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TRI-COUNTY PRESS

Your Community Press newspaper serving Evendale, Glendale, Sharonville, Springdale, Wyoming

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 2017

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Historic tollbooth dedication at park this month Jennie Key jkey@enquirer.com

It’s been than more nine months since the Blue Rock/ Banning Toll House and Creedville Post Office lumbered along the backroads of Colerain Township to a new resting place at Colerain's Heritage Park down along the Great Miami. The Coleraine Historical Society, which rescued the old toll house and Post Office, and under the direction of restoration chairman Gary Henson, has restored it with the help of volunteers and donations. The community will dedicate the restored historic structure at ceremonies set for 1 to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 29, at Heritage Park, 11405 East Miami River Road. Historical society treasurer Chris Henson says Charles Gutzwiller, a descendant of Creedville’s first Postmaster, will cut the ribbon to open the toll house to the public. According to records with the Coleraine Historical Society, the Ohio State Congress passed legislation in 1829 to charge for road usage, and the Blue RockBanning Toll House was built that same year. A small frame structure covered with boardand-batten siding, the toll house was originally on Banning Road at its intersection with Blue Rock Road. As the 19th century neared its end, the roads were free for travelers and documents show

The toll booth was rescued by the Colerain Historical Society and moved from its former location in 2003. It’s been in storage waiting to be restored. PHOTOS PROVIDED

that as early as 1879, the Blue Rock/Banning Toll House was being used as the Creedville Post Office and General Store. The name “Creedville” had been assigned to the postal station after Jerome Creed, a prominent Cincinnati attorney, procured a permit to open a postal station in the area. In the late 1800s, the area was called Creedville after the postal station at Blue Rock and Banning roads, but by the 1920s, the community was known by its more familiar moniker, White Oak, a name that goes back to early settlement years when huge oak trees grew in the area. Records show the Creedville Post Office was officially established in 1880, and its first Postmaster was Fridolon Gutzwiller, See TOLLBOOTH, Page 2A

The Creedville Tollbooth and Post Office has been restored and will be dedicated at ceremonies Oct. 29.

BE TRUE TO YOUR SCHOOL Get the latest news from your favorite high school teams. Download our Varsity app on both the Apple App Store and Google Play.

Visitors enjoy the annual Beer, Wine and Food Festival in Wyoming Proceeds benefit The Cure Starts Now. FILE PHOTO

Enjoy the Beer, Wine and Food Festival Oct. 13-14 Jennie Key jkey@enquirer.com

The Beer, Wine and Food Festival will return to downtown Wyoming for its eighth year with more than 80 varieties of craft beer and wine to sample, including local varieties. There will also be a showcase of Cincinnati’s best eats ranging from barbeque to pizza. This two-day festival raises money for local nonprofit The Cure Starts Now Foundation whose founders, Brooke and Keith Desserich, are Wyoming residents. All proceeds from the festival go directly toward funding pediatric cancer research through the efforts of The Cure Starts Now Foundation. Last year’s festival raised $36,000 for pediatric brain cancer research. Many of the volunteers have been impacted by cancer and are happy to participate in an event to make a difference in the lives of kids battling cancer. To date, The Cure Starts Now has funded more than $7.3 million in cancer research all over the world. The festival will be open 5 to 11 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13, and Saturday, Oct. 14, at the Wyoming Village Green, at Oak and Grove avenues. Fifty West Brewing Compa-

Wyoming started their weekend celebration with their sixth annual Beer, Wine and Food Festival. Proceeds benefit The Cure Starts Now. Lisa Hill, mother of Lauren Hill, and Brooke and Keith Desserich, parents of Elena Desserich. JOE SIMON FOR THE ENQUIRER

ny is among those with beer offerings which will include American Lager, Doom Pedal White Ale, Coast to Coast IPA and Experimental Pale Ale. Check herefor the wines and beers that will be available. On Friday, Don Fields performs from 5 to 8 p.m. and Peter Dressman and the Sun will play from 8 to 11 p.m. On Saturday, Mike and Sean of The Tillers will play from 5 to 8 p.m. followed by the Danny Frazier Band from 8 to 11 p.m. Cost for a tasting single-day admission is $30, which includes single-day admission to the festival, wristband, and five beer or wine-tasting tickets. You must be 21 or older. A VIP tasting single-day ad-

Contact The Press News ..........................248-8600 Retail advertising ..............768-8404 Classified advertising .........242-4000 Delivery ........................576-8240

See FESTIVAL, Page 2A

Wyoming started their weekend celebration with their sixth annual Beer, Wine and Food Festival. One of the featured beers: Rugbrod a dark rye Belgium Ale from The Brewery in Orange County, California. JOE SIMON FOR THE ENQUIRER

Vol. 34 No. 5 © 2017 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

See page A2 for additional information

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Join Us For Our Open House Sunday, November 5 1 p.m. - 4 p.m.


NEWS

2A • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • OCTOBER 11, 2017

Colerain coach resigns amid allegations of inappropriate conduct with student Adam Baum abaum@enquirer.com

Northwest Local School District announced one of its coaches at Colerain High School resigned amid allegations of inappropriate conduct

with a student. Neither the district nor staff at Colerain High School has named the coach as the investigation is ongoing. Here is the Oct. 5 news release from the district: “Northwest Local

School District regards the safety and security of our students as a top priority at all times. Recently the district received allegations of inappropriate conduct between a student and a Colerain High School coach off school

grounds. The district immediately took action to initiate an investigation, contacted the local police, and notified Children’s Services. At that time, the employee was banned from district property and prohibited from com-

municating with students and staff. We are not able to discuss the details of this case as the investigation is ongoing. The individual involved has turned in a letter of resignation and is no longer employed by the district

We will do everything within our power to deal with the issues surrounding the violations related to district policy and state law to protect our students.” Watch for updates on Cincinnati.com

AROUND YOUR NORTHWEST PRESS COMMUNITIES News from the Northwest Press communities of Colerain Township, Green Township, Groesbeck, Monfort Heights,

Index Calendar .................6B Classifieds ................C Food .....................8A Police .....................8B Puzzle .................. 10B Real estate ..............4B Sports ....................1B Viewpoints ............10A

Pleasant Run, Seven Hills and White Oak:

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

Throughout 2016, there were 3,390 fire deaths in the United States – the highest number of fire fatalities since 2007. The two primary reasons for this loss of life remain the lack of working smoke detectors, and the failure to plan and practice two ways out of the home in the event of a fire. Throughout the month of October, not just during

TRI-COUNTY PRESS Find news and information from your community on the Web Cincinnati.com/communities

News Nancy Daly Community Content Strategist 513-768-8530 or 859-578-1059 ndaly@enquirer.com @Nancy_Daly

Jennie Key Reporter 513-332-5976 jkey@enquirer.com @keyNWP

Adam Baum Sports Reporter 513-364-4497 abaum@enquirer.com @adamjbaum

Kelly McBride Reporter 513-576-8246 kmcbride@enquirer.com @Kmcbride_CPress

Scott Springer Sports Reporter 513-364-5517 sspringer@enquirer.com @sspringersports

Melanie Laughman Prep Sports Editor 513-364-4078 mlaughman@enquirer.com @mlaughman

Delivery For customer service: 513-853-6277

Mary Jo Schablein District Manager 513-853-6278 mschable@communitypress.com

Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager 513-853-6279 sschachleiter@communitypress.com

Mary Jo Puglielli District Manager 513-853-6276 mpuglielli@communitypress.com

Steve Barraco Circulation Manager (Tri-County Press) 513-248-7110 sbarraco@communitypress.com

Lynn Hessler District Manager 513-248-7115 lyhessler@communitypress.com

Advertising

Classified

To place an ad 513-768-8404 EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

To place a Classified ad 513-242-4000 www.communityclassified.com

Tollbooth Continued from Page 1A

Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.

Fire Prevention Week, the Colerain Township Department of Fire and EMS will address these issues by making smoke detectors available to Colerain households, and at the same time encourage the need for planning and practicing a fire exit plan, especially with small children, including a centralized outside meeting place for the family to assemble should there be a fire. Colerain citizens are encouraged to contact the Colerain Township Department of Fire and EMS at smokedetectors@ colerain.org or at 513-8256143 for a free inspection of their existing smoke detectors, and the free installation of new smoke detectors with ten year tamper-proof batteries should their existing units be found inoperable. On Oct. 28, the department will conduct a oneday smoke detector installation campaign in Northbrook neighborhood, an area where there have been several fire fatalities in the past five years. Specifically, department members and volunteers will canvass an area of homes on the following streets: Anaheim, Aries, Burgess, Darbidew, Elkhorn, Glenaire, Hyannis, Laverne, Libra, Pulver,

who lived at the southern merger of Cheviot and Blue Rock roads with his wife Theresa and their 11 children. More:1829 Structure moved to new home In 1905, the Post Office

The Colerain Township Chamber of Commerce sponsored a breakfast to present Firefighter and Police Officer of the Year Awards. From left, David Denny Chairman of the Chamber’s Board of Directors, Colerain Township Police Chief Mark Denney, Lt. Mike Owens, Fire Inspector Doug Eikens and Colerain Township Fire Chief Fran Cook. PROVIDED BY COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

Trafalgar, and Windsong. Both of these projects are made possible through a partnership with the Cincinnati-Dayton Chapter of the American Red Cross providing these smoke detectors for installation. For more information, please contact us at smokedetectors@ colerain.org or by calling 513-825-6143.

Chamber honors officers The Colerain Township Chamber of Commerce recognized the Colerain Township Department of Fire and EMS Firefighter of the Year and the Colerain Township Police Department Police Officer of

the Year at a breakfast Sept. 29. Each recipient received both a plaque from the chamber and the corresponding Commendation Medal and Ribbon from the Fire or Police Department, that will be worn on their dress uniform. The 2017 Firefighter of the Year is Firefighter Doug Eikens, a 21-year veteran of the department, currently serving as a fire inspector. Eikens has been reducing a backlog of fire inspections in area businesses due to the transfer of some fire personnel from the Inspection Bureau to Fire and EMS Operations. Eikens also helped implement use of a new tablet-based

inspection system that reduced the amount of time needed to conduct each inspection. Lieutenant Michael Owens is the 2017 Colerain Police Officer of the Year. Owens has been with the Colerain Police Department for 18 years, serving as a patrol officer, bike officer, patrol sergeant and is now the department's Support Services Commander. In that role, Owens managed the 2017 Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies (CALEA) on-site and reaccreditation bid. Owens ensured compliance with more than 489 standards, while overseeing both the Patrol and Support Services divisions.

use was discontinued and shortly thereafter, the wooden building was moved to another location in Colerain Township at Galbraith and Cheviot roads. When it was moved, the front roof extension was removed and the living quarters on the left side were demolished. It stood there for almost 100 years. Moving the historic Creedville Post Office/Toll Booth required special equipment and experience moving buildings. THANKS TO COLERAIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY

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to 8:30 p.m. The Historical Society Museum is at 4725 Springdale Road, in front of Colerain Park. The museum is open the second and fourth Saturday of each month from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. or by appointment. For information call 513-385-7566. For more information, check out the historical society's website.

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In 2002, members of the Coleraine Historical Society negotiated to take possession of the building and moved it into storage until it could find a permanent home. Now it has one. The Coleraine Historical Society meets the third Wednesday of each month at the Northgate Mall Police Substation from 6:30

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mission is $50 and includes single-day admission to the festival, wristband, commemorative glass and unlimited beer or wine tastings. A non-tasting singleday admission is $10 for those 17 and up. Youngsters up to 16 are free with a paid adult admission. All children must be accompanied by an adult. To purchase tickets for this event visit www. thecurestartsnow.org. Tickets are available day of the event at the main entrance at Grove Avenue and Wyoming Avenue at an additional cost.

Wyoming started their weekend celebration with the sixth annual Beer, Wine and Food Festival. Proceeds benefit The Cure Starts Now. From the Wyoming Fine Art Center are Beth Kelly of Glendale and Milan Dukic of Northside. JOE SIMON FOR THE ENQUIRER

To learn more about the festival or The Cure Starts Now, visit the website.


NEWS

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 3A

Cincinnati schools worried about cuts to mental health services Lara Korte Cincinnati

As Cincinnati Public Schools look for ways to improve mental health resources for students, administrators are worried about potential cuts to psychological counseling services, which are part of school-based Medicaid programs. Mental health is on the mind of many parents and educators following the death of 8-year-old Gabriel Taye in January. Gabriel killed himself two days after other students knocked him un-

conscious in a Carson Elementary School. Gabriel’s death came amid an outbreak of youth suicide in Hamilton County. Last year, there were 13 suicides of people under 18, and so far this year, there are eight. The U.S. House of Representatives passed a bill last that calls for $880 billion in cuts to Medicaid, the federalstate partnership that provides healthcare to low-income Americans. Many of the health care centers housed in Cincinnati schools are paid for,

in part, through Medicaid reimbursements, and could be in jeopardy if the bill advances. CPS works with the local non-profit Mind Peace to bring mental health agencies into the schools. It’s what Superintendent Mary Ronan calls a private/public partnership, where private services are brought into public schools. The district also has 25 full-service health centers, three dental clinics, and a vision clinic in its schools.

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NEWS

4A • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

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Cuts Continued from Page 3A

Having experts onsite allows students to receive care without having to be pulled out of school, or have a parent miss work – a major factory in a district that has an 80 percent poverty level. But “if they cut Medicaid and people’s salaries aren’t covered, the schools could lose these services,” Ronan said. Early diagnosis and appropriate services can make a difference in the lives of children with mental health issues, the national Center for Disease Control and Prevention reports. Access to those resources can vary. Even with mental health agencies in every Cincinnati school, some are still concerned. At a recent school board meeting, parents complained that the schools are not doing enough when it comes to resources for bullied students. Ronan echoed those concerns. “The district feels we need more services in our schools, not fewer services,” she said. “So that’s why we’re so concerned about the impact of these cuts on our schools.” Mind Peace Executive Director Susan Shelton said the best way to get children access to services is to place agencies directly in the schools. Shelton said she’s not certain how a potential cut to Medicaid

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would impact the schools’ mental health services, but said, as with any change to a big system, she’s worried about repercussions. “We want to just keep improving it and not do anything to threaten it,” Shelton said. In addition to cuts to mental health care in the schools, the district is also worried about cuts to disability programs. CPS receives $2 million to $3 million every year from Medicaid reimbursements to provide federallyrequired services to students with disabilities. These include physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech and language, nursing and counseling. Ronan said this amount typically covers about 17 percent of the total cost, but even that could vanish with Medicaid cuts. “There are huge costs to this,” Ronan said. “So it’s very discouraging to hear that the little bit you get back might be greatly impacted.” In 2013, Ohio schools received $75 million in combined state and federal Medicaid reimbursements, and about $47 million was federal dollars, according to the Ohio Department of Medicaid. Ronan said the district has reached out to its representatives in Washington, but haven’t heard back. “Having come so far and knowing that there’s work to be done, you don’t want to backtrack,” Ronan said.


