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SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Independence and Taylor Mill

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013

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SCOTT HOSTS OPEN MIC NIGHT B1

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Discussion revolves around roundabouts

Residents invited to ask questions Feb. 4 By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Scott High School students Nick Robb, left, and Madeline Schneider learn knife skills by chopping vegetables in the school's culinary arts program. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scott cooking up new class and more construction

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

TAYLOR MILL — Scott High School will be adding a dash of construction to the school year, cooking up a wing of 27 classrooms, while new culinary arts classes are heating up in the existing building. Construction isn’t new for Scott students, who not only dealt with the ongoing construction of Pride Parkway, but also endured classes while a new entrance, administrative offices and athletic facility were built. Principal Brennon Sapp said bids will be opened in February for the next construction phase, which he expects to cost up to $11 million and be completed for the start of school in fall 2015. The new wing, to be set on the south end of the building, will have a top floor of classrooms and a lower level that includes regular classrooms and art studios. “The current school sits like an ‘L,’ and this new construction connects the corners and comes on out,” he said. “Because the construction is pretty much self-contained, our students won’t be sitting in the middle of construction at any point.” The new classrooms will feature geothermal heating, and include interior windows along hallways, part of the plan’s “daylight harvesting.” Sapp said all the rooms will get natural light, and the lighting system will automatically adjust to the amount of daylight already coming in. Several rooms will be built with collapsible walls, so the space can be used as two smaller rooms or one larger area for combined classes. Not all the work will take place in the classrooms, as a wide hallway will feature

COMFORT FOOD Rita shares recipes for Quick sloppy Joes, Ellen’s orzo-roni and Blender banana bread. B3

Uniformly cut fresh vegetables are prepared to create a meal in Scott High School's culinary arts program. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER Scott High School Principal Brennon Sapp said plans have been approved and bids will be complete in February for the school's next addition, a new wing. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

short lockers topped with work surfaces so “if teachers need additional space for students to work, or if they choose to do projects together after class, they’ll have a space they can do that,” said Sapp. The hallway will also include a seating area. While the design shows traditional wooden chairs and tables, Sapp said the seating chosen by students is more “like stair steps. It looks like a park art installation. They want to be all over it, and use it for what they need, not separated chairs and tables.” Teachers will also work together in a combined office

and professional space. “You can’t function by yourself anymore,” said Sapp. “To do a good job with our kids, we have to let them engage each other. This design plan facilitates that concept.” He said more construction phases are yet to come. One phase will be a new gym area and one will include a new band and chorus space. Which one comes first depends on student needs as they begin that planning process, which will start after this new phase gets under way. Sapp hopes one of those phases will include a new

SOMETHING TO SMILE ABOUT Gentle Dental Care of Independence is giving away a smile makeover. A3

See SCOTT, Page A2

INDEPENDENCE — Independence Mayor Chris Moriconi wants to talk about Ky. 536. Moriconi is concerned about plans for highway construction that include nine roundabouts in less than five miles between the Boone County Line and Ky. 17, according to the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6. “That immediately caught my attention,” he said. “It seemed like that was quite a few when I got to looking at the map.” Moriconi also said, “Construction on 536 is going to be an important topic of discussion in the coming years.” That’s why he wants residents to get information and ask questions from District 6 Executive Director Rob Hans and

Project Developer Bob Yeager at the next City Council meeting, set for 7 p.m. Monday, Feb. 4. “Now is the time for us to give them our input,” said Moriconi. According to District 6 spokesperson Nancy Wood, the Ky. 536 project is still in the early planning stages. She anticipates four years before construction begins, which includes time for design and then for acquiring rights-of-way. “In phase one, we host a public meeting and present the design, then take public comments and finalize the plan,” she said. At this time, the public meeting has not yet been planned. "Roundabouts are safer, cause less congestion, move traffic faster and improve traffic flow,” said Wood. “The roundabouts were presented at a public meeting, and we have been working with the property owners along this corridor to enSee COUNCIL, Page A2

Dispatch fees on Kenton phone bills to be refunded By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

Billing cycles have caused some Kenton County Cincinnati Bell customers to still see 911 dispatch charges on landline telephone bills, fees that will be refunded next month, according to officials. The $4.25 charge has shown up on bills depending on when customers received them, but will be credited to accounts in February, Lisa McLaughlin, public relations counsel for Cincinnati Bell, wrote in an email. Emergency dispatch fees have been taken off of landline telephone bills because they don’t make enough money to fund Kenton County Dispatch. Now residents have to pay an $85 parcel fee, for each parcel of land they own, to cover costs. This does not apply to residents in Erlanger and Crescent Springs, who will continue to use Erlanger Dispatch. Kenton County Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus said his office has gotten a few dozen calls about the charges. “It’s a matter of when billing cycles are,” Arlinghaus said.

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“We’ve been assured by all of the providers that if they are charged in January they will receive a credit on their February bills.” Arlinghaus said the overlap could happen with Insight Broadband customers as well. Representatives from Insight Broadband did not return requests for confirmation by press time. As many as10 percent of customers in cities that took 911 fees off landline telephone bills, which include Fort Mitchell, Lakeside Park and Villa Hills, still got charged. “I’d venture to say that probably each city has experienced this to some degree,” Arlinghaus said. An additional 12 cent 911 service fee is staying on bills though, he said, but it has nothing to do with the county. “That is related to 911, but that’s strictly a bill that Cincinnati Bell charges each and every customer,” he said. “We’ve got a number of calls about it. It’s 12 cents, but it’s the principle of the thing.” Visit www.nky.com/KentonCounty for more community news

Vol. 2 No. 31 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Scott

Index Calendar .............B2 Classifieds .............C Food ..................B3 Life ....................B1 Police ................ B5 Schools ..............A4 Sports ................A5 Viewpoints .........A7

Continued from Page A1

kitchen area to accommodate a culinary arts program that started this year. Scott’s culinary arts program is led by teacher

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covington • nky.com/covington Independence • nky.com/independence Taylor Mill • nky.com/taylormill

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@nky.com Melissa Lemming District Manager ..........442-3462, mlemming@nky.com

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To place a Classified ad ......................283-7290, www.communityclassified.com

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Diana Taliaferro, who has taught cooperative extension home economy classes at Cornell University and wrote, produced and starred in a food and nutrition television program through the University of Kentucky. Sapp said the school’s Site-Based Decision Making Council invested $20,000 in what he calls a “makeshift kitchen” with two cooking workstations, each with a flat-top stove, refrigerator and a triple sink. "You have to have the triple sink to be up to industry standards,” said Taliaferro. “Separate sinks to soap, rinse and sanitize, unless you have a dishwasher with hot enough water.” In the first year of the program, 330 students, or one-third of Scott’s student population, will have completed the introductory class. Talliaferro hopes to add an international foods class and a concentrated baking class to the program in coming years, as well as a progression of classes that could end with food service certification. “If interest stays this high, we’ll have to build a kitchen to accommodate them,” said Sapp. Taliaferro alternates among students engaged in different pursuits. She

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sure this design meets everyone's needs.” Moriconi said the project’s map is on display in the Independence City Council chambers, and

Culinary Arts Teacher Diana Taliaferro encourages Martin Wartman as he's learning to make a stir-fry meal with pasta, chicken and fresh vegetables in Scott High School's new program. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

checks in with students researching cooking terms on tablets at worktables, steps over to admire the knife skills of a student chopping vegetables, then slides up to the stove to encourage a student preparing to flip her stir-fried vegetables. “I show one of them what to do, then they teach each other. They’ll reteach it to themselves; that’s important because each of them will be good

at something different,” she said. “They get a chance to try the different roles, as chef, prep cook or server, all at industry standards." Students also get to eat their creations. “I’ve had something like this before, but it wasn’t fresh. It was packaged,” said senior Madeline Schneider. Martin Wartmansaid his entrée was better than the other meals he’d had

because the others were “not made by me.” “When you like what you made, it makes you feel accomplished,” said freshman Nick Robb. Sapp looks forward to growing the culinary arts program. “Our ultimate goal is to have kids leave here and be ready for jobs. That’s exciting,” Sapp said. “Plus, we get to watch them learn something new.”

Kentucky Transportation Cabinet District 6 has publications that explain, generally, about roundabouts and, specifically, the access management plan for Ky. 536. “I'm not dead-set against roundabouts. I think in certain locations they would be beneficial,

but again, my personal opinion on what I know now about the project, I would think nine seems excessive, but maybe they'll give me some new information and I'll think nine is not enough,” said Moriconi. “Right now my initial, just from the hip, reaction is nine just seems

like a lot, when no where else is there that many planned anywhere in the state or on the Boone County side where they're widening it from Interstate 75 all the way to U.S. 42.”

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NEWS

JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A3

Contest offers a winning smile By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE

Around Christmas 2012, Dentist Tara Dallmann and her staff at Gentle Dental Care of Independence decided to give someone a gift. They just don’t know who that someone is yet. According to head assistant Kim Fisk, they’re looking for someone who needs a smile makeover. “What we’re trying to do is to help someone who’s been through a lot,” she said. “It’s not going to be all about going from an

ugly smile to a pretty smile. It’s more about someone who has put others first, and who just hasn’t taken care of their own dental problems. We really want to help someone who is down on their luck.” To enter the contest, submit an essay explaining why this person deserves a makeover, and attach a photo. The deadline is March 31. Mail letters and photos to Gentle Dental Care Gives Back Contest, 1984 Walton-Nicholson Pike, Independence, KY 41051; visit the Facebook page,

Gentle Dental Care Independence; or send email to staff@sedationspadentist.com. The winner will be photographed before and after the dental work for publicity purposes. Dallmann and her staff will select a winner they feel particularly understands the value of good oral health, but until now has been unable to afford significant dental care, said Fisk. She said Dallmann has provided more than $100,000 of free dental services as part of the Donated Dental Services

Dentist Tara Dallmann and her staff at Gentle Dental Care of Independence hope to help improve someone's life by correcting their teeth. THANKS TO KIM FISK

program, but sometimes recipients wait more than two years to receive service.

