrepreneur who purchased the first Coca-Cola bottling franchise in 1901. The Johnston family soon became an established and integral part of Chattanooga. Growing up in the area, James’ son, Summerfield K. Johnston (Sr.) gained a closer look at polo through friendships with World War I soldiers stationed at

Fort Oglethorpe. Members of Fort O’s 6th Cavalry would play polo as a way to improve their mobility and skill on horseback. Summerfield witnessed the fast-paced and high-stakes game, and his interest in polo was intensified. Before long, he began searching for a way that he and his comrades could play legitimate matches against each other and change up the scenery from always playing at the fort. Summerfield Sr. was so intrigued by the game that he set out to create a regulation playing field at the family farm, Bendabout. This gave his cavalry friends not only a quality place to play, but also an opponent, as Summerfield and the Bendabout farmhands would face-off against the soldiers in regular matches. The two teams took turns hosting – a weekend of matches held at Bendabout, while the next was played at the fort. Soldiers versus farmhands, a well-loved tradition was born. Summerfield went on to play at a competitive level around the country, all the while ensuring the field at Bendabout was well-tended and ready for play. Naturally, he passed on his love for the game of polo to his son and grandchildren.

Players enjoy competition at the Fort Oglethorpe field during the early days of play in Chattanooga. Photo Courtesy of Bendabout Farm

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Sharing the Tradition: Summerfield Jr.’s Impact on Polo

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Born in 1932, Summerfield Johnston Jr. (or “Skey”) grew up already familiar with polo. His father’s love for the sport was always present, evidenced in the field at Bendabout, and it took hold of Summerfield Jr. around the time he was 19 years old. He took to playing while in school at the University of Virginia in 1951 – just in time to ride the swelling wave of popularity for the sport throughout the 1950s. His father began hosting matches at Bendabout again, as they had been on hiatus throughout World War II. Meanwhile, polo clubs were on the rise across the country. The Chattanooga Polo Club, which became the Bendabout Polo Club, was founded. As his love for the sport grew, Summerfield Jr. followed in his father’s footsteps, playing across the country. Eventually, competing at a professional level, it became evident that he was a formidable talent on the field. He played in world-renowned tournaments including the U.S. Open and the International Gold Cup. Over the course of his professional career, Summerfield Jr. earned such honors as the Hugo Dalmar Trophy for exemplary sportsmanship and served as president of both the United States Polo Association

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(USPA) and the Gulfstream Polo Club. After his presidency, he served as chairman of the USPA for four years, then as a governor for another 12 years. He was inducted into the Museum of Polo and Hall of Fame in 2001, and he retired from professional play in 1988 as polo’s “last left-handed player.” His accomplishments on the field are rivaled only by his earnest support and spread of the sport around the globe. Summerfield Jr. served as an honorary governor of the USPA for years following all of his previous roles, and he dedicated years and vast resources and knowledge into developing two more world-class polo facilities. The Flying H Ranch in Big Horn, Wyoming, is home to the Flying H Polo Club. This facility is focused on training horses and players for professional polo. In Wellington, Florida, the Everglades Polo Club is a prestigious hub of polo play. During the winter months, players from all over the country and the world congregate here to train and play, and its impeccable fields are often used during tournament season. The club is also largely focused on training and developing the youth of polo.


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The Tradition Carried On: Summerfield Jr.’s Children and Grandchildren Two of Summerfield Jr.’s five children also fell in love with the sport of polo. They went on to train and play professionally with their own outstanding accomplishments. Summerfield III, better known as Skeeter, was an exceptional polo player and proponent of the sport. Until his tragic death in 2007, he contributed immensely both on and off the field. Summerfield Jr.’s daughter, Gillian, has spent years paving the way for female players to find a footing in the sport, serving as an inspiration to many young ladies training to play. She has advanced to an outstanding 1.5-goal player and spends any time she is not playing training professional polo horses in Wyoming and supporting the next generation of players.

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[ A TRADITION WORTH SHARING

Photo Courtesy of Bendabout Farm

to play with a family member,” Gillian says. “And this sport has such a long history with our family.” Without question, the third generation of Johnston family polo players has upheld the illustrious family legacy, continuing to support the sport at every level. Will Johnston, son of Summerfield Jr.’s daughter, Lavinia (Gillian and Skeeter's sister), is the fourth generation of Johnstons to swing the mallet. His “late blooming” passion for polo mirrored that of his grandfather’s, as he really didn’t take a serious interest until his 20s. Will explains, “My family wanted me to play when I was younger, but I didn’t take to it. We would go and watch Skeeter and Gillian play, and I always thought it was interesting. But one year, I was about 21 or 22, we went to watch them in Florida, and I thought, ‘You know, this is a very cool sport.’ So, I asked my grandfather if there was any way I could play, and he couldn’t believe it. A couple of weeks later, he called me and said, ‘If you’re serious about it, you have to be in Florida by this date, and be at the barn. We’ll see how serious you are.’” Will showed up. And he quickly went from not knowing how to bridle a horse to now, building his own professional team while managing the Flying H Ranch Polo Club in Wyoming. “Polo is my entire life,” Will says. “It’s pretty much everything I think about and do.”

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Skeeter was a passionate advocate of the sport, serving as governor-at-large for the USPA, and he co-founded the North American Polo League. From his family’s Everglades Polo Club in Florida, he also owned and played for the “Skeeterville” team. Before his passing, he was a renowned player, accomplishing a 4-goal handicap, winning the Cartier International Open, captaining the 1988 Gold Cup team (the highest level of polo competition in the United States, as a 26-goal tournament), and winning the USPA Heritage Cup twice. He was also a three-time runner-up in the U.S. Open. Gillian, Skeeter's sister, served as governor-at-large for the USPA as well. A large portion of her time is devoted to working with the horses at the Flying H Ranch in Wyoming, and she is very passionate about the animals involved in the sport. She has won numerous 20-goal tournaments, playing around the world including tournaments in England, Spain, Argentina, South Africa, and Australia. She was also a member of the team that won the U.S. Open in 2002. Gillian affirms, “I would still say that is one of my greatest accomplishments.” She has played against Skeeter and her nephew, Will, in previous tournaments but is really looking forward to playing with Will during the 18-goal tournament in Florida this year. “That is very exciting because I rarely get

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Attendees of the 2019 annual polo weekend at Bendabout Farm included prestigious players from all over the world, and right next door. Pictured here from left to right are: Jeff Blake, Owen Rinehart, Steve Orthwein Jr., Gillian Johnston, LaVerne Easterly (trophy presentation), Will Johnston, Philip Higgins, Miguel Novillo Astrada, and Sugar Erskine.

Sharing the Tradition: The Johnston Family and Bendabout Polo Weekend

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The Johnston polo players spend their summer months in Wyoming and the winter in Florida following the season of warmth so that fields are in prime condition. They have all spent an enormous amount of time bettering the polo facilities around the country, contributing to the level of horses available to the sport, educating the public, and supporting any young people they can who want to play. Will shares, “Grandad is the biggest supporter of this – he is always looking to the next generation. He loves to take talented young players and give them opportunities. He hosted the youth trainees of the USPA several summers. He’s constantly thinking about how to make the sport more spectator-friendly. And he’s focused on quality – quality of the field, quality of play, quality of horses. Everything he’s given back has made an enormous impact on the sport.” Summerfield Jr.’s wife, Gil, is very involved with polo youth in Florida as well, serving for years as the vice president of the Polo Training Foundation. Gil and Summerfield Jr. actually met through their shared love of polo. She was born in England and grew up training horses and playing polo. When she moved to the United States, Gil made a career of training horses and continued playing polo. And their daughter, Gillian, echoes her family’s stance: “As a family, we donate fields for young players to have places to train and compete. I truly believe that advancing the sport involves working with the next generation and helping the young kids develop their interest and skills early.” 40

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With three generations still actively involved in promoting the sport from every angle, the Johnstons are also sure to remember where it all began. Summerfield Jr. still oversees the maintenance of the Bendabout field, and the family continues to arrange an annual weekend filled with polo matches, free and open to the public. World-renowned athletes, whom the Johnstons have befriended over their years in the sport, travel from South America and Europe to come and participate in this family-oriented traditional weekend. This past year, the match saw the likes of Miguel Novillo Astrada, a 9-goal player who has won the triple crown and was awarded Argentina’s award for the top athlete (not just polo), and Owen Rinehart, a talented 10-goal American player, just to name a couple. From their own accomplishments on the field to their indelible marks on the development of the sport for the past, nearly, 90 years, the Johnstons have never lost their love for sharing their favorite pastime with the public. Summerfield Jr. sums it up saying, “Polo is a wonderful sport and has been a part of our family for generations. We love to work with the horses, we love the competition, and we have been able to travel the world to play all while making lifelong friendships with people who share the same love for this sport.” As his grandson says, “When you love something, you want to share it with people!”


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COUPLES WHO CAMP For these couples, time spent in the great outdoors provides an opportunity to grow closer. By Lucy Morris | Photography by Rich Smith

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The Raulstons

WALTER & LOUELLEN

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While working together at a restaurant after college, Walter Raulston stole the keys to Louellen’s heart – or at least her bike lock. “We both rode our bikes to work, and one day he asked to chain his up with mine,” Louellen explains. “I needed to lock my bike up, but I was also interested in her,” Walter laughs. The rest, they say, is history. Married for five years and together for 10 before that, this couple bonded over a shared passion for all things outdoors. Today, they try to go camping as often as they can in order to get away from the hustle and bustle and grow closer as a couple. “We’re both super busy with work and always have to stay connected and on our phones,” explains Louellen. “So, when we go camping, it’s a way to get out of town and relax. It’s good for our relationship.” If they’re just looking for a quick getaway, they’ll visit their favorite spots along the Hiwassee and Ocoee rivers or head up to Tellico with their two dogs, Sammy and Penny Lou. “Typically, we’ll get there in the late afternoon, early evening,” says Walter. “I’ll start setting up camp, and she’ll start the fire. The first night we always grill out and relax. The next day we’ll usually go fishing or mountain biking.” “Once we were camping with some friends, and I decided to do a little fishing while I waited for them to get things set up at our campsite,” says Louellen. “My first cast, I hooked this huge trout – I mean probably 18 inches. I almost reel it in, when it jumps up and spits the hook out. When everyone finally gets to the river, I’m trying to tell them, and they’re all like, ‘Mhmm … sure.’ It was the biggest fish I ever hooked! I still don’t think they believe me.” When it comes to a quality trip, the one thing they can’t live without is their camper. “We got it about three years ago, and we love it,” Walter says. “We took some friends with us to Talladega in it once, and they loved it so much they came back and bought their own a week later!”


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The Boitnotts JUSTIN & KELLI

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Although Justin and Kelli Boitnott attended the same college in West Tennessee, they didn’t actually meet each other until studying abroad in Italy. “We were based in a cute little town called Citerna,” says Kelli. “We would have classes but also have full weeks dedicated to travel. That’s when Justin really introduced me to hiking, and we’ve been doing it ever since!” Today, this dynamic duo is passionate about spending as much time outdoors as possible. “We love the quiet and the time spent away from our regular, sometimes mundane schedules,” explains Kelli. “There’s no ceiling overhead, and it just gives you more perspective.” In addition to spending time outdoors, the Boitnotts hope to see as much of the world as possible. “I think our trip to Iceland was our favorite so far, and we’re planning a trip right now to Spain and Portugal,” says Justin. “My favorite moment in Iceland was when we were driving across a lava field, and we decided to take this dirt road. I was probably driving faster than I should’ve, and it crested at the top, which I wasn’t expecting. I almost drove us into the volcano. But there was a beautiful view at the top!” he laughs. Closer to home, they’ve still managed to take in some incredible experiences. “In May, we went to Elkmont Campground in the Smoky Mountains on this one weekend that corresponds with the synchronization of the fireflies,” Kelli explains. “Everyone brings their lawn chairs out into the woods to watch as they blink in unison.” They’ve also had some humorous experiences. “Once we were camping on my family’s farm in Virginia just for the night, and I knew there were bears and coyotes around the property, so I was a little on edge,” says Justin. “It’s getting close to midnight, and the fire is going down, and I start to hear stuff. Kelli is like, ‘It’s not a bear, just go to bed,’ but I can’t, so I keep banging pans and building up the fire. I didn’t sleep all night. Next morning, we head back home, and the neighbors tell my family they saw a black bear right where we’d been camping!” “I slept through the whole thing,” laughs Kelli.

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Photo Courtesy of the Boitnotts


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The Lewises

JASON & SHELLY

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“When he said he wanted to buy a camper, I said, ‘What?!’” remembers Shelly. “With a 2-year-old and 5-year-old, I was still in survival mode with young ones. I mentioned it to my neighbor, and she said, ‘Don’t worry, I’m sure it’s just a phase.’” “I said, ‘I’m too old to sleep on the ground. I pay a mortgage. We’re getting a camper,” quips Jason. Turns out, it was a life-changing purchase. The Lewises started out easy to make sure they enjoyed it. “Our first trip was in August 2017,” says Shelly. “We went very local – to Raccoon Mountain Campground. His dad lives practically through the trees in Black Creek, so he was right there if we needed anything,” she laughs. Today, they’ve upgraded the camper and gone on more than 30 trips as a family, and they’ve gotten to experience many firsts along the way. “We’ve had a lot of first experiences at campgrounds that we’ll never forget,” says Shelly. “Caroline’s first time catching a fish, Kyle’s first time riding a bike …”

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“There have been so many good memories,” says Jason. “Every time we go camping, we learn new places. We meet amazing people that have those experiences in common with us.” Though it’s hard to narrow down a favorite trip, each is planned with intention. “We love camping because it brings us together. It’s so quiet, the world just stops,” says Shelly. “We get off our screens, away from the concrete and our daily stresses, and we bond as a family.” “You could be anywhere – and it doesn’t even have to be far from home, but it feels like it. That change of pace just provides a break from whatever your reality is at that point, and you can focus on being together,” Jason explains. “Camping is definitely the biggest hobby we all have together,” admits Shelly. “We really do see it as a great opportunity to make memories and experience joy, and that’s what it’s all about.”


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The Robinsons

NATHAN & KATHRYN

This fun-loving couple may not have grown up with the same passion for the outdoors, but as they’ve grown closer, they’ve adopted a mutual affinity for adventure. “I’m pretty outdoorsy and grew up camping and fishing all the time, so when I met Kathryn, I wanted to include her in those activities,” Nathan Robinson explains. “Our first trip was to Tellico, and we went trout fishing.” “Nathan called me a city slicker,” laughs Kathryn. “But he introduced me to so many different activities that I really enjoy now.” The Robinsons prefer camping in the winter because they enjoy the cold weather, and to them, each trip is like a mini vacation. “When we go camping, it’s very chill,” Kathryn says. “Nathan is an early riser, so he’ll get up and make coffee. I’ll stay in the tent with our dogs, Opie and Lyla, then we’ll sit

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by the fire reading and just enjoying the morning before we go hiking.” Nathan adds, “It’s so peaceful and quiet. It’s very relaxing to just get away.” They say their trips have brought them closer and taught them to appreciate each other. “It’s great quality time,” says Nathan. “You have to rely on that other person and know they can pull their own weight too. It’s a big trust thing. You want to make sure you can take care of each other.” When it comes to who’s more high maintenance on their trips, that’s still up for debate. “Kathryn’s high maintenance when we fish, because she makes me do everything for her,” laughs Nathan, “but I get whiny if I’m too cold at night.” The best part about each trip? Disconnecting from the world. Kathryn explains, “He’s my favorite person to spend time with, so it’s nice to have all that time with him with no distractions.”



The Picketts GARY & DEAN

[ COUPLES WHO CAMP ]

High school sweethearts Gary and Dean Pickett have filled their lives with adventure. “I camped as a Girl Scout, and Gary camped with his family as a child. Then our first camping trip together was with his family when we were dating. I think we went to Harrison Bay State Park,” Dean reminisces. The trips have only gotten bigger and bolder since then. “We probably take about five or six camping trips locally each year, but we try to plan a bigger trip every five years or so,” Gary explains. “The best trip we’ve ever taken was when we rafted and camped through the Grand Canyon about three years ago. I never thought I’d get to see every square inch of it from the very beginning to the very end. I always pictured myself looking over the handrail, but we got to live in it,” he adds. They’ve also enjoyed camping and rafting along the Tatshenshini River in British Columbia and even spent two weeks camping along the rivers of Alaska. “We were helicoptered in and were floating on glacier water. For 14 nights, we had

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to collect firewood and get water from a waterfall and filter it before we could drink it or cook with it,” Dean explains. “It’s fun knowing that you can survive out in the wild.” When they stay local, they enjoy camping with extended family. “We’ve visited Mount Le Conte 100 times, and we’ve been going to Cades Cove twice a year for 35 years,” says Dean. “This past fall, we had just gotten there and were setting up the group site when the ranger came and said they’d just darted a bear. So, we took the grandkids down there and watched the rangers weigh, measure, and tag the bear. Since it was asleep, they let the kids pet it. It was neat to see the whole process.” Coming up next, the Picketts have a trip to Arkansas planned where they’ll pack sleeping bags in canoes and row down the Buffalo River, and they’d love to try to visit Okefenokee Swamp at some point, where you put your tent up on platforms above an alligator swamp. “Waking up in the wild gives us energy and happiness,” they explain. “We stay close through camping.”