NEWS

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 5A

SCHOOL NOTES McAuley High School » McAuley High School’s eighth annual mattress sale is 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, at McAuley, 6000 Oakwood Ave. in College Hill. Brand new, name-brand, top quality mattress sets will full manufacturer warranties will be sold. All sizes, adjustable bases, price ranges, delivery and free layaway will be available. Profits from every sale directly benefit McAuley’s Mom & Dad’s Club. For additional information, contact dharbin65@yahoo.com. » McAuley High School will present its fall play, Beverly Cleary’s “Ramona Quimby,” Oct. 20-22. Shows are at 7:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20, and Saturday, Oct. 21, and at 2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 22. Tickets for the shows are $10 for adults, $8 for students/seniors and $5 for children under 10. Tickets can be bought at www.mcacin.booktix.com or at the door. On Sunday, Oct. 22, children and parents are invited to Ramona Quimby’s Halloween Party at 12:45 p.m., right before the 2 p.m. show. Children are encouraged to wear their Halloween costumes, and there will be Halloween treats and activities with the cast members. Tickets for the Halloween party are $5 for adults and $10 for children. A special package deal is offered for those who buy tickets to the Halloween party and the Oct. 22 show. Tickets for the show and the party can be bought for $12 total (adults and kids). Tickets for the party must be bought ahead of time at www.mcacin.booktix.com. » McAuley High School seniors Lindsay Cook and Nora Honkomp have been named Commended Students in the

Dads at South Elementary walk their children to school. PROVIDED/MISSY KNIGHT

2018 National Merit Scholarship Program. Lindsay and Nora are two of the 34,000 Commended Students throughout the nation who are being recognized for their exceptional academic promise. Although they will not continue in the 2018 competition for National Merit Scholarship awards, Commended Students placed among the top 50,000 scorers of more than 1.6 million students who entered the 2018 competition by taking the 2016 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test (PSAT/NMSQT).

Mount Healthy schools » More than 150 fathers walked with their children as they paraded from the board office to Mount Healthy South El-

ementary School to celebrate National Fathers Walk Your Child to School Day. They were escorted by Mount Healthy drumline band, Mount Healthy Cheerleaders, South elementary principal, Yzvetta Macon, and a host of staff. Mothers, other students, formed a tunnel and lined the entrance into the building applauding and cheering the fathers and students. Inside the gymnasium, families packed the bleachers and lined the walls to hear from the Mount Healthy Marching Band play for the celebration, and the cheerleaders performed spirited cheers to rejoice in this experience. Superintendent Dr. Reva Cosby was on hand to welcome fathers and students to the festivities. Families listened as Mrs.

Macon, Reverend Charles King Jr. Brad Johnson, Dean of Students, and Tom Hill, Jr/Sr High School Principal, spoke of the importance of having dads in their children’s lives as well as the joy and success both they and their children experience from the inclusion. Macon even had her father there as well as her husband to support her message. Fathers and their children continued the celebration with breakfast sponsored by South Parent Teacher Organization with President Lakeisha Robinson.

Winton Woods schools » Fairfield Hospital has supported Winton Woods City Schools with a variety of services for almost six years. This community partnership has provided students with free

health checks, a sideline physician at our varsity home football games, and numerous other services to ensure our students are healthy, safe and can perform at their best. It was all this, and more, that led to Mercy Health receiving the district’s Community Spirit Award at the Aug. 28 board of education meeting. “I’ve had several meetings with Mercy Fairfield Chief Executive Officer Tom Urban, and I can tell you he has a genuine care for our students,” said Superintendent Anthony G. Smith. “As president and CEO, Mr. Urban makes it a point to participate in meetings with the school district. Each year, Mr. Urban continues to outdo himself by providing for our students in a See SCHOOL NOTES, Page 6A

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NEWS

6A • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

SCHOOL NOTES Continued from Page 5A

Have a ball getting back on your feet

variety of meaningful ways.” Winton Woods Athletic Director David Lumpkin said Mercy Health’s presence every day is an invaluable service and is a reflection of the company’s commitment to Winton Woods City Schools. Mercy Health provides all teams with an athletic trainer that supports the district at both home and away contests. » Through Sprint’s 1 Million Project, 1,500 Winton Woods High School students will receive free hotspot devices over a five-year time span through a multi-year ini-

tiative to help eliminate the homework gap. Beginning with the 2017-2018 school year, students will have access to free internet connection at home for up to four years while they are in high school. Sprint’s commitment to education is what motivated Winton Woods Director of Technology Rhonda Hobbs to apply for the grant at the end of the 2016-2017 school year. “We have been brainstorming about how to support the lack of internet access at home for students for years; nothing matched our needs until Sprint provided this opportunity through their

1Million Project,” said Hobbs. “It aligns perfectly with our mission of creating opportunities for each student to reach their highest potential.” In order to receive a hotspot device, students must attend Winton Woods High School or Project Success. Also, parents must complete the online back-to-school forms found on InfoSnap or at the high school front office. After the forms have been completed, the device will be activated. Anyone interested in the program or wants additional information can contact the District Technology Department at 619-2350.

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NEWS

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 7A

Rosary March - FOR THE -

Triumph of the Immaculate Heart of Mary CELEBRATING THE 100th ANNIVERSARY OF FATIMA

Saturday, October 14 Meet at Boone Cty. Justice Center 11:00 am 6025 Roger Ln. Burlington, KY (FREE PARKING)

Why We are Marching:

On October 13th 1917, Our Blessed Mother appeared at Fatima, Portugal. The sun danced in the sky with more than 70,000 people watching! The Blessed Virgin Mary asked for the daily Rosary, for penance, amendment of life, and Holy Communions of reparation on first Saturdays of five consecutive months. Our Lady also asked for the consecration of Russia to her Immaculate Heart, to be made by the Pope and Bishops simultaneously in order to obtain the conversion of Russia and peace for the world. This public Miracle of the Sun was predicted by Our Lady and yet, 100 years after these apparitions, the requests of the Blessed Virgin Mary have not been honored: Russia has not been consecrated to Her Immaculate Heart and indeed Russia’s errors have spread throughout the world as Our Lady predicted.

Join us on October 14th for a Rosary March to beg the Blessed Virgin Mary to have mercy upon us and intercede for the Consecration of Russia to Her Immaculate Heart.

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NEWS

8A • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

These warm meals are perfect for crisp fall days As I write this column, the weather has cooled significantly. Time to finish cutting the corn stalks down for fall decorations, and to harvest the rest of the gourds so they can dry naturally. And I can’t forget about saving seeds from the marigolds, zinnias and other annual flowers so that I Rita have a Heikenfeld good amount RITA’S KITCHEN for next year’s flower garden. The pegs in the hallway are holding herbs that are drying. Hopefully, they’ll be dried before we have to use the pegs for coats. I know autumn is a busy time for you, too. The recipes I’m sharing are just right for these crisp, fall days. The vegetable soup is in my Recipe Hall of Fame. The vintage stuffed bell pepper recipe is still being made in lots of Community Press kitchens. It’s that good. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at rita@com munitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line.

Western & Southern’s cafeteria’s stuffed bell peppers This was originally sent to me at a Delhi reader’s request by Thornton Kindred and Mary Ann Williams. I had another request for just yesterday. Thornton said this recipe was in the magazine back in the ‘60s. Now this is a recipe with staying power. Meat and rice stuffing: 4 large or 5 medium peppers 1 -1/2 lbs ground beef 1/4 cup chopped onions 1 cup tomato sauce made from recipe below 3 tablespoons flour 1 tablespoon salt added to water to cook rice 1 teaspoon black pepper 1/4 cup rice (cook according to package directions, in salted water, until done and stir in pepper.)

Tomato sauce: 3 cans, 10-1/2 ounces each condensed tomato soup 24 ounces can tomato juice 2 teaspoons salt Pinch of black pepper

Mix all ingredients and bring to a boil. Set aside one cup sauce. Stuffing: Over medium heat, cook and stir beef until crumbly. Add onions and continue cooking until meat starts to brown. Remove from heat, add flour and mix well. Add seasoned rice and reserved one cup of tomato sauce. Mix and set aside. Peppers: Cut peppers in half vertically. Remove seeds. Put in boiling water to soften. Remove from heat and let set for 20 minutes. Drain. Stuff peppers with meat and rice mix. Put in baking pan and pour sauce over peppers. Bake in 350 degree oven about1 to 1-1/2 hours or until peppers are tender. Baste peppers with the sauce during baking.

When the weather gets cooler, the requests start pouring in for Rita’s Spicy (or not) 30-minute beef vegetable soup. RITA HEIKENFELD FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Spicy (or not) 30-minute beef vegetable soup How many times have I shared versions of this? Too many to count, but when the weather gets cooler, the requests start pouring in. For Meghan and Jen, two moms who asked for the recipe during a recent presentation. l-1/2 pounds lean ground beef - I used sirloin 1 heaping cup chopped yellow or white onion, not sweet onion 1-2 teaspoons garlic, minced 1 jar chunky garden style pasta sauce 1 quart low sodium beef broth Water to taste (start with a couple cups of water and go from there) 10 oz. can tomatoes and chilies or 14.5 ounces diced tomatoes if you don’t want it spicy

1 pound or so frozen soup or mixed vegetables, thawed if you have time Few handfuls any fresh greens (optional) Cheddar for garnish

Saute meat, onion and garlic together in pot until meat is cooked. Now add everything else but the greens. Bring to a boil and let simmer about 20 minutes or until vegetables are cooked. Toss in greens and cook until just wilted, about a minute more.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen Freeze extra peppers They’re in season now so preserve as many as you can. No need to blanch sweet or hot peppers. Just chop, pour onto cookie sheet in single layer and freeze hard, uncovered. Pour into covered containers and store in freezer. Peppers won’t clump together and pour out easily. I don’t thaw before adding to cooked recipes.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen A potato masher works wonders to break up the ground beef as it cooks. Watch me make the soup: It’s on my abouteating.com YouTube channel.

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NEWS

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 9A

Scott Souders is township’s new fire chief Forrest Sellers fsellers@enquirer.com

When Scott Souders joined the Mack Volunteer Fire Department in 1980, he never expected it would eventually be his career. Now almost four decades later, Souders was appointed as the new chief of fire and emergency medical services for Green Township. He succeeds former Chief Doug Witsken, who retired. Souders, who is a Green Township resident, has the distinction of being the first Green Township fire chief to have progressed through every

rank in the department. “(It’s) being able to make a positive difference in the community when people are experiencing lows in their lives,” said Souders regarding what he finds most fulfilling about being a firefighter. In fact, it was seeing how he can make a difference in other people’s lives which inspired him to pursue fire services as a career. Souders joined the Mack Volunteer Fire Department, which was later consolidated with the Green Township Fire Department, with a friend thinking it would be “a

cool thing to do.” Everything changed when he began emergency medical training. “At that point, I realized the idea of helping people medically inspired me to continue in that direction,” he said. Since then Souders said a lot has changed. He said the demand for service has increased as the community has continued to grow and training techniques have continued to evolve. The technology has certainly improved as well, he added. However, it remains the simplest things which bring Souders the most

satisfaction. His fondest memory remains helping deliver a baby about 15 years ago. The expectant mother was in transit between home and the hospital when the birth occurred. “It was a happy time for all involved,” he said. Souders said his goal as the new chief is to help “enhance the department’s reputation with the community.” He said he wants to provide more opportunities for interaction with residents via presentations and educational programs which may range from fire extinguisher training to first aid classes.

Scott Souders is the new chief of the Green Township Fire and EMS Department. THE ENQUIRER/FORREST SELLERS

It’s getting the community to know us in a nonemergency environment, he said. Souders will oversee four stations with a total of 45 part-time staff and 43 full-time staff.

Souders has been married to his wife, Alice, for 27 years and has four children – Ben, 24, Allie, 23, Curtis, 18, and Jack, 17. His interests include small engine repair, fishing and singing.

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10A • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

VIEWPOINTS

COMMUNITY PRESS

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Cincinnati.com/communities

CH@TROOM

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Vote for a person, not a party

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION Where is a great place to take a fall vacation? Suggestions? By the way, Ch@troom will be on vacation the week of Oct. 9. Look for this week’s answers the issues of Oct. 25-26. Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to ndaly@ communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos said Amazon HQ2 will be a “full equal to our Seattle headquarters.” GETTY IMAGES/USA TODAY

Last week’s question What would Greater Cincinnati bring to the table as Amazon considers cities for its second headquarters (HQ2) and the 50,000 jobs it would create? What would Cincinnati’s challenges be? Thoughts?

“It would be great for the Cincinnati area to get the new Amazon Headquarters. That would take cooperation from the state of Ohio, Hamilton County and the city of Cincinnati. The chances of that cooperation are not promising. Amazon has said it wants its ‘HQ2’ to be near a metropolitan area with more than a million people; that it be in an area where it can attract and retain top technical talent; have access to mass transit; and be within 45 minutes of an international airport, among other criteria. Cincinnati’s mass transit is not exactly what Amazon will be looking for. The street car is in its infancy. The competition for this site is very foreboding. My guess is Amazon might look at the area near their current warehouse in NKY however CVG is not really an international airport. Go Figure!” Dave Thomas

“Rush hour traffic would be a challenge.” Michael Robinson

“Drastically lower cost of living compared to their current headquarters. Can’t say how it compares to competing cities as I don’t know who’s in the running. “Amazon air and DHL have major hubs here, and the airport has ample capacity for additional flights. Major UPS hub just down the road in Louisville.” Andy Feger

“An airport with affordable fares and direct flights. Wait, no, that’s Louisville. Professional sports teams who are competitive in their respective leagues. No, wait, that’s Columbus. Hmmm. That’s a tough question ...” Brian Smith

“Call and tell them they can buy anything in Union for the right price.” Mack Long

The election for township trustee is just around the corner. The race is heating up, and it has several candidates in the running. The two most important to you should be incumbent Jeff Ritter, and Dennis Deters’ appointed replacement, Michael Inderhees. Yes, I have seen the big signs saying, “No more Ritter.” I ask you … don’t you want someone who has been fiscally responsible and a good steward of your tax dollars? Someone who has supported the addition of career police officers and firefighters and their much-needed replacement apparatus? The Stone Creek development, keeping Northgate Mall revitalized and occupied, the New Xscape Theatre … I could go on, but most don’t care or are unconcerned with the details. I know Jeff Ritter is the right person for this position because of personal experiences I have had with him as a career firefighter and township resident. Let’s talk about Michael Inderhees. He is an educated, young attorney who is married

to supportive, wonderful wife, with one child and another on the way. But he still makes time to be available to meet and discuss a number of issues, one being something we all face, healthcare insurance. As a township employee, Michael waded through a massive amount of data to help us maintain our current level of coverage. Both Jeff and Michael ask questions, sometimes becoming very passionate about the township, its employees and departments. This is not because they don’t care, but because they take Colerain’s welfare very seriously. Yes, we have all seen the opposition at the trustee’s meeting. It is a small group, given that we are a township of 58,000-plus. I believe Jeff and Michael are doing well, and they deserve the chance to see their continued vision through. Jeff Ritter and Michael Inderhees are men of good morals, values and character. Please give them your vote and support for the next term. Phil Klug Colerain Township

Guidelines for elections letters, columns Here are the guidelines for elections-related guest columns and letters to the editor: » Columns must be no more than 500 words. » Letters must be no more than 300 words. » All letters and columns are subject to editing. » Columns must include a color head shot (.jpg format) and a short bio of the author. » Candidates may submit no more than one guest column before the election. » For levies and ballot is-

sues, we will run no more than one column in favor and one column against. The columns should be from official pro-levy or anti-levy groups. If there is no organized group for a side, the first column submitted will be used. » All columns and letters must include a daytime phone number for confirmation. » The deadline for columns and letters to appear in print is noon Thursday, Oct. 19. The only columns and letters that will run the

week before the election (Nov. 1 edition) are those which directly respond to a previous letter or column. » Print publication depends on available space. We cannot guarantee all submissions will be used. The closer to the Oct. 19 deadline that a column or letter is submitted, the greater the chance it may not be used in print. » Email is the preferred method of submission. Send by email to ndaly@community press.com.