Visit nky.com/independence for more community news

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Refinancing saves city $240,000 By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — City leaders chose to refinance a sewer debt that keeps them from flushing Independence residents’ money away. At the Jan. 7 meeting, Independence City Council members voted to refinance the Fowler Creek sewer project debt of $2.4 million, going from an interest rate rising from 4.3 percent to 4.75 percent

through the current payoff date of Dec. 1, 2021, to a rate of 0.94 percent to be paid off on May 1, 2016. The new fixed rate is financed through U.S. Bank, saving residents $240,000 in interest, according to City Clerk Pat Taney. Taney also spearheaded the refinancing of the Independence Municipal Center building in 2012, saving $1.2 million. City Administrator Dan Groth said the loan closing is set for Tuesday, Jan. 22. The Fowler Creek

sewer assessment has been charged to several residents in the northern and eastern portions of the city since 1993. According to the city of Independence website, www.cityofindependence.org, the Fowler Creek sewer project was brought about in the early 1990s when the Commonwealth of Kentucky’s Division of Water threatened Independence “with $25,000 a day penalties due to the percolation of raw sewage in residential areas and outdated treatment plants resulting in local stream pollution

and health risks. To build the system, the city had to borrow $7 million for the construction of the main lines and a professional bond attorney as well as financial firms that were engaged to determine the future number of users and assessment fee each property owner would be charged in order to pay off the debt for this loan.” The site says the assessment established a 20-year payoff per parcel of $5,600. The annual assessment fee has been $280 per parcel. Until 2000, Sanitation District 1 handled billing and col-

lection of the assessment, but city employees took over those tasks. Mayor Chris Moriconi is glad to see the assessments coming to a close. “The low-interest rate we were able to secure for the Fowler Creek debt will save the users hundreds of thousands of dollars in interest. Additionally, approximately four years of having the pay the fee has been eliminated,” he said. “We are finally starting to see an endgame for this massive infrastructure project that began in the 1990s.”

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SCHOOLS

A4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

Kenton schools go green, earn green

By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

FORT WRIGHT — Since Kenton County Schools made the decision to go green, they’re seeing green by reaping benefits of a tax credit given to energy efficient schools. It’s not just the $66,000 donation received from the architecture firm that designed Edgewood’s Turkey Foot Middle School that’s money in the district’s pockets. Energy efficient schools equate to lower electricity bills and one of Kentucky’s only salary hikes for educators this year. “We put money back into it,” said Superintendent Terri CoxCruey. “That’s why we are going to use this donation to put it into programs that continue to educate our students on the impor-

tance of energy savings and also help our kids get into careers. PCA Architecture, of Covington, designed Turkey Foot Middle School which opened in 2009 with energy efficient solar panels. It’s able to operate using 61 percent less energy than a standard building, said PCA Architecture president Andrew Piaskowy, which is why the firm applied for an IRS tax credit for qualifying buildings, like Turkey Foot. The IRS awarded $66,000 for the efficiency, which Piaskowy donated to the school district. “We felt it wasn’t our money, it was the taxpayers of Kenton County that paid for the building,” Piaskowy said. “We felt strongly in the programs of Kenton County (Schools) and energy initiatives this county

Kenton County Schools Superintendent Terri Cox-Cruey gets a symbolic check from PCA Architecture President Andrew Piaskowy. THE COMMUNITY RECORDER/LIBBY CUNNINGHAM

has done.” With the money the schools can do even more, like fund the E-wise program, which teaches about energy saving, and the

Construction 101 program, which gives students at Scott High School hands-on experience with the school’s renovation.

“We’re saving money and we’re increasing the ability to provide, raise and sustain a good quality workforce,” Cox-Cruey said. “But secondly we’re building up our student population that will eventually be citizens and continue to help our region sustain.” Other projects, such as a human sundial, will be paid for with the funds. “The new Turkey Foot is twice the size of the old one and the energy costs are one-third the cost of the original,” Piaskowy said. “That’s pretty amazing.” Cox-Cruey agrees. “It’s kind of hard to wrap your mind around that,” she said. Visit www.nky.com/KentonCounty for more community news

CovCath choir wins Q-102 competition Community Recorder

Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky radio station Q-102 awarded the Covington Catholic Chamber Choir first place in their annual Christmas Choir Competition. Q-102 Morning Show hosts presented a check for $5,000 to choir director Jim Wolfe on Dec. 18 at an all-school Mass and assembly. To enter the competition, the chamber choir submitted a performance of the holiday song “Blue Christmas.” From all eligible entries, a panel of judges selected CovCath as one of nine semifinal-

ists. The semifinalists were posted on Q-102’s website for listener vote. The three choirs to receive the most votes became finalists, of which CovCath was one. Of the finalists, the Chamber Choir received first place by the judges for its professional quality of sound and quality of performance. Another rendition of the chamber choir singing “Blue Christmas” with full accompaniment is posted on CovCath.org. Choir director Jim Wolfe has been on the faculty at Covington Catholic for four years. He is also music director at St. Mary’s Parish in Alexandria.

Woodland Middle School's advanced art students are adding color to their campus by painting stairwell murals like this one and by coloring ceiling tiles in different areas of the school. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Color adds character at Woodland Middle By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

TAYLOR MILL — Painting on the school’s walls and ceiling might get most students in big trouble, but for some students at Woodland Middle School, it’s advanced art class. Art teacher Brittany Forsythe identified exceptional art students, whom she charged with the task of making the school a little brighter, more colorful and full of positive messages. The students, who are also working on a variety of individual projects, are painting ceiling tiles and creating colorful murals in the school’s stairwells. “My other classes are more

structured,” said Forsythe. “In this class, students are able to have ideas and explore them. No one is working on the same thing.” Eighth-grader Nina Stevers appreciates the opportunity to let her talent grow. “It was more like we all did the same exact thing last year, and now, we’re more free. We can go up to our potential,” she said. Tara Hatfield, also in grade eight, liked working together with her classmates on the large-scale murals. Forsythe thought one big wall mural would be more effective “than tiny 8.5-by-11-inch posters.” One stairwell’s wall says “Many minds, one mission,” and

another one reads, “Whatever it takes.” Principal Tara Sides likes the results. “The murals just help remind them what our time here is about. This is an older school, and we’re trying to make it more student-friendly,” said Sides. “It also helps students feel more invested in the school.” She also likes the way the painting brightens up the school’s public spaces. Forsythe said the rainbowhued ceiling tiles in her classroom could also be seen in the school’s conference rooms and in other areas. Visit nky.com/taylormill for more community news

Q-102 Morning Show hosts present a check to Jim Wolfe and the Covington Catholic Chamber Choir. MAUREEN REGAN

HOLIDAYS AROUND THE WORLD

Howell Elementary teacher Shelley Dunhoft’s second-grade class have been studying holidays around the world. This particular picture is showing Chinese lanterns, as well as the Chinese Dragons the students made. They learned about the history behind Chinese New Year’s and customs. THANKS TO ROSEMARY WEATHERS BURNHAM

COLLEGE CORNER Loomis named to Delaware dean’s list

Joanna Loomis of Fort Mitchell was named to the University of Delaware’s fall semester dean’s list. The list includes students who are enrolled full-time and earn a grade-point average of 3.33 or above on a 4.0 scale for the semester.

Kenton students named to dean’s list

The following Kenton students were named to the dean’s list of National College in Florence. Covington: Nicholas Childs and Robert Barnes. Elsmere: Aminata Diallo. Erlanger: Diana Fahey and Jigna Patel. Independence: Lesa Rider.

The list includes students who earn a minimum gradepoint average of 3.5 out of a possible 4.0.

Schutzman named dean of Workforce Solutions

Carissa Schutzman of Villa Hills was named dean of Workforce Solutions at Gateway Community and Technical College.

In this role, Schutzman is responsible for collaborating with Gateway’s business, industry, and secondary education partners to develop programs and services designed to spur workforce development and preparation. A major part of her role involves creating initiatives to increase the pool of qualified candidates for manufacturing jobs. Schutzman is an award-win-

ning educator. In 2012, she was honored by her Gateway peers as the college’s nominee for statewide recognition as the outstanding faculty member in the annual New Horizons excellence program conducted by the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. She received a similar honor as recently as November from the Greater Cincinnati Consortium of Colleges and Universities.


SPORTS

JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A5

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber

ON THE

jweber@nky.com

upswing

This Week’s MVP

» Simon Kenton senior Andrew Sampson for eight threepointers against Oldham County.

Sweet 16

» The Draw Show for the 2013 KHSAA Boys’ and Houchens Industries/KHSAA Girls’ State Basketball Tournaments will be Friday, Jan. 25, at 1 p.m. CWKYT (Ch. 14) in Lexington will provide a live broadcast of the pairings, with a live feed available online at www.khsaa.tv. Brackets with official times and pairings will be posted to the Riherd’s/KHSAA Scoreboard and the KHSAA website at the conclusion of the program. The 2013 Boys’ Sweet16® will be held March 6-10 at Rupp Arena in Lexington, with the Houchens Industries/KHSAA Girls Sweet 16® taking place March 13-16 at E.A. Diddle Arena in Bowling Green.

By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Scott senior Josh Felts looks for an opening. Holmes beat Scott 60-59 Jan. 17 at Scott High School. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY

Boys basketball

RECORDER

and earlier in the season we may have done that.” Scott senior Nick Jackson led the Eagles with 19 points. He is averaging 16 a game this year as Scott’s top-returning player. The 6-foot-3 forward is also pulling down seven rebounds a contest. “Nick is one of our key components,” Carr said. “The defense has to focus on him and that allows others to be open. He’s a tough matchup because big kids have to guard him and he has guard skills and big-man skills.” Felts is posting 11.8 points a contest. Junior 6-foot-4 center Kameron Crim is averaging six points a game. Scott held the high-powered Holmes offense to 60 points and highly-touted point guard James Bolden to 14. The Eagles forced the super sophomore into 10 turnovers, with junior Josh Castleman taking most of the one-on-one guarding with frequent help from doubleteams on the wings. “Any time you play a team that is very point guard-oriented, you want to cut the head off the snake and that’s what we

Scott senior Nick Jackson gets set to shoot. Holmes beat Scott 60-59 Jan. 17 at Scott. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

tried to do,” Carr said. “Other kids stepped up for them and that’s good for their program. Josh is a very hard-nosed guy and hard worker. He’s not going to back down. He’s going to be up in you and he’s very quick and strong.” Scott had won three games in a row after another tough one-point loss to rival Simon Kenton. The win streak included a nine-point win over Dixie Heights just 14 days after losing to the same Colonels by 19. A veteran team with nine seniors and several top juniors is looking to be in top form in February. Carr has achieved that often, winning four district titles in a row from 2008-11. The Eagles have plenty more tough preparatory tests to come. After playing a key 37th District game against

Campbell County Jan. 22, Scott plays a tough Perry County Central team 3:30 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 26 at Montgomery County, then hosts Covington Catholic Jan. 29. Scott plays at Bishop Brossart Feb. 8 to end district play. “We’re really up and down but we don’t want to be peaking now, we want to be peaking at the end of the year and I think we’re taking great strides towards that,” Carr said. “We’re consistently getting better with our effort and our decisions. It doesn’t matter how many games you win or lose, come tournament time you want to be tested and you want to be ready to go.” Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out more coverage at nky.com/preps.

Deep Pioneers focus on next step By James Weber jweber@nky.com

INDEPENDENCE — The Simon Kenton girls basketball team has a lot of speed and depth this season, and have been able to score a lot of points this year. But the foundation of the Pioneers under head coach Jeff Stowers remains defense, and the two areas have merged to create a team with an 18-2 record. “We like to play uptempo,” said junior guard Abby Owings. “Defense is our big focus. If we get the ball up the court fast and try to get transition baskets, that’s how we try to win.” Simon beat Walton-Verona 62-53 Jan. 19, clinching the top seed in the 32nd District Tournament with the victory. The game came less than 24 hours after a 66-59 win over Ninth Region power Notre Dame. Stowers appreciated the win but is always focused on things his team can improve on. Owings, whom Stowers said “has the heart of a lion,” had 25 points, 22 in the second half, to keep the Bearcats at bay.