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Waiting in the Wings

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Bird watching is an activity that has stood the test of time. Although the worn and colorful bird books your grandfather used to own may now find themselves replaced with their digital counterparts, this pastime has remained largely unchanged. Part of bird watching’s appeal is that it can be done virtually anywhere and at any time. If you find yourself curious about cardinals or looking for loons, there’s no better place than the Scenic City to get started. By Christina Cannon | Photography by Rich Smith

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Lance Parker

S So You Want to Be a Bird Watcher?

As with any new hobby, getting started can seem a little daunting. To make it easier, Eliot Berz, business and community access director with the Tennessee River Gorge Trust, suggests simply paying a little more attention to your surroundings while you are outdoors doing other activities you love. “Birds are an incredibly diverse class of animals that have found a way to live on almost every corner of the Earth, and the good thing about them is that you can find them almost anywhere,” explains Berz. “My bird watching is generally combined with other outdoor activities or is done while conducting research. My favorite time to watch birds is while I’m fly fishing in the Hiwassee and Tellico Rivers.” Kevin Calhoon, curator of forests with the Tennessee Aquarium, notes that, while birding is an activity that is easily accessible, you still need a sense of curiosity and a willingness to learn. “You need to be a good

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WHY I LIKE TO GO BIRDING Eliot Berz “As I became more involved in bird research, I couldn’t help but notice all the captivating birds flying overhead whether I was working or not. It’s fascinating to learn how each species has carved out its own unique niche in our environment. I spend a lot of time outdoors, and I like being among friends and coworkers that share an appreciation for wildlife.” Lance Parker “Growing up I was always outside with my father, and my interest in birds just grew. You don’t really need anything to go birding. I like bird watching for the serenity and peace that it offers. It puts me in a relaxed mood, and I especially like seeing any birds that are colorful. There’s something gratifying about discovering a bird in its natural habitat.”

Danny Gaddy “I am a lifelong learner who feels most comfortable outdoors. I enjoy birding because of the challenge associated with finding and identifying birds, and I think migration is such an amazing natural phenomenon. The bonus is that birding encourages me to visit some of the most beautiful, natural places.” Kevin Calhoon “I really like birding because I like to travel. It’s almost like a treasure hunt, and I like the logistics of it. It’s essentially hunting without a gun. Birders are collectors, and I know of people who have goals to visit every county of every state. Personally, I’d like to photograph every species in the United States, and so far I’ve documented about 680 species. It can be incredibly rewarding when you find a bird you are looking for, but the hunt is also fun.”


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MY MOST MEMORABLE BIRDING EXPERIENCE Eliot Berz “I was fortunate enough to travel to Guatemala in 2018 as part of a program centered around migratory bird conservation. Our local Guatemalan partners took us to the Mayan ruins of Tikal and the surrounding jungle to show us Guatemalan birds and wildlife. The most awe-striking part of the trip was getting to see some of the same migratory birds we study over the summer in Chattanooga on their wintering grounds in Central America.”

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Kevin Calhoon “By far, one of my most memorable moments was being in Antarctica and walking out into a penguin colony. The backdrop and the sheer number of penguins were amazing to see. Another was when I went birding in India and was able to see a Great Hornbill. When a female Hornbill is ready to lay her eggs, she packs herself in a hollow log or tree trunk and relies on the male to bring her food. I thought it was sweet, and I got to watch as a male Hornbill was feeding his mate berries through this tiny hole.”

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Eliot Berz

observer, learner, and you need passion. You have to want to learn,” he says. “There are a lot of great tools, but it still takes a lot of time to learn the information.” For example, plumages, which are the layers of feathers that play a role in how a bird looks, can change from season to season, and Calhoon says it can easily take over a decade to get good at recognizing songs and calls. Even if you struggle to get the hang of recognizing calls, don’t let that deter you. Bird watchers come in all shapes and sizes. An easy place to start is by researching the birds that are native to your area. Take some time to learn which birds should be seen at what time of year. Learning how different species feed, nest, and mate can also go a long way in helping you identify birds. If you are apprehensive about going out in the field for some active birding, first try your hand at backyard birding.

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Set up bird feeders and baths to get some practice observing and identifying different species. After some time spent studying the birds you see every day, you’re ready to head to some of your favorite outdoor spots for some active birding. Keep in mind, there are a few things that will make for a more fruitful trip. Many birders agree that the most important piece of equipment is a pair of binoculars, and an identification guide of some sort is useful as well. “People don’t really use field books anymore. The apps on the market now are really good and can not only help with identification and logging but also with songs,” advises Calhoon. “I remember toting around a Walkman that had various songs on it. I even used records and CDs to learn songs, but now all of that information is at your fingertips.”

Lance Parker “In general, I think it’s an amazing experience to go birding outside of the United States. I’ve been in countries such as Saudi Arabia, Borneo, and Singapore, and it’s always shocking when you see birds that have similar traits to those in the United States. At the same time, you see birds that you’d never get to see back home. One of my favorites is the Beeeaters that are native to Africa. They are really pretty multicolored birds, and it’s cool to watch them travel in flocks.” Danny Gaddy “One of the most unique birds I have had the pleasure of seeing is Resplendent Quetzal in Costa Rica. I was fortunate enough to watch a pair of these rare and beautiful birds repeatedly visit their young in a nest cavity, and it was a wonderful experience. Another moment that sticks out in my mind was this time I was at the Hiwassee Wildlife Refuge, and I let a Japanese woman borrow my telescope to look at thousands of Sandhill Cranes off in the distance. Before she left, she handed me a small origami crane and explained to me how much the birds meant to her because they are symbolic of good fortune and longevity in her culture.”


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Kevin Calhoon

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(Above) Photos by Emily Long


Recognizing birds by their calls is a great way to up your birding game. Birds vocalize for many reasons such as claiming their territory or telling other birds when there is food or danger nearby. Learning to recognize birds by their noises will help you know which birds are nearby without even seeing them. In addition to an identification guide and a good pair of binoculars, Danny Gaddy, president of the Tennessee Ornithological Society, also likes to carry around a scope with a tripod, especially for long-distance viewing across bodies of water. He also notes that more and more birders are beginning to carry cameras with a telephoto lens into the field.

These pieces of camera equipment can magnify your field of view similar to a scope or binoculars, while also allowing you to take photographs for later documentation.

Practice Makes Perfect So you’ve bought some binoculars, and you’ve learned what birds should be in the area. What now? Calhoon notes that a good rule of thumb when looking for birds is to visit places where several habitats come together. Fields, marshes, mud, and water each attract different species, and you should also aim to find places that are as undisturbed as possible.

Lance Parker, retired grounds keeper for Baylor School, notes that places such as Baylor’s campus are great for bird watching. “The trails on campus are good areas to see tanagers and woodpeckers, and there are many birds that like the bigger trees with canopies,” he says. “It helps if you look for habitats that have whatever the birds you are trying to find are foraging on. The edge of a forest is also another good place to look for birds. A lot of species like to take advantage of the trees on the outskirts that can provide safe cover from predators.” Other local hot spots for birding include Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park, Amnicola Marsh, Booker [ WA I T I N G I N T H E W I N G S ]

Danny Gaddy

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T. Washington State Park, Nickajack Lake, Greenway Farm, and Standifer Gap Marsh. “The Brainerd levee along the South Chickamauga Creek Greenway is another great place,” states Calhoon. “There’s dragonfly larva and mud there, which is really important to a lot of birds. The area was built for stormwater retention, and there’s water there all year round. I take people there a lot to see big birds like cranes.” Calhoon also notes that Cravens House and Point Park are great places to get a glimpse of migratory birds, and nearby Birchwood, Tennessee, offers opportunities to see Bald Eagles and Sandhill Cranes.

Strength in Numbers For those who want to become more involved in birding, there are countless organizations that provide a sense of community and camaraderie. “I have developed many lifelong friends through birding,” reflects Gaddy. “One of the best benefits of birding is the fellowship with others who share my interest, and I treasure the friendships that I have developed over the years.” Everything from online forums to Facebook groups are at a birder's disposal, and several local resources are available as well. The Tennessee Ornithological Society focuses on habitat protection and conservation efforts,

and the organization frequently hosts activities and events to raise awareness about local and national issues. Several bird counts take place throughout the Chattanooga area, and Calhoon hosts a birding walk at McCoy Farms every spring and summer. “By participating in birding activities, you can really make an impact,” says Calhoon. “Citizen science has taken off, and there’s a lot of information gathering being done. By sharing that information, birders can contribute to the data collection being done by scientists, and it’s also starting to impact other disciplines. When it comes down to it, birders are just good for birds.”

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MY FAVORITE BIRD

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Eliot Berz “I spent three years tracking the Louisiana Waterthrush's migration from Chattanooga to the tropics as part of a wildlife research project. Plus, I get to encounter them often since their preferred habitat of mountain streams with steep gradients coincides with my favorite places to kayak.”

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Danny Gaddy “One of my many favorite birds is the Osprey because of its graceful beauty in flight, dedication to raising its young, and tolerance of human observation. Ospreys arrived in Tennessee in the 1900s as reservoirs were created, but they were nearly wiped out by the use of DDT. Thanks to human intervention, Ospreys have made a strong recovery in our area.”

Kevin Calhoon “Locally and around the world, one of my favorite birds is the Scarlet Tanager. They are a bright scarlet red color with black wings and come up from Mexico to breed in the late spring and early summer months.”

Lance Parker “My favorite bird is the Purple Martin. I have established two colonies on the Baylor campus, and the scout usually arrives in March or April. The Purple Martin looks black at first, but if they turn just the right way, you can see this beautiful rich purple. These birds are unbelievable fliers and gliders.”


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Real Estate, New Homes & Community Leader

Paula has served multiple terms on the Board of Directors of both the Greater Chattanooga Association of REALTORS® and the Multiple Listing Service. Paula is a multiple term member of the local Home Builders Association and has also been a member of its Executive Committee. She serves too on the Board of Directors of the Kidney Foundation of Greater Chattanooga.

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Call for a Home Valuation

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Tackle Box Takeover

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The Adams

The Woolly Bugger

Considered to be one of the most essential flies, especially in trout fishing, the Adams is a versatile dry fly (made for the water’s surface). The Adams generally has a gray body and tends to look like anything that could be alluring to a trout. This fly has been adapted over time, so you can find them with a variety of features, but many anglers maintain that the no-frills versions work just fine. These flies exhibit an impressionistic pattern, mimicking a variety of insects at various stages. The Adams is best used in fast-moving water where fish have only seconds to decide whether or not to take the bait.

The Woolly Bugger, like the Adams, is loved for its versatility. This fly, wellsuited for streams, is slightly larger than other flies and is good at imitating baitfish, crayfish, leeches, and large insects. Woolly Buggers get their bulk from fur, and most have a marabou tail, which is typically made from bird feathers and can sometimes feature flashy colors or tinsel. Some fly tiers will elect to use colored beads for a head, providing weight for a jiggly motion and further adding to the imitation of underwater prey.

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The Elk Hair Caddis Above the water, the Elk Hair Caddis is a staple for many anglers. The realistic appearance is this fly’s strength. Made with – you guessed it – elk hair, the Elk Hair Caddis has a little bulk in the body, and the hair serves for added buoyancy. To boost the success of this elite fly, try using a twitching motion followed by letting the fly dead-drift. This mimics an emerging caddis trying to get off of the water’s surface.


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ith the Tennessee River and its many tributaries a short cast away, Chattanooga and the surrounding area is an ideal location for fly fishing. Whether a tranquil hobby or skilled

competition, fishing in the South is serious business. And perfectly stocking your tackle box can be a tall task. To make it easier, we have selected six flies that we consider to be ‘tied and true’ for Chattanooga’s fly fishing fanatics.

The Royal Wulff

The Stimulator

The Copper John

Falling into the attractor category, the Royal Wulff imitates nothing in particular and works to attract everything. Its characteristic red body makes it easy to see for both anglers and fish. Complete with a tail and hackle, which is a feather often from the neck of a chicken, the Royal Wulff is a dry fly that is highly buoyant. This fly is designed to elicit a strike rather than imitate a specific insect.

A long-lost cousin of the Caddis, the Stimulator easily sits on the surface of the water. With a longer hook and more hackle and hair for buoyancy, this dry fly imitates a variety of stoneflies. Traditionally, features are yellow and brown in color but can vary. It's designed to be twitched hard on the surface to elicit strikes from trout – hence the name. For exciting results, try twitching it on the surface before pulling it underwater and twitching it as a wet fly.

With a wire body, this wet nymph-style fly sinks quickly and stays deep in the river where many larger fish tend to camp out. The Copper John typically features a streamlined copper wire body but will sometimes include lead wire as well. A strength of the Copper John is the large brass bead used for its head. This helps the fly sink even more quickly and gives it the ability to move across the river floor with a more natural motion.

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“If there are no dogs in Heaven, then when I die, I want to go where they went.” –Will Rogers

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Photo by Nathalie DuPré


MAN'S BEST FRIEND

For these Southern gentlemen, their dogs are much more than just hunting companions – they’re family. While their skills in the field are unrivaled, it’s their ability to provide a kinship unlike any other that truly sets them apart. By Lucy Morris

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If I pick up a shotgun, he knows we’re going hunting, so he’s immediately at the door of the truck.”

Bob Bullard ]

with Luke

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“I spent four or five weeks trying to ignore him at first,” quips Bob Bullard about his beloved English Cocker Spaniel and hunting companion, Luke. The thing is, Luke wasn’t originally supposed to be a hunting dog. “My wife saw him at a charity auction and fell in love, so she brought him home as a companion. He wouldn’t leave me alone, so I decided, ‘Okay, I guess I’ll pet ya. After that it was all downhill,” he laughs. “I think she’s still mad at him.” Luke, whose breed is known for its quail hunting ability, began training with Bob before heading to training school outside of Thomasville, Georgia. “ The trainer asked me if I would mind if he worked Luke alongside the labs to see if he would retrieve ducks, which was fine with me, even though his breed doesn’t typically take to water,” Bob shares. “Turns out, he loves it.” When it’s time for a hunt, Luke gets down to business fast. “If I pick up a shotgun, he knows we’re going hunting, so he’s immediately at the door of the truck,” Bob says. “When 68

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we're duck hunting, we’ll load up the equipment and get his little camo vest on, trudge out into the flooded timber, set up the decoys, and then he goes to his stand to wait for the first shot. When we're quail hunting, if he picks up the scent of a covey, you can tell because of how fast his tail wags – then you better get ready!” Luke’s excitement and enthusiasm reach far beyond the hunting world, though. “Something that strikes me still is when he comes with me to work,” says Bob. “My coworkers see him and are always like, ‘Hey Luke! How ya doing? … oh, hey, Bob.’ I’m used to it,” he laughs. “Everyone loves him.” Not a traditional duck retrieving breed, Luke had to fight through adversity to gain respect. “We were hunting in Arkansas, and it was really cold, but the water hadn’t been frozen long. The bigger labs couldn’t go out and retrieve on top of the ice because they’d fall through,” explains Bob. “So we had little Luke out there, skating on top of the ice, and he made all the retrievals and saved the hunters a lot of hard walking,” Bob laughs. “That’s when people started having more respect for him as a retriever.” Photos by Nathalie DuPré


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It’s great to have somebody there when you walk in the door that’s glad to see you. They’ve been waiting on

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MAN’S BEST FRIEND

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you to get home ever since you left.”

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Photos by Lanewood Studio


Clay Watson with Finney

[ MAN’S BEST FRIEND ]

When it came time to choose a hunting dog, Clay Watson took a risk when he went with a Hungarian Vizsla, a breed he’d never worked with before. “I wanted a sporting dog because I’m a hunter and a fisherman. A good friend of mine just so happened to be breeding their female Vizsla, and she’s on the smaller side, which I liked.” The risk paid off. “My daughters helped pick Finney out, and she’s been a great addition to our family!” At 16 months old, Finney has just headed off to training at Ronnie Smith Kennels outside of Oklahoma. “She’ll spend the first month being introduced to the game birds she’ll be hunting, and she’ll learn basic commands, how to point those birds, and not to flush them,” Clay explains. “They’ll also gun break her, teach her how to retrieve birds and bring them back to me, and train her to hunt with other dogs.” The goal is for the duo to be able to hunt together starting this fall. “By then, she’ll be more disciplined and more mature, and she’ll have realized what she was

born to do,” says Clay. “I’m anxious and excited to explore that with her and show her what she’s capable of. With bird dogs especially, making the leap from just shooting birds to working your dog so they can catch birds on their own is almost like a sport in itself. I’m looking forward to that part.” But for Clay, Finney is more than just a hunting dog. “She’s both a companion and almost like a kid at the same time,” he says. “It’s great to have somebody there when you walk in the door that’s glad to see you. They’ve been waiting on you to get home ever since you left. Specifically, with Vizslas, they’re known as ‘Velcro dogs.’ They want to be right beside you, and the bond forms very quickly.” To describe Finney in just a couple of words is tough. “She is so strong, both mentally and physically. Pound for pound, she’s the most athletic dog I’ve ever seen,” says Clay. “She’s also loving, caring, and passionate about being a Vizsla. She’s a good dog.”