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OCTOBER 11, 2017 • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • 1B

SPORTS

TRI- COUNTY PRESS

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

CommunityPress.com

Adversity creates a tougher Winton Woods football team Adam Baum abaum@enquirer.com

FOREST PARK - Winton Woods head football coach Andre Parker had an idea his Warriors would be special this season. It was a suspicion that arrived four years ago when the current seniors were freshmen on West Kemper Road, and it’s only gotten stronger. Winton Woods is 6-0 as of Oct. 6 and ranked No. 2 in the most recent Division II state poll. It’s the best start since 2013 when the Warriors also began 6-0. “This is a special group,” Parker said. “To be honest, they had to play a little earlier than they were ready. About 13 of them that have been playing since they were sophomores. They’ve played at least one state champion, and a couple years multiple state champions, every year they’ve been in high school, so they’ve competed against the best.” That level of competition is a product of desire and necessity. Winton Woods doesn’t belong to an athletic conference, so the Warriors are required to play

Miyan Williams dishes for a touchdown late in the fourth quarter to put Winton Woods up 18-7 at La Salle Friday, Sept. 22 at La Salle High School. ALEX VEHR FOR THE ENQUIRER

anyone and everyone to fill their schedule. They can’t schedule cupcakes because they can’t afford it if they want to make the

playoffs and if they want to compete when they get there. “Their sophomore year (the current seniors) we had to drive nine hours to a game in Missouri, so we drove 16 hours to play one football game,” said Parker. “That’s just kind of what they’ve gone through. We’ve gone to Indianapolis, Akron, we’ve gone to Columbus, just for games. The sacrifices they make to be a part of this program is huge. We don’t have a league … They can’t be first-team all-league. They can’t be second-team all-league and they can’t be honorable mention, which you know has a big impact on all-state voting. They’re against the eight ball.” Since this senior class started at Winton Woods, the Warriors have not won a playoff game and they’ve gone a combined 15-13 over the last three seasons. The difference this season, Parker said, is a little belief goes a long way. “I think the things these kids have been through, their loyalty and their persistence has been great,” Parker said. “They’ve

Scott Springer sspringer@enquirer.com

Wyoming head coach Steve Thomas goes over instructions to the Cowboys at halftime of their game with Mariemont Oct. 3. The Cowboys won 3-0. THE ENQUIRER/SCOTT SPRINGER

Jonathan Klein prepares to launch the ball for Wyoming THE ENQUIRER/SCOTT SPRINGER

Walnut Hills with a 0-0 tie. "Until we make a deep run in tournament Anderson will be the best team we've faced all year," Thomas said. "They're phenomenal. I learned some things playing them."

GLORY DAYS: Mancuso, Taylor lead Princeton to 1983 state title Jeff Wallner

See FOOTBALL, Page 2B

Wyoming back atop CHL soccer heap WYOMING - By virtue of a 3-0 shutout on Mariemont's Senior Night, the Wyoming High School boys soccer squad will have their name on a Cincinnati Hills League banner for the first time since 2014. The Cowboys won that title outright three years ago and can have the 2017 crown to themselves with a win or tie against Indian Hill Oct. 10. While coach Steve Thomas has had numerous successful teams with deep runs in the postseason, the championship is only Wyoming's second in the CHL since 1998, well before any of his current players were born. "CHL titles are tough to come by," Thomas said. "We're very grateful." If it weren't for an early season 1-1 tie against Taylor, the Cowboys would have clinched sole possession of the championship after the Mariemont win. "I'm so proud of my players and coaches," Thomas said. "It was just a phenomenal job (against Mariemont). We had one of our players who was out all year and it was his first game cleared to come back (Isaiah Hornsby). It was nice to see him come back. He'll make a difference for us." Among Wyoming's top point producers have been junior Zach Napora, freshman Ethan Herbert, junior Perrin Varland and senior Zachary Herbert. Ethan Herbert and Varland have led the goal scoring, with Napora topping the team in assists. Wyoming's only two losses at presstime were non-conference games at Chaminade-Julienne (4-2) and Anderson (2-0). To date, those are the only two schools to score more than one goal against the Cowboys. They opened the season at Division I

Princeton quarterback Mike Taylor (7) ran the offense to perfection with help from coach Pat Mancuso (left). THE ENQUIRER/DAVID KOHL

Against Chaminade-Julienne, Wyoming held an early lead, but a late first-half goal changed the momentum of the game. From there, C-J played add-on and the Cowboys couldn't rebound. The difficult non-conference slate normally helps Wyoming through the tournament, along with playing Indian Hill each season. The Braves notoriously schedule a rough road to challenge their players. Generally, the strategies have paid off for both schools. The last time Wyoming won fewer than two tournament games was in 2009. Two seasons ago, Wyoming made it all the way to the regional final before falling to Dayton Carroll 2-1. They won four tourney games before being ousted in the regional semifinal in 2014 and three last year before a heartbreaking overtime loss to Tippecanoe 1-0 in the district championship. "We don't have easy games coming up, but soccer's still alive and well (in Wyoming)," Thomas said.

Enquirer contributor

SHARONVILLE - Michael Taylor passed for nearly 2,200 yards and 17 touchdowns in three seasons at the University of Michigan, helping guide the Wolverines to the Rose Bowl in 1989 and ‘90. But, if you ask the Lincoln Heights native to talk about his fondest football memory, it is 1983 - the year the Princeton Vikings rode an emotional roller coaster en route to a Division I state championship. “We accomplished something nobody thought we could do,” Taylor said. “Nothing against any guys I played with at Michigan, but I played with some guys (at Princeton) since I was 8 years old, from the first time I put on a helmet. To this day, they mean more to me than anything.” There were always high expectations for the Princeton football program during the 1980s, but the bar was raised exponentially when USA Today ranked the Vikings No. 1 nationally in its 1983 preseason Super Bowl 25 poll. Pat Mancuso, who was in his 23rd season as Vikings head coach, wanted his players to enjoy the national recognition, but also made sure it was kept in perspective. “We instilled this in our players: that we earned that ranking mostly for what we had accomplished before as a program,” Mancuso said. “We had good players on that team, no doubt about it. We showed signs of being a championship team.” Princeton’s roster was packed with talent. Junior defensive back Harlon Barnett would be named All-American at Michigan State, where he currently serves as co-defensive coordinator and associate head coach. He spent seven years in the NFL with three different teams. Senior tight end Alex Higdon was named first-team AllAmerican by USA Today and Parade Magazine in 1983 before starring at Ohio State and playing three seasons with the Atlanta Falcons before

suffering a career-ending injury. The Vikings had a pair of 1,000-yard rushers in James Brown and Vinnie Simpson. Junior receiver Vincent Munlin made some huge catches later in the year. Senior John McKinney anchored a powerful defensive line. Linebackers Tim Zugg and Scott Napier, and defensive end Tim Riesenberg were keys on a defense that was a force by November. A strong secondary was anchored by Marcus Harrison, whose nephew is Josh Harrison of the Pittsburgh Pirates. Princeton lived up to its lofty ranking the first two weeks of the ‘83 season with impressive victories over La Salle and Findlay, beating them by a combined score of 82-27. The third game was at home against Columbus Upper Arlington. It was supposed to be a coronation for the Vikings, who were ranked No. 1 in the nation, city, and state rankings. Mancuso was in line for his 200th career victory and celebrations were planned. But, the Golden Bears had no intention of being the subplot that evening. On the third play from scrimmage, Upper Arlington running back Paul Neff scored on a 69-yard run, setting the tone for a stunning 36-17 win. “We were comfortable being No. 1 in the nation,” said McKinney. “Those little guys beat us up and down the field.” Mancuso said playing tough non-league schedules was by design, and there was legitimate concern about the Golden Bears that week. That did little to lessen the shock. “We blew it, but we had to make it right,” Mancuso said. “You hate to say something bad had to happen for something good to happen. Everyone came off their pedestal.” The Vikings rolled to six straight victories, winning by a combined 210-47. “We couldn’t afford to lose again, and we approached it See TITLE, Page 2B


LIFE

2B • TRI-COUNTY PRESS • OCTOBER 11, 2017

Football Continued from Page 1B

had to learn not to be selfish and control what we can control. I think that’s probably the biggest thing between the last few years and this year. We can’t control injuries. We can’t control calls. We can’t control the ball that doesn’t bounce our way. We gotta continue to press forward and they’ve been so unselfish. They’re not worried about who scores the touchdowns; they’re just worried about winning.” In Week 7, Winton Woods travels north to take on Canton Central Catholic. This trip was by design, based on the fact that the state champion-

Title Continued from Page 1B

like that,” said McKinney. “Nobody was stopping us.” During that streak, Princeton survived a thriller at Middletown before a raucous crowd of nearly 10,000 at Barnitz Stadium. Future NFL Hall of Fame receiver Cris Carter caught four passes for 113 yards and a touchdown for the Middies. But, Taylor rushed for 141 yards and two scores, including the game-winner with 6:11 left in a 23-22 Princeton victory. “Probably the most exciting game I’ve watched,” said Mancuso, “even as a spectator.” By that point in the sea-

ship games are back in Canton this season, and Canton Central Catholic is a perennial contender for state titles. Parker said, “I think there’s something to be said when you’ve been through a situation in life and you feel like you’ve been there before. This week, we travel to Canton Central Catholic. That’s a four-hour drive, roughly nine hours on the bus, and they won a state title last year. The reason we wanted to play them is because they’ve been to the state final three years in a row. We like to compete against that.” Parker’s not surprised by the talent or attitude of his team. They’re running the same schemes and same playbook as last year. The difference this

season is they believe. “Like I told them the other day, as a coach you look to the future and you see things,” said Parker. “Part of the whole Canton trip was we got a shot. We want to go up there. We want to see what it’s like up that way, see how that trip is. I want them to be able to say, ‘If you wanna do this later in about six or seven weeks, then here it is. It’s right here.’” The Warriors aren’t just a talented team with major college recruits all over the field. They’re built on togetherness. The captains are linebacker Chris Oats, quarterback Kenny Mayberry, cornerback Quinn Smith and lineman Maurice Chapman. Oats essentially can pick where he wants to play in college,

already with offers from most of the major programs. Parker said of Smith, “I think he’s the best corner in the state of Ohio and he’s been doing it since he was a sophomore. The problem with Quinn is he’s so good in coverage, not a lot of people try (to throw against) him.” Winton Woods also has guys like Evan BlackwellStephens, Markeif White and Paul McKnight — all three-year starters. “We don’t have to get in playoff mode because we have to be in playoff mode every week,” said Parker. The Warriors beat three-defending state champion, La Salle, back in Week 5, 18-15, and they still play host to Elder and Moeller later in the regular season.

son, Taylor had taken full charge of the Vikings’ offense. He had breakaway speed, a strong arm, and a 3.6 grade-point average. Most of all, he had the complete trust of his teammates. “When you went to Princeton, you started learning the offense in the eighth grade,” Taylor said. “If I called something, it was going to be the right thing to do.” A 47-7 victory over Lima Senior the following week earned Princeton its 16th straight Greater Miami Conference championship Despite losing 28-21 to Moeller in the regularseason finale at Galbreath Field, the Vikings qualified for the state playoffs, setting up a rematch with the Crusaders the following week.

As a sophomore, Taylor watched Moeller dismantle Princeton, 56-7, at Vikings Stadium. The Crusaders went on to win the state title and a mythical national championship. “From the time I was little, I hated to lose,” said Taylor. “Nobody likes Monday practice when they lose. We weren’t losing like that. It’s not going to happen.” Momentum in the game swung just before halftime when Harrison returned a punt for a touchdown to tie the score 7-7. Mancuso sensed the rising confidence in his kids at halftime. “If we just limited our mistakes in the second half,” he thought, “the kids felt confident we could win.” With Higdon doubleteamed, Munlin wound up

with three catches for 94 yards. Brown scored the go-ahead touchdown with 52 seconds left. Moeller QB Mark Kamphaus’ “Hail Mary” pass fell incomplete in the end zone and the Vikings held on to win by an identical final score as the previous week, 28-21. The loss ended Moeller’s 23-game winning streak. It was Princeton’s first victory over the Crusaders since 1978. “If they beat us, they would’ve won state; we know that,” Mancuso said. “The kids earned that win. We played our best. They played their best.” The rest seemed anticlimactic. Princeton defeated Fremont Ross 35-7 at Dayton’s Welcome Stadium. Afterward, Ross head coach Pete Moore was quoted saying, “All we saw was a blur.” On a cool, drizzly Sunday afternoon at Ohio Stadium in Columbus, Princeton, at that point ranked 10th nationally, faced the third-ranked team in the nation, Akron Garfield, in the Division I state championship game. Garfield running back Charles Gladman, who rushed for 1,500 yards that season, was held to 36 in a 24-6 Vikings’ victory. “I don’t care what USA Today says, we’re still No. 1 in the nation,” Barnett said following that game. Princeton finished No. 2 behind Berwick, Pa. in the USA Today poll, narrowly missing a mythical national crown. The Vikings were the only two-loss team to be ranked nationally that season, and arguably Ohio’s best two-loss team in the playoff era. “We didn’t have superstars,” Mancuso said. “We had kids who weren’t afraid of practicing hard. Everyone was committed to the team. Our best team? It’s difficult to say. Talented, yes. Hard working, yes. Dedicated, without a doubt.” Mancuso, 88, spent 37 seasons as head coach at Princeton and never had a losing season He compiled a 305-76-1 record, with 29 GMC crowns, and three state titles in 1978, ’83, and ‘87. “He’s one of the greatest living coaches,” McKinney said. “He could’ve left for any Big 10 school, but he stayed with us. He gave us courage and strength. The coaches were like fathers to me.” Jeff Wallner was a senior wide receiver on the 1983 state championship football team at Princeton.

