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PRICE HILL PRESS Your Community Press newspaper Price Hill and other West Cincinnati neighborhoods

WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS ❚ PART OF THE USA TODAY NETWORK

Revealed: New FC Cincinnati stadium ‘grand staircase’ Sharon Coolidge Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Alice Magoto of Hyde Park represented Ohio in the 2019 Miss USA final competition in the Grand Theatre in the Grand Sierra Resort in Reno on Thursday.

No crown but Seton grad Alice Magoto still shined in Miss USA Sarah Brookbank sincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A new Miss USA was crowned Thursday night and while Miss Ohio didn’t take home the crown, she made us proud. Miss North Carolina Cheslie Kryst, a 28-year-old lawyer from Charlotte, took home the crown in Reno, Nevada according to USA TODAY. Alejandra Gonzalez of New Mexico was the firstrunner up, and Oklahoma’s Triana Browne the second-runner up during the competition. Miss Ohio Alice Magoto of Hyde Park, a Seton High School graduate, was among the top 10. Others in the top 10 included Miss Arkansas, Miss Kansas, Miss North Carolina, Miss District of Colombia, Miss New Mexico, Miss Maryland, Miss

Florida, Miss Nevada and Miss Oklahoma. “Gosh, what a DREAM! I can’t believe last night I walked the Miss USA stage. Thank you to every single person who has made this possible, I wouldn’t have been able to do this without my insane support team! I love you all,” Magoto said on Instagram. Magoto won the Miss Ohio USA title in November. She also competed in the Miss America pageant in 2016. During the competition, Magoto was one of two contestants who swapped out the standard bikini for a floral one-piece suit. Magoto and Miss Iowa wore one-shouldered monokinis that covered up a bit more skin, but still had a cut-out at the waist, according to USA TODAY. USA TODAY contributed to this article.

New images show the entrance to FC Cincinnati’s Major League Soccer Stadium will be a “grand staircase” that begins on Central Parkway, which team officials say are supposed to echo the Spanish Steps in Rome and the steps leading into the New York City Public Library. That image, plus clearer pictures of a modern structure that seems wrapped in ribbons, were shown to the public Monday, April 22 as the Cincinnati Planning Commission prepares to sign off on the stadium’s final design. The drawings are the most detailed yet. There will be a two-story, glasswalled team store with space outside for a kids area on game days. FC Cincinnati was awarded a Major League Soccer expansion team this year, with the caveat that it build a stadium in or near the urban core. The team is building a $250 million privately funded stadium, with roughly $35 million in taxpayer-funded incentives for infrastructure needs. The foundation is being poured now and the stadium is set to open in time for the 2021 soccer season. Previously, the team unveiled pictures that showed the stadium will include a canopy that extends over every seat – important in the wake of rainy home games this season. The orange glow first shown as a full stadium covering has morphed into a ribbon-like wrap. The new images show ribbons, which will be lit at night. As previously reported, the stadium will be a full bowl rather than one with open ends. That combined with the canopy that bounces down light and sound is aimed at keeping energy – and noise – inside the stadium. See STADIUM, Page 2A

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Miss Ohio Alice Magoto competes during Miss USA 2019. PHOTOS BY JASON BEAN, RENO GAZETTE-JOURNAL VIA USA TODAY NETWORK

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2A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

Flash mob’s performance in the produce section of Harrison Kroger goes viral Sarah Brookbank Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A local choir took to the Harrison Kroger this weekend for a flash moblike performance to promote its spring concert Harrison Voce performed in the pro-

duce section on Saturday and has since gone a little viral in the community. “This is just a small taste of the amazing music we will be performing at the Spring Concert on May 19th,” the group said on Facebook. Harrison Voce was established in 2013 and is a non-profit organization.

The group said it relies on donations and ticket revenue to continue musical and artistic outreach into the community. The group will be performing America’s Musical Journey on May 19 at 4 p.m. at the Martin Marietta Performing Arts Theater located at 9999 West Road

in Harrison. Tickets are $10 each and are available at Harrison FCN Bank and Village Pharmacy or at the door. Visit http://www.harrisonvoce.org/ for more information.