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When Riley wakes up, the only thing she wants to do is please me. Whether I’m smart enough to be able to communicate what I want her to do or not do is on me.”

Pat Holmes with Riley

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“Roddy Reynolds called and said, ‘I’ve got one puppy left, and you’re gonna want her,’” says Pat Holmes as he recalls the first time he heard about his chocolate lab, Riley. Roddy couldn’t have been righter. At just 7 weeks old, the Holmeses made it official, and Riley joined the family. “Riley’s an extremely versatile dog, and she’s great around my family,” says Pat. “She’s much more than just a hunting dog. I have a daughter with special needs, and Riley hardly ever leaves her side. When she’s not home, Riley will go sleep right by her door.” Pat and Riley’s communication is clear and concise, and the strong bond they’ve formed is evident. “When Riley wakes up, the only thing she wants to do is please me. Whether I’m smart enough to be able to communicate what I want her to do or not do is on me. If there’s any failure, which there rarely is, that’s on me,” explains Pat. “Roddy taught me a long time ago – it’s easier for you to communicate with them on their level, not have them communicate with you on

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your level. I don’t need Riley to do my taxes,” he laughs. According to Pat, Riley’s ability to understand what’s going on is in her DNA. “When she sees the shotgun going into the truck, she knows exactly what’s happening. You can tell by the way she wags her tail. And she’ll hunt all day until she’s so exhausted you basically have to hand feed her at night,” he says. “That’s just her DNA, and there’s a lot to be said for that.” Her favorite part of the hunt is retrieving. “We used to have a farm down in Stevenson, Alabama, and it had gotten bitterly cold, so there was ice on the water,” remembers Pat. “She was young – maybe a year or two – and there was a duck laying there on the ice. I’m like, ‘Give it a try, Riley!’ and she looks over her shoulder like, ‘You really want me to go get that?’ But she trusted me, and she went and got it.” And that’s just one of the many stories Pat looks back on fondly. “There are a million good memories with Riley,” says Pat. “I’ve never had a bad day with that dog.”

Photos by Nathalie DuPré


WATSON FAMILY DEALERSHIPS

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Frank Mitchell with Willie Nelson

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Frank Mitchell’s first hunting dog came about in an interesting way. “Willie was actually a wedding present for my wife,” he explains. “I got her a lab, and she got me a set of golf clubs.” Having both grown up with labs and wanting to start a family themselves, the Mitchells knew they wanted a lab for a pet. They also wanted a dog that Frank could take hunting. “I self-trained him,” Frank explains. “We started with basic obedience and then built upon that foundation with retrieving drills, whistle training, and those sorts of things.” Frank and Willie prefer duck and goose hunting, and they typically stay fairly local for their hunts. “This area of the country is not necessarily overpopulated with ducks and geese, so there’s always a chance that you can go hunting and see absolutely nothing,” laughs Frank. “But Willie is always fun to be around, so it doesn’t even matter.” The pair has developed such a loving bond, but that doesn’t mean there’s no room for a little negging – even if it’s nonverbal. “He has a lot of facial expressions, and you can tell when he is talking crap about your shooting,” Frank jokes. But Willie also knows when it’s time to get serious. “When I put on his collar and take him outside for a hunt, his demeanor completely changes. He’ll go from nosing me and being excited to being in the zone. We’ll start with some bumper throws to get him warmed up, then once I tell him to heel, he focuses really well,” says Frank. “… or at least if there’s action. If it’s slow, he’ll look at me like, ‘Why did you bring me out here?’ Sometimes he’ll just sigh and lay down. It’s really funny.” Willie’s favorite part of the hunt is the initial walk up to the site. “He gets so excited. He’ll run 200 yards in front of me, run back and jump around, sprint out ahead of me again – he just gets really amped up about it.” Whether this hunting duo is collecting ducks or watching the clouds go by, it’s time well spent. Frank laughs, “Willie may be kind of like a bull in a china shop, but we love him so much and can’t imagine our lives without him.” 74

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Photos by Emily Long


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Willie may be kind of like a bull in a china shop, but we love him so much and can’t imagine our lives without him.”

MAN’S BEST FRIEND ]

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Ryan Marshall

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with Maggie and Poppy

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In the Marshall family, English that doesn’t mean he doesn’t have Setters are a tradition. “We started to put in effort as well. “They’re Both these girls are incredibly raising and working Setters back eager to hunt and to do what they passionate about the hunt. in 2000 because they’re so wellwere born to do; they’re instinctual, rounded,” explains Ryan Marshall, and they like to please you,” he says. They’re beautiful and elegant who developed an interest in hunt“But practice makes perfect, so I in the field.” ing from his father and grandfather. have to work them and build that “They have great noses, but they’re bond. You’ve got to learn what to also really visual and hunt close to you.” expect from one another, and the more you work together Ryan’s two Setters, Maggie and Poppy, are a mother/ the better the bond.” daughter duo, ages 6 and 2, and they primarily hunt upland That bond is built upon an understood promise between birds. “Their job is to track, locate, and point coveys for us,” owner and dog. “You have to promise you’ll hunt them, he explains. “When we’re lucky enough to hit our targets, and you have to keep it up every year, otherwise you they’ll go retrieve the birds and bring them back to us.” break your commitment to them,” Ryan explains. “HuntSince Maggie and Poppy come from a long bloodline of ing brings them joy. They display a sense of satisfaction Marshall-owned Setters, they’ve picked up some personalwhen I do my job and hit my target. There’s no doubt ity quirks from their family members. “They both have this they celebrate.” sweet little growling disposition – almost like they’re trying However, it’s about more than just the hunt. “Both these to talk to you. It comes from Bonnie, who was Maggie’s girls are incredibly passionate about the hunt. They’re beautigrandmother and Poppy’s great-grandmother. It reminds ful and elegant in the field,” says Ryan. “But beyond that, me of her, and it’s really sweet. I love it.” they’re incredible pets. They’re just as sweet as they can be According to Ryan, Maggie and Poppy make great huntwith our family. They’re our best friends, and they go with ing companions because it comes so naturally to them, but us everywhere.”

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Photos by Rich Smith


Setting a Higher Standard

BP Construction and its homebuilding subsidiary Barry Payne Homes believe that standards in quality are meant to be surpassed — that’s why we continually raise ours. To learn how we can assist you with residential, commercial and development projects, please contact our office at 423-805-3497 or visit www.bpconstruct.com.


Glory Days Local Athletes Wax Nostalgic on Their Impressive High School Careers & the Positive Impact of Sports in Their Lives Glory days: a time in someone’s life that is remembered for great success. For the following men, athletic success defined their high school experience – they set school records, earned state titles, and ultimately led their teammates to victory. But success didn’t stop there. Remarkable collegiate careers, rewarding professions, and growing families followed, with the lessons learned from their high school days touching every facet of their lives. Here, six athletes share their fondest memories from their time on the field, mat, or court … and how sports shaped them into the men they are today. BY MARY BETH WALLACE PHOTOGRAPHY BY LANEWOOD STUDIO


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Eric Voges McCallie School, Class of 1981 Sport: Tennis Eric Voges has been playing tennis since he was 4 years old – and he’s still serving up shots. While a student at McCallie School, Voges was a leadership award recipient, a TSSAA state doubles champion two years running, a Chattanooga Rotary singles champion, and MVP his senior year. After playing tennis all four years at the University of Tennessee, he returned to his high school alma mater as the head varsity tennis coach. He now serves as director of tennis operations, and in this role, he’s using his experience and expertise to mold young players into outstanding citizens and athletes.

G L O R Y D AY S

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Q. Who was your high school tennis coach, and what impact did he have on you? A. My coach was John Strang, who

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gave me the nickname “Big E” because I was small. His impact on me was a lot more about life than tennis. Coach Strang taught me how to meet success and failure with the same attitude. His humor and ability to make you feel good still live with me today.

Q. What is your fondest memory from playing tennis? A. The relationships, no doubt. At the time you don’t realize

it, but as a coach now and as a former player, the relationships you make while playing your sport stay with you a lifetime.

Q. How did tennis shape you into the man you are today? A. In tennis, you are out on the court by yourself, no coaches,

no referees, just you. So, you have to be a problem solver and work through doubt, insecurities, frustration, anger, winning, choking, and nerves all on your own. I learned how to set goals and work toward them. I also had to make the decision early on if I was going to play fair or cheat. You’re responsible for calling your own lines, so you have to be prepared to make the right decision.

Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. I use tennis as a vehicle to teach athletes about life. I would

say train very hard, and don’t be afraid to go after your goals. I also remind them that they can go a lot further being part of a team than they can thinking and acting like an individual.

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As a tennis player, I was known for being elusive and consistent. I wasn’t very physical, so I had to use my brain and persistence a lot. I won more games with my brain than my body.”



Ed Hammonds Howard High School, Class of 1968 Sports: Track & Field, Football For Ed “Buddy” Hammonds, speed was the name of the game. This track star was the 100-yard dash state champion for two straight years, and in 1968, his senior year at Howard High School, he set the state record at 9.7 seconds. His collegiate career was equally as impressive, and Hammonds seemed bound for the 1972 Olympics – until a pulled hamstring benched him from the trials. Never one to quit, though, Hammonds was competing, and winning, the very next year. He’s since been honored by the Greater Chattanooga Sports Hall of Fame and the M Club Hall of Fame ]

at the University of Memphis. G L O R Y D AY S

Q. What was your favorite thing about track? A. I loved to compete. And I loved that no matter the

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outcome of any one race, you always had the opportunity to come back and take things to the next level. With track, you’re running against the same athletes multiple times a year. You might beat me one day, but I can work harder and beat you tomorrow. Q. Did you continue to run track after high school? A. Yes, I got a track scholarship to Memphis State

University. I competed all four years of college and was a two-time NCAA National Champion in the 100-yard dash. My best time was 9.4 seconds. I was also on the Memphis State championship team for the 440-yard relay. I got to travel and compete all over the United States, Canada, Europe, Africa – all these places I would never have had a chance to go in my life if it weren’t for track. Q. What is the greatest lesson track taught you? A. Don’t give up. Continue to fight. Defeat is just a

mindset – I absolutely believe that. The only time I felt like I lost a race was when I thought another individual was better than I was, and my performance reflected that. Even though you may admire someone, or find them superior, you can’t let it stop you from doing your best. Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. To be a good athlete, you have to have the heart and

the dedication. Your coaches will provide the training for you – it’s up to you to provide the rest.

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Track allowed me many opportunities – to see the world, to become friends with my competitors. I owe so much to this sport.”


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under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Protect the environment. The Kawasaki MULE™ side x side is an off- highway vehicle only, and is not designed, equipped or manufactured for use on public streets, roads or highways. Obey the laws and regulations that control the use of your vehicle. ©2019 Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. KAWASAKI CARES: Read Owner’s Manual and all on-product warnings. Always wear protective gear appropr 20TTTMULE6X7C under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Protect the environment. The Kawasaki MULE™ side x side is an of Assembled in theCARES: U.S.A. badge does not applyand to the MULE PRO-MX™ models. Accessorized unit shown. KAWASAKI Read Owner’s Manual all on-product warnings. Always wear protective gear appropriate for the use of this vehicle. Never operate equipped or manufactured for use on public streets, roads or highways. Obey the laws and regulations under the influence of drugs or alcohol. Protect the environment. The Kawasaki MULE™ side x side is an off- highway vehicle only, and is not designed, Kawasaki U.S.A. equipped or manufactured for use on public streets, roads or highways. Obey the laws and regulations that controlMotors the useCorp., of your vehicle. ©2019 Kawasaki Motors Corp., U.S.A. 20TTTMULE6X7C Assembled in the U.S.A. badge does not apply to the MULE PRO-MX™ models. Accessorized unit shown. Assembled in the U.S.A. badge does not apply to the MULE PRO-MX™ models. Accessorized unit shown.

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I couldn’t begin to imagine what I would be like if I hadn’t wrestled for 16 years of my life.”

Chris Mullin Notre Dame High School, Class of 1985 Sport: Wrestling If you are familiar with Notre Dame athletics, chances are you’ve heard of the “Wrestling MulG L O R Y D AY S

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lins” dynasty. While in high school, Chris Mullin wrestled under his older brother, John, who served as assistant coach. He went undefeated two seasons and earned Tennessee’s “Most

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Outstanding Wrestler” two years in a row. Mullin continued his wrestling career at the University of Tennessee before switching gears and pursuing a career in medicine. He’s passed down his wisdom, and his athleticism, to sons Packie and Lucas, who have become wrestling state champions in their own right.

Q. What is your fondest memory from wrestling? A. In high school, it was the state tournament my senior

year – just being able to finish out on a high note, plus I got to watch my friends win championships too. Then later in life, wrestling became a true family affair. My fondest memories have been watching my two sons and my nephew wrestle for Notre Dame and win their own state championships. And my daughters and nieces, they’ve all been managers for the team.

Q. What were you known for on the wrestling mat? A. I might have had a little bit of a mean streak at the

time [laughs]. I was actually known for my takedowns, which is when you take your opponent off their feet. I was pretty intense. 84

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Q. What is the greatest lesson wrestling taught you? A. Wrestling really taught me work ethic and how hard

you have to work to be successful. That same work ethic carried me through the long hours and late nights of medical school and residency and even now, as an obstetrician. Wrestling also taught me how to stay calm and cool under significant pressure, which I still find helpful to this day.

Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. Competing in a sport is something that you do that

helps you reach your potential as an individual; it’s a tool to prepare you for your future life. The sport you compete in is not who you are.


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Jimmy Wigfall South Pittsburg High School, Class of 1970 Sports: Football, Basketball Jimmy Wigfall is a legend – literally. Dubbed “The Legend” for his stellar career as a tailback for the South Pittsburg Pirates, Wigfall was notorious for his speed and elusiveness on the football field. Not only did it earn him All-Tri-State honors and “Player of the Week” recognitions, Wigfall’s talents contributed to the Pirates’ undefeated 1969 season. Although he turned down his football scholarship to pursue the military at the age of 18, Wigfall’s love for the sport still runs deep. He’s now a regular on Friday nights at Beene Stadium. Q. What is your fondest memory from playing football? A. I’ll never forget coming from behind to win over

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Jasper and earn our trip to the state playoffs. Jasper was South Pittsburg’s big rival, and we were down 22-8 at the half. The locker room was sort of somber as the coaches – Don Grider, Sam Brooks, and Hoot Gibson – tried to form a game plan. I’ll never forget when Phil Beene, our principal and former coach, came to that locker room and stood there in his trench coat. He just stood there and glared – never said a word! It was all the motivation we needed for the second half. The final score was 28-22.

Q. What were your goals as a high school athlete? Did you achieve them? A. I wanted to go undefeated with my team – and we

achieved that. Then, once we realized the TSSAA was creating a playoff system for the very first time, we wanted to win it all. Our ’69 team was the first to win the Class A state championship.

Q. What is the greatest lesson football taught you? A. It’s more than just one lesson. Football taught me to

be fair, to make good decisions, and to do what’s right. You have to try to be humble, whether you’re winning or losing. I don’t like to lose, but when it happened, I saw it as an opportunity to learn from my mistakes. I could always work harder for the next time.

Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. Work hard, be a team player, never quit, and listen

to your coaches. If you do those four things, you’ll go far as an athlete.

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Football gave me discipline. I’m very disciplined in what I’m doing, always planning ahead. When you don’t come prepared to win, you lose.”


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Chris White Bradley Central High School, Class of 1981 Sports: Football, Basketball, Golf, Track & Field A multi-sport athlete, Chris White was known for two things: his competitive drive and his height (measuring in at 6-foot-4). He was an All-State football player, led the basketball team in scoring, and received Mr. Bear at Bradley Central High School – the top award given to a male athlete. White’s discipline and skill earned him a position on the University of Tennessee’s football team, where he was named All-American in 1985. He then went on to play for the Seattle Seahawks and the European Football League in Italy before settling down in Cleveland. His three children, Alex, Lorenzo, and Isabella, are now carrying on their father’s athletic legacy.

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Q. What is your fondest memory from playing sports? A. With football it was beating our rivals, Red Bank and

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Cleveland, my senior year and being able to go to the playoffs. Back then, they just took one team to the playoffs, so it was a really big deal – the entire city shut down.

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Q. What were your goals as a high school athlete? Did you achieve them? A. I always wanted to play quarterback at the University

of Tennessee. And I did – I played one series as a freshman against Memphis. I ran the ball and lost four yards – I’m in the record books! After that, I got moved to defensive back. But I did fulfill my goal.

Q. How did athletics shape you into the man you are today? A. I remember playing football against Red Bank. We

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The single greatest lesson my athletic career taught me is this: Don’t let anyone tell you that you’re not good enough.”

were ranked No. 1 in the state at the time. I ran the wrong direction on an option play, and then I pitched it and we lost the game. I remember playing basketball in a packed gym at Howard on Friday night. The ball is thrown to me, and I’m posting up Reggie White – the best athlete to come out of Chattanooga. I also remember riding my bike to the practice field in the summer, in 90-degree heat. I’m the only person on the field preparing for August. The way I dealt with the failure, the competition, and the preparation shaped me into the person I am now.

Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. If you put the same amount of time in your education

as you do sports, how smart would you be? Try to maintain a good balance between athletics and your education.

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Lee Dyer Baylor School, Class of 1977 Sports: Baseball, Football, Swimming, Wrestling, Basketball, Track & Field You could say that Lee Dyer has mastered the fine art of multitasking. His freshman year at Baylor, Dyer spread his time between not two, not three, but six sports. He eventually whittled the list down to baseball, football, and swimming, and he lettered multiple years in all three sports. His senior year, he was captain of the baseball and football teams, an All-City performer in baseball, and the recipient of the Alexander Guerry Leadership Award, Ted Nelson Best Athlete Award, and Tommy Mullican Award – Baylor’s most prestigious athletic honors. Fast-forward four decades, and Dyer is still multitasking. He’s now balancing his faith, family (including two sons, also Baylor grads), work, and an enduring career as a football official. [

Q. What was your favorite thing about playing sports in high school? A. Definitely the camaraderie and the friendships I built with

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my teammates and coaches. To this day, these men are some of my closest friends. We’ve kept in touch through phone calls, reunions, and fundraising efforts for Baylor.

Q. Who were your coaches, and what impact did they have on you? A. I had a lot of coaches [laughs], but two that stand out are

Luke Worsham and Gene Etter. These guys basically pushed me every day – not only on the field, but off the field as well. They instilled in me principles like teamwork, preparation, and sacrifice.

Q. Did you continue to play sports after high school? A. I had offers to play football and baseball at different schools. I

ultimately chose to play baseball at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and I was an outfielder all four years there. That’s when I got into officiating, and that career has continued to this day. I began officiating high school sports, then I moved on to the Southern Conference, then the SEC, and now the NFL.

Q. What advice would you give today’s high school athletes? A. First, play more than one sport if you’re given the opportu-

nity. It helps break up the monotony so that you don’t burn out. Second, work hard to balance sports with academics. And third, once you stop playing, find ways to give back to your sport. I’d really encourage former athletes to get involved in officiating; it’s very rewarding, and we need officials right now in all sports.

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I’ll never forget my senior season of baseball. In the district tournament, I hit four home runs in four consecutive games – two of those were grand slams!”

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Life on the Farm By Lucy Morris Photography by Emily Long

For Daniel Carter, second-generation farmer and owner of Carter Farms, farming isn’t just a hobby or a job – it’s a way of life. Nestled in the Sequatchie Valley just over the line into Jasper, Tennessee, Carter Farms sits quietly, not far from the main road. Founded by Bobby Brad Carter in 1958 and currently run by his son Daniel Carter, Carter Farms raises Angus cattle and Katahdin sheep. With more than 200 acres of pasture, 22 paddocks, and two separate farm locations, the Carters could easily spread out. But given the strong familial bonds, when it came time for Daniel to take over the farm, settling down just a few hundred yards from the childhood home where his parents still reside felt right.

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Learning Life’s Values Growing up on a farm meant long, blissful days spent exploring the outdoors for Daniel. “My dad bought the farm in 1958, and I was born and raised here. Growing up, it was really the idyllic farm life that you read about in novels,” he reminisces. “All the kids wanted to be here. We were always on horseback, in the mountains, in the creek bottoms. Friends regularly stayed overnight, and we coon hunted, we fished, we wrestled goats – typical kid stuff,” he laughs. His passion for the outdoors only grew, and it didn’t take long for Daniel, the youngest of five children born to Bobby Brad and Gwendolyn Carter, to take to farm life. “All of my best memories are on the farm,” he says. “I was always wanting to be around the animals, to play with them and take care of them.” His love for animals was evident to his family, who enjoyed nurturing his enthusiasm. “Each Christmas, my present was an animal for the farm,” he recounts. “My favorite Christmas ever, my dad bought me a nanny goat named Barbara. Dad had gotten her from a friend that had named her after his wife, and she had a red bow around her neck. I built an empire with Barbara over the years!” he laughs. “I was definitely an animal kid, and I think my dad was too. He always had an animal in his hands.” This shared love for animals bonded Daniel and his father; it was days spent working in the fields and feeding cattle that created an environment ripe with opportunity to pass along some " o f l i f e ’s m o s t i m p o r t a n t t e - I don’t see nets. “One of the it as work. biggest values I These are learned from my dad is the impor- just the tance of taking things you care of your animals. You have to do because feed them, check they’re your up on them daily, and make sure lifestyle, and they have their you love it." vaccines,” he explains. “It’s not cheap, and if you’re not willing to put in the work and the resources, you shouldn’t do it. If my dad didn’t think someone would take care of the animals, he wouldn’t sell them to them.” 92

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The Carters Daniel Carter with wife, Rachel, sons, Ollie and Harry, and father, Bobby Brad

Today, Daniel and his wife, Rachel, along with their two teenage sons, Ollie and Harry, have about 100 head of cattle, 100 sheep, 10 to 15 laying hens, a couple of roosters, a goose, a llama, a pig, some guinea fowl, horses, peacocks, a few dogs including Daniel's righthand man and farm dog, Ace, and a turkey – to name a few – which means checking the animals can take some time. “You can’t do that well if you’re just out a few days a week. It’s gotta be seven days a week,” says Daniel. “But I don’t see it as work. It’s a lifestyle. The moment you start trying to count hours or days, it loses something. It’s not about return on investment. These are just the things you do because they’re your lifestyle, and you love it.”

Forging Community Relationships Part of the lifestyle you grow akin to as a farmer encompasses the relationships you develop with others in the community. For Daniel, this can mean rushing to help a fellow farmer move his horses when extensive rain has caused flooding that's affecting his land and livelihood, or it can simply involve making connections at the local co-op. “There is so much camaraderie with the other farmers. They become part of your community, part of your family,” he explains. “We like to catch up and talk, compare notes and stories.” One story that sticks out to Daniel involves his rescue pig. “My pig got out


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Feeding Time

When Daniel and his dog Ace first arrive to the second farm to feed the bulls, they race each other to the barn, Ace on foot and Daniel in his truck. It's a tradition they both enjoy.

one day and was running toward the post office down the street,” he recalls. “I didn’t know what on earth she was trying to do, but I raced to catch her before she went too far. My friend Wally Shadrick saw it apparently, and he called me and was quite serious about his question – had he seen me chasing my pig on a bicycle?” he laughs. “We always laugh about it because it reminds us of that Jeff Foxworthy routine, ‘You Might Be a Redneck If…’” The connections formed in the community mean everyone is willing to lend a helping hand. “A couple of times a year, I’ll have some guys come to the farm to help 94

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me out. I’ve got teachers from the local high school helping, coaches, all types of guys,” he explains. “We laugh, get dirty – we make it a fun time. The ongoing joke is that whatever goes wrong, like a gate being left open or a goat getting loose or something, is the fault of the person who’s not there,” he laughs. But with all the joking and horsing around aside, everyone is there to put in a hard day’s work. “Our time spent working on the farm feels like a throwback to an older way of living. There’s something quite pleasing about being exhausted from a day of working cattle.”

Passing Down Life Lessons Daniel, in addition to working on the farm, has served as a faculty member and rugby coach at Sewanee for more than a decade. For students eager to learn more about civic engagement and environmental responsibility, he’s got knowledge to share. “A lot of students I teach at Sewanee want to learn more about what we do here at the farm, and they’ll come stay with us for a couple of months and help out.


On the "Moove" Daniel checks in with his cattle while rotating them from one pasture to another with fresh grass.

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Rachel and I have really enjoyed getting to know these young folks over the years. While many of them have grown up, gotten married, and moved on, they’ll often come back in the summers to visit. We’ll have homecooked meals, eat on the porch, and go swimming in the lake,” he says. The time spent together has had a positive effect on everyone. “It seems like their time here had an impact on them, and they have all been influential on my own children,” he explains. When it comes to Daniel's teenage sons, who both attend McCallie School, time spent together on the farm means everything. “I love when I get to see them out being boys, getting dirty, running around in the open field,” he explains. “Boys, man. They are so caught up in technology that they can forget to notice a butterfly or a bird or just nature itself. So, when I see my boys pausing to recognize something, I always enjoy that. I hope those are the things they will look back on and appreciate.” Daniel would be happy if his kids wanted to take over the farm one day, but he recognizes " that desire may come There’s later in life. “We all go through different something quite pleasing phases in life,” he explains. “Even I had a about being period where I lived away. So, if it’s not exhausted their thing now necesfrom a day sarily, I think as they grow older, they may of working start to realize that a cattle." lot of great memories were made here.” For now, Daniel is content. “As with anything in life, there are those moments when everything is settled. The sun is shining, the cows are laying down. The calves are happy, and the birds are chirping,” he says. “There’s a certain contentment about that. “There are always questions, you know, about whether you can make a living as a farmer,” Daniel says. “But it really comes down to how you think about what it means to make a living. Are you trying to make a certain amount of money before you can call it a career? Or can you focus on whether or not your family is happy and able to get by? For me, I plan to hold onto the farm as long as I can and do this until I can’t anymore. I tell people all the time, whether I’m Coach Carter, Dr. Carter, Daniel, or Dad, you all know where to find me. I’m at 150 Carter Farm, and I don’t plan to go anywhere.” 96

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Lifestyle The Making of a Gentleman / Musical Men / Hosts with the Most / Southern Style Homes

“A man who is a master of patience is master of everything else.” – George Savile

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THE MAKING OF A

Gentleman

BY M A RY B E T H WA L L AC E / PH O T O G R A PH Y BY R I C H S M I T H O N L O C AT I O N AT C H AT TA N O O G A W H I S K E Y E V E N T H A L L

Humility, integrity, chivalry, and honor – these are characteristics often attributed to a gentleman. But the list rarely stops there. Copious “how to” guides contend a real gentleman walks with purpose. He must stand out in a crowd, but never seek to be the center of attention. He must show superb manners, but challenge practices he deems unethical. He must have a desire to succeed, but give credit to whom credit is due. While all of the above rings true, getting to the essence of a gentleman lies in this statement: “Today, I will strive to be a better man than I was yesterday.” In their own words, these six men share what principles guide them and how their past experiences and influences have defined and shaped them into who they are today.

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JAMES MCKISSIC President, ArtsBuild

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y early days were spent exploring life with and emulating my Great Aunt Leona. When I was born, she was well into her 70s, but she became my babysitter and, later on, took care of my sister and me after school. She was gender nonconforming before we had the language for it, had a pistol under her pillow, and sometimes, to our delight and giggles, cussed. She burned her clipped fingernails so nobody could hex her, loved the Atlanta Braves, and taught me how to make cracklin’ cornbread. My Aunt Leona also taught me that family was most important and that education and “what I get in my head” were paramount – once I had it, no one could take it away. She was compassionate, and she ignited my interest in history and genealogy with her thick family Bible, full of faintly written births, marriages, and deaths. When other family members whispered and worried, she celebrated and encouraged my artistic interests. So much of the quirky, creative man I am today was influenced by my Great Aunt Leona, and I wouldn’t trade anything in the world for the time I spent in her tiny, olive green house on Fair Street.


TODD WOMACK President and CEO, Bridge Public Affairs

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would credit a lot of who I am to where I came from. Having two parents who were focused on serving others – and not drawing attention to themselves in the process – has created a model that really is foundational. Then, throughout my career, I’ve had the pleasure to work for people of character and integrity like Senator Bob Corker, from whom I learned a tremendous amount. In the government arena, it’s easy to find individuals who are driven by ego and a desire to promote themselves. But Senator Corker was always drawn to public service out of a desire to help others. He recognized that we’re here to serve other people, and to do that effectively, you have to have a strong dose of humility, an extraordinary work ethic, and a willingness to speak up for “the least of these.” Generosity is also a big piece of that. There’s financial generosity, of course, but also generosity of time and talent. I’ve watched folks give their lives away for the sake of serving others, which is inspiring to me. The best example of this is Jesus, and my ultimate desire is to be like him.

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DAN GILMORE Founder and Attorney at Law, Squire Strategies

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grew up in a wonderfully loving and supportive church community – the very church in which my parents were raised, met, and married. And it was the same church that later ordained my mother, the first woman ordained by a Southern Baptist church in Texas and only the second woman of any faith ordained in the state. Her devotion to her calling, even when it meant transferring her orders to the Methodist church, taught me the importance of commitment in the face of hardship and intolerance. My father’s extensive participation and leadership in many forms of civic engagement, including serving as a Dallas city councilman, taught me the importance of community and service. But it was meeting my wife 37 years ago that, to quote Robert Frost, “has made all the difference.”

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Selling Houses. Creating Homes.

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here are three traits my parents instilled in me that made me the man I am today. The first is respecting others. They emphasized the importance of respecting all members of society and knowing you are no better than anyone else. Also, respecting your elders – saying “yes sir” and “no sir” – was strongly encouraged in our daily upbringing. Secondly, having a strong work ethic was stressed. Hard work, dedication, and always doing the right thing were of utmost importance. Lastly, showing thanks for the blessings you have in life is a key to happiness. Always give back to your church and your community, and your life will continue to be blessed.

MIKE GRIFFIN President and CEO, Cleveland/Bradley Chamber of Commerce

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JIM HILL

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Army Veteran and Retired Business Executive

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n my youth, a gentleman was defined as one born in a family of high social status. By that standard, I could never aspire to be a gentleman. Not accepting that definition, my parents insisted that I always live ethically and honorably, and they taught me that I should treat others in a proper and polite way. In addition, they modeled this behavior in their daily lives. Later in life, notwithstanding the original definition, I officially became a gentleman as I took the oath of office as a commissioned officer in the U.S. Army, where I served for 20 years as “an officer and a gentleman.” During those years of service, I tried to emulate my parents’ teachings in my dealings with those around me, especially with all the cadets who enrolled in my chemistry class at the United States Military Academy at West Point.

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JOE NOVENSON

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Pastor to Senior Adults, Lookout Mountain Presbyterian Church

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ny admirable character trait I might have is indisputably a gracious gift from another. Because of their own goodness, they gave to me that which I neither earned nor deserved. That is true of me all the way back to my childhood. Others loved me and invested in me with unimaginable kindness. The pre-eminent gracious giver in my life is a former carpenter. He’s also a King. His name is Jesus. He carved his grace into the splintered grain of Joe at 16 years of age. By his grace, he shifted the momentum of my life outward and away from myself to honor and serve him and others. The person who introduced me to Jesus is the woman who has been my most influential teacher over 44 years of marriage. I remember picking her up for a date from a riotruined inner-city Boys Club, where she served with a joyous abandon that called me to a much deeper love of the little and left behind. My Savior and my bride are the two most life-shaping forces in my 67 years on the Earth.

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USICAL EN Plato once said, “Music gives a soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and life to everything.” His words certainly strike a chord with the following musicians, whose natural talents are second only to their passion and dedication to their craft. Here, we invite you to meet the men behind the instruments. By Mary Beth Wallace Photography by Emily Long

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What got you into music? RS I grew up in a highly musical family. My mother is a fantastic singer and piano player. She played and practiced relentlessly when I was a child, so it was always around. I also grew up in a Pentecostal church where my grandfather was a pastor. He played guitar and taught me my first chords. Then I had an uncle who was a singer in a pretty well-known jam band in the 90s, and he took me to his shows. Those shows were where I really fell in love with musical performance. I’ve had a lot of folks who influenced me along the way, and I’m grateful to them all.

Where has your musical career led you?

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RS I play the banjo for Slim Pickins Bluegrass. We’ve been based here in Chattanooga since 2009. We’ve done some touring in Europe and Montana, but we mostly play private events and select shows in the area. We released an album in 2014, titled simply "Slim Pickins," and it's comprised of mostly original music. And then as a solo artist, I’ve released multiple albums, with the first being “Songs from the Suck” in 2017. I had a great response from that album, and it received a nomination for Bluegrass Album of the Year from the Independent Music Association.

“The actual process of learning new music and creating new music is probably my favorite part. I enjoy the performance aspect as well, but the times I’ve spent with the instrument and words alone in a quiet place are special.”

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How often do you practice? What does your process look like? RS I enjoy practicing and do it as often as I can. I try to get in 30 minutes per day as a minimum, but typically end up putting in 90 minutes to two hours. My rehearsals can be structured and precise if I’m rehearsing for a specific show, or they can be creative and loose if I’m trying to write new material.

What impact has music had on you? RS The biggest impact has to be the opportunities I’ve been lucky enough to have. The number of cool people and places I’ve been exposed to is far greater than what I ever imagined. It definitely wouldn’t have happened without music.

If you could collaborate with another musician, who would it be? RS Earl Scruggs, hands down. He’s been incredibly influential to me as a banjo player.


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AL AN WY AT T S A X O P H O N E P L AY E R S I N C E ‘ 7 9

What got you into music? AW My mother is a musician, who in her day sang and played piano very well. So with that, I can hardly remember a time in my life when I was not around music.