Simon Kenton’s Paige Bosse grabs a rebound. Simon Kenton beat Walton-Verona 62-53 Jan. 19 at Walton-Verona. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

“We just had to keep playing hard and play our best,” she said. “It’s a pretty big lift but we still have the rest of our season and that’s what we have to worry about. These games are over.” The speedy and diminutive guard, who is listed at 5-foot-2, had two floaters over W-V’s 6foot-1 post player Michele Judy at crucial spots in the second half.

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Scott basketball

TAYLOR MILL — Like their record suggests, the Scott boys basketball team has been up and down this year. Head coach Brad Carr is happy to trade close losses now for big wins in the postseason, however, as he focuses on getting a veteran Eagles team to improve. Scott is 10-8 for the year after beating 10th Region nemesis Clark County 53-34 Jan. 19. That was a bounce-back effort for the Eagles after they lost 6059 to Holmes Jan. 17 at Scott. It was the third one-point loss this year for the Eagles, and the second close loss to their nearby rival Bulldogs after losing 74-69 at Holmes Dec. 22. Holmes, ranked seventh in the state Associated Press poll of Jan. 14, is the lone unbeaten boys team in Kentucky. Scott, which led for most of the game, had a chance to ruin that. “You have to be able to handle pressure and be able to grind in games like this,” Carr said. “We had too many instances where we played a little too fast. They sped us up and we made poor decisions. They did a good job of forcing the tempo. It will be a good experience for us and hopefully we’ll learn from it and we’ll get better from it.” Scott had several shots in the final seconds of the game, and after a foul on the other end, Holmes forward Chris Englemon made a foul shot with three seconds to go. Scott senior Josh Felts missed a three-pointer at the buzzer. “Our kids competed for 32 minutes and that’s something we haven’t done consistently so far, and that’s something I’m happy about,” Carr said. “We had a chance to take the lead and we came fighting back. We had times we could have folded

SOUTH KENTON

“It’s rough,” Owings said. “It’s very hard to see over the top of her and that’s one of my big struggles. I have to jump twice as high to be able to score.” SK has averaged 62 points per game on offense this season, and has scored more than 60 in 11 of its last 12 games, including 88 against Scott, 85 against Valley and 79 against Seneca.

Owings and junior guard Christina Cook are averaging 12 points a game this year. Cook, who had 13 points against W-V, is one of the top sprinters in the area during track season, having finished third in the 3A state meet in the 400 meters after winning the region. “(Cook) has been solid for us all year,” Stowers said. “She never gets mentioned. She had a great tournament at LexCath and Bardstown and a great, great game against Notre Dame. She made four clutch free throws at the end of that game. She’s one of those that we can’t do without.” Senior Paige Bosse and junior Rachel Cox have been strong in the paint. Bosse averages 10 points and eight rebounds. Cox averages eight points and seven rebounds. Junior forward Sarah Tomlin had 11 points against Walton. “Normally we’ll go 12 (deep) and sometimes 15,” Stowers said. “Everybody has to be ready when their number is called. We want a lot of possessions. We want to go down See PIONEERS, Page A6

» Covington Catholic beat Elizabethtown 63-53 Jan. 17. Nick Ruthsatz had 20 points, Nick Fredrick, 16, and Bo Schuh, 14. » Holmes beat Scott 60-59 Jan. 17 to improve to 20-0. Chris Englemon scored 12 points including the winning free throw with 3.2 seconds to play. Daquan Palmer led Holmes with 22 points and James Bolden 14. Holmes beat Mason County 5950. Palmer and Quinton Chames had 16 points, and Bolden 15. » Holy Cross beat Beechwood 78-49 in the All “A” tourney. Antonio Campbell had 27 points and Christian McClendon 16. » Simon Kenton beat Oldham County 67-53 Jan. 15. Andrew Sampson had 26 points including a school record eight three-pointers.

Girls basketball

» Holy Cross beat Scott 6557 Jan. 15. DeAsia Beal had 31 points and Ally Mayhaus 13 and Dajah McClendon, 10. Jenna Trimpe had 17 points and five three-pointers for Scott. HC beat Brossart 51-41 Jan. 18. Beal had 16 points, Hannah Tupman 12 and Abby Hassert 11 points and nine rebounds. » Scott beat Campbell County 77-72 Jan. 18 in 37th District play. Jenna Trimpe had 18 points and Ally Niece 17. » Villa Madonna beat BelleSee HIGHLIGHT, Page A6

Holmes senior Daquan Palmer shoots the ball. He had 22 points in the game. Holmes beat Scott 60-59 Jan. 17 at Scott. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


SPORTS & RECREATION

A6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

Pioneers Continued from Page A5

through our bench and see who’s still standing in the end. If we can get up and down and make some baskets, we can win games.” While the Pioneers have been lighting up the scoreboard on their side, they have still been stingy on the other end. SK is allowing just 39 points per game for the season. In the latest KHSAA up-

Highlight Continued from Page A5

vue 35-25 Jan. 15. Allie Hennard had 14 points including four threepointers. VMA beat Heritage 52-16 Jan.18. Junior center Maria Blom, in her second game back since injuring her ACL, led all scorers with 11 points

Swimming

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date of Jan. 15, the Pioneers ranked sixth in the state in scoring defense among the 159 teams that submitted statistics. “We do defense every day for an hour, and the rest of it we’re working on transition,” Owings said. SK plays Boone County Jan. 22 after Recorder print deadlines, goes to Williamstown Jan. 25, then has another marquee matchup at Conner Jan. 26. Wins over Boone and Conner would put Simon in the driver’s set

for the Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference Division I title. In the meantime, Stowers will change some tactics to get his team in peak form for the postseason. “We’re starting to get good things to look at and good tapes to look at,” he said. “We’re going to begin to watch tape a lot more than we normally do. We have some bad habits we need to address. We need to start looking at things and really honing our skills.”

» The NKAC swim meet was Jan. 19 at Scott. Boys team scores: 1. Dixie Heights 341, 2. Covington Catholic 309.5, 3. Highlands 133, 4. Ryle 118.50, 5. Scott 111, 6. Campbell County 92, 7. Cooper 77, 8. Boone County 63, 9. Simon Kenton 56, 10. St. Henry 40, 11. Villa Madonna 32, 12. Beechwood 12, T13. Conner 4, T13. Holmes 4. Boys winners: 200MR–Dixie Heights 1:46.80; 200 free–Bright (D) 1:54.06; 200IM–Huffman (D) 2:11.55; 50 free–Zimmerman (D) 23.18; 100Fly–Schoettker (D) 56.93; 100 free–Zimmerman (D) 50.92; 500 free–Williamson (CovCath) 5:03.63; 200FR–CovCath 1:34.76; 100Back–Shoettker (D) 59.32; 100Breast–Williamson (CovCath) 1:05.46; 400FR–CovCath 3:30.82. Girls team scores: 1. Notre Dame 325, 2. Highlands 262, 3. Ryle 171, 4. Dixie Heights 137, 5. Simon Kenton 83, 6. Boone County 80, 7. Scott 76, 8. Beechwood 65, 9. Cooper 61, 10. Holy Cross 53 11.

Campbell County 39, 12. St. Henry 31, 13. Holmes 8, 14. Villa Madonna 2 Girls winners: Highlands 2:02.53; 200 free–Whitt (Highlands) 2:01.39; 200IM–Redden (Highlands) 2:21.47; 50 free–Summe (N) 26.10; 100Fly–Margroum (N) 59.01; 100 free–Margroum (N) 54.96; 500 free–Whitt (Highlands) 5:29.14; 200FR–Notre Dame 1:49.48; 100Back–Hagen (N) 1:03.29; 100Breast–Morgan (N) 1:10.61; 400FR–Highlands 3:58.44.

NKU Notes

» Northern Kentucky University’s Tyler White was the Atlantic Sun Conference co-Newcomer of the Week for Jan.15. White, a freshman guard, netted a careerhigh 18 points against Lipscomb to lead NKU to a 67-53 victory. NKU hosts Mercer 7 p.m. Thursday and Kennesaw State 7 p.m. Saturday. The women’s team hosts Kennesaw 4:30 p.m. Saturday and Mercer 7 p.m. Monday.

Pandas focus on improvement NDA one of top 9th Region contenders By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

PARK HILLS — Getting away for a while has served the Notre Dame Academy basketball team quite well. Seven of the Pandas’ first11games were played on the road in a pair of holiday tournaments. Since returning to a locals-only schedule to start the new year, the Pandas have reeled off five wins in six games. “(The tournaments) were really good for us,” Pandas head coach Nicole Levandusky said. “The competition we played was really good.” Notre Dame played four games in Berea at the Berea Lady Pirate Holiday Classic, winning three of four games against teams from around the state of Kentucky. After a home win over Cincinnati Sycamore, the Pandas hit the road again, this time traveling out of state. Notre Dame lost two of three games at the Columbus North Holiday Tournament in Indiana, but gained valuable experience from playing against some of Indiana’s best teams. “The better teams you play, the better it makes you,” said Levandusky.

Notre Dame Academy forward Olivia Voskuhl (15) blocks a shot during their girls basketball game against St. Ursula Wednesday, Jan. 16. TONY TRIBBLE/FOR THE RECORDER

The next tournament on the horizon is the one that matters most. Over the final four weeks of the regular season, the Pandas will square off with their main competition in the Ninth Region. While these games will give the team a barometer of the level of competition it will face in the postseason, the Pandas are not concerned with what their opponents show them. Levandusky is looking for more consistency . The team’s skills are not in question, but the girls cannot rely on talent alone. It will take extra effort to outwork opponents to set

themselves apart from the competition when the games matter most. The Pandas have a blend of veterans and underclassmen and team chemistry is a strength. Senior Olivia Voskuhl has emerged as the team’s leader. Sophomore Haylee Smith has emerged as a strong second scoring option behind Voskuhl. The senior has served as a mentor to the younger Smith. “Olivia has really stepped up in her leadership role,” said Levandusky. The Pandas host Beechwood on Jan. 24.