Beer hall at the new FC Cincinnati stadium? Possibly Sharon Coolidge Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

FC Cincinnati President Jeff Berding and former mayor Mark Mallory speak before “media round table” on Thursday, April 25. SAM GREENE / THE ENQUIRER

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The new FC Cincinnati stadium could include a beer hall, team president and manager Jeff Berding revealed during a recent panel discussion focused on the stadium. It shouldn’t come as a surprise. This is Cincinnati, where brewing is part of the city’s German history. But a beer hall would be about more than just drinking. It’s part of a discussion about how to make sure the stadium is used all year, not just during the 17 home games each season. “It’s an idea we’re kicking around,”

Berding told The Enquirer after the breakfast. “We are discussing a brewing partner, or something representative of our beer heritage to be a part of the plan.” The idea, Berding said, would be perhaps put it on the plaza so that it opens into the stadium on game days, and toward the community on non gamedays. It would be open during away games for fans to watch the game on television, Berding said during the discussion. It’s so early in talks, there are no renderings. Berding’s initial remarks about the beer hall came during the Cincinnati

Business Courier’s Commercial Developers Power Breakfast at the Duke Energy Convention Center. FC Cincinnati is building a $250 million, privately-funded stadium in the West End. The first question asked was about the displacement of tenants who live in two buildings north of the stadium site. Berding said the residents are being given more time to move. In the meantime, the team is pausing the final stadium design approval process with the Cincinnati Planning Commission. At the moment, the team is just seeking approval to two right-of-ways within the stadium site.

Stadium Continued from Page 1A

The stadium site runs between Wade Street and the city’s District One police station on Ezzard Charles Drive. In the plans shown Monday night, the police

A newly released rendering shows what the outside of the FC Cincinnati stadium will look like. PROVIDED

The key to a successful surgery is a successful recovery

station remains where it is, as does the Cincinnati Ballet. Cincinnati City Council members Amy Murray and David Mann on Monday, April 22 floated the idea of selling District One, possibly to the team. Then the District One station could move to Clifton, where a combined District One and District Five police station would be built. The city is grappling with what to do about District Five, which needs a new permanent home after the city was

forced to close the substandard buildings where it had been located. Under the plan, the sale of the District One plan could pay for the combined police stations. The team has also acquired property north of the site and is asking Cincinnati City Council to rezone the property, a move that has highlighted the displacement of some residents. During a public meeting to discuss zoning issues, displacement took center stage instead.

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COMMUNITY PRESS WEST ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ 3A

Prosecutor: ‘Professional assassin’ calls himself ‘Ghost’ Kevin Grasha Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A man who police consider a professional assassin calls himself “Ghost,” a prosecutor said. Styles Hummons was recently indicted in connection with an executionstyle killing last year and two other alleged plots, one of which Hamilton County Assistant Prosecutor David Prem said was stopped by police. Prem said Hummons, 31, “brags that he is the kind of guy, if there’s a target, he can pop up out of nowhere,” and then disappear. One way he does that is to enlist the help of others, Prem said during an arraignment in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court. Among three others who have been charged along with Hummons is a 21year-old East Price Hill woman, Courtney Walters. Prem said Walters lured 29-year-old Brendan Phillips into a car, “under the guise that he was going on a date.” Hummons then “executed” Phillips in the back of the car, he said. Phillips’ body was found Feb. 16, 2018, in an alley in Mount Airy. “Mr. Hummons is known to police as a professional assassin,” Prem said. At separate arraignments, Judge

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Walters

Leslie Ghiz set bond for Hummons at $2 million. He faces charges including murder, attempted murder and conspiracy. Ghiz set bond for Walters, who also is charged with murder, at $1 million. Walters’ attorney, Wilkes Ellsworth, said in court that his client has told authorities that “she had no idea that Mr. Hummons was going to do what he did.” Hummons’ attorney M.J. Hugan said prosecutors more than 10 years ago accused Hummons of being “an executioner,” but a jury found him not guilty of murder and robbery charges. He had been charged in a 2007 shootout that left two people dead, including an alleged accomplice. In that incident, prosecutors said Hummons used an assault-style weapon. He was found guilty of a gun charge, records show, and sentenced to five years in prison.