Where has your musical career led you? AW In addition to my professorship at Lee University, I’ve performed at many venues in the greater Southeast, as well as a few spots in the Los Angeles area. My favorite so far has been the Knoxville Civic Center with the Knoxville Symphony Orchestra. And before moving to Katowice, Poland, for a semester-long sabbatical, I led a jazz quartet that performed every month at Barking Legs Theater in Chattanooga.

How have you evolved as a musician over the years?

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AW In the beginning of my career, I thought what I really wanted to do was move to a big city, perform with everybody, ride tour buses, etc. I realized pretty early on that this kind of life wasn’t for me. It was while I was playing in a house band five nights a week that I was asked to teach

“Being a university professor for me has been ideal, affording me the opportunity to have a positive impact on future generations of musicians.”

saxophone to students part-time at Lee College, now Lee University. I discovered immediately that helping young people get on a path to more effectiveness and efficiency with their instrument was the kind of puzzle that held more of a fascination for me.

How often do you practice? What does your process look like? AW As a jazz musician, I am in the habit of individually researching (listening to recordings) and then practicing my respective part, so that when the band comes together to play, I know how to add effectively to the collective whole. This aspect of personal readiness is the single most important element in the proper training of jazz musicians.

If you could collaborate with another musician, who would it be? AW John Coltrane, Charlie Parker, Sonny Still, Cannonball Adderley – there are too many to name! I couldn’t begin to thank each of them for the incredible nonverbal instruction I’ve received from hours spent listening to and studying their music.

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J EFF HERN DO N T R O M B O N E P L AY E R S I N C E ‘ 7 8

What got you into music? JH My grandfather, Bob Pillsburg, was a musician. He played the trombone and an assortment of brass instruments for an army band in WWII. He wasn’t playing anymore by the time I came around, but he’d tell stories about it. I wanted to follow in his footsteps.

I had become a much more independent musician. I took that compliment as a challenge, to be able to walk into a group and play a new piece of music with confidence from the start … to not hide behind a large ensemble but make my own original mark on the piece.

Where has your musical career led you?

How do you use music to express yourself?

JH After taking a long break from playing in high school, I picked the trombone back up again in 2001. Since then, I’ve joined three different groups here in Chattanooga: Mid-South Symphonic Band (a concert band), Scenic City Sound (a jazz band), and the orchestra at Christ United Methodist Church. Between these ensembles, I’m covering a wide range of genres, from the classics and religious pieces to the jazz standards of Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin. Each challenge me in a different way.

JH My “regular” job is in industrial maintenance, which is very technical in nature. I get the same feeling of satisfaction when I master a particularly difficult passage of music as I do when I solve a technical problem at my job. Working it out is part of the fun for me.

How have you evolved as a musician over the years? JH Most of my evolution happened in the past few years when I was in the jazz band at UTC. My director, Dr. Erika Schafer, paid me a compliment I’ll never forget; she said that, over the course of two semesters,

“At this point in my life, I’m not sure what it would be like not to have music. It’s always something to look forward to, whether an upcoming concert or a weekly rehearsal.”

If you could collaborate with another musician, who would it be? JH James Pankow – he’s the trombone player for Chicago and has arranged all the brass parts since the band’s inception in the 60s. If there was ever an opportunity to learn how to arrange or even just to play something with the guy, that would be a dream.


JAC QUES IRV IN P I A N O P L AY E R S I N C E ‘ 9 8

What got you into music? JI Growing up in New Orleans, in the same neighborhood as jazz greats Louis Armstrong, Kermit Ruffins, and Shamarr Allen, music was a way of life. My mother was a concert pianist, and my father directed the church choir. I used to run around on the stage during choir practice in my diapers. As I got older, I learned to play music by ear – it was just a natural gift. I could sit down at the piano, hear a song, and play it. My parents taught me theory and how to read music after that.

Where has your musical career led you?

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JI I play gospel music at my church every Sunday morning. It’s so gratifying because it helps people get through their week. I’ll have folks tell me that they sometimes don’t receive the Spirit from the spoken word, but they will

from my music and the songs that I chose. I also play at weddings and at a few local venues during the holidays.

How do you use music to express yourself? JI Music stimulates me, relaxes me, and gets me through stressful times. I’ll actually “play myself happy.” If I have something going on in my life, I turn to the piano. If my wife, Tenesha, is mad at me, I use music to woo her [laughs]. I love the holidays, so during Easter or Christmas, I’ll play all the traditional songs for my son, Jayden, and daughter, Jaylen, and get us all in the holiday spirit.

I know I have to live up to a greater standard. I realize that I can’t say or do certain things, because at the end of the day, I’m a musician for the Lord.

If you could collaborate with another musician, who would it be? JI Stevie Wonder, because of the way he plays and all the knowledge he has as a musician. I’d enjoy every minute of it!

What impact has music had on you? JI It’s made me a better person. Being a gospel musician and being up in front of the congregation every Sunday,

“Practicing my music isn’t necessarily something I need to do, but it’s something I love to do. Music is therapy for me.”

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DARREN S ELF G U I TA R P L AY E R S I N C E ‘ 9 8

What got you into music? DS Without a doubt, my dad got me into playing because he is a musician as well. He saw that music came naturally to me, and that it piqued my interest. When I was in third grade, he enrolled me in piano lessons, and in seventh grade, he bought me my first guitar.

Where has your musical career led you?

MUSICAL MEN

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DS I’m a music director at a local church, The Met Off Main, and I’m also part of a YouTube musical vlogging duo, Eklektiq Sol. Plus, over the years

I’ve been connected to musical groups around town. I’ve performed at Nightfall, Riverbend, and Songbirds, to name a few. There’s nothing quite like playing music with a group of people.

How have you evolved as a musician over the years? DS When I was young, music brought me confidence because people thought I was “cool” for playing guitar. I identified myself as a musician and loved the attention it brought me. I played for a lot of people, but I also played for myself. Then, in my late 20s, I did a lot of reflection on the kind of legacy I wanted

to leave behind. That’s when I realized I needed to share my gifts with others. I believe that’s the best way to honor a God-given talent. So, my biggest evolution wasn’t so much my style, but my perspective.

How often do you practice? What does your process look like? DS I typically practice daily, and it’s seldom that a day goes by that I do not touch an instrument. Many times, my practice is based around a need to learn new songs for performances or Sunday services. At my house, practice consists of me either playing my favorite songs from memory or composing new songs. It’s an ongoing process, and I love my practice to be a hybrid of discipline and creativity.

[

If you could collaborate with another musician, who would it be? DS Quincy Jones, due to his amazing insight and knowledge of the whole creative process. His influence will span generations.

“I want to use music to bring hope, light, and unity to people – to make the world better. So, more times than not, the songs you hear from me will be written about those things.”

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HOSTS

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The art of entertaining is a talent bestowed upon a select few. Meet the men who have what it takes to engage their guests with compassion and style. From calm and comforting to elegant and energetic, each host has his own flair. And while these one-of-a-kind parties may feature thought-out themes or custom culinary creations, guests always take center stage. BY CHRISTINA CANNON PHOTOGRAPHY BY RICH SMITH

BO WATSON HIXSON

If you were to ask Bo Watson where he draws inspiration for his events, his answer might surprise you. “I enjoy reading and studying Thomas Jefferson, and he was a huge entertainer,” explains Watson. “He was known for his dinners at Monticello, and he used good food and fine wine as an entrée to many deep political and philosophical discussions.” Watson, who began hosting more events after marrying his wife, Nicole, in 2018, admires Jefferson’s approach and tries to embody him when entertaining guests. “There is something strangely spiritual about sharing a meal with someone. Somehow the environment, not just the food, lowers relationship barriers,” says Watson. “It opens us up to conversation and the chance to have a deeper understanding of one another.”

“MY FAVORITE PART OF HOSTING EVENTS IS GETTING TO BUILD RELATIONSHIPS AND KEEP UP WITH EVERYONE’S BUSY LIVES.”

A meal at the Watson household wouldn’t be complete without the couple’s signature charcuterie board, and other crowd favorites including a watermelon and feta appetizer and goat cheese stuffed dates wrapped in bacon. Regardless of what is on the menu, one thing is certain – Watson’s Big Green Egg is never far away. From his prime rib nights to burger bars, preparing at least part of the meal on his Big Green Egg has become somewhat of a tradition for Watson.

Since he’s frequently on the road for work, Watson’s gatherings serve as a way to stay connected with family and friends, and his parties typically welcome anywhere from four to 20 people. To be a good host, Watson believes it’s all about preparation and perspective. No event turns out perfectly, and things do, in fact, go wrong. People don’t show up, food gets cold, and recipes don’t always turn out as planned. A good host focuses, not on these things, but rather on their guests. “If you keep your focus on the main thing, your guests, then everything else seems to work out. When we invest our time in people, it makes a difference – it impacts them,” Watson elaborates. “People find comfort in the presence of people they know and care about. Combine that instinct with food preparation, and you have the spot where people want to be.”

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MARK RAMSEY RIVERVIEW

[

HOSTS WITH THE MOST

]

“ TO BE A GOOD HOST, YOU HAVE TO TREAT EVERYONE INVOLVED WITH YOUR EVENT WITH THE U TMOST RESPECT.”

Growing up in North Carolina, Mark Ramsey was a big fan of the beach music popular in the coastal areas of the state. From an early age, he could be found listening to artists such as The Tams, The Drifters, and The Spinners, so when he set out to throw a party one year, he knew he wanted beach music to play a role. Beach Music & Beer is now in its 25th year, and the event is reminiscent of the good ol’ college days. What started with a guest list of 50 has grown to 300 attendees, and the party places an emphasis on good conversation with good friends. “If it wasn’t for some of these events, I’d have no social life at all,” laughs Ramsey.

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“I love to host events because I get to spend time with my friends, and these parties help reinforce my friendships.” To this day, Beach Music & Beer is as simple as it started. With no food and just a few kegs of beer, guests at Ramsey’s lawn party are encouraged to connect with those around them. “It’s always nice when guests come to me and tell me that they had a nice time at my party and that they got to see people they hardly ever get to see,” says Ramsey. But Ramsey isn’t just skilled in hosting laid-back, more informal events. He has also been instrumental in what he calls the holiday museum party. This event

started as an elegant Christmas gathering in an apartment lobby and has transformed into a black-tie affair that welcomes roughly 1,000 individuals. Taking place at the Hunter Museum of American Art for the last several years, this event features an open bar and light food. While Ramsey was one of four men who originally started the event, it has seen more than 125 hosts come and go over its 40-year history. “To be a good host, you have to treat everyone involved with your event with the utmost respect,” Ramsey says. “Mostly, I just try to think in advance what would make the guests want to stay with you, regardless of where you are or what you’re doing.” In addition to his Beach Music & Beer party and the holiday event, Ramsey regularly hosts a Head of the Hooch gathering and a Holiday Open House, as well as several smaller gettogethers for various holidays.

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SHALIN TEJANI

HOSTS WITH THE MOST

]

OOLTEWAH

[

For Shalin Tejani, hosting famand his wife, Niti, were upfront with their ily and friends hasn’t been a learned builder and architect about communal activity – it’s in his DNA. Growing spaces being at the forefront. The end up within the Indian community, result was a home that’s layout caters to Tejani was constantly at family-friends’ groups, whether it be for a grilled pizza houses, and it wasn't night, game night, or uncommon for casual a traditional Indian “HOSTING, TO ME, parties at various homes meal. to have 20 to 30 guests TRANSCENDS THE Anywhere from GATHERINGS WE on the weekend. just a few people to “Our community has ORGANIZE. I WANT TO upwards of 35 can an ‘open door’ policy ALWAYS BE KNOWN be found at one of when it comes to family Tejani’s gatherings, AS SOMEONE WHO and friends, and it’s just but he notes that he a cultural norm that we EXUDES HOSPITALITY doesn’t necessarily spend time with each RATHER THAN JUST want people to feel other,” explains Tejani. BEING A HOST.” like they are at an “Having people over is event. so much a part of who “You have to strike I am that I don’t even a fine balance beconsider it hosting, and our gatherings tween meeting people’s needs but also don’t feel like events.” making them feel at home at the same Hosting is so engrained in Tejani’s time,” says Tejani. “I just love making lifestyle, it was a major motivator when it people feel like they are part of the family. came to building his current home. Tejani They need to be taken care of, but not 126

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everything has to be prim and proper.” The one exception is his children’s first birthday parties. Each of these took place at an outside venue and welcomed roughly 150 people. “We’ve done everything from a farm party to renting out the Loose Cannon Gallery and bringing in circus performers. We even had a fairy party at my in-laws’ lake property one year,” explains Tejani. When it comes to the children’s parties, the Tejanis’ goals are a little different. For these, everything is in the details, but regardless of what type of party they are hosting, Tejani hopes all of his guests walk away feeling like they just came from a warm and inclusive place. “Hosting, to me, transcends the gatherings we organize. I want to always be known as someone who exudes hospitality rather than just being a host. Guests should simultaneously feel comfortable and catered to.”


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TOM CORY SIGNAL MOUNTAIN

[

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“CARING ABOU T AND HELPING TAKE CARE OF OTHERS IS WHAT LIFE IS ALL ABOU T. IT ’S OUR RELATIONSHIPS, NOT OUR POSSESSIONS, THAT TRULY MAT TER.”

Tom Cory has always been highly involved in his community. Wanting his friends from different walks of life to meet each other, Cory began hosting meetups and events alongside his wife, Pat, decades ago. “I became invested in helping our neighbors and friends meet each other,” explains Cory. “We think it’s incredibly important to know our neighbors.” As a result, Cory began hosting a Christmas open house in 2004 and welcomes upwards of 45 people into his home each holiday season. “A fun tradition that has grown over the years is our Christmas Village. We began putting out miniatures in the late 90s, and we started getting a lot of compliments

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when people were over,” says Cory. “We’ve grown from about 12 buildings to roughly 130 structures and several trains. Each Christmas, we try to add a few new items and rearrange the whole set up. Everyone seems to really look forward to what we’ve done with that each year.” In addition to the Christmas open house, Cory, who is a part-time professional photographer, has been a part of many enthusiast and hobbyist groups over the years. To this day, the Corys host a creativity group, photo arts group, and travel photography group as a way to bring like-minded individuals together. “We wanted people to have a supportive, non-critical environment where they could show their work without

worrying about it being judged,” explains Cory. For these smaller gatherings, the Corys provide food and drinks so their guests can focus on each other, and every get-together starts the same way – with a toast to the health and happiness of each person. “That is a tradition that we picked up from our Irish friends when we were teaching overseas,” remarks Cory. “I like hosting these meetups because it’s exciting to watch as our friends meet new people or restore a connection with someone they haven’t seen in a while. It’s not unusual for photographers to leave our events with plans to take a trip together.” Regardless of what type of event he is hosting, it is always Cory’s goal to make sure everyone in the group feels welcomed and included. Fostering new and existing relationships is the main driving force behind the parties Cory plans. “To be a good host, you simply have to realize that you’re the host and that it’s your job to make sure everyone feels good about the evening,” explains Cory. “Caring about and helping take care of others is what life is all about. It’s our relationships, not our possessions, that truly matter.”


GABRIEL FRANCESCHI BRAINERD

[ HOSTS WITH THE MOST ]

When Gabriel Franceschi and his they had. I love helping people have fun, wife married and put down roots in the so I thought I’d try to do it more often.” Scenic City following college graduFrom wine tastings to game nights, ation, they were ready to fun is at the epicenter of meet some new people. everything Franceschi “It wasn’t long after we “AT THE END does. He notes that, bemoved to Chattanooga that OF THE NIGHT, tween him and his wife, we realized there weren’t I REALLY JUST their family has quite a many events in which WANT MY number of different social people could participate,” GUESTS TO circles, but the goal when Franceschi says. After hosting friends or family throwing a surprise birth- HAVE F UN, is always the same. day party for his wife one WHATEVER “At the end of the night, year that went off without THAT LOOKS I really just want my guests a hitch, Franceschi decided LIKE TO THEM.” to have fun, whatever that that was a void he would looks like to them,” he try to fill. explains. “I always try to “I just wanted to do put myself in my guests’ something nice for my wife, so I rented shoes during every step of the planning a venue, got some food catered, hired a process. I try to think about what that band, and created some special drinks. group of people likes and enjoys, and I I was surprised when over 100 people try to provide that.” showed up,” he recalls. “After the party, Franceschi notes that the events he I started getting all these texts and calls hosts do look a little different now that from people telling me how much fun he has children, but fun is still a priority.

One of the more popular annual events the family hosts is A Birthday Party for Jesus, which takes place every Christmas Eve. “When this party started, I thought parents would just come drop off their kids and use it as a chance to do some last-minute shopping, but the parents love it, and most of them stay,” says Franceschi. Now in its fourth year and with about 50 attendees, A Birthday Party for Jesus consists of several different stations where children get to participate in activities like decorating ornaments and cookies and making waffles and s’mores. The entire night culminates in a reading of “The True Meaning of Christmas.” “Regardless of if it’s adults or kids, it’s always heartwarming to watch people get to connect and bond over shared values or a common interest they didn’t know they had,” says Franceschi. “I like being able to provide that.” C I T YS CO P E M AG .CO M

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Southern Style Homes Homes and properties that embrace and enhance Southern lifestyles Set amongst rolling hills, sparkling lakefront vistas, breathtaking panoramic mountain views, and flourishing farmlands, this collection showcases a variety of authentic home styles available across the Scenic City and Southeast Tennessee. From bungalows with charming amenities or idyllic river retreats to horse farms, mountain bluff estates, and more, these homes demonstrate the highest level of architecture and design with elements genuine to the South.