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JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • A7

SOUTH KENTON

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

United GOP? I don’t think so The Enquirer recently reported that the Northern Kentucky Tea Party and traditional Republican Party have united. I’m skeptical. If true, it would seem to reflect their recognition of their mutual long-term vulnerability following the last election. But I’m still skeptical. Let’s look to the recent past. In 2010 local Republican favorite son Trey Grayson, after having won two statewide elections, was defeated in his bid for the U.S. Senate by Rand Paul, a downstate doctor who had never run for election. The local party establishment was not happy. And from what I hear, many have neither forgotten nor forgiven since. Meanwhile, over the past three year the Northern Kentucky Tea Party has opposed

county library taxes, school taxes, the Area Planning Commission Tax, and somewhat unbelievably, a modest increase in Col Owens water treatCOMMUNITY ment rates to RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST pay for removal of known carcinogens from our drinking water. As I’ve observed to some, these folks seem to have a problem not only with government but with certain fundamental components of our evolving civilization. Except, of course, that they drive on publicly financed roads, in cars that meet government standards, breathe clean air, drink the water, eat

Learn role as global citizen Learning about International Humanitarian Law (IHL) is relevant, meaningful and useful for young people in all societies, regardless of the absence of war or conflict and understanding our roles and what we can do as a citizen is a helpful tool. We currently have the highest percentage of younger generation (those born after 1980) that will shape the future; therefore Dyah Miller helping COMMUNITY them to unRECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST derstand their roles as a global citizen is paramount. The American Red Cross helps the public, especially younger generations, to understand their world through international humanitarian law education, both in and out of classrooms. This year, the Cincinnati Chapter will join seven other chapters nationally to implement the IHL Peer Education Program for young people. The program will run from Feb. 23 through the end of April and consists of three stages: Explore, Address, and Implement. The main training on Feb. 23-24 will be led by Rachele Tardi, senior adviser for peer education from Washington, D.C., who has a wide range of peer education experience with the British Red Cross. The participants, Team Members (ages 13-17) and Team Mentors (ages 18-25), will be working to explore the importance of protecting the rights of people affected by war, address an IHL-related issue, and implement an action project on what they learned from the training. One team will be selected and sponsored

George Huser Drive article confusing

Dyah Miller serves as international services coordinator at the American Red Cross Cincinnati Chapter. Originally from Indonesia, she spent two years as a Rotary World Peace Fellow. To obtain more information about the IHL Peer Education program and applications for both Team Members and Team Mentors, email dyah.miller@redcross.org or call 513-579-3023.

RECORDER

with their fellow citizens. Former U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes – hardly a liberal – said over a century and a half ago that “taxes are the price we pay for civilization.” As local Republican leaders know, especially business and Chamber of Commerce leaders, we all prosper in an economy built on people pursuing their dreams within a framework of reasonable government regulation that protects vital public interests. They know that governmental investments in education, transportation, infrastructure, and jobs and employment supports have been instrumental in supporting our economic development. They know, from experience, that the Tea Party obsession with mini-

malist government is not the pathway to a higher standard of living and quality of life. From all this I conclude that reports of unification, like reports of Mark Twain’s death, are highly exaggerated. Political parties are primarily about winning elections – but they are also, like religious traditions, carriers of culture, in this case our political, social and economic culture. If the Tea Party has captured the Republican Party, many traditional Republicans will not find a compatible home there. So: if you find yourself in that situation, come and talk with us in the Democratic Party. You might be surprised at the comfort level you find. Col Owens is an attorney from Fort Mitchell and chairman of the Kenton County Democratic Party.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

to attend the first National Youth Conference in Washington, D.C., on June 1-2. The participants will also be able to use this experience to fulfill their service learning hours for school. The application deadline for this program is Feb. 1. One of the great emphases of this project will be role playing, which give young people a personal experience to understand an “abstract” concept such as International Humanitarian Law. Role playing helps to put an idea into a humanitarian perspective. It may be harder to understand an idea, but it’s easier when we put a face into the story. One day I am a shopkeeper in Bangkok, Thailand, who risks losing business for protecting a victim of a street violence. Another day I am a Catholic factory worker who went to incredible lengths to save a Jewish stranger from the Nazis in Germany. The next, I am Grace Lorch, a white woman, who risked her life to escort Elizabeth Eckford through the mob in 1954 in front of Little Rock Central High School. Taking on these roles helps us understand the concept of a “bystander” in conflict and war situation. International Humanitarian Law is not only relevant for those working in war situation, actually what happens in the world right now affects us locally. Jelaluddin Rumi, a 14th century Sufi poet said, “Be a lamp, a lifeboat, or a ladder.” The decision is yours.

SOUTH KENTON

FDA approved meat, rely on anti-discrimination and workplace safety laws, participate in Medicare, enroll their children and grandchildren in public schools, obtain government-protected mortgages, invest in government-protected financial institutions and securities exchanges, expect massive government assistance to combat natural disasters, and rely on police and fire professionals, military defense forces, and our justice system to protect them from a myriad of natural and man-made adversities. In other words: they rely on multitudes of government services while maintaining a mental fantasy life in which they are ruggedly independent, reliant on no one, and have little obligation to pay for services they share along

A publication of

I was delighted to finally read something about the plan for the Kyles Lane alignment with George Huser Drive (Long-awaited improvements may come to Kyles Lane, Jan.10). But, what a confusing article! At first it sounds as if the improvement project will be funded by a federal CMAQ grant of $2 million. Then it indicates the money will not be forthcoming for the revised plan because of the new Walgreens and will cost upwards of $20 million. Finally, the article states that the solution is a raised median at George Huser Drive to eliminate left turns from northbound Dixie Highway. What does that have to do with anything? Is there or is there not going to be an alignment of Kyles Lane with George Huser Drive? Maybe the city of Fort Wright could publish a statement as to the actual plan and what we can expect. Evelyn Carney Covington

Heartfelt consideration

In heartfelt consideration for some unfortunate souls who may engage in a home invasion or some other illegal entry into

our home, I plan to purchase a handgun with a 15-shot capacity to allow me to fire off a couple of warning shots before deciding that these individuals truly mean my family harm. If some misinformed advocates have their way though and my magazine options are limited to a 7- to 10-shot capacity, then my first shots by necessity must have the aim of being fatal. This is factual and not political, for I have empathy for those who may feel desperate in their situation and make decisions that they’ll come to regret – and taking a life is something that we can all agree should be the last resort. Unfortunately, opportunists with a long held political agenda will use tragic

U.S. Senators

U.S. House Thomas Massie, Fourth District Washington, D.C., phone: 202-225-3465 Local phone: 859-426-0080

State Representatives Diane St. Onge, District 63 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 701 Website: www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/ h063.htm Thomas Kerr, District 64 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 694 Local phone: 859-431-2222 Website: www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/ h064.htm Email: Thomas.Kerr@lrc.ky.gov Arnold Simpson, District 65 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 695 Local phone: 859-261-6577

Steve Gabbard Crescent Springs

Gun registration

The anti-gunners seem to have forgotten that they had gun registration in Germany in the 1930s. Hitler and his goons took the registration lists and rounded up the guns of all who opposed him effectively disarming his enemies. I believe things would have been a lot different in Nazi Germany if the Jews there had been able to shoot back. Ted Smith Park Hills

ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Monday E-mail: kynews@communitypress.com Fax: 859-283-7285 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

YOUR REPRESENTATIVES Mitch McConnell Washington, D.C., phone: 202-224-2541 Local phone: 859-578-0188 Website: http://mcconnell. asenate.gov. Rand Paul Washington, D.C., phone: 202-224-4343 Local phone: 859-426-0165 Website: http://paul.senate.gov

events to lessen the security of law-abiding citizens and limit our options to defuse a situation.

Website: www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/ h065/htm Email: Arnold.Simpson@ lrc.ky.gov Adam Koenig, District 69 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 ext. 689 Local phone: 859-578-9258 Website: http://www.adamkoenig. com/ Email: Adam.Koenig@lrc.ky.gov

State Senators John Schickel, District 11 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 617 Website: www.lrc.ky.gov/legislator/ s011.htm Email: John.Schickel@lrc.ky.gov Damon Thayer, District 17 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 644 Local phone: 859-621-6956 Website: http://www.lrc.ky. gov/legislator/s017.htm Email: http://www.lrc.ky.gov/ Mailform/S017.htm Chris McDaniel, District 23 Frankfort phone: 502-564-8100 Ext. 615 Website: http://www.lrc.ky. gov/legislator/s023.htm New legislators are asked to send updated contact information to ndaly@nky.com.

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

WHEN THEY MEET Kenton Fiscal Court Meetings: Second Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Independence Court House, 5272 Madison Pike Meetings: Fourth Tuesday at 9 a.m. at Kenton County Courthouse, 303 Court St., Covington Address: 303 Court St., Covington Phone: 859-392-1400 Judge-executive Steve Arlinghaus Commissioner Beth Sewell, First District Commissioner Jon Draud, Second District Commissioner Kris Knochelmann, Third District http://www.kenton county.org

Crescent Springs City Council Meetings: Second Monday at 7 p.m. Address: 739 Buttermilk Pike Phone: 859-341-3017 Mayor: Jim Collett www.crescent-springs. ky.us/

South Kenton Recorder Editor Nancy Daly ndaly@nky.com, 578-1059 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


A8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 24, 2013

LIFE

SOUTH KENTON RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

OPEN MIC EVENT SETS THE STAGE FOR YOUNG PERFORMERS

Scott teens find a place to express themselves By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

TAYLOR MILL — Stage lights splash across a platform set with microphones upstage against a simple black curtain, as teenagers roam the stage talking excitedly or sit and strum a guitar. They’re preparing for Scott High School’s Open Mic Café, an event that starts at 7:30 on select Friday nights and allows students to showcase their performing talents as long as they keep coming up to the microphone. They’ll stay until everyone is done. On the first Open Mic Café of 2013, which is also the second such event for the school year, around 25 students were present when the show opens, but only two were signed up to perform. Before the evening ended, after more than two dozen performances, the crowd’s size had more than doubled. The seats are set up on the stage, as though everyone in attendance is part of the performance. Tables are set downstage with snacks and bottles of water. Student volunteers go through the crowd asking for $2 donations to help support the program before the performances begin. Tommy Steffens’ rendition of The Wiggles’ “Big Red Car” grew enthusiasm among the audience members, who started clapping and singing along, before dramatic readings by Brianna Parsons and Lisa Griffin and an original acoustic guitar song by Russell Toll brought a more somber tone to the evening. Senior Molly Hennessy took turns reading poetry and singing along to her acoustic guitar throughout the evening, while overseeing the event as Drama Club president. “It’s a great way to foster community in the school where there are so many cliques. Not everyone gets a chance to express themselves or feels comfortable doing that,” she said. “I came as a freshman and seeing people per-

Taylor Smith, known by friends as "Tayter," performed stand-up comedy at Scott High School, despite moving to Boone County two years ago. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

form here just blew my mind. It’s a safe environment with no judgment. There’s really nothing else like it.” Adviser and drama teacher Mandy Volpenhein said everyone is invited. She said high school students and alumni from throughout Northern Kentucky have come to perform, and occasionally, teachers show up to read poetry. “This provides an avenue for kids who want to perform, but don’t want to compete at performing. They’re pretty much free to do what they want, and the other students have all been there before, nervous and wondering what everyone will think,” she said. Volpenhein, affectionately known as “V,” also read a vibrant, vivacious verse in honor of her nickname. Performances also included two members of The Yugos, Christian Goughand Jackson Deal, playing “Riverside,” an original song available for download at theyugos.bandcamp.com. Several poetry readings ensued, including an emotional recitation of the alphabet. Standup comedy acts were delivered by Taylor “Tayter” Smith and Justin Hamm. Tayter said she attended Scott before switching to Boone County’s Cooper High School two years ago, but she keeps coming back. “I came before I moved and read poems. I write a lot,” she said. “The first time I was very nervous, but I just got going. I think it’s a lot of fun. Everyone is so nice. No one judges anybody. I think it’s a great atmosphere. It’s awesome. I started doing comedy because I love it and because other people encouraged me.” Much of Tayter’s comedy is situational and reflects on her relationship with her girlfriend and her family. “I’ve been bullied most of my life, and I’m still bullied,” she said. “It’s nice to have a comfortable place to be yourself.”