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SHORT HOPS Shelby Dermer sdermer@enquirer.com

Football » St. Xavier’s Chase Wolf’s pair of touchdown passes to Cameron Specht was enough to lead St. Xavier to a 14-6 win over Elder on Sept. 29. » La Salle quarterback Griffin Merritt orchestrated a 13-play, 98yard drive in the final 4:37 and capped off the game-winning march with a one-yard touchdown run with 21 seconds left that pushed the Lancers to a 28-24 win over Moeller on Sept. 29. » Mason Bernhardt caught two of Danny Vanatsky’s three touchdown passes and Alex Barnard totaled two scores in CHCA’s dominating 51-8 road win over North College Hill on Sept. 29. » Courtney Woodward’s 73-yard touchdown pass to Lorenzo Sparks was North College Hill’s only score in a 51-8 loss to CHCA on Sept. 29. » Mitch McKenzie’s 14-yard touchdown pass to Jack McCracken gave Moeller a threepoint lead in the fourth quarter. But La Salle drove 98 yards in the game’s waning moments and the Crusaders fell to the Lancers 28-24 on Sept. 29. McKenzie threw for 219 yards and two scores in the loss and Chrystopher Watkins led all rushers with 88 yards and one score on 23 carries. » Tyrese Sherman ran for 152 yards and two touchdowns on 12 carries in Princeton’s 36-18 win over Oak Hills on Sept. 29. The Vikings averaged 6.6 yards over 48 carries in the win, while their defense intercepted Oak Hills’ quarterback Jacob Woycke three times. » Finneytown’s losing streak hit 29 straight games (dating back to Oct. 2014) in a 12-9 overtime loss to Taylor on Sept. 29. The Wildcats managed just 95 yards of offense in the loss, with their only touchdown coming on Larry Haywood’s 49-yard fumble return touchdown. » Aiken snapped a two-game losing streak with a 56-10 win over Shroder on Sept. 29. Quarterback Timothy Jordan and Kievaughn Sanks combined for 426 rushing yards and five touchdowns on 33 carries. James Goss added two rushing scores on 10 attempts as the Falcons’ offense racked up 523 yards on the ground. » Roger Bacon fell to Alter 42-0 Sept. 29. » Mt. Healthy fell to Campbell County 41-6 Sept. 29. » Kenny Mayberry’s 20-yard touchdown pass to Miyan Williams turned out to be the game-winner in Winton Woods’ 28-27 victory over Bishop Chatard on Sept. 29. Mayberry threw for 193 yards and three scores in the win, while Williams ran for a team-high 112 yards on 22 carries. » Wyoming score 48 first-half points and cruised to a 68-21 win over Deer Park on Sept. 28. Evan Prater completed all nine of his

La Salle’s quarterback Griffin Merritt looks to pass during the Lancers’ 28-24 win over Moeller, Friday, Sept. 29. TONY TRIBBLE FOR THE ENQUIRER

pass attempts for 123 yards and three touchdowns, while two of Pierson Rogers’ six carries went for scores. Freshman backup quarterback Brennan Pagan had a team-high 161 rushing yards on four carries, including an 86yard fourth-quarter touchdown gallop that capped the Cowboys’ scoring on the night. » Colerain’s defense intercepted Mason quarterback Will Adams three times, including a game-sealing fourth-quarter pick-six by Josh Huber, and Gunner Leyendecker threw for a touchdown and ran for another in the Cardinals’ 36-10 win over the Comets on Sept. 29. Junior running back Deante Smith-Moore ran for a season-high 122 yards on 27 carries. » Northwest’s two fourth-quarter touchdowns were not enough as the Knights fell to Little Miami 21-19 on Sept. 29. Tarpley Kameron’s one-yard touchdown run with 7:54 left made it a two-point game, but Dae’Mon Cherry’s pass on the ensuing game-tying conversion attempt fell incomplete. Northwest forced three turnovers in the loss, including Caleb Thurmond’s 52-yard fumble return touchdown in the first quarter. » Gamble Montessori blanked Riverview East on Sept. 30.

Boys soccer » Roger Bacon fell to Carroll 3-0 Oct. 3. » La Salle fell to Moeller 3-2 Oct. 3.

Girls soccer » McAuley fell to Badin 1-0 Oct. 2. » North College Hill bowed to Norwood 4-0 Oct. 3. » Princeton fell to Sycamore 4-0 Oct. 3.

Girls’ Tennis » Northwest fell to West Clermont 3-2 Oct. 2. » Lindsay Macey tallied McAuley’s only set win in a 4-1 loss to Seton on Oct. 5. » Wyoming beat Finneytown 5-0 Oct. 5 with wins by Jenny Lewis, Eleanor Stall, Abby Rosenberg, Lindsay Sasson-Anya Kirch and a forfeit.

Volleyball » Wyoming bowed in straight sets to McNicholas on Oct. 2. Wyoming (13-4) beat Madeira 25-17, 16-25, 25-17, 2516 Oct. 3. » Finneytown fell in straight sets to Deer Park Oct. 3. » Mt. Healthy fell in straight sets to Talawanda Oct. 4. » McAuley fell in straight sets to Ursuline (20-1) on Oct. 5.


LIFE

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 3B

Free fall festivals coming to YMCAs All members of the community are invited to 13 YMCA of Greater Cincinnati locations throughout September and October for free Fall Festivals, thanks to their partners at Interact For Health. These festivals will bring fall-themed fun and lots of activities to many communities Participating branch locations will offer a number of free activities including hayrides, games, face painting, crafts, costume contests, scavenger hunts, bounce houses, a happy haunted trail, prizes and much more. » Blue Ash YMCA 3-5 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 14 » Campbell County YMCA 5:30-8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 27

» Clermont County YMCA 5:30-7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 26 » Clippard Family YMCA 1-3 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 21 » Y at Duck Creek 5-9 p.m., Friday, Oct. 27 » Gamble-Nippert YMCA 6:30-8 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 26 » M.E. Lyons YMCA 5:30-8:30 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24 » Powel Crosley, Jr. YMCA noon to 3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28 » R.C. Durr YMCA 6-9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 20 Events and activities may vary at each participating YMCA location. For more information on branch events, visit MyY.org or call 362-YMCA.

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LIFE

4B • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS

BRIEFLY Shop with Friends Craft Show The Donauschwaben Society presents its annual Shop with Friends Craft Show Oct. from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 29, at the Donauschwaben Haus, 4290 Dry Ridge Road. Admission is $2. The show features more than 50 crafters and vendors indoors and there is plenty of parking on site. Food and refreshments available will be available and raffle prizes will be given away at

the end of the day. The annual craft show is a fundraiser for Donauschwaben youth and kinder dance groups.

Forest Park seniors collect donations for hurricane relief At the Forest Park Senior’s end-of-the-summer picnic on Sept. 18, members of the Center did much more than simply enjoy a cookout, they completed a drive to collect items for victims affected by hurricanes in both Texas and

Florida. Over the last three weeks, the seniors collected items such as clothing, cleaning supplies, paper products and personal care items. The Forest Park Senior Center served as the collection point for the donations. The City’s Police, Fire, and Public Works Departments picked up the items from the Senior Center and will be delivering these donations to the Matthew 25: Ministries, located at 11060 Kenwood Rd, Blue Ash.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP 9895 Arborwood Drive: $46,000; Sept. 18. 3736 Benhill Drive: $161,500; Sept. 15. 3363 Blue Rock Road: $85,800; Sept. 19. 2845 Countrypark Drive: $111,000; Sept. 19. 2957 Cranbrook Drive: $225,000; Sept. 21. 9816 Dunraven Drive: $96,000; Sept. 21. 3129 Elkhorn Drive: $35,000; Sept. 18. 8656 Forfeit Run Road: $36,100; Sept. 21. 8749 Forfeit Run Road: $134,900; Sept. 20. 3936 Hanley Road: $165,000; Sept. 15. 3231 Heritage Square Drive: $60,000; Sept. 18. 2848 Houston Road: $73,800; Sept. 18. 9866 Islandview Lane: $75,000; Sept. 15. 2606 Jodylynn Court: $81,000; Sept. 18. 2949 Laverne Drive: $40,000; Sept. 15.

Do You Have? Arthritis • Knee Pain

• Back Pain • Neck Pain Neuropathy • Hip Pain • Shoulder Pain • Joint Pain

Good News! Local Stem Cell Institute of America Centers Now Offers Regenerative Therapy! The Stem Cell Institute of America devotes much of its time treating chronically ill patients -especially those in pain. With 3 years experience, serving Cincinnati with multiple practices, it continues to utilize cutting-edge technology to help restore patients’ health. The institute recently announced its latest state-of-the-art healing procedure: regenerative stem cell therapy. The Stem Cell Institute of America is now offering painless, FDA approved Amniototic Stem Cell Injections and advanced procedures for arthritic and/or degenerative conditions, especially those found in the knees, hips, shoulder, neck and lower back. These remarkable treatments can repair tissue in the body that has been damaged from age, disease or degeneration. They do this by pinpointing the impaired areas, removing the swelling with powerful anti-inflammatory properties and healing them by regenerating cells and tissue. This innovative therapy is particularly effective in treating such conditions as degenerative arthritis, degenerative cartilage and ligaments, bone spurs, degenerative joint disease, bursitis and tendinitis, especially Osteoarthritis of the Knee. According to the Stem Cell Institute of America chief medical officer, patients can experience a significant decrease in pain and an improvement in range of motion within weeks of treatment. “We are so excited about the results we are seeing with our patients. More Importantly, our patients are excited about living their lives enjoying the activities they enjoy. We invite you to attend one of our upcoming seminars near your home, to learn more about this incredible healing technology and how it might be able to help you or someone you love finally live a pain free life.” Dr. Jill Howe DC, CNPS, Chicagoland Director for the Stem Our FREE Educational Seminars Cell Institute of America

are held several times a week in the

We invite you to browse our web site – following towns: www.StemCellTherapyForPain.com to watch the documentary from our patients and find out when and where a FREE Covington Seminar is being held near you. Please call us at: 888-966-4284 to register for an October 23, 1:00, 6:30 upcoming FREE seminar.

West Chester

October 16, 1:00, 6:30

Reservations are required please call (888) 966-4284 to confirm your place and get the times and location best suitable for you. www.StemCellWorkshop.com

8986 Livingston Road: $125,000; Sept. 15. 2489 Schon Drive: $25,500; Sept. 20. 3020 Snowvalley Court: $70,000; Sept. 19. 8220 Springleaf Lake Drive: $218,000; Sept. 19. 8041 Valley Crossing Drive: $51,352; Sept. 15. 3650 Vernier Drive: $53,000; Sept. 18. 9161 Whitehead Drive: $180,000; Sept. 15.

COLLEGE HILL 7880 Bobolink Drive: $95,000; Sept. 21. 6233 Cary Ave.: $52,000; Sept. 18. 1148 Cedar Ave.: $8,120; Sept. 21. 1430 Cedar Ave.: $65,000; Sept. 15. 1673 Cedar Ave.: $1,168,750; Sept. 18. 1974 Connecticut Ave.: $56,000; Sept. 21. Gershom Ave.: $277,970; Sept. 18. 1825 North Bend Road: $147,500; Sept. 15. 6028 Sunridge Drive: $45,000; Sept. 15. 6028 Sunridge Drive: $62,900; Sept. 15. 1130 Wilmont Court: $42,000; Sept. 20.

EVENDALE 3222 Turgot Circle: $284,000; Sept. 21.

FOREST PARK 10943 Carnegie Drive: $50,000; Sept. 18. 11432 Farmington Road: $10,000; Sept. 15. 915 Glasgow Drive: $84,500; Sept. 20. 11934 Hamden Drive: $143,000; Sept. 18. 783 Hanson Drive: $165,000; Sept. 15. 11891 Horatio Court: $123,000; Sept. 19. 1865 Lewiston Court: $60,000; Sept. 20. 790 Northland Blvd.: $105,900; Sept. 19. 11484 Oakstand Drive: $204,000; Sept. 18. 2150 Rangoon Court: $92,000; Sept. 15.

GLENDALE 32 Lake Ave.: $170,000; Sept. 20.

GREEN TOWNSHIP 6996 Alexandras Oak Court: $242,500; Sept. 21. 4410 Andreas Ave.: $102,000; Sept. 15. 5545 Antoninus Drive: $129,800; Sept. 18. 6055 Benken Lane: $110,000; Sept. 15. 2857 Blue Rock Road: $135,000; Sept. 20. 5095 Boomer Road: $105,400; Sept. 19. 6427 Bridgetown Road: $162,000; Sept. 19. 6222 Charity Drive: $124,000; Sept. 20. 6211 Eagles Lake Court: $124,000; Sept. 15. 3627 Edgebrook Drive: $112,000; Sept. 21. 3705 Eyrich Road: $114,000; Sept. 18. 3742 Frondorf Ave.: $82,040; Sept. 18. 6081 Gaines Road: $166,500; Sept. 20. 5512 Goldcrest Drive: $157,000; Sept. 20. 5385 Haft Road: $279,000; Sept. 20. 4495 Homelawn Ave.: $97,200; Sept. 19. 1329 Leders Lane: $118,000; Sept. 20. 5276 Leona Drive: $60,000; Sept. 19. 6159 Muddy Creek Road: $239,000; Sept. 19. 3014 North Bend Road: $84,000; Sept. 21. 5919 Oakapple Drive: $119,900; Sept. 20. 5753 Ocala Court: $129,900; Sept. 18. 5206 Peterborough Drive: $342,000; Sept. 18.

4036 Race Road: $65,000; Sept. 19. 3642 Shortridge Circle: $140,000; Sept. 15. 3451 South Road: $1,000; Sept. 20. 6195 Squirrelwoods Lane: $365,000; Sept. 18. 5101 Sumter Ave.: $129,000; Sept. 20. 2706 Topichills Drive: $61,785; Sept. 21. 6133 Wilmer Road: $365,000; Sept. 18.

GREENHILLS 2 Ashby St.: $40,000; Sept. 18. 98 Burley Circle: $134,900; Sept. 21. 10 Hamlin Drive: $73,000; Sept. 15.

MOUNT AIRY 2461 Hearthstead Lane: $157,500; Sept. 18.

MOUNT HEALTHY 7300 Bernard Ave.: $25,000; Sept. 18. 7429 Clovernook Ave.: $45,000; Sept. 18.

NORTH COLLEGE HILL 1544 Galbraith Road: $25,216; Sept. 18.

SHARONVILLE 4158 Beavercreek Circle: $157,000; Sept. 18. 5399 Dickens Drive: $123,000; Sept. 20. 10728 Jeff Lane: $132,000; Sept. 20. 11765 Lebanon Road: $410,000; Sept. 21.

SPRINGDALE 11487 Bernhart Court: $147,500; Sept. 18. 340 Cameron Road: $48,000; Sept. 21. Crescentville Road: $550,000; Sept. 21. 11810 Fairsprings Court: $115,000; Sept. 18. 11830 Lawnview Ave.: $55,000; Sept. 15.