“A man travels the world over in search of what he needs and returns home to find it.� - George Augustus Moore

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The Classic Tudor — 829 North Bragg Avenue Lookout Mountain, TN 30750

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verlooking the city of Chattanooga, this L ookout Mountain home allows for privacy while being surrounded by beautiful views and historic attractions. Built in 2007, the English Tudor retains a rich vintage character with its flagstone driveway and walkways, decorative half-timbers, and steeply pitched roofs. Inside, modern technologies and luxuries make this home the ideal property. The seamless floor plan and expansive main living areas of the home allow for easy entertaining, whether a large crowd or more intimate gathering. Generous moldings, hardwood floors, coffered ceilings, and five fireplaces

can be found throughout, enhancing the oldworld aesthetic. Large windows provide plenty of natural light, while four stately interior fireplaces generate a warm, cozy living space. For the chef in the family, the home’s sizable kitchen boasts Wolf and Sub-Zero appliances, including a free-standing gas stove, ovens, warming drawer, and double-sided refrigerator. These appliances are accompanied by a prep sink and granite countertops. Between the kitchen, dining room, and family room, a double-sided butler’s pantry operates as the ideal gourmet coffee station or entertaining bar for guests. On the main level, the family room, kitchen, and master bedroom open to a magnificent


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screened-in porch overlooking a sparkling tiled heated pool, flagstone patio surround, and secluded outdoor living area and kitchen. Off the foyer, with absolute serenity, a study doubles as the library or music room. Quietly tucked away on the main level, the master bedroom with steamer shower offers the perfect peaceful retreat. On the second level, four bedroom suites, a bonus room, guest suite, and working office open to a spectacular city view. The walk-out level was designed with the best of times in mind. An oversized family room with an exercise room, expansive mahogany bar, and walk-in brick temperature-controlled wine cellar ensure family and friends will comfortably enjoy this mountain paradise.

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Authentic Luxury Residences — Brow Wood, The Village of Oakbrook, and McLemore

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imeless and elegant, Arthur Rutenberg Homes are designed and crafted by local builders with the owner in mind. Whether 2,000 or 7,000 square feet, each home is given careful planning and attention by a collaborative team of architectural and interior designers. Each step of the home-building process is personalized so that dream homes can become a reality. While home styles vary, common themes can be found throughout AR Homes. These homes are built for ultimate livability by marrying function and design — with function always coming first. Exuding refinement and elegance, homes are simultaneously warm, inviting, and intimate. They maximize comfort and quality, giving you and your family a place to connect, relax, and entertain.

A beautiful blend of materials like stone, stucco, and brick are used on the homes’ exteriors to provide a sophisticated appearance. Meanwhile, timeless elements such as archways, window shutters, and wood accents add character and charm. Paved walkways lead up to the front door, beckoning guests indoors. Inside, open floor plans promote a sense of openness and better traffic flow while allowing for flexibility in layout. AR Homes experiment with mixing natural materials and textures in the main living spaces, creating visual interest. Modern features and neutral tones are also characteristic of these residences. Every detail has been delicately crafted to establish a space that truly feels like home.


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Mountaintop Community — Lookout Mountain, GA

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ive above the clouds at McLemore, a master-planned mountaintop community in Northwest Georgia’s Historic High County. Spread across 400 acres, this gated community offers up relaxation, charm, and of course, Southern hospitality. McLemore’s many comforts and conveniences work to make residents feel at home, and the numerous botanical and geological amenities surrounding the area only add to the community’s appeal. At McLemore, mountaintop living awaits. Choose from a variety of stunning custom residences, blending styles such as old-world architecture and mountain craftsman. While homes are meticulously tailored to fit the lifestyle of their owners, they also reflect the spirit and topography of McLemore’s

mountaintop setting and are enabled with a host of up-to-date utilities. The spacious lots at McLemore boast golf course views, bluff-side locations, and forested shade, providing gorgeous scenery to be enjoyed from the comfort of a back porch. For sport enthusiasts, a round of golf is only minutes away. Redesigned by internationally recognized golf course architects Rees Jones and Bill Bergin, the 18-hole Course at McLemore has established itself as a championship venue. A six-hole short course, added to McLemore in 2019, is the perfect warm-up or cool down to your golf game. Additional amenities such as access to hiking and mountain biking trails, tennis courts, a community pool, and a planned clubhouse round out the McLemore experience.


FEATURES: Gated community | Custom residences with world-class amenities | 18-hole championship golf course 6-hole short course | New clubhouse | Proximity to hiking trails, waterfalls, and historic attractions

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Southern Style Homes

Elegant Mountain Estate — 165 Gnome Trail Lookout Mountain, GA 30750

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or those looking for scenic brow views and an abundance of space, this charming home atop Lookout Mountain is a perfect fit. The all-brick estate offers a modern touch with its expansive, open floor plan while maintaining a traditional and elegant nature. Situated on 1.52 acres, this partially wooded lot offers up the best in panoramic views, and beautiful interior amenities make it an ideal location to share with loved ones. A haven for entertaining, this home has five en suite bedrooms, giving your guests plenty of space. A great room caters effortlessly to groups and boasts an oversized stone fireplace, refreshment area, and wet bar, while a large patio at the back of the home offers lush green space and views

of downtown Chattanooga and the Blue Ridge Mountains, making it the perfect spot to relax on a warm evening. For a slower pace, try curling up next to one of the home’s five fireplaces or preparing a meal in the gourmet kitchen, which is outfitted with granite countertops and custom cabinetry. Double wall ovens, two dishwashers, and a gas stove with professional grade hood make for a food lover’s paradise. Decorative lighting and heavy crown molding enhance the traditional ambiance of the two-story property, and beautiful hardwood, travertine, and slate floors run throughout the home. With storage galore, this residence even features two laundry rooms and an elevator for optimal convenience.


FEATURES: Brow views | 5 fireplaces | Great room with wet bar 3-car garage with half bath | 5 bedrooms | 5 & 1/2 baths | 6,975 square feet

JAY ROBINSON Keller Williams Realty | Cell: 423.903.6404 1830 Washington Street, Chattanooga TN 37408 Office: 423.664.1900 | RobinsonTeam.com

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL SECTION

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Style Jacket & Tie / Dapper Details / Elevated Essentials / Ask the Gentleman

“In the end, it’s not the years in your life that count. It’s the life in your years.” – Anonymous

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By Mary Beth Wallace Photography by Lanewood Studio on Location at The Dwell Hotel

Whether in the boardroom, out to dinner, or attending an evening soiree, a gentleman can hardly go wrong with the classic combination of jacket and tie. We asked local retailers and tailors for their take on this beloved menswear staple.

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] JACKET & TIE [

Jim Vaughn outfitted by Yacoubian Tailors Jim’s light gray suit is always in fashion. Styling it with a crisp checkered dress shirt and patterned tie keeps things fresh and modern. Yacoubian Tailors: Light gray Super 150s wool suit. David Donahue dress shirt. Eton silk tie and Peter Millar pocket square. 144

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CLOSETS · PANTRIES · HOME OFFICES · LAUNDRY ROOMS · GARAGES · WALL BEDS

Simplifying Life Organizing One Room at a Time Since 1998 1901 BROAD STREET, MONDAY-FRIDAY 8-5 423.517.7190 | CHATTANOOGACLOSET.COM

TRADITION, NEVER GOES OUT OF STYLE Every seam, every stitch, styled to perfection. That’s Yacoubians...the destination for exclusive clothing for more than 50 years. 629 Broad Street / Yacoubians.com

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Dallas Joseph outfitted by Bruce Baird & Co. The bold, bright hues of Dallas’ jacket and tie are anchored by a white cotton shirt and pearl gray trousers. It’s a polished look that communicates sophistication and finesse.

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JACKET & TIE

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Bruce Baird & Co.: Southwick wool sport coat. Robert Jensen 100% silk tie. Gitman Bros. dress shirt. Hickey Freeman wool trousers.

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735 Broad Street | The James Building | Chattanooga, Tennessee 37402 | 423.265.8821

BruceBaird.com C I T YS CO P E M AG .CO M

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Matt Hullander wearing J. Gibson Clothiers A navy sport coat is the perfect base for an infinite number of looks. Here, Matt is sporting an orange paisley tie to add a touch of flair. J. Gibson Clothiers: Super 120s merino wool sport coat. 100% silk tie.

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Chattanooga, TN

OFFERING OUTSTANDING CUSTOMER SERVICE

by way of unmatched quality, beautiful designs, and friendly professional service for over 47 years POOL CONSTRUCTION | POOL RENOVATION | CUSTOM SPAS | RESIDENTIAL & COMMERCIAL OUTDOOR LIVING SPECIALISTS - POOL HOUSES, KITCHEN & BARS, FIREPLACES & FIRE-PITS

423.298.4002 | www.aquariumpools.com

Your Fit. Your Style. Your Way.

Exceptional Quality | Impeccable Fit | Concierge Service 707 Cherry Street, Chattanooga JGibsonClothiers.com 423.269.6262

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Zack England wearing Tom James Paired with navy slacks, Zack’s red patterned sport coat makes a statement with minimal effort. A coordinating tie pulls everything together and dresses up the look a notch.

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Tom James: Super 120s year-round wool sport coat.

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] JACKET & TIE [

David Banks outfitted by Hanover Blue David looks dapper in a timeless, yet functional jacket. His signature bow tie – crafted from black turkey feathers – stands out without overshadowing the rest of the ensemble. Hanover Blue: Tom Beckbe Tensaw jacket. Brackish Slate bow tie. Filson Tin Packer hat in otter green. Trask “Brady” shoe.

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W

hile you may be tempted to sport the same old four-in-hand or Windsor knot every time you don a suit and tie, sometimes a fresh take on your tie is the detail that makes all the difference. For a look that’s fit for a king, try the Prince Albert Knot the next time you’re getting ready for a formal occasion. The Prince Albert Knot is a dapper detail that creates an elegant appearance. With Queen Victoria’s husband as a namesake, this knot features a double wrap that produces a sleek, elongated appearance with hints of an ascot aesthetic. The perfect accompaniment to narrow-collared shirts and more formal occassions, this necktie knot will leave you feeling subtly stylish.

1 Wrap the tie around your neck.

2

5 Pass it back around to the left across the front one last time.

6

Make the neck loop.

Take the wide end up through the neck loop.

3

7

Pass the wider end to the right, behind the back of the tie. Then pass it to the left across the front.

Pass it down, through the two central wraps, and pull it through completely.

4 Pass it again to the right side from behind.

8 Tighten to finish the knot.

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E L E VA T E D ESSENTIALS These accessories pack enough flair to carry you throughout your day and well into your evening. ­— By Amy Clarke Photography by Emily Long

Luxurious Leather This Ted Baker London Connected leather satchel in classic gray comes with a special pocket that’s tailor-made for a wireless charger. It's perfect for your laptop and phone. Antibes

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Alluring Aesthetics This new, authentic Rolex Datejust 36 is the archetype of the classic watch thanks to functions and aesthetics that never go out of fashion. Rone Regency

Italian-made These Italian-made graphite Reece Wingtip shoes from the Johnston & Murphy Collection are always a favorite, sure to complement many styles. Yacoubian Tailors

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Timeless A striking timepiece of precision, this new men’s Patek Philippe watch features 18-karat gold and a genuine leather band.

E L E VAT E D E S S E N T I A L S

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Brody Jewelers

Piney Parfum

[

Leather + Pine is a personal fragrance created with aromas from the Earth to wear in your everyday life. Made by Ranger Station, the brand is based out of Franklin, Tennessee. Refinery – Mercantile & Apothecary

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D enise L each Real Estate Focused-Customer Driven

Licensed in Tennessee & Georgia

SquareOne Realty, LLC c. 423.242.8277 | o. 423.551.3279 denise.leach@sq1realestate.com

Juliet Braly

Interior Design

Specializing in Kitchen and Bath Design. Full Residential Interior Design Services for New Construction and Remodeling. julietbraly.com | julietbraly@gmail.com | 423.400.9500 C I T YS CO P E M AG .CO M

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True to Time True to its name, the innovative Breitling Premier Automatic Day & Date 40 watch has day and date windows at 12 o’clock and 6 o’clock respectively.

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Rone Regency

Simply Sophisticated Sure to be a topic of conversation, this handstitched needlepoint belt on a genuine leather back is made by Smathers & Branson and highlights major landmarks across Chattanooga. Bruce Baird & Co.

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Professional Poise A shining example of craftsmanship and elegance, this Tiffany & Co. 14-karat gold belt buckle is a great fit for almost any occasion. Brody Jewelers

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The T.B. Phelps genuine bison wallet is made from the most durable full grain of the hide. With unique leather graining, this bifold has an oil-wax handfeel. Hanover Blue of The Blue Collection

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ASK THE GENTLEMAN B

eing a modern gentleman isn’t just

My fiancé and I are

about dressing well and knowing which

working on our wed-

dinner fork to use at a party, so we asked The

Gentleman to chime in and answer the tough stuff. Here’s his expert advice on everything from job interviews to social media debates.

I have a job interview coming up and, of course, want to present myself well. That being said, is it necessary that I shave my beard? Conventional advice calls for a completely clean-shaven face when interviewing, and you can certainly never go wrong taking that route. However, beards have become more socially acceptable in recent years, even in the workplace. If you are especially attached to your beard and would prefer to keep it while interviewing, both the employer and the condition of your beard need to be taken into consideration. Many corporate jobs have strict, more conservative dress codes. In this case, your best bet is to go ahead and shave (It'll grow back, after all!). Other companies may not have rigid guidelines. Research the company you are interviewing with to see if they have any restrictions on facial hair. Remember, they’re looking for someone who fits the company image. If you ultimately decide to keep your beard, it must be properly maintained and should be paired with clean, pressed professional attire.

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ding registry, and we’ve talked about adding a honeymoon fund. Is that considered tacky? While this one is a bit controversial, the short answer is no, it is not tacky. Honeymoon funds have become more popular in recent years as the average age of those getting married continues to rise. Many couples already live together, meaning they don’t necessarily need a bunch of items to furnish a new home. If you want to register for a honeymoon fund, by all means, go for it. That being said, there are a few rules to follow. First, this should not be your only registry. Many guests, especially older ones, prefer to gift actual items. Make a registry with more traditional options, and when possible, register with a store that has an actual storefront. When registering for the honeymoon fund, give as much detail as possible and show what the money would be going toward. For example, list things like dinner for two on the beach, a spa treatment, or a skydiving excursion, as opposed to just asking for dollar amounts. Ultimately, the choice is up to the gift-giver, so give them options.


I meet a lot of people through work and social events. How can I make the best first impression? It’s well known that it’s important to make a positive first impression because, well, you only get one. Back in the Middle Ages, shaking hands upon initial greeting became standard to show that neither party was armed. Today, a firm handshake is still the best way to initiate contact, but there are other actions you can take to make an even better first impression. Always wear a tasteful ensemble and introduce yourself clearly. When introducing someone you’ve brought along or connecting acquaintances in a social situation, make sure you introduce the man to the woman. (e.g. “Mrs. Beckman, this is Mr. Johnson.”) If you are at

the office, introduce your acquaintances based on rank and importance, regardless of their gender. For instance, you would introduce an intern to the CEO (e.g., “Mr. Gates, I’d like to introduce our new intern, Josh.”).

I often see my colleagues and family members engaging in

I finally bit the bullet and pur-

arguments on social media, and I must admit, I participate

chased a nice pair of leather

from time to time too. Is there anything wrong with virtual

dress shoes. What is the best

heated debates?

way to take care of them? Manners are not just for the dinner table! The things you do and say online help create your digital footprint, and you always want to make a positive impression on others. No one wants to constantly read negative posts or temper tantrums, and those sorts of posts can leave a sour taste in the mouths of others. If you are tired, angry, or just want to rant, consider waiting until the next day to see if you still feel as passionate about the touchy subject. Oftentimes, you won’t, and you will be glad you didn’t post out of impulse. In general, if there is a subject you are passionate about and want to discuss, talking with family or friends in person will provide a better outlet and a more beneficial discussion. If you can’t resist engaging in an online debate, be prepared to back it up with facts, and treat it as a two-way conversation, not an argument.

First off, congratulations! A nice pair of dress shoes will take you far, assuming you care for them properly. Whether your shoes are bal or blucher, slip-on or monk strap, you must take a few steps before you wear them. Begin by wiping them down with a warm sponge to make the leather more porous. Then, apply a waterproof solution to lessen general wear and tear. From there, it’s all about regular upkeep. Brush your shoes with a horsehair brush often to remove any dust and debris. Once every other week or so, apply a small amount of conditioning cream. Let that dry and absorb for a few minutes, then brush it with your horsehair brush. Lastly, buff your shoes with a clean cotton cloth to add extra shine. You should use shoe trees after each wear.