Styles Hummons, wearing a jail uniform, stands next to his attorney, M.J. Hugan, at an arraignment Thursday, April 25, in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court. KEVIN GRASHA/THE ENQUIRER

Few details have been revealed about the other two plots. Prem said police were able to stop one, and a victim was shot and wounded in the other. Tratez Mackey, 26, is accused of plotting with Hummons and others, between March and April 18 of this year, to kill someone. Police found two guns in Mackey’s home, Prem said. In the third plot, court documents

say that in 2018 Hummons and Donell Woods attempted to kill another person, luring him to the crime scene. Prem said the target as well as Hummons were shot and wounded during the attack. Jail documents say Woods, 33, of Colerain Township, “arranged and implemented a murder for hire.” Ghiz set bond for Mackey, of North College Hill, at $1 million. Woods’ bond was set at $1.5 million.

Documents: Robbery suspect threatened to kill 6 police officers Kevin Grasha Cincinnatii Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A man who was accused in a robbery faces multiple counts of aggravated menacing after court documents say he threatened to kill six police officers involved in his arrest. El Hanan Pittman, 24, was suspected

Pittman

in an April 15 robbery. That day, Cincinnati police pulled over a vehicle Pittman was in, the documents say, partly based on the robbery victim’s description of the vehicle. Inside the vehicle, po-

lice found two loaded handguns. One of the guns had an extended magazine, which the victim described. According to court documents, as he was being arrested, Pittman “threatened to kill six police officers.” The Westwood man also faces charges of carrying a concealed weapon and being a felon in possession of a gun.

Pittman is barred from possessing guns because of previous felony convictions. He was convicted as a juvenile of aggravated robbery. As an adult, records show he has been convicted of felonious assault as well as drug possession and gun charges.

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4A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

Child to rapist: ‘You deserve to go to hell’ Kevin Grasha Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A man described as a family friend who would take young children camping, swimming or to play miniature golf pleaded guilty Thursday, April 11 to rape charges involving four children. The children, three boys and a girl, were between the ages of 6 and 10 when court documents say Steven Matthew Sarver forced them to engage in sex acts. In sentencing Sarver to 20 years in prison – a term agreed upon as part of the plea – Hamilton County Common Pleas Judge Melba Marsh read letters written by two of the children. “You’re a child abuser, and you

Sarver

abused kids, and that is wrong… I don’t ever want to see or hear from you again,” one of the children wrote. “You deserve to go to hell for at least one year… God is telling me I have a right to be

mad at you.” “If I could, I would spit in your face,” the other letter said. “You need to think about how me and my friends feel. You hurt us.” Marsh told Sarver, who is 38, that the children’s words conveyed their “pure innocence.” “They are the most powerful words I’ve heard in a long time,” she said. Several times, Marsh tried to get Sarver to say something in response.

But Sarver, who has a 5th-grade education, declined to speak. At one point, he said simply, “Sorry.” “Is that the only word you can speak?” Marsh asked. “Yep,” he replied. Sarver pleaded guilty Thursday, April 11 to four counts of rape. The attacks involving various victims happened between May 2016 and December 2018, Hamilton County Assistant Prosecutor Jennifer Deering said in court. According to court documents, Sarver sexually assaulted them while camping, at a miniature golf course in Green Township, and at his Addyston home. Sarver was arrested Nov. 29, 2018, records say.

Competency tests ordered in vandalism spree Kevin Grasha Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

There was no further explanation Tuesday, April 30 for a woman’s alleged vandalism spree on April 13 at multiple stores, during which authorities say she smashed liquor bottles and set fires inside a Colerain Township convenience store. Falicia Ford, 29, also is accused of destroying or damaging items at a mini-mart and then a Family Dollar in the West End. The mother of two young children also is charged with causing $89 in damage that day at a Walmart. At an arraignment Tuesday, April 30 in Hamilton County Common Pleas Court – where Ford faces arson charges – her attorney, Robert Gutzwiller, said she has attention deficit hyperactivity