SPRINGFIELD TOWNSHIP 2101 Adams Ridge Drive: $181,900; Sept. 21. 1706 Brightview Drive: $85,000; Sept. 20. 7235 Greenfield Drive: $150,000; Sept. 19. 8760 Grenada Drive: $39,000; Sept. 19. 1530 Hazelgrove Drive: $124,000; Sept. 15. 12053 Hazelhurst Lane: $4,144; Sept. 21. 9493 Leebrook Drive: $90,000; Sept. 18. 440 McCreary Court: $134,900; Sept. 21. 1853 Miles Road: $25,000; Sept. 20. 2257 Miles Road: $109,000; Sept. 21. 8788 Mockingbird Lane: $127,000; Sept. 20. 10579 Morning Glory Lane: $55,000; Sept. 18. 880 North Hill Lane: $42,000; Sept. 15. 224 Ridgeway Road: $83,500; Sept. 20. 700 Silverhedge Drive: $169,000; Sept. 21. 811 Southmeadow Circle: $82,000; Sept. 21. 9701 Wildbrook Lane: $63,840; Sept. 18.

WOODLAWN 10032 Arnold Drive: $47,900; Sept. 21. 10155 Shady Lane: $165,000; Sept. 19.

WYOMING 72 Evergreen Court: $116,000; Sept. 15. 904 Oregon Trail: $455,000; Sept. 15. 544 Tohatchi Drive: $317,500; Sept. 15. 15 Vale Ave.: $91,000; Sept. 21.

DIRECTORY

EMAIL: servicedirectory@gannett.com or CALL: 877-513-7355, option 7

MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 10180 Woodlawn Blvd., Woodlawn, OH 45215 Rev. Dr. T. Scott Swan, I Pastor

Sunday School - 9:30am Sunday Worship Service - 10:45am Sunday Children's Church - 10:45am Wednesday Bible Study 12:00pm & 7:00pm

Christ Church Glendale Episcopal Church 965 Forest Ave - 771-1544

www.christchurchglendale.org The Rev. David A. Pfaff 8am Holy Eucharist I 9am Holy Eucharist II 11am Holy Eucharist II Child Care 9-12

Saturday Bible Study - 10:00am www.mtzionwoodlawn.com 513-772-6230

Trinity Lutheran Church, LCMS 5921 Springdale Rd

Rev. Richard Davenport, Pastor FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 8580 Cheviot Rd., Colerain Twp 741-7017 www.ourfbc.com Gary Jackson, Senior Pastor Sunday School (all ages) 9:30am Sunday Morning Service 10:30am Sunday Evening Service 6:30pm Wedn. Service/Awana 7:00pm RUI Addiction Recovery (Fri.) 7:00pm Active Youth, College, Senior Groups Exciting Music Dept, Deaf Ministry, Nursery

Worship & Sunday School 10:30 a.m, Bible Study 9:15 a.m. Sundays

Classic Service and Hymnbook

www.trinitylutherancincinnati.com

385-7024

Mt. Healthy United Methodist Church Corner of Compton and Perry Streets 513-931-5827 Sunday School 8:45-9:45am Traditional Worship 10:00-11:00am Nursery Available Handicap Access “Come as a guest. Leave as a friend.”

Bread From Heaven Outreach Ministry C.O.G.I.C.

2929 Springdale Road 45251 Phone#(513) 742-9400 Sunday School - 9:45am Sunday Morning Service - 11:00am Bible Study Thurs. - 7:00pm Pantry Tuesday - 11am-2pm

FLEMING ROAD United Church of Christ 691 Fleming Rd 522-2780 Rev Pat McKinney

Sunday School - All Ages - 9:15am Sunday Worship - 10:30am

Nursery Provided


LIFE

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 5B

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6B • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, OCT. 12

ABOUT CALENDAR

Art & Craft Classes Drawing Class, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Springfield Township Senior and Community Center, 9158 Winton Road, The Art Room. Session focuses on gesture drawing and capturing images of people in action. Ages 15-99. $85. Registration required. Presented by ArtsConnect. 522-1410; www.theartsconnect.us. Springfield Township. DIY Adult Craft Night, 6-10 p.m., Art on Fire of Cincinnati, 9336 Colerain Avenue, Choose from variety of projects to do and everyone can do something different. OK to bring drinks and snacks. Ages 18 and up. $40, $10. 923-3473; www.artonfirecincinnati.com. Colerain Township. After School Enrichment Classes, 4:30-5:30 p.m., The Pottery Place, 3616 Jessup Road, Explore new pottery technique: silk screening. Ages 6-15. $16. Reservations required. 741-1500. Green Township.

Clubs & Organizations General Federation of Women’s Club Southwest Ohio Valley, 5-8:30 p.m., Sharonville Community Center, 10990 Thornview Drive, Club provides programs, services and activities through which active women can utilize talents for betterment of community and themselves. Free. Presented by GFWC Southwest Ohio Valley Women’s Club. 755-8519; heaney.wix.com/ gfwcswohio. Sharonville.

Dance Classes Country Line Dance, 1-2 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., New instructor. Singles and couples welcome. Casual dress, soft soled shoes. Ages 18 and up. $5 per class. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. 520-2784. Springdale.

Dining Events Oktoberfest Luncheon, noon to 2 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Sauerbraten over noodles, potato pancakes and German

To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

Chocolate cake for dessert. Oktoberfest music with Sally & Joe Lukasik. Ages 21 and up. $10, $7.50 members. Register with payment by Oct. 9. Presented by Springdale Parks and Recreation. 346-3910. Springdale.

Exercise Classes Zumba, 7-8 p.m., Springdale Community Center, 11999 Lawnview Ave., Wear comfortable workout attire and gym shoes. Bring water. $5. Presented by Praise in Motion Fitness. 2055064; www.debsfitnessparty.com. Springdale. Tai Chi, 6-7 p.m., Concrete and Iron, 19 Village Square, Gentle flowing movements based on ancient Chinese martial art. $15. Registration required. Presented by Concrete & Iron. 341-9372; www.concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Self-Defense, 7-8 p.m., Concrete and Iron, 19 Village Square, Learn how to protect self,control distance with another person, use voice to diffuse potentially dangerous situation, defend, attack and escape attacker and more. $15. Registration required. Presented by Concrete & Iron. 341-9372; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. FitChick Bootcamp, 7:30-8:30 a.m., Concrete and Iron, 19 Village Square, Women only. Full-body workout using high intensity interval training and core conditioning that combines strength, cardio, and flexibility training designed for all fitness levels. For ages 15 and up. $15. Registration required. Presented by Concrete & Iron. 341-9372; concreteandiron.com. Glendale. Bfit Bootcamp, 5:30-6:30 a.m., Concrete and Iron, 19 Village Square, Betsy’s fitness Bootcamp helps men and women get fit

and stay fit with full-body workouts using high intensity interval training and core conditioning that combines strength, cardio, and flexibility training designed for all fitness levels. For Ages 15 and up. $15. Registration required. Presented by Concrete & Iron. 341-9372; concreteandiron.com. Glendale.

Exhibits Glendale During WWI: Doing Our Bit, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Glendale Heritage Museum, 44 Village Square, Exhibit features stories about Glendale citizens during WWI, those who worked for war effort at home and those who served overseas. Free. Presented by Glendale Heritage Preservation. 227-8613. Glendale.

Farmers Market College Hill Farm Market, 3-6:30 p.m., College Hill Presbyterian Church, 5742 Hamilton Ave., Parking lot. Credit cards, EBT, and WIC accepted. Those using EBT receive up to $10 of matching tokens to purchase fruits and vegetables through Produce Perks. Free admission. Presented by College Hill Farm Market. 898-3412; collegehillfarmmarket.org. College Hill.

Holiday - Halloween Halloween Nights, 5:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm, 10073 Daly Road, Non-scary nighttime Halloween event. View lights, displays and Hardly Haunted House, take wagon ride through wooded light show and enjoy campfires and other live entertainment. Through Oct. 29. $8, $7 online, free under age 2. Presented by Great Parks of Hamilton County. 521-7275; http://www.greatparks.org/ learn/parkys-farm. Springfield

Township. Pumpkin Sale, 2-7 p.m., Northern Hills United Methodist Church, 6700 Winton Road, Gourds and small pumpkins also available. Through Oct. 31. Cost varies according to size of pumpkin. 542-4010. Finneytown. Pumpkin Patch, 4-8 p.m., Christ Fellowship Church, 5000 North Bend Road, Pumpkin patch, games, corn maze, photo booth. Through Oct. 31. Free. 662-4569; cfcnext.org. Monfort Heights.

Home & Garden Citirama: Woodlawn Meadows, 4 p.m.-9 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd., Woodlawn community off of Mayview Forest Drive features 6 singlefamily homes ranging in price from $200,000-$375,000. $8. Presented by Home Builders Association of Greater Cincinnati. 608-2544; www.cincybuilders.com. Woodlawn.

Literary - Story Times Preschool Story Time, 12:30-2 p.m., The Pottery Place, 3616 Jessup Road, Preschoolers create cute monsters from clay and read story. $13. Reservations required. 741-1500; www.thepotteryplacecincy.com. Green Township.

Public Hours Rockin’ Tots, 9-11 a.m., Rockin’Jump Cincinnati, 8350 Colerain Ave., Program for parents and their toddlers (ages 6 and under). Price includes 1 parent and 1 child for 2 hours of jump time. $12. Presented by Rockin’Jump. 373-4260; cincinnati.rockinjump.com. Colerain Township. Rockin’ Homeschoolers, 3-8 p.m., Rockin’Jump Cincinnati, 8350 Colerain Ave., Must show valid Home School ID. $13 for 2 hours of jump time. Presented by Rockin’Jump. 373-4260. Colerain Township.

FRIDAY, OCT. 13 Art Openings Whimsy and Words, 5:30-8 p.m., Sharonville Cultural Arts Center, 11165 Reading Road, The Westheimer Gallery. Works by Allie Guard and Michele Trainor. Free. 554-1014; www.sharonvilleculturalarts.org. Sharonville.

Drink Tastings Wine Tasting, 6-8 p.m., Marty’s Hops & Vines, 6110 Hamilton Ave., Sample 4-5 wines accompanied by light bites. Live entertainment at 9 p.m. Ages 21 and up. $15 per person. Through Dec. 29. 681-4222; martyshopsandvines.com. College Hill.

Home & Garden Citirama: Woodlawn Meadows, noon to 9 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, $8. 6082544; www.cincybuilders.com. Woodlawn. Sip and Savor in Style, 6-9 p.m., Woodlawn Community Center, 10050 Woodlawn Blvd., Night of food, fashion, sips and stylish new homes. Tour 6 Citirama homes. $15. Registration required. Presented by Cincy Chic. 721-2445; www.citirama17.eventbrite.com. Woodlawn.

Holiday - Halloween Haunted Village, 6-10 p.m. Gates close at 9 p.m., Heritage Village Museum, 11450 Lebanon Road, Slight fright event features village of ghostly attractions: wagon rides, games, trick or treat, mad scientist, witches house, haunted cemetery and more. Through Oct. 28. $10, free ages under 2. 563-9484; www.heritagevillagecincinna-

PUZZLE ANSWERS T A B S

S L I T

G R I T

R O S A

S E A L

Recreation Weekly Bingo, 12:45-2:30 p.m., North College Hill Senior Center, 1586 Goodman Ave., Free admission. 521-3462. North College Hill.

ti.org. Sharonville. Halloween Nights, 5:30-9:30 p.m., Parky’s Farm, $8, $7 online, free under age 2. 521-7275; http://www.greatparks.org/ learn/parkys-farm. Springfield Township. Pumpkin Sale, 2-7 p.m., Northern Hills United Methodist Church, Cost varies according to size of pumpkin. 542-4010. Finneytown. Pumpkin Patch, 4-8 p.m., Christ Fellowship Church, Free. 6624569; cfcnext.org. Monfort Heights.

A F R O

A L L E G E D L Y

A L F R E

E L T P R O E E N T C R A T I L W C O U M T L A R A N O T D E

I M P E L C I R C A Y O C E A N A N P R E R P A D N D A Y S S E I C A C R O O N O R S W I F H Y I N R W M E T A O T E O N W O L F S N O R S E A Y N E N L S E T T A Z E R S C E M E K Z A P P A A I R O U T T O P S Y

G D P S

A T A G U E S S

T O L E T

A L O H A E O L E O N T S A R

S E R E N E

S A C R E D C T O I W D I C N E E S S T S M R U E D U P S I E E

E T G R A T O A D E F I S T O N R U G S A R P O L D P L N E M A O N T C F O R R E A Y E S D O I P I N N E O N S T N A Y Y C H A M M E D E O T I T L E R G R O D E O G S E Y

P O R E

S H E D

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LIFE

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 7B

“Wanna meet the rest of my family?” “Sid. Nancy. Little guy is Kevin. Tina. My brother-in-law, Phil. More coming tomorrow.”

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LIFE

8B • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

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Erlanger (859) 340-1633

Florence (859) 353-6098

Hamilton (513) 427-0260

Community Press no longer picks up police reports from local departments. We will publish police reports from those departments which can submit them to us by email in a useable format. Reports can be emailed to Bonnie Beasley, bbeasley@communitypress.com.

COLERAIN TOWNSHIP

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Middletown Lebanon Lawrenceburg (812) 718-4090 (513) 202-4755 (513) 402-1129 Western Hills Springdale (513) 427-0346 (513) 427-0054

One More Thing Some parts of the evaluation include the use of a familiar voice, so if you are married, please bring your spouse with you. Call us today to confirm your appointment time!

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2 for $995 *Limit one coupon per patient at the promotional price during event dates only. Not valid with any other discount or offer. Does not apply to prior purchases. Fits up to 35 db loss. Offer expires 10/28/17.

We Work With Most Insurance Plans CODE: NP 2 FOR $995 1017 *Hearing tests are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only, not medical exams or diagnoses. If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days from the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fee may apply. Valid at participating locations only. See store for details. **Not valid on Audiotone Pro.

Animal bite Reported at 2400 block of Schon Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 12100 block of Killbride Drive, Sept. 17. Assault Reported at 2900 block of Libra Lane, Sept. 15. Reported at 2400 block of Compton Road, Sept. 16. Reported at 8200 block of Pippin Road, Sept. 17. Breaking and entering Reported at 3100 block of Springdale Road, Sept. 18. Burglary Reported at 3100 block of New Year Drive, Sept. 19. Reported at 5700 block of Chapel Heights Lane, Sept. 15. Criminal damaging Reported at 11700 block of Hamilton Ave., Sept. 18. Reported at 8800 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 15. Reported at 10000 block of Pebble Ridge Lane, Sept. 17. Reported at 5700 block of Springdale Road, Sept. 18. Critical missing adult Reported at 2500 block of Banning Road, Sept. 16. Disorderly conduct Reported at 3100 block of Springdale Road, Sept. 20. Reported at 8800 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 15. Driving while intoxicated Reported at 9100 block of Yellowwood Drive, Sept. 17. Drug offense Reported at 4700 block of Poole Road, Sept. 19. Reported at 11600 block of Hamilton Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 9700 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 3300 block of Compton Road, Sept. 20. Reported at 9800 block of Crusader Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 10200 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 15. Failure to pay Reported at 3100 block of W. Galbriath Road, Sept. 20. Forgery Reported at 8200 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 15. Misuse of credit cards Reported at 2900 block of Butterwick Drive, Sept. 19. Robbery Reported at 10200 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 20. Reported at 2600 block of Springdale Road, Sept. 15. Runaway Reported at 10100 block of Spiritoak Lane, Sept. 20. Reported at 2500 block of Bellbranch Court, Sept. 18. Theft Reported at 9600 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 9100 block of Round Top Road, Sept. 16. Reported at 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 16. Reported at 3700 block of Stone Creek Blvd., Sept. 16. Reported at 2400 block of Walden Glen Circle, Sept. 14. Reported at 2800 block of Glenaire Drive, Sept. 18. Reported at 2400 block of Clovercrest Drive, Sept. 18. Theft - shoplifter Reported at 10200 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 9000 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 15. Reported at 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 16. Reported at 10200 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 17. Reported at 8400 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 17. Reported at 9900 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 18. Theft from vehicle Reported at 2400 block of Walden Glen Circle, Sept. 13. Reported at Blue Rock Road, Sept. 15. Reported at 3100 block of Windsong Drive, Sept. 17. Reported at 2900 block of Glenaire Drive, Sept. 17. Reported at 3000 block of Libra Lane, Sept. 17. Reported at 12100 block of Spalding Drive, Sept. 17. Reported at 9300 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 18. Truancy Reported at 3200 block of Banning Road, Sept. 20. Violation court order Reported at 2700 block of Breezy Way, Sept. 18.