Senior Russell Toll performed "Fourth Drink Instinct" by Cute is What We Aim For, as well as a couple of original works. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Denzel Hamm, a Woodland Middle student, took the stage during Scott High School's Open Mic Café on Friday, Jan. 11. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Christian Gough and Jackson Deal of The Yugos perform "Riverside" during the Open Mic Café at Scott High School. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Brianna Parsons performs an emotional prose reading. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Scott Senior Molly Hennessy performs at the school's Open Mic Café, an opportunity for current and former students to display their talents. AMY SCALF/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JAN. 25

ice.com. Covington.

Art Exhibits

On Stage - Theater

Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., All six galleries showcase paper art, featuring work of Kristine Donnelly, Mary Gaynier, Travis Graves, Jennifer Grote, Matt Kotlarczyk, Sara Pearce, Margaret Rhein, Carl Schuman, Jonpaul Smith, Allison Svoboda and Roscoe Wilson. Free. 859-9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, 27 W. Seventh St., International art exhibition featuring 12 artists from Cincinnati, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, Italy and Switzerland. Local artists Kim Burgas, Jeffrey CortlandJones, John Humphries and Sheida Soleimani participated at request of curator Cate Yellig. Benefits OMID USA. Free. Through Feb. 16. 859-292-2322; www.omid-usa.org. Covington.

Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Bingo, 12:30-3 p.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Through Oct. 8. 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 5-6 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, 519 Enterprise Drive, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Kentucky was a Mason-Dixon state with an idealistic but unrealistic goal of neutrality. Learn how this had a far-reaching impact, tearing families and communities apart. Through Feb. 17. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Concerts Frazzle Town, 8 p.m. Music by Sassafraz, Magic Jackson, Hellnaw, Aliver Hall and LZRPNY., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Music and arts festival. $10. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Exhibits Kevin Fox will perform 10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 25, at Strasse Haus, 630 Main St., Covington. Admission is free. For more information, call 859-261-1199. FILE PHOTO three sushi rolls, BYOB and recipe/product information. $25. Reservations required. 513-3350297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington. Tapas and Wine Cooking Class, 2-4 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Learn secrets of preparing tapas and pairing them with appropriate wine. Ages 21 and up. $25. Registration required. 859-4261042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills. Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m.; 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits

New Sleepcat Band, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy

Health / Wellness

Live Bait Comedy, 9 p.m. With comedians Ray Price, Andy Scott, Kristy Ashley, Russell O’Doyle, Keith Sowder, Zach Hale, Angelo Catanzaro, Tom Young and Gene Sell., Mahogany’s Coffee House and Bar, 3715 Winston Ave., $5. 859-314-9543; www.mahoganyslive.com. Latonia.

New Year, New You Group, 10-11:30 a.m., Latonia Baptist Church, 38th and Church streets, Fellowship Hall. Encouragement and guidance for success from professional counselor using proven strategy for change. Ages 18 and up. $15 per session. Presented by Kordenbrock Christian Counseling. 859-4687534. Covington.

On Stage - Theater

Karaoke and Open Mic Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl, 510 Commonwealth Ave., Drink specials: $12 buckets, $3 domestics and $2 jello shots. With DJ Matt V and DJ Love MD. Free. 859-727-2000. Erlanger.

Music - Jazz

SATURDAY, JAN. 26

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington. Karl Dappen on Sax, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Art Exhibits

Music - Rock

Pulp Art, noon-3 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Madison Theater Band Challenge, 7 p.m. Round 2. With Death Of A Poet, Eyes On Tomorrow, Kill Box, the Dugongs, the Newt, the String Theory and We Are As Ronin., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., $10. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Canasta, 9 a.m.-noon, Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Through March 1. 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

Auditions American Girl Fashion Show Model Auditions, 9-11:30 a.m., Kerry Toyota, 6050 Hopeful Church Road, More than 350 local girls ages 4-13 needed to present historical and contemporary fashions to celebrate being an American Girl as part of American Girl Fashion Show April 26-28 at Music Hall. Free. Presented by Aubrey Rose Hollenkamp Children’s Trust Foundation. 513-265-5801; www.aubreyrose.org/americangirlshow. Florence.

Cooking Classes Sushi Rolling and Dining Experience, 7:30 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 20 W. Pike St., Includes training, choice of at least

To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Exercise Classes

Music - Jazz

Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., In the magical age of Merlin and the Round Table, Arthur and Guenevere preside over tranquil Camelot until bold Sir Lancelot and the queen succumb to a romance. $19-$28. Through Feb. 3. 859-957-3456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

ABOUT CALENDAR

Nature Lecture and Observatory Open House, 7 p.m., Thomas More College Bank of Kentucky Observatory, 333 Thomas More Pkwy., Dr. Wes Ryle, physics assistant professor, presents a brief introduction and lecture "So Far from Home: The Voyager and Pioneer Probes" in Steigerwald Hall. Move to observatory and gaze at the stars, moon and Jupiter through telescopes. Weather permitting. Free. Presented by Thomas More College. 859-341-5800; www.thomasmore.edu/observatory. Crestview Hills.

Camelot in Concert will be performed now through Feb. 3, at Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Covington. Tickets cost $19 to $28. For more information, call 859-957-3456. Pictured are performers Doug Carpenter, Mark Hardy and Danielle Knox. THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

SUNDAY, JAN. 27 Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30 a.m.-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 1-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Acoustic Kevin Fox, 10 p.m., Strasse Haus, 630 Main St., Free. 859-261-1199. Covington.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 3 p.m.; 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-957-3456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Special Events Cincinnati Entertainment Awards, 7 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., Cincinnati’s only annual local music celebration. Standing only on the main floor. VIP information and performances TBA. Benefits Cincinnati USA Music Heritage Foundation. $20. 859-491-2444; www.cincyticket.com. Covington.

Friends of Peaselburg Neighborhood Association Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington, 1650 Russell St., Residents and business owners encouraged to attend meetings and get involved in discussing new ideas and concerns in our neighborhood. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Friends of Peaselburg Neighborhood Association. Through Nov. 25. 859-468-4177; peaselburg.org. Covington.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m.; 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-3317778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Get Started with Gym and Tom’s Monday Morning Exercise Class, 10-11 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., 859-727-2306. Elsmere.

TUESDAY, JAN. 29 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

MONDAY, JAN. 28

Community Dance

Art Exhibits

Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Civic

Discover new techniques to remember and tell stories of your life journey thus far. Bring pens and sense of adventure. Appropriate for adults of any writing level and both new and returning students. $120. Reservations required. Presented by Extraordinary Lives. 859-4310020; www.extraordinarylives.com. Covington. Northern Kentucky Arborist, Landscaper and Nursery Worker Seminar, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Boone County Cooperative Extension Service, 6028 Camp Ernst Road, Many different speakers and classes. $5. Reservations required, admission due by Jan. 24. Presented by Boone County Cooperative Extenson Service. 859586-6101; www.ca.uky.edu/ boone. Burlington. Human Services Education Info Session, noon 5:30 p.m., Gateway Community and Technical College Urban Center, 525 Scott Blvd., Info session on admissions to Gateway’s new Human Services associate in applied science degree. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College. 859-441-4500. Covington.

Exercise Classes Zumba Class, 6-7 p.m., Edgewood Senior Center, 550 Freedom Park Drive, Exotic rhythms set to high-energy Latin and international beats. $5. Presented by Zumba with Gabrielle. 513-702-4776. Edgewood. Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, 3230 Turkey Foot Road, Exotic rhythms set to high-energy Latin and international beats. All fitness levels welcome. $5. Presented by Zumba with Gabrielle. 513-702-4776. Edgewood. Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30.-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Education

Music - Jazz

Life Story Workshop, 10 a.m.noon, Baker Hunt Art and Cultural Center, 620 Greenup St.,

Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Pianist. 859-261-2365; www.deefel-

Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

High School Sports Covington Catholic Athletic Hall of Fame Induction, 6 p.m., Gardens of Park Hills, 1622 Dixie Highway, Inducting Tim Grogan ’02, Jarod Kees ’98, Ben Schreiber ’97 and Dennis Walsh. Dinner and ceremony at 7 p.m. Ages 18 and up. $30. Reservations required. Presented by Covington Catholic High School. 859-491-2247; covcath.org. Park Hills.

Music - Jazz Mike Darrah, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 859-261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington.

On Stage - Theater Camelot in Concert, 7:30 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, $19-$28. 859-9573456; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

THURSDAY, JAN. 31 Art Exhibits Pulp Art, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, Free. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington. Domino 02: Aqua, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., Artisans Enterprise Center, Free. 859-292-2322; www.omidusa.org. Covington.

Exercise Classes Yoga, 6 p.m., Scheben Branch Library, 8899 U.S. 42, Basic/ beginner yoga practice offers holistic approach to maintaining healthy weight with increased flexibility, more stamina and lean muscle. Bring mat. All levels. $25 per month. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. Through Feb. 28. 859-334-2117. Union. Zumba Class, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Turkey Foot Middle School, $5. 513-702-4776. Edgewood. Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; 4:30-5:30 p.m.; 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs. Inner GLOW Yoga, 5:30-6:30 p.m.; 6:45-7:45 p.m., Glow Gallery Studio, 264 W. Pike St., Faith-based yoga movement class uses breath to guide from one posture to the next while surrounded by artwork in contemporary art gallery space. $10. 513-295-5226; www.facebook.com/NickisYogaRoom. Covington.

Exhibits Divided We Stood: Northern Kentucky in the Civil War, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington.

Music - Acoustic Bob Cushing, 8 p.m., Happy Days Taven, 801 Bakewell St., Presented by Happy Days Tavern. 859-261-6607. Covington.


LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B3

Comfort foods offers quick, easy meals For the past several days, I’ve been testing recipes for classic stews, including chicken fricassee and beef bourguignon. I’m in the tweaking stage for a beef stew that has an olive butter swirl in it. When it gets to the “oh my gosh this is perfect” Rita stage, I’ll Heikenfeld be one RITA’S KITCHEN happy cook. Meanwhile, your requests have been for anything but long-cooking, gourmet food. I agree it’s good to have meals that are quick, appealing and not budget-busting. Here’s some to try.

Quick sloppy Joes

For the mom who wanted to make a barbecue-type sandwich for her preschooler but didn’t want something

real spicy. This freezes well. This is good on slider buns topped with slaw for Super Bowl parties as well. Or put in a fondue pot and serve with Frito scoops or tortilla chips.