disorder and depression. Judge Lisa Allen ordered Ford to undergo emergency mental competency tests. Gutzwiller, who entered a not Ford guilty plea on Ford’s behalf, said she has no criminal record. Cellphone video from the Colerain Township incident, which happened at the Airy Pony Keg on Colerain Avenue, showed a woman breaking liquor bottles and tossing bills from the cash register into the air. “Free, free, free!” the woman yelled. “Money, money.” The store’s owner, who was in the courtroom for Ford’s arraignment, told The Enquirer he doesn't know her. The witness who recorded the incident said the woman never explained

her actions. Court documents say the damage at the Airy Pony Keg totaled more than $3,000. There was approximately $400 in damage at the Family Dollar. The owner of Amir Mini Mart reported $200 in damage, according to court documents. Ford, who lives in the West End, faces charges of arson, aggravated arson, vandalism and criminal damaging. The criminal damaging charges were filed in Municipal Court. Ford spoke only a few words during her arraignment. The competency tests determine if she understands the charges against her and can assist in her own defense. Allen ordered her held without bond.

Man who drove into crowd now charged with abduction Cameron Knight Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

A West End man who drove a car into a crowd in 2017 was arrested again last week after police said he abducted a woman and tied her up in her own apartment. Chaaz Hill, 22, is accused of taking a woman against her will to her Westwood apartment building, tying her hands and feet up with rope and then duct taping her mouth, according to police records. Hill The incident is said to have occurred last Wednesday. Hill was arrested the same day. In August 2017, Hill injured a different woman when he drove a blue BMW car into a crowd in North Avondale, court records state. In that case, Hill pleaded guilty to aggravated assault. He was sent to River City Correctional Facility to complete a residential treatment program. He was kicked out of that program in June 2018. After serving 36 days in jail, he was sent back to complete the program. Now, Hill is being held on a $75,000 bond at the Hamilton County Justice Center awaiting trial on the abduction charge.


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6A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

Perfect ACTs not just happening at Walnut Hills. They are soaring everywhere. For more on Walnut Hills and the ACT, see page 8A.

Hannah K. Sparling and Dan Horn Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Walnut Hills High School recently announced that 17 of its students scored a perfect 36 on the ACT college admissions test. Things got a little crazy after that. Jimmy Fallon joked about it on the “Tonight Show.” Social media blew up with congratulations and conspiracy theories. And test experts buzzed about what it all meant. But was it really that unusual? Yes. But maybe not as unusual as everyone first thought. Turns out, the number of perfect ACT scores nationwide has more than doubled since 2015 and is six times higher today than it was eight years ago. In 2010, 1 of every 2,600 students nailed a perfect score. In 2018, it was 1 of every 500. “There used to be a literal handful of students with a perfect score,” said Bob Schaeffer, public education director for the National Center for Fair and Open Testing. “Now, there are thousands.” ACT officials say the test, which more than 1.9 million students took last year, hasn’t changed in any meaningful way since 1989. Students armed with No. 2 pencils still get three anxious hours to answer multiple choice questions about math, English, science and reading that could help determine whether they get into their college of choice. The average test scores haven’t changed much, either. Those have hovered around 21 for at least the past five years. The scores at the top, however, have changed dramatically. At Walnut Hills, an elite, public college-preparatory school in Cincinnati, nine students post-

Ray Conroy, 18, a Walnut Hills High School senior, in the school library with his current favorite book, “Catch-22.” He scored a perfect score on the ACT college entrance exam.

Gabrielle Chiong, 16, a Walnut Hills junior, earned a perfect score on the ACT college entrance exam the third time she took it.

ed perfect scores in 2018 and seven more have done it so far this year. A total of 17 juniors and seniors at the school currently boast perfect scores, with one of those earned in 2017. “Walnut prepared me very well,” said Ray Conroy, one of the seniors who scored a 36. “It’s kind of encouraged to get good at test taking.” If the test is essentially the same, why are so many more students acing it? The most likely answer is a booming test-preparation industry that’s built on the hopes and fears of students and parents who are willing to work – and pay – to get an edge. They see the investment of a few hundred or even a few thousand dollars in a test prep program as worthwhile if it helps land their child at an Ivy League school or secures a big financial aid package. “The stakes are absolutely real,” said Mark Treas, CEO and founder of TorchPrep in Newport, which charges $1,700

for its comprehensive, private test-prep package. That package includes, among others, 16 hours of tutoring, a two-hour strategy session and TorchPrep’s “Code Crackers” to help navigate the test. Treas cited an email he got from the parents of one of the 7,000 students who used his program this year. They told him the student’s recent 4-point improvement on the ACT could make her eligible for as much as $100,000 in financial aid.