- The Gentleman

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Food & Spirits Behind the Brew / Raising the Bar / Any Way You Slice It / Camping Cookware / Making It with Mezcal

“One cannot think well, love well, sleep well, if one has not dined well.” – Virginia Woolf

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BEHIND THE

BREW BY AMY CLARKE P H O T O G R A P H Y B Y E M I LY L O N G

Strawberry-pineapple kettle sour, lemon-cherry German-style gose, MoonPie stout ... it may not sound like it, but we are talking beer – locally crafted beer. Thanks to a growing number of Chattanooga breweries, it’s not hard to find a locally made beer with hints of apricot, vanilla, cacao, coffee, or even guava. “Pineapple ManBun is my selfportrait,” laughs Nathan Woods, head brewer at Naked River Brewing Company. “I am a big fan of pineapples, always have been.” In addition to all the different flavors of beer on the market these days, there are just as many creative names, including Sturgeon General, Old Heller, Monkey Heart, Belay On, and Cloudfall. Most of these you can find in incredibly detailed cans often featuring work from local and regional artists. So who are the minds behind some of these uniquely crafted concoctions, and how are they coming up with these popular pours? We talked to five local head brewers, all who entered the Chattanooga brewery scene in the last six years. They are men with different educations and different paths, but all homebrewed for many years, and all love beer. Together they are following their passion, taking the local craft beer scene in Chattanooga to a whole new level, and turning their favorite brews into top-selling brands inside their own establishments as well as in restaurants and stores across the Southeast.

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Photo Courtesy of OddStory Brewing Co.

BEHIND THE BREW

]

Photo Courtesy of OddStory Brewing Co.

Jay Boyd

[

Age: 29 Brewery: OddStory Brewing Company Flagship Brew: Monkey's Heart, a combination of East and West Coast IPAs – best of the bitter combined with the fruity

THE INSPIRATION

“It takes drinking a lot of beer. You are out there trying other people’s beer, food, wine. You are trying new flavors and broadening your horizons, and when that happens, ideas start coming to you,” says Elliot Kehoe, head brewer at Five Wits Brewing Company. Schooled in electrical engineering, Kehoe, a transplant from Denver, Colorado, and originally from St. Louis, Missouri, is finally doing what he wants to do at the Five Wits location on the Southside. Same for Woods with Naked River. He moved here from Asheville, North Carolina, originally from Florida. Woods worked on submarines with the Navy before

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he decided to bite the bullet and help start the Naked River Brewing Company by UTC’s Finley Stadium. “The best way to come up with new ideas is to explore new beers and what is out there. You want to stay on top of the trends, what is coming, what is fading out.” “I can be inspired at any time,” shares Brett Bauer, head brewer at Heaven & Ale Brewing Company on the NorthShore. “It could be something new I ate or drank, something I read in a publication, something that a colleague might be doing that I want to try my hand at.” Bauer, a chemistry major from the pharmaceutical industry, became a certified brewer after he decided to make his

part-time passion a full-time career. With five years of brewing under his belt outside Boston, Massachusetts, Bauer moved to the Scenic City just eight months ago. Regardless of how the latest brew flavor and style comes about, it’s often a group effort as these local breweries work to be innovative and stay fresh. Many create and brew a new beer every month and can it on-site. Some of those new brews come from collaborations, another way to get those creative juices flowing. “We did a super unique collaboration with Big River,” says Kehoe with Five Wits. “We took indigenous Eastern cedar tree branches and put them at the bottom of the grain and filtered liquid through the cedar.”



] BEHIND THE BREW

Brett Bauer

[

Age: 32 Brewery: Heaven & Ale Brewing Company Flagship Brew: Cloudfall, a hazy IPA with a focus on Mosaic hops providing intense flavors and aromas of stone fruits and ripe berries

Collaboration beers often combine the best of the best from different local breweries. “We just did a collaboration with Five Wits – a Belgian stout. We used two different kinds of yeast, dark Belgian candy syrup, fresh plums, apricots, and currants,” says Joel Krautstrunk, owner and head brewer at Hutton & Smith Brewing Company. Krautstrunk is the proud winner of a gold award at the 2018 World Beer Cup, and a silver and bronze medal at the 2019 Great American Beer Festival. “The scope of aroma and flavor with a beer is so much wider in my experience than wine because you can do whatever you want with a beer, ferment it with different yeasts, put adjuncts like fruit in it, age it in a barrel, so many different things to do with so many different possibilities. The flavors are almost limitless.” Without any formal brewing education, Krautstrunk, who holds degrees in psychology 168

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and music and worked as a school counselor in Las Vegas for years, was encouraged by his wife, Melanie, to follow his dream. Together they have shaped Hutton & Smith to what it is today – two locations with the largest brewing facility in town, located on Riverside Drive, and a tasting spot on MLK Boulevard. Just down the street is OddStory Brewing Company. “In terms of beer, I want people to think of eclectic wide styles and varieties but also true, approachable, palpable beers,” explains Jay Boyd, owner and head brewer at OddStory. He recently introduced a raspberry wild ale with a hint of chocolate, aged in local bourbon barrels. A transplant from Decatur, Alabama,

Boyd started his career in the beer brewing industry. Today, it’s a family affair, as both his father and wife work alongside him. One of his popular beer ideas came from blending the bitter, piney, and fruity flavors of the East and West Coast India Pale Ales. “Intentionally designed to please both of these IPA drinkers, it’s taken on a life of its own,” smiles Boyd. Another avenue driving new beer creation is when local breweries come together to create a special beer for a fundraising event. There is a whole host of specialty craft beers supporting Chattanooga causes. Naked River supports local waterways and is now showcasing the Cosmic Turtle, a blood orange IPA for the Tennessee Aquarium.


[ BEHIND THE BREW

Elliot Kehoe

They are also teaming up with Five Wits and brewing a special beer for the Lula Lake Hike Bike and Brew event. Afterward, the two establishments will feature the new brew on tap and donate proceeds to the nonprofit. Whether making new beer for local causes, donating beer for fundraising events, or even hosting nonprofit leaders to talk about their missions, there is always a bigger sense of community and camaraderie around the beer.

THE COMMUNITY

“Beer is a way to bring people together and connect the community,” shares Kehoe with Five Wits. “We want to get people talking, whether it's about the beer or personal experience.” Bauer with Heaven & Ale believes that’s what it is all about. “I appreciate it for its ability to bring

people together and not so much be the centerpiece, but the complement. It's not the thing that everyone is talking about, but it’s the thing that got these people in a room.” Fostering communication is the goal behind OddStory’s open floor plan and communal seating. “We designed it with an old-style German beer hall in mind. We have tables pushed together that seat 12 people on each side, and it pretty much forces people to sit next to people they don’t know. That creates conversation, creates memories, and creates a bond back to this place,” explains Boyd. And, all of these head brewers see the local craft beer scene flourishing and growing and believe other

]

Age: 32 Brewery: Five Wits Brewing Company Flagship Brew: Sunblaze IPA, a mingling of light and crisp malt body, tropical and juicy notes from hop blends, and delicious fruity jam flavors from the house yeast

breweries that open in the area will only help improve the scene. “There is a very prominent sense of camaraderie between brewers,” shares Krautstrunk. "There is no other profession like it that I have been in that has that sense of brotherhood, doing collaborations, welcoming fellow brewers and exchanging ideas." “Being a head brewer is a dream job. It’s something a lot of people have a desire to do, and you never want to not support another person’s dream,” says Boyd with OddStory. For Bauer at Heaven & Ale, it’s his favorite part of the industry. “In the brewing industry, there is always that sense of camaraderie, that sense of shared success.” C I T YS CO P E M AG .CO M

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] BEHIND THE BREW

Joel Krautstrunk

[

Age: 45 Brewery: Hutton & Smith Brewing Company Flagship Brew: Igneous IPA, a classic American IPA with grapefruit, pine, and resin character

THE BUILDING BLOCKS

To have any kind of success when it comes to brewing good beer, you have to be committed to the detailed processes. Believe it or not, all of these brewers say they spend most of their time cleaning and testing. This is the part where art meets science. “Everything is about quality control,” says Woods with Naked River. “We test the beer daily and make sure it is fermenting correctly.” At Naked River, it’s about being crystal clear. “I love the way it looks in the glass.” “We have invested a lot of time and money in quality control at Riverside,” explains Krautstrunk with Hutton & Smith. Throw a bunch of new ingredients into the brewing process, which

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craft beer drinkers get super excited about these days, and you can understand why. “Once we started distributing beer throughout the state, we knew we couldn’t screw up. We have a full-time quality control manager and a part-time assistant constantly testing beer, cleaning, sanitizing, making sure everything is up to our standards. We also closely monitor the progress of the beer as it ferments, conditions, and is packaged. We routinely test for dissolved oxygen in the beer throughout the process – we have very strict protocols.” Still, with all the extra steps, most of the beer out there is made from just four main ingredients. Essentially all beers fall into two key categories depending on how the yeast is fermented: lagers and

ales. In lagers, the yeast is cold fermented, while in ales it’s warmer. Vary the yeast and any of the other building blocks of beer – hops, grains, and water – and you can create a wide variety of beer styles. “Within those four building blocks are a whole range of flavors. Jam and fruit flavors come from the yeast, malt builds the backbone of a flavor profile, and hops are the spices of the brewing world,” explains Kehoe with Five Wits. “You can have the same base recipe and use two different hops, and the two beers will taste entirely different.” One of the biggest challenges to good brewing is duplicating that same good beer over and over. “I want the consumer to think and feel and know that the product is made with the highest integrity as possible – that it’s well-made beer,” says Boyd with OddStory.


[ BEHIND THE BREW

Nathan Woods

“We try hard to make sure the beer we envision is the beer you get,” says Woods with Naked River. To keep up with demand for new styles and flavors, these local brewers work hard on their processes and often test smaller batches before they take it to the public. “My job is to make sure that idea ends up as a good recipe that makes a good beer,” says Kehoe with Five Wits. “You can look at a flavor profile and have to figure out how to bring it all together.” Bauer with Heaven & Ale likes the same kind of challenge. “I think when looking at trends we are being pulled in opposite directions between intensity of flavors and nuance. I’m hoping to strike a balance.” Even with the best of intentions, sometimes you have to dump a batch of

beer. “It’s a punch in the gut to open the bottom valve and let the beer go down the drain,” says Boyd with OddStory. “If you have to ask yourself if you should dump it, then the answer is, ‘yes.’ It’s pretty easy to make really bad beer. That’s where cleanliness comes into play. If you do all of it properly, you will make a good batch of beer.” With a drive to make the best beers across a wide spectrum, Hutton & Smith now sees an opportunity for more experimentation.“My favorite thing is a new recipe or scaling a recipe up from our small location on MLK to our large facility on Riverside Drive. The process from start to finish is challenging, and it's rewarding to brew a beer that turns out

]

Age: 29 Brewery: Naked River Brewing Company Flagship Brew: Naked Light, a light-colored pilsner brewed according to style with a German lager yeast and Saaz hops

as expected,” explains Krautstrunk. Ultimately, it’s about the challenge, creativity, camaraderie, and community. “I enjoy the pride of being able to present something I made to the consumer, a friend, a family member and say, ‘Yep, I made this. Please enjoy,’” smiles Bauer with Heaven & Ale. They share the belief that when one succeeds, they all do. “We are all on this ship together,” says Boyd with OddStory. “If you aren't bringing people together, you might as well hang up your boots,” laughs Kehoe with Five Wits. “I love everything from the grunt work and designing the recipes to sweeping the floors," shares Woods with Naked River. “At the end of the day, we make a pretty cool product.” C I T YS CO P E M AG .CO M

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Raising the Bar A well-stocked bar is a must-have for those who like to entertain. If you are looking to impress through your libations, there are several tools to have in your arsenal. To truly customize your cocktail creations, consider the functions of the following tools when stocking your bar area with these staples.

To stock your home bar even further, consider adding the following items to your lineup:

• • • • • • • • • •

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Jigger Wine key Corkscrew Foil cutter Egg separator Ice cube mold Bottle opener Paring knife Channel zester Ice tongs

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• Mixing glass • Muddler • Y peeler • Juicer • Pour spout • Funnel • Matches • Toothpicks • Lewis ice bag • Spice grater

Cocktail shakers. For cocktails that need to be enjoyed at cooler temperatures, a cocktail shaker is paramount. These not only chill drinks but also blend flavors, allowing for a consistent taste from the first sip to the last. One popular shaker is the cobbler shaker, also known as the three-piece shaker, which features a built-in strainer and lid. Another option is the Boston shaker, which is a twopiece tool composed of a larger tin mixing cup and a smaller glass pint glass. This shaker takes some elevated skill as you have to create a watertight seal to avoid leaks or spills. While this shaker is quick to use and easy to clean, it will also require the use of a strainer. A French shaker, sometimes called a Parisian shaker, falls in between a cobbler and Boston shaker and features two pieces that fit snuggly together but with no built-in strainer.


Strainers.

Bar spoons.

For many cocktails, you will want to filter out ice and other solid ingredients, and there are several types of strainers that can get the job done. The Hawthorne strainer features a disk with a handle, several prongs, and a metal spring. This strainer is great at keeping ice and muddled fruit at bay, and the metal spring allows you to strain liquids without touching the rim of the mixing tin. The julep strainer was originally used to help mint julep lovers enjoy their drinks without getting a face full of ice and mint, but now it’s used to craft various cocktails. This strainer consists of a perforated bowl-shaped cup with a handle and fits into a pint glass better than a Hawthorne strainer. For even more straining clout, consider using a fine mesh strainer. These variations catch ice and fruit like alternative strainers but go one step further in catching smaller particles such as seeds.

Typically made from stainless steel, bar spoons are used for stirring cocktails, and their elongated handles make it easy to mix drinks regardless of what glassware you’re using. American bar spoons have a simple twisted handle and often come with a red plastic cap on the end, which makes them easy to find when sorting through your bar tools. European bar spoons are generally sturdier and have a hammer or disk attached on one end to muddle ingredients. Another popular bar spoon has Japanese origins and typically features a more elongated handle with a teardrop-shaped spoon on one end and a fork on the other, which can be used for grabbing garnishes.

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Any Way You Slice It Few foods inspire the intense passion, the unadulterated devotion, that bacon does. A couple strips of bacon can transform a mediocre breakfast spread into an indulgent feast fit for a king. Used as a topping for burgers, pasta, or – dare we say it – a green salad, this cured piece of pork boosts flavor and enhances the overall dining experience. The following men know better than most the true beauty and potential of this crisp culinary delight. Here, they generously share their favorite recipes with bacon as the star of the show.

BY MARY BE TH WALL ACE PHOTO G R APH Y BY EMILY LONG

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SMITTY’S BACON-WRAPPED CHEESE AND JALAPEÑO STUFFED SHRIMP “I first had this dish on vacation with friends from Texas. Bacon always pairs well with shellfish, and our two boys can eat an entire platter! It’s a quick and easy dish to put together too.” – Scotty Smith, Lookout Mountain, TN

Serves 2 Ingredients • 3 strips bacon • Sequatchie Cove’s Cumberland cheese, sliced into thin strips • 1 jalapeño, seeded and julienned • 6 large shrimp, peeled and deveined • 1 lemon For the cocktail sauce: • 1/2 cup ketchup • 1/2 cup chili sauce • 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce • 1 Tbsp. freshly squeezed lime • 1/4 cup prepared horseradish • Cajun seasoning, to taste Directions 1. Mix together ingredients for the cocktail sauce. Adjust seasoning to taste and set aside. 2. Cut bacon in half and lay flat. Place cheese strips and jalapeño into the back of the shrimp and roll tightly in bacon, securing with a toothpick. Place on a baking sheet and bake in a preheated oven at 375° for 12 minutes, or until cheese melts and bacon crisps. 3. Grill lemon until charred, then slice and squeeze on finished shrimp. (Grilling gives the lemon a sweeter flavor and balances the fat and saltiness of the bacon.) 4. Serve shrimp with grilled asparagus and cocktail sauce.

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Photos by Rich Smith


DAN’S BACON CHOCOLATE CHIP COOKIES “The credit for this recipe actually goes to Main Street Meats, where I learned from one of the cooks, Milton White. Everyone loves the bacon at MSM, so much so that they begged us to create a dessert with it! Hey, if it’s bacon and chocolate, what could be better?” – Dan Key, Chickamauga, GA

Makes approximately 36 cookies

1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature 1 cup packed light brown sugar 1 cup granulated sugar 1 tsp. vanilla extract 2 large eggs, room temperature 3 cups (about 14 oz.) bittersweet or semi-sweet chocolate, coarsely chopped

Directions 1. Fry bacon until crisp and drain on paper towels. Chop bacon into approximately 1/4-inch pieces and set aside. 2. Whisk together flour, baking soda, and salt in a small bowl. 3. In a separate mixing bowl, use a flat wooden spoon to beat together butter, both sugars, and vanilla until smooth. If you have a mixer, use the paddle attachment. Add eggs one at a time until thoroughly mixed. Stir in flour mixture, followed by bacon and chopped chocolate, and continue to mix until all thoroughly incorporated. 4. Pour mixture onto a lightly floured work surface and divide dough into quarters. Shape each portion into a log 9-10 inches long. Wrap logs in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 8 hours, but preferably 24 hours. The firmer they are when you cut them, the thicker the cookie. 5. Preheat oven to 350° and line two baking sheets with parchment paper. Slice logs into disks 3/4-inch thick and place disks on the baking sheets about 3 inches apart on all sides.