EVENDALE Incidents/investigations Breaking and entering Reported at G.E. Neuman Way, Sept. 18. Drug abuse Reported at 2700 block of Glendale Milford, Sept. 8. ID theft Reported at Brinton Trail, Sept. 5.

Menacing Reported at 10500 block of Reading Road, Sept. 5. Theft Reported at 10200 block of Spartan Drive, Sept. 1. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 1. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 2. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 8. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 11. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 13. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 14. Reported at 10700 block of Evendale Commons, Sept. 14. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 16. Reported at Walmart, Sept. 17. Reported at Menard’s, Sept. 11. Theft, drug abuse Reported at Walmart, Sept. 20.

FOREST PARK Incidents/investigations Domestic trouble Reported at 11600 block of Hinkley Drive, Sept. 23. Reported at 800 block of W. Sharon Road, Sept. 20. Robbery Reported at 1200 block of West Kemper Road, Sept. 22. Runaway Reported at 11400 block of Romandi Place, Sept. 18. Theft Reported at 600 block of Northland Blvd., Sept. 20. Reported at 1000 block of Smiley Ave., Sept. 22. Reported at 1100 block of Kemper Meadows Drive, Sept. 23. Theft from auto Reported at 11400 block of Lincolnshire Road, Sept. 24. Theft from vehicle Reported at 11800 block of Kempersprings Drive, Sept. 21. Theft in progress Reported at 1500 block of Waycross Road, Sept. 18.

GLENDALE Incidents/investigations Theft from vehicle Reported at 500 block of East Sharon Ave., cell phone, change and pocket knife removed from vehicle during the night, Sept. 15. Theft Reported at 10000 block of Chester Road, wicker love seat and chair were taken from front porch of residence, Sept. 16. Reported at 1000 block of Congress Ave., purse taken from business, Sept. 16.

GREEN TOWNSHIP Incidents/investigations Abduction/kidnapping Reported at 900 block of Kemper Meadows Drive, Sept. 25. Alcohol violation Reported at 5400 block of North Bend Road, Sept. 23. Assault Reported at 3300 block of Mercy Health Blvd., Sept. 23. Reported at 5900 block of Bridgetown Road, Sept. 23. Assault - person injured Reported at 3900 block of Virginia Court, Sept. 22. Breaking and entering Reported at 4300 block of Fearman Ave., Sept. 25. Burglary Reported at 3200 block of North Bend Road, Sept. 24. Reported at 6900 block of Taylor Road, Sept. 24. Reported at 4100 block of School Section Road, Sept. 26. Burglary in progress Reported at 5900 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 3600 block of Glenmore Ave., Sept. 22. Reported at 6700 block of Hayes Road, Sept. 23. Reported at 2200 block of Fayhill Lane, Sept. 24. Criminal damaging/vandalism Reported at 5400 block of Cherrybend Drive, Sept. 19. Reported at 5900 block of Colerain Ave., Sept. 21. Reported at 5700 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 24. Reported at 5000 block of Western Hills Ave., Sept. 24. Reported at 6500 block of Hearne Road, Sept. 25. Disorderly person Reported at 6200 block of Glenway Ave., Sept. 21. Domestic trouble Reported at 3500 block of Robroy Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 5300 block of Lees Crossing Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 3600 block of Castlewood Lane, Sept. 20. Reported at 7100 block of Leibel Road, Sept. 22. Reported at 3500 block of Jessup Road, Sept. 22. Reported at 3300 block of North Bend Road, Sept. 23. Reported at 6700 block of Harrison Road, Sept. 24. Reported at 5600 block of West Fork Road, Sept. 25. Reported at 3900 block of Raceview Ave., Sept. 25. Reported at 3700 block of Meadowview Drive, Sept. 25. Reported at 4200 block of Turf Lane, Sept. 25. Reported at 5000 block of Western Hills Ave., Sept. 26. Drug offense Reported at 5400 block of Northpointe Drive, Sept. 19.

See POLICE, Page 9B


LIFE

OCTOBER 11, 2017 • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • 9B ADVERTISEMENT

POLICE REPORTS Continued from Page 8B Reported at I-74 EB, Sept. 19. Reported at 4000 block of Race Road, Sept. 20. Falsification obstruction Reported at I-74 WB, Sept. 23. Forgery Reported at 5400 block of Muddy Creek Road, Sept. 25. Identity fraud Reported at 6500 block of Glenway Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 5200 block of Leona Drive, Sept. 22. Menacing/threats Reported at 3100 block of Westbourne Drive, Sept. 19. Reported at 6300 block of Glenway Ave., Sept. 23. Reported at 6200 block of Schunk Court, Sept. 24. Missing child Reported at 5400 block of Bluesky Drive, Sept. 25. Missing person Reported at 6600 block of Hearne Road, Sept. 20. Reported at 5400 block of Michelles Oak Court, Sept. 20. OVI Reported at 4100 block of Westwood Northern Blvd., Sept. 20. Reported at Jessup Road/Brierly Creek Road, Sept. 21. Person shot Reported at Columbine Court, Sept. 22. Robbery Reported at 900 block of W. North Bend Road, Sept. 21. Reported at 3700 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 22. Theft Reported at 3400 block of Mirro Lane, Sept. 19. Reported at 5000 block of Casa Loma Blvd., Sept. 19. Reported at 5500 block of Pinecrest Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 6200 block of Glenway Ave., Sept. 20. Reported at 8200 block of Bridge Point Drive, Sept. 20. Reported at 5700 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 20. Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Road, Sept. 20. Reported at 3300 block of Mercy Health Blvd., Sept. 20. Reported at 3400 block of Markay Court, Sept. 22. Reported at 1800 block of Anderson Ferry Road, Sept. 23. Reported at 3200 block of North Bend Road, Sept. 24. Reported at 6300 block of Cheviot Road, Sept. 25. Reported at 3300 block of Kleeman Lake Court, Sept. 25.

Reported at 3400 block of Katies Green Court, Sept. 25. Reported at 5500 block of Westwood Northern Blvd., Sept. 25. Reported at 4400 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 25. Reported at 5200 block of Oakhill Lane, Sept. 25. Reported at 3300 block of Diehl Road, Sept. 26. Theft - failure to pay Reported at 6000 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 22. Theft - shoplifting Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 24. Theft in progress Reported at 6500 block of Harrison Road, Sept. 21. Reported at 3400 block of North Bend Road, Sept. 22. Reported at 5000 block of Glencrossing Way, Sept. 24. Reported at 5700 block of Harrison Ave., Sept. 25. Vehicle pursuit Reported at 3600 block of Boudinot Ave., Sept. 20.

NORTH COLLEGE HILL Incidents/investigations Assault Reported at Emerson Ave., Sept. 21. Burglary Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 20. Criminal damaging/vandalism Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 19. Reported at Emerson Ave., Sept. 15. Reported at Flora Ave., Sept. 16. Disorderly person Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 20. Domestic dispute Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 19. Reported at Parrish Ave., Sept. 15. Reported at Oak Knoll Drive, Sept. 16. Domestic violence Reported at Dallas Ave., Sept. 14. Drug abuse/possession/selling Reported at Bauer Ave., Sept. 19. Drug activity Reported at Dallas Ave., Sept. 20. Fight in progress Reported at Hamilton Ave., Sept. 14. Reported at Goodman Ave./Hamilton Ave., Sept. 14. Reported at Bising Ave., Sept. 17. Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 21. Reported at Dallas Ave., Sept. 21. Menacing Reported at Bising Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at Ellen Ave., Sept. 18. Person with a gun Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 15.

Reported at Hamilton Ave., Sept. 17. Prowlers Reported at Prospect Place, Sept. 16. Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 21. Shots fired Reported at Clovernook Ave., Sept. 16. Reported at Cordova Ave./Betts Ave., Sept. 21. Theft Reported at Hamilton Ave., Sept. 14. Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 15. Reported at West Galbraith Road, Sept. 20. Reported at Tarawa Drive, Sept. 21. Theft from auto Reported at Emerson Ave., Sept. 14. Trespasser Reported at Hamilton Ave., Sept. 15.

SPRINGDALE Incidents/investigations Arson Reported at Lawnview Ave., Sept. 21. Assault Reported at 12000 block of Springfield Pike, Sept. 17. Reported at 1100 block of Chesterdale Circle, Sept. 15. Reported at Princeton Pike/I-275, Sept. 15. Reported at 11500 block of Olde Gate Drive, Sept. 15. Reported at 11400 block of Springfield Pike, Sept. 16. Reported at 12000 block of Springfield Pike, Sept. 17. Auto theft Reported at 100 block of West Kemper Road, Sept. 16. Breaking and entering Reported at Kenilworth Court, Sept. 18. Criminal mischief Reported at 11800 block of Neuss Ave., Sept. 17. Reported at 11800 block of Lawnview Ave., Sept. 21. Drug offense Reported at EB I-275, Sept. 16. DUI Reported at I-275 WB, Sept. 16. Forgery Reported at 300 block of Cherry St., Sept. 18. Theft Reported at 11600 block of Greenlawn Ave., Sept. 17. Reported at 100 block of West Kemper Road, Sept. 15. Reported at 11700 block of Princeton Pike, Sept. 16. Reported at 12100 block of Lawnview Ave., Sept. 19. Reported at 11700 block of Princeton Pike, Sept. 21.

New Fast Acting Arthritis Painkiller Stops Pain on Contact New cream works faster and is more targeted than oral medications. Key ingredients penetrate the skin within seconds to relieve joint arthritis pain. Users report significant immediate relief. By Robert Ward Associated Health Press BOSTON – Innovus Pharmaceuticals has introduced a new arthritis pain relief treatment that works in seconds. Sold under the brand name Apeaz™, the new pain relief cream numbs the nerves right below the skin. When applied to an arthritic joint, or a painful area on the body, it delivers immediate relief that lasts for hours and hours. The powerful painkilling effect is created by the creams active ingredient, a special medical compound. Anesthetics are used in hospitals during surgery. They block nerve signals from the brain so that patients don’t feel pain and they work fast. The anesthetic found in Apeaz™ is the strongest available without a prescription. The cream form allows users to directly target their area of pain. It works where it is applied. The company says this is why the product is so effective and fast acting. “Users can expect to feel relief immediately after applying,” explains Dr. Bassam Damaj, President of Innovus Pharmaceuticals. “There will a pleasant warming sensation that is followed by a cool, soothing one. This is how you know that the active ingredients have reached the infected joint and tissue.”

Works In Seconds For arthritis suffers, Apeaz offers impressive advantages over traditional medications. The most obvious is how quickly it relieves discomfort. The cream contains the maximum approved dose of a top anesthetic, which penetrates the skin in a matter of seconds to numb the area that’s in pain. This relief lasts for several hours.

- Louisa M.

Cincinnati, OH

The Christ Hospital Physicians offer new treatments for pelvic floor disorders. If you’ve been told pelvic floor disorders are just part of aging or something women simply have to deal with after childbirth, it’s time to talk. The truth is, pelvic issues like sexual Aparna Shah, MD discomfort, pain, and bladder and bowel leakage are very Urogynecologist treatable, and the specialists at The Christ Hospital Pelvic Floor Center can help. The Pelvic Floor Center is a one-stop shop for all your issues, with the most preferred physicians and advanced treatment options in the region. Our compassionate team will navigate you through all stages of treatment. We understand that pelvic issues can be complicated and confusing, and treatment often involves multiple physicians. That’s why our specialists work side-by-side, complementing each other in their respective areas of expertise. Let’s talk about this, ladies. Stop coping with your symptoms and get help. To learn more, call 513-463-2500. The Christ Hospital Health Network—we’re here for your pursuits.

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Apeaz™: Quick Acting Pain and Arthritis Cream is Now Available Without a Prescription Those with terrible arthritis in their hands and fingers, love how easy Apeaz™ is to open. The jar fits in the palm of the hand, which makes it much easier to use.

Instant Pain Relief Without a Prescription

Many Apeaz™ users report significant improvements in daily aches and pain. Many more report increased flexibility and less stiffness. They are moving pain free for the first time in years, like Henry Esber, and early user of Apeaz™. “I’ve tried more pills than I can count. I’ve also had a handful of cortisone shots. Nothing is as effective as this product. With Apeaz™, I get relief right away. I rub a little on my knees and some through my hands. It keeps the pain away. It also prevents the pain from getting really bad. It’s completely changed my life.”

How It Works “Apeaz™ contains the highest, non-prescription dose of a medical compound that fights pain on contact. When applied to the skin it goes to work within seconds by penetrating right to the source of your pain, numbing the nerve endings.”

Apeaz™ is an FDA drug with approved claims for the pain relief of the following conditions: • Arthritis pain • Simple back pain • Strains • Sprains • Athletic injuries • Muscle stiffness and pain • Wrist, elbow, shoulder, hip, knee, ankle, foot, muscle or joint pain Additional ingredients in the cream help suppress inflammation around tissues and joints. Published pre-clinical studies have shown that the ingredients in Apeaz™ can also prevent further bone and cartilage destruction. There are also no negative side effects from the oral medication. Apeaz™ delivers its ingredients through the skin. Oral medications are absorbed in the digestive tract. Overtime, the chemicals in pills can tear the delicate lining of the stomach, causing ulcers and bleeding. When compared to other arthritis medications, Apeaz™ is a fraction of the cost. At less than $2 a day, the cream quickly is becoming a household name.

“This is why Apeaz™ is so effective for people with arthritis. It reduces pain while adding an additional layer of joint protection,” explains Damaj.

A New Way to Treat Pain Although Dr. Damaj and his team say that their cream is the fastest and most effective way to relieve arthritis pain, they believe there is still a reason to take joint pills. The most effective are those which help to further strengthen and support the joints. That’s why every container of Apeaz™ comes with ArthriVarx™, a breakthrough pill that’s taking on joint support in an entirely new way. ArthriVarx™ works on your joints, making it the perfect companion to Apeaz™.