1 pound lean ground beef 1 ⁄4 cup diced onion or more to taste 1 diced bell pepper (optional) 12 oz. bottle chili sauce Brown sugar to taste: Start with 3 tablespoons and go from there

Sauté beef, onion and bell pepper until beef is cooked. Add remaining ingredients. Bring to a gentle boil, lower to a simmer for a few minutes.

Ellen’s orzo-roni

Ellen Mueller is my Greek cooking buddy at Jungle Jim’s. We teach Lebanese/Greek menus together and joke that our moms and aunts are up in heaven arguing about whose food is bet-

broth 3 tablespoons chopped parsley Salt and pepper to taste

Rita’s blender banana bread uses banana puree. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD.

ter. Here’s a comforting pasta dish that Ellen says her girls, Maggie and Alex, ask for on a regular basis. “Better than the boxed stuff,” she told me. Orzo is rice-shaped pasta sometimes called rosemarina. 1 ⁄4 cup butter 1 small onion, finely diced 1 garlic clove, minced 4 oz. sliced cremini mushrooms 1 cup orzo 4 oz. spaghetti broken into thirds 4 cups low sodium chicken

Melt butter in skillet. Add onion and sauté until translucent. Add garlic and cook another minute. Add mushrooms and cook until soft and juices have released. Add orzo and spaghetti and coat well with butter. Add broth, stir, bring to boil. Cover and reduce to simmer. Simmer 15 minutes or until most of liquid is absorbed. Add parsley and season. Ellen says it will be a little saucy, which is what you want.

Blender banana bread

This is the most moist and delicious banana bread I’ve made in a long time. I have a “tastes like Bob Evans” banana bread recipe on my blog (Cincinnati.Com/blogs) that uses half as much butter as oil, along with

buttermilk, and that’s a good one, too. The one thing I will tell you, though, is for any banana bread to taste good, the bananas have to be really ripe, like black-speckled ripe, for the bread to have a good, sweet banana flavor. If you don’t have a blender, you can do this by hand.

3 very ripe bananas whirled in blender to make 1 cup puree 1 cup vegetable oil 2 large eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla 11⁄2 cups flour 1 cup sugar 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 ⁄2 teaspoon salt 1 cup walnuts, chopped in blender (optional) Little bit of sugar for sprinkling on top (optional)

Brush a loaf pan with soft butter or spray with cooking spray. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. To puree in blender add oil, eggs and vanilla. Whirl until blended. Whisk

flour, sugar, soda, salt and nuts together in bowl. Pour banana mixture over dry ingredients and mix just until blended. Don’t over mix. Pour into pan, sprinkle with extra sugar, and bake 45 minutes or so until center springs back when lightly pressed. Cool on rack a few minutes before removing from pan.

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Refrigerate or freeze ripe bananas! The skin will turn black, but inside will be creamy yellow. Mix nuts with flour mixture so they stay suspended in your baked goods and don’t sink to the bottom.

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

One-stop women’s cancer screening available Community Recorder

If it’s time for a mammogram and annual exam, then you may be able to save time by getting both on the same day with the Prevention Pays women’s cancer screening program. Screenings are scheduled at each of the Northern Kentucky Health Department’s county health

centers. The program is coordinated by the Northern Kentucky Health Department and the Northern Kentucky Women’s Cancer Coalition. On the designated screening days, eligible women will be able to have an annual exam, including a pap smear, pelvic exam and clinical breast exam performed by a nurse practitioner, as well as re-

ceive a mammogram in the mobile mammography unit from St. Elizabeth, which will be parked outside the health center. To be eligible for the screening, women must be Kentucky residents between the ages of 40 and 64, have an income below 250 percent of the federal poverty guidelines (currently $27,225 annually for a single-person house-

hold and $55,875 annually for a four-person household), and not be enrolled in a private health insurance plan, Medicare or Medicaid. Appointments are required for the screenings, and women are asked to schedule their appointments in advance. The dates, locations and hours are as follows: » 8:30-11:30 a.m. Fri-

days, Jan. 25 and July 26, at the Kenton County Health Center, 2002 Madison Ave., Covington; 859431-3345. » 8:30-11:30 a.m. Fridays, Feb. 15 and Aug. 2, at the Boone County Health Center, 7505 Burlington Pike, Florence; 859-3632060. » 8:30-11:30 a.m. Fridays, March1and Sept.13, at the Grant County

Health Center, 234 Barnes Road, Williamstown; 859824-5074. » 8:30-11:30 a.m. Fridays, May 3 and Nov. 8, at the Campbell County Health Center, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, Ky.; 859-431-1704. For more information on the Prevention Pays screening days , call 859341-4264.

SCORE A BIG WIN WITH YOUR FAMILY Wear your favorite team attire and check out free Super Bowl Saturday fun at all participating neighborhood YMCA of Greater Cincinnati branches on Saturday, January 26, 2013 in Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. Check out numerous programs for kids and adults, along withsummercampandchildcareopportunities.Bringyour workout clothes; try out the latest fitness equipment and group exercise classes, or pack your swimsuit and relax in one of our refreshing indoor pools.

WE DECLARE

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LIFE

B4 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

So, you want to work? Oats good for heart,

In the last month’s column, I indicated that there would be three in this series dealing with the excess amount of time that we have when we retire. The first article dealt with the benefits of volunteerism and suggested volunteer opportunities. This column deals with that four letter word: W-OR-K! What if, as so many of us were, Ken Rechtin COMMUNITY PRESS you were “right GUEST COLUMNIST sized” into retirement in the middle of this recession? What if your boss appeared at your door late on a Friday afternoon in August of 2010 and said: “Goodbye, we no longer need you until after this recession.”? You know that you are

COMMUNITY CHURCHES

Open Door Community Church 3528 Turkeyfoot Rd. Erlanger, KY 41018 (859) 341-8850 • www.ODKY.org

Service Times

Sunday: 10:30am • Wednesday: 6:30pm

the high cost employee. It isn’t your fault, it is just that you have been with the company longer than the others and have risen to the highest pay. So, the highest paid is first to go! You want and need, however, to work? Maybe work is a real financial need, maybe it is an emotional need; but it is a real need for many of us. A small task force made up of seven dedicated representatives of business, not-for-profits and government has been meeting on a regular basis since January 2012 to learn more about this employment issue and begin addressing it. The group has asked unemployed 55+ers their viewpoint. Here are some of the things that they told us: “I am too old. Nobody wants or needs my skills. I haven’t been in the marketplace for employment since I finished college, high school or community college. My resume’ is 20 years old. I really don’t know how to go about reentering the workforce.” From business focus groups, we learned that their perception (and perception is reality) is: “You are too old, too set in your ways, not knowledgeable about technology, prone to illness and disease. You cost too much! Or, if you do come to work for me, then you will jump ship for a better paid position if one presents itself.” The need is real. There are numerous examples of 55+ individ-

uals who find themselves in this position. The perception the employer has of us is real. So what can be done about this? The Task Force hopes to match employers’ needs with potential employees’ skills, resulting in a winwin for each group. The niche employee group represents mature (55+), committed, motivated and experienced men and women who want to contribute to society as active members of the workforce. Their interest may be in job sharing, part-time, seasonal, project based or full-time employment. The Task Force continues to move forward in development of strategies to address this need. As programs are developed, more information on the actions of the Task Force will follow. Interested in becoming involved as a potential 55+ employer or are you 55+ and want to reenter the workforce? Call Ken Rechtin at Senior Services at 859-292-7971. If you find this article helpful and have suggestions about other topics, let me know. I can be reached at 859-292-7971, or email me at krechtin@seniorservicesnky.org. Or write to me at Senior Services of Northern Kentucky, 1032 Madison Ave., Covington, Kentucky 41011. Ken Rechtin is the interim executive director of Senior Services of Northern Kentucky.

body and wallet

January is National Oatmeal Month. Some sources say Americans eat more oatmeal in January than any other month of the year. Oats are a great, inexpensive and nutritious addition to any eating plan. Diane They can Mason be cooked EXTENSION NOTES for a breakfast cereal, added to entrees, and included in desserts, breads, and appetizers. When shopping for oats, there are many choices. You may find rolled oats, quick-cooking oats, instant oatmeal, steel cut, or pin oats on the shelves. The advantage is that all are whole-grain choices. They just take different amounts of time to cook. Steel cut oats, pin oats, Scotch and Irish oats are all similar. They are the whole oat groat cut into smaller pieces for easier cooking. Rolled oats, quick cooking oats, and instant oats are all similar because they have been steamed and rolled flat. Quick cooking oats have been cut into small pieces. In-

Oats contain a type of fiber called beta-glucan that can help remove cholesterol from your body. Eating foods high in some kinds of fiber can actually help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. FILE PHOTO

dry oats is equivalent to a one-ounce grain portion for MyPlate guidelines. They are easy and quick to prepare in the microwave or on the stove top. Steel cut oats take longer to prepare but there are many recipes for use with a slow cooker. Soaking steel cut oats for several hours or overnight will also shorten the cooking time. Plan to enjoy a bowl of hot oatmeal as we finish out the month and consider ways you can add oats to your family meal plans more often in the coming year. Your heart, body, and wallet may just thank you.

stant oats are cut into even smaller pieces than quick oats. Instant oats often have added sugar, salt, and flavoring adding to their cost and affecting their nutritional profile. Oats contain a type of fiber called betaglucan that can help remove cholesterol from your body. Eating foods high in some kinds of fiber can actually help reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Oats have also been shown to decrease the risk of type II diabetes because the fiber can help stabilize blood sugar. Oats are a good source of B vitamins and other important minerals. They also are a good source of carbohydrates that provide energy to our bodies. One-fourth cup of

Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B5

DEATHS Charles Beckett Charles Tildon Beckett, 81, of Florence, died Jan. 9, 2013. A member of the Transportation Workers Union, he was a retired fleet service man for American Airlines and a member of the First Church of Christ in Burlington. His wife, Donna Rose Raisor Beckett, also died Jan. 9, 2013. Survivors include his daughter, Tanya Brashear; sister, Icealene Blake of Covington; and two grandchildren. Burial was in the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery, North in Williamstown. Memorials: First Church of Christ, Burlington, KY 41008.

Donna Beckett Donna Rose Raisor Beckett, 73, of Florence, died Jan. 9, 2013. She was a member of the First Church of Christ in Burlington and a former secretary for several finance companies. Her husband, Charles Tildon Beckett, also died Jan. 9, 2013. A brother, J.B. Raisor, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Tanya Brashear of Fort Myers, Fla.; two grandchildren;

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com. sisters, Norma Baxter of Dry Ridge, Doris Robb and Betty Magee, both of Florence, and Judy Wainscott of Holbrook; and brother, Ronald Raisor of Florence. Burial was in Kentucky Veterans Cemetery, North in Williamstown. Memorials: First Church of Christ, Burlington, KY 41008.