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Ingredients • 1 Ib. thick-cut smoked/cured Main Street Meats bacon • 3 cups all-purpose flour • 3/4 tsp. baking soda • 1/4 tsp. kosher salt

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6. Bake until cookies are lightly browned, about 10 minutes. For more even baking, give the baking sheets a 180-degree turn halfway through the cooking time. Remove cookies from the oven and allow to cool. Enjoy!

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BEN’S BACONWRAPPED DATES ON TENNESSEE GUACAMOLE

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“Using the Sous Vide method to prepare bacon locks in the natural moisture of the meat, which makes such a difference, preserving all that smoky Benton's flavor to be wrapped around the dates. But if you prefer crispy bacon, I have you covered – traditional cast-iron fried bacon is mixed into the Tennessee Guacamole!”

Serves 6-8

Ingredients

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1 Ib. Benton’s Hickory Smoked Bacon 4 cups balsamic vinegar 3 ripe avocados, peeled and pitted 1/4 cup red onions, finely chopped 1/4 cup Grainger County tomatoes, finely chopped 1/4 cup Litehouse Guacamole Herb Blend seasoning 1 whole lime 8 oz. pitted dates 1/2 cup blue cheese crumbles Sea salt and fine pepper, to taste

Directions 1. Place the Benton’s bacon, still in its vacuumsealed wrap, in a water bath set to 147°. Sous vide bacon for 48 hours. 2. In a saucepan, bring 4 cups of balsamic vinegar to a boil. Lower heat and simmer until vinegar has reduced to 1/2 cup.

3. Place avocados in a medium mixing bowl. Add red onions, tomatoes, and half of the guacamole seasoning. Squeeze lime over the bowl and mix well, then set aside. 4. Stuff pitted dates with blue cheese crumbles.

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– Ben Connor, North Chattanooga

5. Remove bacon from the sous vide water bath and cut down the middle. 6. Gently toss six strips of bacon in the remaining guacamole seasoning, covering liberally. Sauté the strips in a cast-iron skillet until crispy. Set aside to cool before chopping finely. Add to avocado mix with salt and pepper to taste. Mix thoroughly. 7. Wrap all dates in the remaining bacon half strips. Place bacon-wrapped dates on a medium baking sheet. Broil dates in a 500° oven for 3-5 minutes, until desired crispness is reached. 8. To serve: Place a heaping Tbsp. of Tennessee Guacamole on a plate. Rest a bacon-wrapped date on the edge of the mix. Drizzle balsamic reduction on the date. Enjoy!

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TRACY’S BACON-WEAVED STUFFED CHICKEN BREASTS Serves 4

the chicken breasts and spread stuffing inside each one. Fold the chicken breasts back over.

Ingredients • 4 boneless skinless chicken breasts • 22 oz. pack of bacon (thin sliced preferred) • Smokey Boys’ Smokey Dust Hen & Fin Rub

For the stuffing: • 4 oz. cream cheese, softened • 1 cup sharp cheddar cheese, shredded • 1 tsp. minced garlic • 1/4 tsp. parsley flakes • 1/4 tsp. ground black pepper Directions 1. Slice chicken breasts horizontally, about 3/4 of the way through, creating a pocket for the stuffing. Season liberally with Smokey Dust Hen & Fin Rub.

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2. Combine stuffing ingredients in a mixing bowl until incorporated and divide the mixture by 4. Lay open

“This recipe is a family favorite because it combines chicken with a great cheese stuffing. Incorporating the bacon weaves, along with the Smokey Boys' rub, gives it a nice salty-sweet flavor, and the bacon seals in all the juices of the chicken.” – Tracy Arp, Ringgold, GA

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3. On a cutting board, lay 4 strips of bacon side by side (width ways). Create a lattice by weaving in 4 strips of bacon lengthways – this becomes the bacon weave that will cover the chicken breast. 4. Lay each chicken breast, top side down, diagonally on one of the bacon weaves. Wrap all sides of the chicken until it’s completely covered in bacon. Apply another coating of the rub. 5. Set a grill or smoker to 300°. Cook chicken using indirect heat until an internal temperature of 165° is reached. Depending on the size of your chicken breasts, this could take 45 minutes to 1 hour. For additional color, add cherry wood to the lump coal. 6. Transfer chicken to a serving platter and allow to rest for several minutes before enjoying.


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Jetboil Flash Cooking System

Camping Cookware Prepare a chef-worthy meal in the great outdoors with these dining essentials.

A long day of hiking can make you ravenous. Fortunately, speed is of the essence with this cooking system. Whether warming water for your meal, melting snow, or disinfecting water to drink, this fuel canister can prompt a boil in just 100 seconds. The Flash also features a colorchanging boil indicator on its sleeve, so you know when to shut it off.

Rolla Roaster Marshmallow and Hot Dog Roasting Forks Is it really camping without s’mores? These stainlesssteel forks, which feature heat-resistant wood handles with a rotisserie knob for 360° browning, can extend from 12 inches to 42 and allow for flawlessly toasted hot dogs and marshmallows. Gone are the days of searching the woods for the right stick.

Wealers Camp Kitchen Utensil Organizer Travel Set This 8-piece BBQ camping organizer is perfect for all outdoor occasions. Lightweight and travel-friendly, the set won’t take up much room in your rucksack, and it includes all of your necessities ― a soup ladle, a spatula, a pair of tongs, a knife with a cover, a pair of scissors, a bottle opener, a cutting board, and a rice paddle.

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The Muncher Titanium Multi Utensil The most funded camping utensil ever featured on Kickstarter and Indiegogo, The Muncher Titanium Multi Utensil packs a punch with nearly a dozen functionalities. Made from aerospace-grade titanium, this meticulously engineered tool weighs just 0.7 ounces. The versatility ― it can be used as a spork, serrated butter knife, fire starter, and flathead screwdriver, just to name a few ― is what sets it apart from the competition.

YETI Loadout Bucket Made from high-density polyethylene, this 5-gallon bucket is a serious workhorse. With its lip grip handle and non-slip ring at its base, it’s perfect for everything from bait to campsite kindling, spent shells, innards, and more. It’s also food safe, high-impactresistant, and virtually indestructible, making it a must for any outdoor enthusiast.

GSI Outdoors Pinnacle Camper Cookset Traveling with friends or family? This cookset can accommodate up to four hungry campers. With color-coded plates, bowls, and insulated mugs with lids, it’s easy to keep track of which set is yours. Weighing in at only 3 pounds, 10 ounces, the set also includes two pots, a frying pan, a pot gripper, and a welded sink basin that doubles as a carrying case.

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Making lt with Mezcal

When it comes to modern cocktail culture, mezcal is having a moment. While it hasn’t quite reached the popularity of other distilled spirits in the United States, such as vodka or whiskey, it’s gaining traction and is weaving itself into restaurants and bars beyond those exclusively serving Mexican libations. BY CHRIS TINA CANNON

How It’s Made Mezcal and tequila are often thought of as two different spirits, but they may be more related than you know. Mezcal is essentially any liquor made from the agave plant, and while tequila is a type of mezcal, it is made specifically from Blue Weber agave and has a different flavor profile from many of the other mezcals on the market. Mezcal can be made from a variety of agave plants, but the majority of the spirit comes from Espadin agave due to the plant’s availability. Agave plants are typically harvested when they are seven or eight years old before the spines of the plant are cut off exposing the heart, also known as the piña because of its resemblance to a pineapple. Piñas can weigh up to 220 pounds and are typically cut into halves or quarters before artisans place them in an in-ground fire pit containing rocks, wood, or charcoal. These pits are called palenques and are used to roast or char piñas for several days. This is a key part of the process and is one of the reasons why many mezcals carry a different flavor profile from tequila, which is baked in above-ground ovens.

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Following the roasting process, the agave hearts are crushed and placed into wooden barrels to ferment. Water is added to the barrel in several stages, and after fermentation is complete, the spirit is either bottled or enters a stage of additional fermentation. Unaged mezcal is often referred to as joven or blanco, while its aged counterparts are called reposado (aged anywhere from two months to a year), añejo (aged one to three years), or extra añejo (anything aged over three years). The end result of this process is a distinctively different spirit that is generally clear, light gold, or amber in color.

Del Maguey Single Village Mezcal – VIDA Del Maguey pays homage to the history of mezcal production with its line of single village mezcals. Every mezcal in the lineup is made by individual family producers in old-style villages who produce the spirit the original handcrafted way. VIDA, loved by many as a quality spirit at an impressive price, uses small wood-fired copper stills to create a versatile mezcal. This twice-distilled spirit welcomes a nose of honey, vanilla, and roasted agave, while hints of ginger, cinnamon, banana, and tangerine round the palate. With a long yet soft finish, VIDA is another great option for those looking to explore crafting cocktails with mezcal.

Mezcals on the Market With craft spirit connoisseurs and creative bartenders always chasing new flavor profiles, mezcal has been rising in popularity throughout the States. Despite its growing popularity, mezcal can sometimes be harder to find and more expensive than other spirits, and classic mezcal cocktails are just now starting to make it on American menus. In 2005, Mexico began regulating mezcal production, and the spirit can only be labeled mezcal if it is 100% agave and hails from one of seven states within Mexico – the most popular of which is Oaxaca, a state that is responsible for 90% of the world's mezcal supply. In the United States, some of the most popular brands of mezcal include Del Maguey, Fidencio, Pierde Almas, Ilegal, and El Buho. These brands offer a variety of mezcals each with their own price points and unique flavors. Due to its method of production, many mezcals have a slightly charred flavor akin to peated whiskey, but some varieties on the market boast floral, fruity, or earthy notes. How long the mezcal is aged can also impact its flavor profile. In general, a long maturation period is likely to result in a more mellow and rich flavor. Other factors that play a role include the variety of agave used, soil, topography, and climate. Each of these aspects, along with the production method, can impact the overall flavor of the mezcal.

Mezcal Clase Azul For those ready to explore a more artisanal option, Clase Azul’s mezcal has you covered. This spirit’s agave comes from Durango, Mexico – a region known for its extreme climate, mineralrich soil, and natural springs. All of these environmental factors work together to produce a mezcal that boasts an interesting flavor profile. Sweet notes of brown sugar, honey, and chocolate meet the earthy flavors of peanut, ash, and wood. Packaged in a hand-carved decanter with a bright beaded cap, this mezcal is both a beautiful and tasty addition to any home bar setup.

Xicaru Silver Mezcal Hailing from the town of Matatlán in Oaxaca, Mexico, Xicaru’s silver mezcal is light in color but not in flavor. This clear spirit boasts all the characteristics of a robust, traditional mezcal and comes from a family recipe passed down for generations. Rich vegetal notes are followed by a hint of smoke, which complements the existing flavors without overwhelming its balanced nature. This earthy mezcal is both full-bodied and long-lasting, making it a great option for cocktails that leave a lasting impact.

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SG What are the most common flavors associated with mezcal? AM Some of the most common flavors associated with mezcal are smoke and spice! There is sweetness from the roasted agave, but at the same time a lot of herbal and deep earthy notes. SG What sets the flavor of mezcal apart from the majority of tequilas? AM The difference comes from the ingredients. Tequila is made from one type of agave: Blue Weber agave. Mezcal, however, can be made from assorted varieties of agave. There are about five common varieties used, but the list varies. This difference gives mezcal its distinctive character and a smokier, smoother flavor. SG What are the proper steps for tasting mezcal?

MAKING IT WITH MEZCAL

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AM Pour your mezcal into a glass and enjoy it neat – not chilled. Savor it in your mouth first before swallowing. It’s not a tequila shot. SG How are distributors, retailers, and bartenders contributing to the popularity of mezcal?

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AM Mezcal is becoming more and more popular across the globe with bartenders, and this is where all the growth begins. When you have trending mixologists bringing specialty cocktails using unique spirits like mezcal, then consumers begin bringing those ideas into their homes. This moves the market with distribution and retailers. SG What are some good flavor complements to mezcal?

We Chatted with Local Expert and Market Manager for Athens Distributing Co. Alesha Manning to Learn More About Mezcal’s Uprising

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AM Some unique complements are hibiscus, coffee, or fresh ginger. Citrus is another good flavor to pair mezcal with, and mezcal also goes well with a variety of pressed juices. SG What are a few cocktails someone should try if they are interested in mezcal? AM I would start with a riff on an old fashioned using mezcal and a nice reposado tequila like Roca by Patron, with a dash or two of some chocolate bitters. Another great and easy combination would be a little smoky mezcal in a shot of espresso – simple and delicious!

Photo by Emily Long


Destinations

See You on the Slopes A G U I D E TO T H E S O U T H E A S T ’ S TO P S K I D E S T I N AT I O N S B Y M A R Y B E T H WA L L AC E

You don’t have to book a trip to Colorado or Utah to experience great skiing. In fact, you don’t even have to board a plane. The following five ski destina-

tions, each within driving distance of Chattanooga, have it all: scenic views,

countless amenities, experienced instructors, and acres of skiable terrain. So, lace up your boots and grab your ski poles – the slopes are calling.

Photo Courtesy of Snowshoe Mountain Resort

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] SEE YOU ON THE SLOPES

Snowshoe Mountain Resort S N OW S H O E , W E S T V I R G I N I A —

or some of the best ski terrain this side of the Mississippi, head to Snowshoe Mountain – home of the “upside-down resort.” The Village at Snowshoe, complete with lodging, shopping, and dining amenities, is located at the peak of the mountain instead of the base, allowing enthusiastic guests to ski down the mountain within minutes of their arrival. Guests can also look forward to ample snowfall, more than 50 trails, and 20 acres of freestyle terrain. One of three ski areas, the Western Territory boasts a 1,500foot vertical drop via trails Cupp Run (designed by renowned Olympian Jean-Claude Killy) and Shay’s Revenge.

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Photos Courtesy of Snowshoe Mountain Resort

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Ober Gatlinburg G AT L I N B U R G , T E N N E S S E E —

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can immediately access the resort’s 10 trails, including two black diamond runs and a 600foot vertical drop. A freestyle terrain park gives avid skiers and snowboarders a place to practice their moves, while additional winter activities, from snow tubing to ice skating, are available for anyone needing a break from the slopes.

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ber Gatlinburg is the only ski resort in Tennessee – but that’s not its only claim to fame. At just over two miles, one of America’s largest aerial tramways will whisk you to the base of the ski hill, where sweeping views of the Smokies await. Skiers

Photos Courtesy of Ober Gatlinburg

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Beech Mountain Resort B E E C H M O U N TA I N , N O R T H CA R O L I N A —

ki fanatics can gain some serious altitude at Beech Mountain Resort, a North Carolina institution since 1967. With an elevation of 5,506 feet, Beech Mountain is the highest ski resort in the Eastern United States. Offering 17 slopes on 98 skiable acres, along with ski lessons and a terrain park, this resort has something for every skill level. Beech Mountain’s 2018-19 season brought with it several upgrades, including two new chairlifts, additional snowmaking machines, and 115 new slope lights. After exploring the resort’s alpine village, be sure to check out the summit view from 5506’, a sky bar aptly named for its impressive height.

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Photo Courtesy of Beech Mountain Resort

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Wintergreen Resort WINTERGREEN, VIRGINIA —

intergreen Resort puts the full beauty of the Blue Ridge Mountains on display. Enjoy the view from one of five chairlifts, which shuttle guests to the resort’s 26 trails – 14 are lighted for nighttime skiing. Expert skiers take note: Combining the

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upper and lower Cliffhanger trails makes for a 1.4-mile run on black and double black diamond terrain. Just as notable as its slopes is Wintergreen’s après-ski lifestyle. The resort is home to Virginia’s largest tubing park, The Plunge, as well as a full-service spa, two championship golf courses, and a variety of dining options.

[ SEE YOU ON THE SLOPES ]

Photos Courtesy of Wintergreen Resort

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Sugar Mountain Resort S U G A R M O U N TA I N , N O R T H CA R O L I N A

ith 21 slopes dotted across 125 skiable acres, Sugar Mountain Resort is a true gem. Its vertical drop, at 1,200 feet, is just behind Snowshoe Mountain’s as the largest in the Southeast, and one of the resort’s signature trails – Whoopdeedoo – holds double black diamond status. Beginners to the sport are also in luck, as more than a third of Sugar’s trails cater to novices; a lesson or two at the ski school will get you started. Don’t leave the mountain without taking advantage of other Sugar offerings, from tubing and ice skating to guided snowshoe treks. The town of Banner Elk, located at the foot of the mountain, provides plenty of lodging at a variety of price points.

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Photos Courtesy of Sugar Mountain Resort

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Last Look Photo by Emily Long

“I believe that what we become depends on what our fathers teach us at odd moments, when they aren’t trying to teach us.” – Umberto Eco

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