PHOTOS BY SALBERT CESARE/THE ENQUIRER

This is Walnut Hills, after all Seventeen seemed a shocking number at first, but if any school is primed for over-the-top academic success, it’s Walnut Hills. Students must pass an entrance exam to get into the school, so it’s the cream of the Cincinnati Public Schools’ academic crop. Walnut is regularly ranked the No. 1 public school in the state. It has far less poverty than other schools in the CPS

district – 18 percent at Walnut compared with 82 percent districtwide. Walnut has a rigorous test-prep program and an extensive alumni network that raises hundreds of thousands of dollars each year to ensure Walnut students have more than what the district alone can provide. Still, even for Walnut Hills, 17 perfect ACT scores is unusual. Since 2008, Walnut students have earned a total of 32 perfect scores, which means half of those have come in the past 18 months. CPS has 12 other high schools, not counting online programs. None of them has had a perfect score since the district started keeping track a decade ago. But it’s not just Walnut. At Mason High School, just north of Cincinnati, 16 members of the class of 2019 earned a 36 on the ACT. Another 44 missed it by a point, compared with 23 Walnut seniors who earned a 35. So, going by the senior class alone, Mason, which is larger, actually has Walnut beat. In fact, this is happening nationwide. In Kentucky, the number of perfect scores is nine times higher than it was in 2010. In California, it’s 11 times higher. Treas said top students at highachieving schools – like Walnut Hills and Mason – are driving up the number of top scores because they are more focused on the test and more dedicated to preparing for it. That could mean taking multiple practice tests, special classes at school dedicated to the ACT or even taking the actual test itself, which costs at least $50.50 per sitting, multiple times. Schools are on board with more agSee ACTS, Page 12A

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8A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

17 Walnut Hills students score a perfect ACT Sarah Brookbank Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Seventeen Walnut Hills High School earned a perfect score of 36 on the ACT, a standardized test used for college admission, according to Cincinnati Public Schools. An additional 23 seniors missed the mark by a single point, said Principal John Chambers. “I have never heard of so many students in one school earning a perfect score,” said Ed Curry, a spokesperson for ACT told the district. Curry said ACT does not keep records of students with perfect ACT scores by school or district and could not verify if this was the largest number of students from one high school earning the top score. ACT said approximately one-tenth of one percent of students who take the exam nationwide earn a 36, according to the district.

The ACT consists of tests in English, mathematics, reading and science, each scored on a scale of 1–36. A student’s composite score is the average of the four test scores. Here are the students who earned a perfect score: ❚ Suvan Adhikari ❚ Nolan Brown ❚ Meoshea Britt ❚ Raymond Conroy ❚ Gabrielle Chiong ❚ Nickolas Deck ❚ Matthew Dumford ❚ Bridget Fuller ❚ Peter Hattemer ❚ Antoine Langree ❚ Nathan Miller ❚ Evan Peters ❚ Milan Parikh ❚ Mohit Pinninti ❚ Dhruv Rungta ❚ Naomi Stoner ❚ Alan Zhang

Walnut Hills High School is ranked No. 1 in Ohio. FILE PHOTO

Walnut Hills, Wyoming lead list of Tristate high schools ranked best in the state and country Sarah Brookbank Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Local high schools are some of the best in Ohio and Kentucky according to a new report from U.S. News and World Report. Five local schools from Kentucky and six local schools from Ohio made it into their state’s respective top 30 rankings. U.S. News ranked 17,245 public high schools and reviewed more than 23,000.