Her husband, John W. Bott, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Jacqueline B. Van Houten of Villa Hills, and two grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Villa Madonna Academy, 2500 Amsterdam Road, Villa Hills, KY 41017.

Elvera Bott

Rose Marie Brummer

Elvera Mae Gausepohl Bott, 93, of Villa Hills, died Jan. 14, 2013, at Rosedale Green Care Center in Latonia. She had retired from retail sales with Gus Meyer in Louisville, was a member of St. Joseph Church in Crescent Springs and Happy Timers with St. Joseph Church, and a 1935 graduate of LaSalette Academy.

Rose Marie Brummer, 85, died Jan. 9, 2013, at Florence Park Care Center. Her husband, William Brummer, and a sister, Naomi Dickman, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Drew Brummer of Villa Hills, William Brummer of Dry Ridge and Jon Brummer of Florence; daughters, Elizabeth Schira of

Cheviot and Christine Brummer of Elsmere; sister, Jeanine Dietz of Erlanger; brothers, Ronald Studer of Hebron and Richard Studer of Villa Hills; 12 grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: American Cancer Society.

Jeanette Carol Rummel Bush, 73, of Taylor Mill, formerly of Erlanger, died Jan. 11, 2013, at the Baptist Convalescent Center of Newport. She was a sales clerk for Woolworth’s, managed rental properties with her husband and was a member of Oakridge Baptist Church. Her husband, Elbert, died previously. Survivors include her sister-inlaw, Mary Belle Bush of Independence, and many nieces and nephews. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Garden in Taylor Mill. Memorials: Jeanette Bush, Chambers and Grubbs Funeral Home, 11382 Madison Pike, Independence, KY 41051.

Robert Brunst Robert H. Brunst, 91, of Edgewood, died Jan. 13, 2013, at the Baptist Village Care Center in Erlanger. He was a Navy veteran of World War II and life member of Immanuel United Methodist Church, serving on various boards of the church. He retired as a mechanical engineer for the University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children’s Hospital. Survivors include his wife, Barbara Eunice Riggs Brunst; a nephew; and several greatnieces and -nephews. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park Mausoleum in Erlanger. Memorials: Immanuel United Methodist, 2551 Dixie Highway, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Mary Carstens Mary Margaret Carstens, 92, of Fort Mitchell, died Jan. 7,

Arrests/citations Nathan W. Martin, 27, 15630 Carlisle Rd., criminal trespassing at 884 Regal Ridge Rd., Jan. 7. Michael D. Kurtz, 29, 4222 Arbor Ct., executed Kenton County warrant at 4222 Arbor Ct., Jan. 6. Tony P. Reinhart, 30, Unknown, criminal trespassing at 4041 Turkeyfoot Rd., Jan. 5. David P. Thompson, 44, 9034 Supreme Ct., public drunkenness at Supreme Ct., Jan. 3. Hayley E. Stewart, 19, 6360 Pembroke Dr., criminal trespassing at 4262 Aspen Dr. #11, Jan. 6. Branden L. Faulkner, 27, 106 Harlan St. #2, executed Kenton

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ABOUT POLICE REPORTS

Incidents/investigations

The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. County warrant, executed Grant County warrant, driving on suspended license at 6357 Taylor Mill Rd., Jan. 4. Joshua Abney, 26, Unknown, executing Franklin County parole warrant at 6357 Taylor

Burglary Television and guitar stolen at 4231 Briarwood Dr. #2, Jan. 8. Credit card fraud Card used for unauthorized purchase at 5266 Pioneer Dr., Jan. 10. Criminal mischief, theft CDs stolen and truck damaged at 4260 Aspen Dr., Jan. 12. Robbery Jewelry and $1,500 cash taken at 10398 Calvary Rd., Jan. 14. Theft Ring and other jewelry stolen at 3935 Richardson Rd. #12, Jan. 13. Air compressor stolen at 10312 Charleston Ln., Jan. 10.

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Incidents/investigations Burglary Television stolen at 709 Sharon Dr., Jan. 11. Television stolen at 710 Rosewood Dr. #67, Jan. 12. Theft by deception Fake check cashed at 4802 Taylor Mill Rd., Jan. 10.

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2013, at Doverwood Village in Fairfield Township, Ohio. She was a homemaker, had an English degree from the University of Cincinnati, taught grapho-analysis and was a member of St. Agnes Church in Fort Wright. Her husband, Roy Carstens; brothers, Tom and Robert Schlinkert; and sister, Dorothy Corbett, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Gary Carstens of Argyle, N.Y., Greg Carstens of Edgewood and Glenn Carstens of Fox Lake, Ill.; daughter, Gail Stocker of West Chester; seven grandchildren; and 10 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Mother of God Cemetery in Fort Wright. Memorials: Doverwood Village Social Committee, Pam Martinkovick, 4195 Hamilton-

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LIFE

B6 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B5 Mason Road, Fairfield Township, OH 45011.

70th Anniversary

Olan Cheesman Olan Layne Cheesman, 81, of Walton, died Jan. 14, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Florence. He was a retired manager for Walton Lumber Co., served in the Army, and was a member of Walton Christian Church and the Walton Masonic Lodge. He enjoyed playing and coaching basketball, baseball, and softball, and was recruited for Berea College’s basketball teams. Survivors include his wife, Coreta F. Rice Cheesman; daughters, Layna Feagan of Verona, Dayna Mohammadione of Toledo, Ohio, Jayna Cheesman of Lexington, Mary Ganzel of Albany, Ga.; son, Callen Cheesman of Verona; brother, Richard Cheesman Jr. of Latonia; sisters, Lois Piercefield of Latonia and Imogene Bradley of Louisville; six grandchildren; and a greatgrandchild. Interment was at Richwood Cemetery. Memorials: Walton Christian Church.

West-Marro

Harry Lee and Almeda Rea of Florence, KY celebrated 70 years of marriage on Saturday January 19th, with their children, Maid of Honor Rae M. Beasley, sister of the Bride, and brother of the Groom, Robert and Pat Rea, at Jewels on Main Restaurant in Warsaw, Kentucky. Harry Lee married the former Almeda Mangold on January 23, 1943 in Warsaw, Kentucky. Harry Lee was originally a farmer, but retired after many years in Management as the Superintendent of the Building and Track Maintenance at Latonia/ Turfway Race Course. During the early years of their marriage Almeda was a homemaker, she also retired from Latonia/ Turfway as Director of Admissions. They have 5 children: Nancy Ann (Hugh) Boden, Howard, Mary Elaine (Robert) McCurdy, Dennis (JoeAnn) and Linda (Harry) Snyder, 11 grandchildren, 15 great grandchildren and 2 great great grandchildren.

Mr. & Mrs. Frank Marro of Indep,KY announce the engagement of their daughter, Malina Marro, to William West son of Bertha Tolle of Florence and Eric West of Morning View. The future bride is currently studying English Edu. at NKU. The future groom will graduate in August with his associates degree in business management. Both are managers at local businesses. The wedding will be in September this year.

Joe Crouch Joe Eddie Crouch, 62, of Burlington, died Jan. 10, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He was a retired certified electrician for Duke Energy and supported veterans through his membership in the Sons of the American Legion. Survivors include his wife,

In Memoriam LAPILLE

Martha M. LaPille, nee Beumer b. 2/4/33 d. 1/11/97. TRULY LOVED AND MISSED by her family and friends EVERYDAY and on Feb.4th which would have been her 80th Birthday

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Janet of Burlington; daughters, Marie Hardin of Independence, Beth Hite of Rabbit Hash and Jodi Griffith of Graham, Wash.; brother, Jerry Lee Crouch of Independence; sisters, Sue Powell of Independence and Cynthia Crouch of Covington; and 17 grandchildren. The body was cremated. Memorials: The Joe Crouch Memorial Fund, c/o Heritage Bank.

Linville Eades

ters, Anita Scharfenberger of California and Lisa D. Ellis of Melbourne; son, Ron Ellis of Lakeside Park; three grandchildren; three great-grandchildren; and three great-greatgrandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Lucille Haskell Lucille, “Ceil” Scherder Haskell, 91, died Jan. 11, 2013, at Madonna Manor Nursing Facility in Villa Hills. She volunteered for 4-H, the Queens Service, and the Bereavement Committee of Mary Queen of Heaven Church. Her husband, Paul Haskell; brothers, Gerald Scherder and Harry Scherder; and sisters, Rita Disken and Dorothy Schneider, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Allan Haskell of Edgewood and Louis Haskell of Dublin, Ohio; daughter, Linda Cox of Washington Courthouse, Ohio; six grandchildren; and five greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Mary Queen of Heaven Church or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Gustav Gebhard

Linville “Pete” Eades, 89, of Florence died Jan. 12, 2013, at Emeritus of Edgewood. He and his wife were the owners and operators of Pete & Libby’s Gift and Ceramics of Florence. He was a member and deacon of Florence Christian Church and an Army veteran of World War II. His wife, Libby Eades; a daughter, Rebecca Ruth Vanderpool; three brothers, Edward Eades, Walter Eades and Omer Eades; and sisters, Nancy Clark and Nel Johnson, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Mary Cecil Easterday of Columbus, Lelia Katherine Bates of Warsaw, Barbara June “Bobby” Beckner of Lexington; brothers Eugene Eades and Cecil Eades, both of Florence, and Earl Eades of Erlanger; 11 grandchildren; 29 great-grandchildren; and many great-greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Warsaw Cemetery. Memorials: donor’s choice.

Gustav J. Gebhard, 91, died Jan. 10, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a sales manager and service representative for Scothorn Motor Co., a member of Ralph Fulton Veterans of Foreign Wars Post, a Kentucky Colonel, a lifetime member of the Erlanger Volunteer Fire Department, a retired auxiliary for the Erlanger Police Department, and a member of the Kentucky Sheriff’s Boys and Girls Ranch. His wife, Thelma Gebhardl; a daughter, Nancy Roenker; and sister, Mary Nuxoll, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Melanie Brummer of Villa Hills; four grandchildren; six great-grandchildren and a great-great-grandchild. Memorials: St. Henry District High School, 3755 Scheben Drive, Erlanger, KY 41018; St. Elizabeth Hospital, 1 Medical Village Drive Edgewood, KY 41017; or St. Elizabeth Hospice 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Mary Ellis

Linda Gilb

Mary Cecilia Ellis, 84, of Covington, died Jan. 15, 2013, at Madonna Manor Nursing Home in Villa Hills. She worked as a secretary with C&O Railroad, Wadsworth Electric and Owens Corning and Fiberglass, enjoyed gardening, and was a member of Holy Cross Parish in Latonia and Mother of God Parish in Covington. Her husband, George E. Ellis, and daughter, Beverly Fowee, died previously. Survivors include her daugh-

Linda L. Gilb, 64, of Alexandria, died Jan. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a manager for Frisch’s in Fort Thomas. Survivors include her daughters, Heather Stephens of Alexandria, Candy Covey of Falmouth and Angie Saylor of Fort Thomas; son, Chris Gilb of Independence; sisters, Connie Hernandez of Lake Forest, Calif., and Jan Cuevas of Anaheim, Calif.; brother, Lloyd Durham of Bellevue; and 10 grandchildren.