“ArthriVarx™ contains special compounds published to lubricate the joints and connective tissues that surrounds them. With daily use, they improve joint health and can give an extra cushion,” explains Dr. Damaj. “When combined with Apeaz™, it becomes the perfect system to tackle arthritis. While the anesthetic component of Apeaz™ is working on the outside, relieving pain on contact, ArthriVarx™ is working on the inside, adding cushioning to the joints”’

A Powerful Combination For Arthritis and Joint Pain

With daily use, Apeaz™ plus ArthriVarx™ helps users live a more vital, pain free life without any of the negative side effects or interactions associated with oral drugs. By delivering fast, longlasting, and targeted relief from joint pain and reducing inflammation and swelling that causes joint damage, Apeaz™ and ArthriVarx™ is the newest, most effective way to tackle your arthritis pain. You can now enjoy an entirely new level of comfort that’s both safe and affordable. It is also extremely effective, especially if nothing else has worked well for you.

How to Get Apeaz™ in Ohio This is the official public release of Apeaz™. As such, the company is offering a special discounted supply to any joint-pain arthritissufferer who calls within the next 48 hours. A special hotline number and discounted pricing has been created for all Ohio residents. Discounts will be available starting today at 6:00AM and will automatically be applied to all callers. Your Toll-Free hotline number is 1-800-461-8519 and will only be open for the next 48 hours. Only a limited discounted supply of Apeaz™ is currently available in your region. Consumers who miss out on our current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. Experience the guaranteed Apeaz™ relief already enjoyed by thousands of consumers. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-461-8519 today.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FDA. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.


LIFE

10B • COMMUNITY PRESS/NORTHWEST • OCTOBER 11, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 1008 POWER BALLADS

1

BY ERIK AGARD AND ALEX BRIÑAS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ AC R O S S

RELEASE DATE: 10/15/2017

1 Agcy. for Kennedy and Reagan 4 Push 9 Positive quality 14 Provider of directions, for short 17 Penne ____ vodka 19 Around 20 Claw 22 “Intriguing!” 23 Aquaman’s favorite singer? 25 The Human Torch’s favorite band? 27 ____ Edberg, two-time U.S. Open tennis champion 28 With child, informally 30 Nicely muscled 31 Canine warning 32 Feminine-hygiene product 33 Seashore feature 34 Oriental, e.g. 35 The Hulk’s favorite band? 38 Does 110, say 40 Sculptor/collagist Jean 41 Staff 42 Number between cinque and sette 43 Mama ____ Elliot 44 Iceman’s favorite band? 48 Bermuda, e.g. 50 Sweetly sing 52 14-pound unit Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

54 Australian friend 55 The Flash’s favorite singer? 58 Adamant refusal 60 Animator’s frame 61 “Your” of yore 62 Bit of progress 64 “Seriously?” 66 Front of a vessel 68 Magneto’s favorite band? 70 Quaint agreement 71 Comment advising you to set your sights a little lower? 73 Low tie 74 Response to “You have something on your face,” maybe 75 List-ending abbr. 76 Gobbles (down) 78 Spider-Man’s favorite band? 83 Smell ____ (sense something fishy) 85 Like Hägar the Horrible 87 ____ Martin 88 “Enough already!” 89 Batman’s favorite rapper? 91 Revivalists, for short 93 Not only that but also 95 Singer Sumac 96 The Avalanche, on sports tickers 97 Make do with a lesser option 99 Thor’s favorite rapper? 101 Actress Thurman 102 32° Fahrenheit, in Celsius 103 Parisian street

104 ____ volente (God willing) 105 Old-fashioned provider of directions 107 Completely set 109 Sir and madam 112 Electro’s favorite singer? 114 What the musical artists in this puzzle would form if they all performed together? 116 Decompose 117 Let breathe, as stinky shoes 118 Tangent line? 119 Princess Fiona, after sunset 120 One begins, “Thou still unravish’d bride of quietness” 121_ ___-turvy 122 Chocolate cup inventor H. B. ____ 123 Pained cry DOWN

1 Things the police may keep on suspects 2 Narrow cut 3 [legally covering our butts here] 4 Clickable item 5 Boom ____ 6 Remit in advance 7 Digital greeting 8 “Stay in your ____!” 9 Approximately 10 Untroubled 11 Divine bovine? 12 Timeline sections 13 Wee bit

14 Destined for greatness 15 Opening in cosmetology? 16 Molt 18 Woodard with four Emmys 21 Covalent bonds of a carbon atom, e.g. 24 Things sailors spin 26 Late afternoon hour 29 Some economic figs. 32 Tournament bridge players, typically 35 Stick-to-it-iveness 36 Santa ____, Calif. 37 Speak out against 38 City by the Bay, informally 39 “Why, you little …” 43 Several quarter turns? 45 Jay with jokes 46 Starting squad 47 Speak up, and then some 49 ____ Brand, two-time N.B.A. All-Star 51 Boo-boo 53 Good trait in a housemate 56 “Jeez, wasn’t expecting that!” 57 For rent 59 Test for fit 63 Song with the lyric “A loko e hana nei” 65 Things equestrians have on hand? 66 ____ dish 67 What 14-Across will do if you miss a turn 68 Fruit-salad ingredients

2

3

17

4 18

23

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28 31

32 37

41 49

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33

34 39 44 52

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89

58 64

78 86 91

97

93

111

114

95 100

104

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109 115

118 121

69 “____ bon” 71 Pup grown up 72 Uptown 74 “____, won’t you blow your horn?” (old lyric) 77 Cold summer treat 79 Puerto Rican city that shares its name with an explorer 80 System of roots?

94

103

117

120

80

99

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116

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70

88

92

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82

65

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81

60

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96

59

73

90

46 54

63

85

16

22

45

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76

15

40

53

68 72

105

30

57

67

83

29

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14

26

43

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66

13 21

38

42

48

12

25

27

36

11

20

24

35

10

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81 Part of a so-called “grand tour” 82 Trade barbs or blows 84 Like some saws and bobsleds 86 Supplication 90 “What did Delaware?” “I don’t know, but ____” (classic joke) 92 University in North Carolina

94 “Feel me?” 98 “____ fugit” 99 Gooey chocolate treat 100 Public transit system 103 Be economical with 105 Lead-in to -centric 106 Stepped 107 Italian dear

123

108 Victim of a revolution 109 What the upright yoga pose vrikshasana simulates 110 It’s worth a little more than a dollar 111 Violently send out 113 Stridex target, informally 115 Mag personnel

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Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply. Expires 10/31/17.

513-752-1804 SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8 • Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30


Classifieds

OCTOBER 11, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

Homes of Distinction

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Fire Lieutenant Exam Announcement

COLERAIN

12091 KILBRIDE DRIVE

B BO UY UG ER HT

The Deutsch Team just found this stunning home for our customers. Now is the time to find your next home sweet home before the holidays. If you’re wanting to make that change give the team that has an abundance of real estate experience a call today. We can’t wait to get started.

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Examination process shall consist of written test, agility test, oral test, and assessment center test. Candidates must receive score of 75% or higher to pass written test and be eligible to proceed in examination process.

Rentals

Homes for Sale-Ohio

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. 1-3BR. 513-929-2402 Equal Opportunity Housing Clifton Heights: Beautiful 4BR, 2.5BA, $2200 off street parking, huge back yd, minutes from UC & Hospitals call Karen, Ikota Mhmt 513407-9207 kcastillo@ikotamanagment.c om Colerain, 2BR, heat/water pd. A/C carpet, balcony. No dogs. No sect. 8. Dep. $300 Rent $695. 513-521-3753 Covedale: 1 BR balcony, heat & water incl. no section 8, no pets $475/mo. 513-451-3191 FT. THOMAS. 1 & 2 BDRM APTS & 1 BDRM TOWNHOMES 859-441-3158

Hartwell - 1BR, $500/mo includes electric, gas & trash, cute, quiet building, Les 513512-9459

HARTWELL/ELMWOODFurnished rooms on busline. $95 to $105/week w/$100 dep. 513-617-7923, 513-617-7924, 513-919-9926 Monroe: EZ access to I 75 rooms to rent $390-$525 mo.incl.util./cbl/wifi/ prkg; shared kit/BA/WD/outDR space call or txt 310-467-6297

Careers

Jobs new beginnings...

Software Developer II sought by KORE Telematics, Blue Ash, OH to dvlp, maintain & test high-throughput production systems utilizing concurrency -based dvlpmt & distributed system concepts. Deg’d, exp’d applicants send resume to jlim@korewireless.com

Stuff

Special Notices-Clas

MT. LOOKOUT 1 & 2 BDRM Grandin Bridge Apartments 513-871-6419

great places to live...

Announce May the sacred heart of Jesus be adored, glorified, loved and preserved throughout the world. Now and forever. Sacred heart of Jesus pray for us. Saint Jude, worker of miracles pray for us. Saint Jude helper of the hopeless, pray for us. ~ P. Herbert ~

Candidates must possess valid driver’s license, current Ohio EMTParamedic, Ohio Firefighter II, and Ohio Fire Safety Inspector certifications. Proof of certifications must be submitted with resume. Candidates must have minimum three years current consecutive full-time employment with City of Montgomery Fire Department or minimum three years current consecutive parttime employment with City of Montgomery Fire Department. Associate’s degree or equivalent of two years of course credit from accredited college or university preferred but not required.

Real Estate

430 Tipton Court Springfield TWP Tim Hamblin 1pm-3pm

Assorted all kinds of things...

Special Greeting

Written exam will be conducted January 8, 2018. Additional examination process information and study guide will be provided to qualified candidates no later than 30 days prior to written examination date. Hourly range $25.91 – $32.56. EOE/ADAAA

October 15th

Community announcements, novena...

The City of Montgomery is conducting an open-competitive examination process for the position of Fire Lieutenant. Candidates must submit letter of intent and current resume to the Human Resources Manager by noon, November 13, 2017.

VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

HOMES

JOBS

ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & FERNALD (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES: Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitled to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information, call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800-548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose recontructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. We also handle other Federal Workers Comp. (OWCP/FECA) 2495 Main St, Suite 442, Buffalo, NY 14214.

Upward Basketball Registration/Evaluations, Saturday, Oct. 14, 10am 12:30pm; 10/17 & 10/19 78:30pm for boys and girls age 5 4th grade Register online at www.forestvillebaptist.c om Forestville Baptist Church 1311 Nagel Road, Cincinnati, OH 45255, (513)4743884

    VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

BURLINGTON ANTIQUE SHOW Boone County Fairgrounds Burlington, KY Sunday, Oct. 15 -----------8am-3pm $4.00/Adult Early Buying 6am-8am $6/Adult Rain or Shine 513-922-6847 burlingtonantiqueshow.com Moeller Band Antique Show 9001 Montgomery Rd, Cincinnati, Oh Sat. Oct. 21 9am-4pm Over 70 vendors! $5.00 admission 513-353-4135 cincywam@fuse.net

Motorized Wheelchair/Jazzy Select. 2 new batteries (valued at $400!), 45 deg recline, folds for easy transportation. $600. 513-470-1323

∂ Table saw Makita w/ stand. Like new! 8.25 in. blade, $190. ∂ Craftsman compound mitre saw, 10 in. $90. È 513-385-7118

BUYING Comic Books 1940’spresent, 1920’s - 1950’s Dectective & Pin-up Pulp Magazines, 35mm Photo Slides, 1940’s - 1970’s primarily railroad & transportation related. 513-325-4913

SERVING OHIO, INDIANA & KENTUCKY September Listings Leaders

September Sales Leaders

Jeanne Rieder

Lisa Ibold

OPEN SUNDAY 1-3

Bridgetown - 6361 Werk Rd 5 Bdrm/4.5 Ba $725,000 Dir: Between Werkridge and Devils Backbone. H-9298

Sylvia Kalker

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Vicki Schletchinger

OPEN SUNDAY 1:30-3

Bridgetown - 3354 Harwinton Ln 3 Bdrm/2.0 Ba $133,900 Dir: Lawrence to South on Harwinton H-9481

Steve Florian

OPEN SUNDAY 12-2

Julie Pieczonka

Heather Claypool

OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Bridgetown - 3080 Country Woods Ln 3 Bdrm/3.0 Ba $198,000 Dir: Werk to Country Woods H-9474

Steve Florian

OPEN SUNDAY 11:30-1

Delhi - 5232 Farm House Ln #39 2 Bdrm/2.0 Ba $78,000 Dir: Off Anderson Ferry between Foley and Delhi Pike H-9495

Green Twp - 5107 Michael Anthony Ln 4 Bdrm/3.5 Ba $359,900 Dir: Race Rd to Boomer to Michael Anthony H-9421

Monfort Heights - 5543 Samver Rd 3 Bdrm/2.0 Ba $141,900 Dir: North Bend near LaSale HS to street H-9511

Green Twp - Sweet 3 bed 2 ba Br ranch Open floor plan. WBFP. Enclsd Fr Porch. Rear patio. Newr mech and Ba. Hdwd fl. 2 LL rooms $88,900 H-9430

Miami Twp - Stunning Ranch home located in the quiet Sanctuary/St. Cloud neighborhood! Spacious floor plan w/3 bdrms, 9ft ceilings, cust wdwk, endl patio, fin LL. Doug Rolfes $324,900 H-9422

North College Hill -Opportunity in NCH’s Bus Dist! Ideal for 2 offices: dr off, law firm, etc. Brick bldg. in excell cond. 10 pkg spots! 3150 sq ft per cnty aud. $122,900 Lisa Ibold H-9114

Dick Schneider

Jeanne Rieder

Heather Claypool

451-4800

Jeanne Rieder

Hoeting-Wissel Team

OPEN SUNDAY 3:30-5

Mike Wright

Doug Rolfes

OPEN SUNDAY 1:30-3

Melissa Leurck

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Brian Bazeley

OPEN SUNDAY 12-1:30

Bridgetown - 2858 Chardale Ct 4 Bdrm/2.5 Ba $174,900 Dir: Westbourne to Robert to right on Chardale H-9517

Bridgetown - 7828 Bridge Point Dr 2 Bdrm/2.5 Ba $250,000 Dir: Rybolt to Ruwes Oak to straight on Bridge Point H-9516

Bridgetown - 3961 School Section #33 2 Bdrm/2.0 Ba $62,000 Dir: Harrison or Westwood Northern Blvd. (Stonehedge I) H-9531

Bridgetown - 2 homes for price of 1! 4bd/2ba w/ detachable 1bd cottage. Updtd Kit & Baths. Lg rms, 1st flr Master.Above Gnd Pool &deck! Great 4 entertaining! $249,900 Bill Dattilo H-9388

Bridgetown - Light & bright 3 bdrm 1.5 bath brick ranch style home! Freshly painted & new carpet! 2 car oversized garage! Fenced backyard! Move in ready! $129,900 H-9500

Cheviot - Charming 4 bdrm, 3 Bath Cape Cod on a quiet street. Updates include equipt kit, HVAC, roofing system, HWH. $114,900 H-9528

Lisa Ibold

Hoeting-Wissel

Cheviot - Two business opp for the price of one! Grand 2 Family-3 bd+2 bd loft. Plus 2800 sf bus space in adj level entry hall. 20+ car blacktop pkg+ 2 car gar. $150,000 Jeanne Rieder H-9515

Pleasant Run - Fully reconditioned 4 bd, 2.5 Ba 2-sty, huge Great Rm, 1st fl Ldry, private rear setting with woods and creek. $226,900 H-9519

Price Hill - Charming 3 Bd 1 Ba home w/ long time owners. Beautiful wdwk & large rooms. Lg inviting fr porch, det gar in rear. Close to downtown. $75,000 H-9522

Price Hill - Completely remodeled 4 Br 2.5 Ba 3 sty! Full ba & wlkin closet off master! Near Incline District! Granite/SS! Roof/Win/dual HVAC’14. $119,900 H-9480

Westwood - Move-in ready! Cute 2-Bed/1Ba Ranch home with full Basement. Large rooms, high ceilings and plenty of charm! A must see! $74,900 H-9499

Bridgetown - 6734 Taylor Rd 3 Bdrm/2.0 Ba $104,900 Dir: Taylor Rd/Rybolt to right on Taylor H-9407

Art Chaney

Mike Wright

Jeanne Rieder

Melissa Leurck

Thinking of a Real Estate Career? Give Us a Call

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Bill Dattilo

hoeting.com


2C µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ OCTOBER 11, 2017

Hiring Event

Tuesday, October 17th 6 – 8 a.m. | 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. | 3 – 6 p.m.