The highest ranked U.S. public schools in U.S. News & World Report’s 2019 Best High Schools rankings are those whose attendees demonstrated “outstanding outcomes above expectations” in math and reading state assessments, passed a diverse array of college-level exams and graduated in high proportions. Two schools even made the national top 100. Walnut Hills High School ranked No. 65 and Wyoming High School ranked

No. 74. If you notice a big jump in rankings from last year, U.S. News changed its methodology. “With the revamped methodology, most schools’ ranks changed significantly between 2018 and 2019 because of the broader competition in terms of the number of schools being newly ranked,” U.S. News said. How local schools ranked In Ohio: No. 1: Walnut Hills High School

No. 2: Wyoming High School No. 3: Indian Hill High School No. 8: William Mason High School No. 15: Turpin High School No. 22: Sycamore High School How local schools ranked in Kentucky: No. 3: Highlands High School No. 10: Beechwood High School No. 18: Ryle High School No. 23: Campbell County High School No. 30: Conner High School

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Jimmy Fallon had something to say about Walnut Hills High School students Wednesday, April 24 on his show. The Walnut Hills students have cornered the market on perfect ACT scores. Cincinnati Public Schools announced that 17 students had earned a perfect score on the ACT. A perfect score is a 36. An additional 23 seniors from Walnut Hills missed the mark by a single point. On the episode of the Tonight Show starring Jimmy Fallon, the host said he thought it was “kind of weird.” In the bit, he showed three stock pictures of ‘students’ and quoted them each as saying “Well I mean it took a lot of mental prep. It wasn’t wasn’t, but I

Jimmy Fallon did a bit on the Walnut Hills’ students perfect ACT scores. ANDREW HARNIK/AP

studied a bunch and it paid off.” Then one “student” admitted they cheated off the smart kid.

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10A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

How to grow herbs in containers Rita’s Kitchen Rita Heikenfeld

On Earth Day, I visited my granddaughters Eva’s and Emerson’s school. We had fun sharing seeds and plants and talking about being good stewards of our earth. The girls gave their teachers container herb gardens. A few had questions about growing herbs in containers. I’ve had requests from some of you about the same subject, so I thought it a timely topic. Although I grow most herbs in the ground (give me a hoe and a patch of land and I’m a contented woman), growing herbs in containers is doable and budget friendly. Mother’s Day is coming up. How about a container herb garden for her? Here are tips on growing kitchen favorites, including newer varieties, that thrive in containers. Pots/Soil. The most important element? Drainage and lots of it. Width, height and depth should accommodate the root system. Herbs grow well in soilless mixes. Go multiple. Plant several herbs together as long as growing requirements match. Do you like edible flowers and salad greens? Tuck some in! Sun exposure. Most herbs love sun, while others tolerate some shade. Read labels! Watering. Herbs in pots need watered more often than in-ground herbs since they don’t have enough soil surrounding them. Most herbs prefer to dry out slightly between waterings. Fertilizing. Augment about halfway through the season unless your mix already contains enough. Go easy here. Like too much watering, too much fertilizer produces lush

A container herb garden. Pinch off herb flowers and use. RITA HEIKENFELD PHOTOS

A collection of garden herbs.

growth with little flavor. Pruning. See a flower forming? Pinch it off and use. Pruning allows plants to continue to put energy into leaves. Harvesting. Volatile flavors are highest when blooming starts. But no worries. They’ll still have flavor all season long.

to seed. My family’s tabouleh has lots of fresh parsley. Thyme. Cooks adore this peppery, perennial herb. Both bush and trailing thymes are suitable for containers. No need to chop thyme leaves. Just strip them from stem. Rosemary. This tender perennial can take some drought. Its piney flavor is delicious with roasted potatoes and grilled meats. Sage. Annual variegated sages with small leaves lend texture and color. Wrap pork tenderloin with sage leaves and prosciutto. Tuck leaves under poultry skin. Check out abouteating.com for more container herbs. Visit Rita at Natorp’s in the herb section. Times are on natorp.com.