Margaret Johnson Margaret Louise Conrad Curd Webb Johnson, 86, of Erlanger, died Jan. 3, 2013, at Woodcrest Manor in Elsmere. Her husband, Willie C. Johnson, and sisters, Ruth Gentry and Clara Lee Thaman, died previously. She was a homemaker and volunteer at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her sons, Steve Johnson of West Chester and Scott Johnson of Fort Thomas; eight grandchildren; six great-grandchildren; half sisters, Joyce Whitney, Brenda Roland and Geneva Whaley. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Suite 1026, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Gwendolyn Koors Gwendolyn Jean Koors, 71, of Covington, died Jan. 11, 2013, at St Elizabeth Edgewood. She was home maker and volunteer at Prince of Peace

See DEATHS, Page B7

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LIFE

JANUARY 24, 2013 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • B7

DEATHS Continued from Page B6 School. Her husband, Ralph “Pud” Koors, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Sue Ann Koors and Barbara Holbrook, both of Covington; four grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren.

Ambrose Kramer Ambrose “Jake” Kramer, 77, of Crestview Hills, died Jan. 12, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a retired employee of Owens and Minor, where he worked in shipping and receiving. He served in the Army, and enjoyed gardening and sports, especially the Cincinnati Reds. Survivors include his wife, Margaret Kramer; daughter, Jenny Farrell; brother, Bernie Kramer; sisters, Sister Rose Magdalene and Sister Agnes Clare, both of Congregation of Divine Providence; and four grandchildren. Burial was at St. Johns Cemetery. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45227; Congregation of Providence, 5300 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059; or the Kramer Family Trust for his grandchildren.

Betty Kruempelman Betty Ann Kruempelman, 81, of Lakeside Park, died Jan. 11, 2013, at St Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired worker for the Kenton County Property Valuation Administrator office, and enjoyed cooking, reading, decorating and shopping. Her sisters, Jean and Gloria, died previously. Survivors include her husband, George “Bud” Kruempelman, and son, Jeff and Maribeth Kruempelman. Interment was at St. John Cemetery. Memorials: The Parish Kitchen, 141 West Pike St., Covington, KY 41011 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

William Lantz

William C. “Bill” Lantz, 86, of Fort Thomas, died Jan. 1, 2013, at his residence. He was a Navy veteran of World War II and a retired office manager with Fechheimer Brothers Co. He was a sports fan, and enjoyed the Reds, Bengals and University of Kentucky. He was lifelong member of St. Thomas Church. Survivors include his sister, Betty Jane Scherrer of Fort Thomas; a nephew; a niece, two great-nephews; a great-niece; and a great-great-nephew and -niece. Burial was at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Thomas Church Building Fund, 26 E. Villa Place, Fort Thomas, KY 41075.

Thelma Lee Thelma M. Lee, 85, of Crescent Springs, died Jan. 12, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired tax examiner for the Internal Revenue Service, and a volunteer for Girl Scouts, St. Elizabeth and Welcome House. Her husband, Wilbur Lee, and infant brother, Richard Rehkamp, died previously. Survivors include her son, James Lee of Fort Mitchell; daughters, Margaret Smith of Worthington, Ohio and Patricia Lee of Crescent Springs; a grandchild; and two great-grandchildren. Burial was at Mother of God Cemetery. Memorial: St. Henry Catholic Church, 3813 Dixie Hwy., Erlanger, KY 41018; St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017; or Welcome House, 205 Pike St., Covington, KY 41011.

Viola Martin Viola Martin, 96, of Taylor Mill, formerly of Dundee, Fla., died Jan. 12, 2013, at her residence. She was a member of Community Family Church in Independence, and as a resident of Florida owned a fishing camp on Lake Pierce and taught Sunday school.

Her husband, Conrad Martin; three sisters, Georgia, Euna and Lona; and a brother, Bill, died previously. Survivors include her brother, Charles R. Carpenter of Walton; sister, Ruth Evelyn Treadway of Mesquite, Texas; 10 nieces; and four nephews. Interment was at Floral Hills Cemetery. Memorials: Community Family Church.

Eleanora Miller Eleanora L. Miller, 97 of Erlanger, died Jan. 2, 2013. She was a homemaker and member of Fort Mitchell Baptist Church. Her husband, Earl Brent Miller Jr., died previously. Survivors include her sons, Richard Miller and Wayne Miller; daughter, Bobbi Chatham; nine grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Mausoleum in Erlanger. Memorials: Fort Mitchell Baptist Church.

Myrna Mills Myrna Loy Mills, 75, of Covington, died Jan. 8, 2013, at St Elizabeth Edgewood. Survivors include her children, Rhonda Mills, Ronald Mills and John Mills; four grandchildren; four great-grandchildren; and brother, John Knebel of Cincinnati. The body was donated to University of Cincinnati College of Medicine.

Kathryn Moffitt Kathryn Moffitt, 84, of Edgewood, died Jan. 14, 2013, at Rosedale Green in Covington. She was a retired secretary for Doxol Gas Co. and a member of Saints Boniface and James Church in Ludlow. Her son, Daniel Moffitt, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Michael Moffitt and Robert Moffitt, both of Fort Wright; daughter, Peggy Brooks of Crestview Hills; four grand-

See DEATHS, Page B8

CE-0000541823

CE-0000536059


LIFE

B8 • SOUTH KENTON RECORDER • JANUARY 24, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B7

the Veteran Affairs Hospitals in Cincinnati and Huntington, W.V. She was a member of St. Pius X Church in Edgewood and Catholic Daughters of America. Her husband, John W. Murray; two brothers, Charles and Carl Bess; and sister, Veda Stern, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Gail Darpel of Edgewood; son, Geo William “Bill” Murray of Alexandria; brother, James Bess of Fayetteville, W.V.; 14

children; and a great-grandchild. Interment was at St. Mary’s Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

Ila Murray Ila Bess “Nonny” Murray, 94, of Edgewood, died Jan. 14, 2013, at Elmcroft of Florence. She was a retired registered nurse for the American Red Cross and worked as a nurse for

grandchildren, 37 great-grandchildren; and a great-great grandchild. Interment was at Ridgelawn Memorial Park in Huntington. Memorials: Catholic Charities, 3629 Church St., Latonia, KY, 41015.

Odessa Phelps Odessa Phelps, 66, of Erlanger, died Jan. 11, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a retired executive

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Alexandria, Va., Peggy Young of Fort Wright; eight grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren; and five great-great-grandchildren. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park.

secretary for the Drawbridge Inn and Deters & Bros. She enjoyed the outdoors, camping, gardening and animals. Survivors include her husband, James E. “Jim” Phelps; daughter, Greta Kassam of Ottawa, Canada; son, James W. Phelps of Erlanger; brother, Billy Sears of Crescent Springs; and four grandchildren. Memorials: The Doris Day Foundation, 8033 Sunset Blvd., Suite 845, Los Angeles, CA 90046 or The Parish Kitchen, P.O. Box 1234, Covington, KY 41012.

Elizabeth Schambach Elizabeth “Betty” Schambach, 89, of Covington, died Jan. 5, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was the book keeper at her late husband’s business, Deluxe Yellow Cab, and a parishioner at Blessed Sacrament in Fort Mitchell. Her husband, Phillip; son Daniel; and a great-grandchild, died previously. Survivors include her sister, Carol Foltz of Speedway Ind.; daughters, Donna Conrad and Mary Darlene Horton, both of Covington; nine grandchildren; and nine great-grandchildren.

James Plessigner James C. Plessinger, 100, of Fort Wright, died Jan. 2, 2013, at Colonial Heights in Florence. He retired as the owner of the Ludlow Sunoco Filling Station. An avid golfer, he was champion of the Northern Kentucky Amateur Golf Tournament for his age group several consecutive years. His wife, Ardell Hafer Plessinger; brother, Dr. Virgil Plessinger; and sisters, Janette and Elizabeth, died previously. Survivors include his son, James Plessinger of Richmond; daughters, Nancy Ziegler of

Helen Scherder Helen L. Scherder, 88, of Crestview Hills, died Jan. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. Her husband, Donald C. Scherder, died previously. She was a homemaker, member of St. Pius X Church and

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Margaret Whitaker Margaret Jane Whitaker, 83, of Walton, died Jan. 6, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker. Her husband, John Whitaker; brother, Jerry Cox; and sisters, Marilyn Cox and Martha Meier, died previously. Survivors include her son, Bryan Whitaker of Villa Hills; daughter, Monique Holt of Burlington; brother, Kenneth Cox; five grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Burial was at Highland Cemetery. Memorials: donor’s choice.

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Hilltoppers, former postulate with the Sisters of Notre Dame and enjoyed playing cards. Survivors include her daughters, Karen Ford of Crestview Hills, Amy Kyle of Alexandria, Renee Newman of Petersburg and Donna Clifford of Alabama; 14 grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Interment was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

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CELEBRATING AT ALL

7 LOCATIONS!

150 BEDS to choose from! Over 200 LIVING ROOM GROUPS to choose from! Over 100 DINETTES & DINING SETS to choose from! We are Cincinnati’s LARGEST SERTA DEALER! HUGE selection of HOME ACCENTS! Over

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OUR DELIVERY GUARANTEE

We will e-mail you with a two hour window for delivery. If we are late for your delivery, you will receive a Gift Card for the amount of your delivery charge. You can also go to our website and click on the blue truck in the top right hand corner. You will need the 11 digit sales order number from your original sales receipt.

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! m o r f e s o o h c o t s t e s s s e r t t a m Over 40 Closeout Prices

POWER BUYS

Firm

499

$

EXTREME VALUE

Queen 2pc Set ... Reg. $548

199

$

Twin 2pc Set ... Closeout $379 Full 2pc Set ... Closeout $469 King 3pc Set ... Closeout $748

Queen size 2pc mattress set

ase special purchw top Pillo

799

$

299

$

Queen 2pc Set ... Reg. $848

Queen size 2pc mattress set

p Serta euro to

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$

Queen size 2pc mattress set mattresses shown are for illustration purposes only and may differ from actual sale merchandise

Twin 2pc Set ... Closeout $648 Full 2pc Set ... Closeout $748 King 3pc Set ... Closeout $1098

Premium Euro Top

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$

Queen 2pc Set ... Reg. $948 Twin 2pc Set ... Closeout $748 Full 2pc Set ... Closeout $848 King 3pc Set ... Closeout $1198

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CE-0000539673

Your Choice Premium Plush or Firm

Serta mattresses are manufactured right here in Cincinnati!

36 MONTHS! *on purchases of $3000 or more with 25% down. Made on your Furniture Fair Gold Card January 24th through January 31st, 2013. Minimum monthly payments required. 4&&!2!89=I A9=9(% 872!893 =.=!I=<I% !9 3285%> See store for details

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