Interviewing for: •LPNs – 7 p.m. – 7 a.m. •STNAs – 7 p.m. – 7 a.m. •Cooks •Housekeepers •Laundry Associates At Ohio Living Llanfair, a five-star life plan community, you can make a difference in the lives of others in a friendly environment that provides you with the opportunity to grow personally and professionally. Our employees enjoy competitive wages, affordable benefits, education assistance and free meals. If you are unable to attend, please apply online at:

ohioliving.org/careers

1701 Llanfair Avenue | Cincinnati, Ohio 45224

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys

Garage Sales

neighborly deals...

BUYING ALL TYPES OF KENNER TOYS & HISTORICAL MEMORABILIA. Help add to the largest private STAR WARS collection in Ohio! Did you or a family member used to work for Kenner? We are LOCAL paying CASH for prototypes, packaging samples, displays, artwork, paperwork, and toys in all conditions. Heck, we will even buy your KENNER business card! Looking specifically for STAR WARS, M.A.S.K., Jurassic Park, GI Joe, Alien, Stretch Armstrong, The Real Ghostbusters, and most character lines. 1980’s and older only please. Help keep Kenner history here in Cincinnati! Call or text 513.500.4209 - Please leave a voicemail if we don’t answer, or email us at CincyStarWarsCollector@gmail.com . Save this ad- we buy all year !

Cincinnati, Rummage, 7515 Forest Road, Fri: 9 am6 pm , Sat: 9 am-1 pm, Friday, October 13 and Saturday, October 14: 8:30 am early entry Friday & Saturday with $2 donation; $5 Bag Sale on Saturday; United Methodist Women rummage Sale, Boutique, Furniture, Books, Glassware, Dishes, Baskets, Women & Men’s Clothing, Children’s Clothing & Toys and a variety of tools!, Dir: Anderson Hills United Methodist Church, 7515 Forest Rd, 5 Mile Exit on I-275, right on Beechmont, right on Forest Rd, church on right, look for sign to the entrance for the sale!

Garage Sales Cincinnati , Oct. 13th, 10-2, 8117 Austin Ridge Dr., hope to move sale. Vintage Dining Rm table w/ 6 chairs, China, cedar chest, In/out furn, clothes, loads of housewares, and some holiday decor COLLEGE HILL RUMMAGE SALE FIRST UCC. 5808 GLENVIEW AVE SAT 10/14, 9A-1P

HAND OUT THE CIGARS!

Garage Sale. Antiques, beer signs, Christmas Village, home items. Oct 13-15, 9-6. 10910 Newmarket Dr.

GARAGE SALE! Sat. 10/14, 9a-3p, Monfort Heights6992 Aspen Point Ct, in Monte Vista.DOWNSIZING, TOO MUCH TO LIST! Wyoming- Oct. 13-14, Fri, 9-2, Sat. 9-12 CHURCH RUMMAGE 460 Fleming Rd. ($5 bag sale Sat. 11am) Lots of stuff! Yard Sale! 5932 Countryhills Dr. Sat, 10/14, 8-12. Tons of household items!

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

UPDATED ALL DAY.

Garage Sales

Delhi: 224 Jupiter Dr Saturday 10/14 8:30am - 3:00pm Baby stroller, swing, exersaucer, play yard, gates & more. Winter clothes - infant, toddlers, teen (boy & girl) Men sz to XXXL, womens coats, shoes, Halloween costumes, Harlequin books, kids books, games, puzzles, small bikes, tricycles, scooters, Mega Blocks, Lego (small and large), trucks, dolls, and more, Linens, Misc. 2:00 Special: All remaining clothes half price! Rain Date 10/21

NOW THAT’S REFRESHING.

Celebrate it. VISITCLASSIFIEDS onlineatcincinnati.com THE NEWS IS ALWAYS CHANGING. SO ARE WE.

VISIT US ONLINE TODAY

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.

EOE


OCTOBER 11, 2017 µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ 3C

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985 CASH FOR RECORDS Private collector buying 45’s & LP’s Up to $10 per record, small & large collections. Roger 513-575-2718 I can come to you!

INSTANT CASH PAID For Baseball Cards Coins, Gold, Silver, Antiques, Old Toys, Watches, Comics, Case Knives Military, Trains, Autographs, Many Others! We Pick-up. 513-295-5634

Make Money for Your Collectibles! We are searching for toys and collectibles from the 70s, 80s, and 90s in good to excellent condition. Downsizing? Making room for new items? We can help! CompleteSet is a nationally recognized and trusted source for collectors and sellers. Call or email today to find out how we can help you make money from your vintage toys, old video games, and pop culture memorabilia. Call 1-855-434-2454 or email us at sell@completeset.com

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

LEGAL NOTICE

LEGAL NOTICE

The following legislation was passed at the October 4, 2017 Springdale City Council meeting:

Sealed proposals will be received at the Office of the Clerk of Council/Finance Director, Municipal Building, City of Springdale, Hamilton County, 11700 Springfield Pike, Springdale, Ohio 45246, until 10:00 A.M. local time on MONDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2017 for furnishing all labor, materials, and equipment necessary to complete project known as the NORTH MALL MAST ARM REPLACEMENT, and, at said time and place, publicly opened and read aloud. as specified by the City of Springdale, Ohio and at said time and place be publicly opened and read aloud.

PUBLIC AUCTION In accordance with the provisions of State law, there being due and unpaid charges for which the undersigned is entitled to satisfy an owner and/or manager’s lien of the goods hereinafter described and stored at LifeStorage Self Storage" location(s) listed below. And, due notice having been given, to the owner of said property and all parties known to claim an interest therein, and the time specified in such notice for payment of such having expired, the goods will be sold at public auction at the below stated location(s)to the highest bidder or otherwise disposed of on Monday, 10-3017 @ 10AM, 11378 Springfield Pike, Springdale, OH 45246, (513)7715311 Natalie Gray 1311 Wabash Ave. Cincinnati, OH 45215 H o u s e h o l d Goods/Furniture, Tools/Appliances, Clothing. Antonio Murphy 1205 Congress Ave. Glendale, OH 45246 H o u s e h o l d Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment. Mark Hawkins 667 Coxbury Ln. Springdale, OH 45246 H o u s e h o l d Goods/Furniture, TV/Stereo Equipment, Tools/Appliances, Boxes. Shirley Lenzly 670 Northland Blvd. P.O. Box 46654 Cincinnati, OH 45240 Clothes, Shoes. Shirley Lenzly 670 Northland Blvd. P.O. Box 46654 Cincinnati, OH 45240 H o u s e h o l d Goods/Furniture, Account Records/Sales Samples, Clothes, Shoes. Catherine Edmondson 1102 Indra Ct. Forest Park, OH 45240 H o u s e h o l d Goods/Furniture, Boxes. TRI,Oct11,18,’17#2402092

ORDINANCE NO. 39-2017 AMENDING THE CODIFIED ORDINANCES OF THE CITY OF SPRINGDALE, OHIO, TO AMEND SECTIONS 153.253, 153.254, AND 153.600 OF THE SPRINGDALE ZONING CODE RELATED TO SMALL CELL WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS FACILITIES ORDINANCE NO. 40-2017 AN ORDINANCE TO AUTHORIZE THE CITY TO JOIN A COALITION OF MUNICIPALITIES RETAINING SPECIAL COUNSEL FOR PURPOSES OF INITIATING LITIGATION TO CHALLENGE THE CONSTITUTIONALITY OF AMENDMENTS TO CHAPTER 718 OF THE OHIO REVISED CODE RELATING TO MUNICIPAL INCOME TAX, AND DECLARING AN EMERGENCY Kathy McNear Clerk of Council/Finance Director CIN,Oct11’17#2454336

$$$ PAID for LPs,CDs, CASSETTES-ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123 WANTED: R12 FREON., Certified buyer will PICK UP and PAY CASH for cylinders of R12., $10. (312)291-9169 refrigerantfinders.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 Adopt Me

Pets find a new friend...

AKC Havanese Puppies for Sale. 1st Shots, Vet Checked. Males Avail. $900.00 each. Ready for new home 10/17. Pics can be found at: https://millerca46.wixsite .com/website (513)675-9888

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.

German Shepherd Pups AKC, shots & wormed.Blk & tan, liver red, blk, wht $550600 cash/ MC/ Visa. 419-629-3830, or 419-233-6165 Golden Doodle F1B Puppies. Standard, M&F, POP, vet checked, hlth guar. , 3 mo. $400. 513-553-1674. goldendoodlevalley.com Lab Pups AKC blk/yellow, POP, shots, wormed, dew claws & story kennels 513-941-5935 or 513-604-5721

Maltipoos, Beagles, Yorkies, Shorkies, Morkies, Shihpoos, Yorkiepoos. S/W, vet @. Blanchester. 937-725-9641

Automotive

Rides best deal for you... FREON R12 WANTED, Certified buyer will PICKUP, pay CASH for R12 cylinders and cases of cans. (312)291-9169 www.RefrigerantFinders.com

Contract documents, bid sheets, plan and specifications can be obtained at TEC Engineering, 7288 CENTRAL PARKE BLVD, MASON, OHIO 45040, at a cost of $25.00 per set (non-refundable). Plans requested to be sent by mail will be an additional $15.00 per set. Checks shall be made payable to TEC Engineering. Each bidder is required to furnish with his/her proposal, a Bid Guaranty in an amount equal to 10% of the bid in accordance with Article VII, Paragraph 5 of the Springdale Charter. The successful bidder will be required to furnish a Performance Bond in an amount equal to 100% of the Contract amount. A Surety Company shall issue bid security furnished in bond form or Corporation licensed in the State of Ohio to provide said surety. Proposals must contain the full name of the party or parties submitting the same and all persons interested therein. It is the intent and requirement of the owner that this project be completed no later than APRIL 2, 2018. The Council of the City of Springdale, Ohio reserves the right to waive irregularities and to reject any or all bids. By the order of the Council of the City of Springdale, Ohio. Kathy McNear Clerk of Council/Finance Director City of Springdale, Ohio TRI,Oct11,18,’17#2425015

1992 Bobcat 643, 28.5 hp,diesel,recently serviced by Bobcat,3000 hrs. Call or Text, $2089. (330)237-2454

Trike Conversion Kit for Harley Davidson, Motor Trike brand kit fits 1987 through 1996 Electra Glide. Independent air ride suspension with handle bar control. Hand brake. New tires and mag wheels. Trunk carpet. Vivid black paint with factory pin stripes. Tombstone taillights. Dust cover. You supply bike., $8000.00. Mike (513)317-7503

Buying All Vehicles Not Just Junk up $3000 Fair cash price, quick pickup. 513-662-4955

Toyota 1999 Camry, 258,000 miles, good condition! $1,399. Call: 513-919-2559

1 BUYER of OLD CARS CLASSIC, ANTIQUE ’30-40-50-60-70s, Running or not. 513-403-7386

Wanted - All motorcycles pre-1980. Running or not, any condition. Cash paid. Call 845-389-3239 or email: cyclesndmore10@gmail.com

2016 Keystone Cougar 26 foot travel trailer. Perfect for snow birds. 2 slide outs. Kitchen island. Large rear bath. $23,000 È 513-505-8680

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

DON’S TREE SERVICE, LLC

Trees Trimmed Topped & Removed Free Estimates - Insured

896-5695 Proprietor, Don Stroud

CE-0000688594

LOW Cost Tree Service - Trim, Top & Removal. 30 yrs exp. Free est. Sr disc. George 513-477-2716

PROPOSED TAX LEVY (ADDITIONAL) CITY OF NORTH COLLEGE HILL A majority affirmative vote is necessary for passage, An additional tax for the benefit of the City of North College Hill, County of Hamilton, Ohio, for the purpose of PROVIDING AND MAINTAINING FIRE APPARATUS, APPLIANCES, BUILDINGS OR SITES THEREFOR, OR SOURCES OF WATER SUPPLY AND MATERIALS THEREFOR, OR THE ESTABLISHMENT AND MAINTENANCE OF LINES OF FIRE ALARM TELEGRAPH, OR THE PAYMENT OF FIREFIGHTING COMPANIES OR PERMANENT, PART-TIME, OR VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTERS, EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICE, ADMINISTRATIVE, OR COMMUNICATIONS PERSONAL TO OPERATE THE SAME, INCLUDING THE PAYMENT OF THE FIREFIGHTERS EMPLOYER CONTRIBUTION REQUIRED FOR SUCH PERSONNEL UNDER SECTION 14 5.4 8 O R 742.34 OF THE REVISED CODE, OR THE PURCHASE O F AMBULANCE EQUIPMENT, OR THE PROVISION OF AMBULANCE, PARAMEDIC, OR OTHER EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES OPERATED BY A FIRE DEPARTMENT OR FIREFIGHTING COMPANY at a rate not exceeding three and two-tenths (32) mills for each one dollar of valuation, which amounts to thirty-two cents ($0.32) for each one hundred dollars of valuation, for five (5) years, commencing in 2017, first due in calendar year 2018. FOR THE TAX LEVY AGAINST THE TAX LEVY HT,Oct11,18,25,Nov1,’17 #2446215

Special meeting of The Sharonville Civil Service Commission as follows: DATE: October 13, 2017 TIME: 10:00 AM LOCATION: Sharonville Municipal Building - 10900 Reading Road AGENDA: Planning meeting for the assessment center component of the promotional examination procedure to the rank of Fire Lieutenant TRI,Oct11 ,’17#2460969


4C µ NORTHWEST - COMMUNITY µ OCTOBER 11, 2017

FROM

“NO FOOD ALLOWED.” TO

“HOW OLD ARE THESE FRIES?”

You know us for shopping, and now Cars.com is the site for the entire life of your car. So for every turn, turn to Cars.com.

Tri county press 101117  
Tri county press 101117