Kitchen herbs for containers Basil. Try minet or globe varieties of this annual herb for smaller containers. Leaves are small so no need to chop. Common sweet basils, as well as a new sterile flower variety, Amazel basil, grow well in larger ones. Toss some basil leaves into green salads. Chives. Both onion and garlic chives are perennial herbs that are happy in

pots. Their flowers make lovely vinegars. Cilantro. An annual that loves sun but hates heat. Try a slow bolting variety. Make successive plantings. Add during last few minutes of cooking. Vietnamese cilantro is a good substitute that takes the heat. Mint. If there’s one herb that should be in a container, it’s mint. Yep, it’s that invasive. Spearmint is sweet while peppermint is pungent. So many varieties! Thai mint makes stir fries pop. Oregano. Greek is the gold standard of this perennial herb; for smaller pots, golden oregano is a good choice. Think pizza! Parsley. The classic garnish, this biennial herb sends leaves up the first year and the second it flowers and goes

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12A ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

ACTs

They call me ‘Mr. 36’

Continued from Page 6A

gressive preparation, Treas said, because they increasingly are measured by student performance on standardized tests. And parents are all-in because they see the financial benefits a higher score can bring. Those factors came together in the past decade to create a test preparation industry that did about $25 billion of business in 2016, according to the Journal, a magazine for school administrators. “You’re seeing a market shift going on,” Treas said. “People weren’t doing this 10 years ago.”

Think like a card counter A Google search for some variation of “ACT” and “test prep” is a testament to that market shift: “10 must-know tips for the ACT,” “Expert ACT test prep help,” “ACT 36 in just 7 steps.” Test prep for the SAT, the other big college admissions test, also is booming. And top scores on that test appear to be rising as well, although a major change in the SAT three years ago makes measuring those numbers more difficult. In 2017, 5% of students who took the SAT scored between 1400 and the maximum score of 1600. In 2018, 7% of students hit that mark. Treas, whose company focuses on the ACT, said he takes a practical approach to the tests. A former blackjack player and card counter, Treas said his goal is to give students better odds of scoring well by teaching them to practice and to understand the test’s structure. A card counter has a system to beat the house. A test taker needs a system to beat the test. “Generally, gamblers sit down at a table and hope to win,” Treas said. “You need to think of it more like a card counter than a gambler.” Schaeffer, whose organization wants to reduce the emphasis on standardized

Alvin Zhang, Mason High School's 2016 valedictorian, accepts his diploma during that year's graduating ceremonies. PROVIDED

tests, said a significant majority of U.S. colleges still admit more than half the students who apply. Yet the testing boom convinces many they must excel on the tests to go to college and be successful. “Kids get the message that they’re falling behind,” Schaeffer said. “More importantly, their parents, who have the checkbooks, get the message.” Not every parent can spring for prep classes, which can cost several hundred dollars, let alone for private tutoring, which can run thousands more. But the Varsity Blues college admissions scandal earlier this year revealed how far some wealthy parents would go to get their kids into elite schools, in some cases hiring others to take their children’s tests or securing doctor’s notes to give them more time on the test. Some parents even bribed university officials. There’s no indication from ACT officials or anyone else that anything improper occurred at Walnut Hills. The students with perfect scores are ambitious high achievers who had access to test prep in the school and on their own. Research on test prep still is in its infancy, but studies suggest the kind of practice and repetition students get from test preparation are among the best ways to improve scores. Confidence also is a factor: If students feel prepared, they tend to do better.

Conroy, the 18-year-old senior at Walnut, jokes about it, but he wonders, really, if such fierce academic competition is healthy. He got a 34 the first time he took the ACT, and he felt pretty good about it. Then one of his friends got a 34, too. “I pretty much, out of competitive spirit, wanted to get a 36,” he said. His friends call him “Mr. Perfect Score” and “Mr. 36” now, which Conroy thinks is funny. But at the same time, he questions whether some are putting too much stock in a test score. “People think it defines your value as a person,” he said. But Conroy, who is planning to study mechanical engineering at Ohio State University, said he doesn’t think a standardized test is the best measure of anyone, or even of anyone’s academic ability. “Whether or not you get a perfect score – it’s chance,” he said. “You just happen to know all the topics they test that day.” Gabrielle Chiong, a 16-year-old junior at Walnut, took the ACT three times. She got a 33 her freshman year, a 35 her sophomore year and then a 36 this year. Less than 1 percent of test takers get a 35 or 36, but still, Chiong said she felt pressure for her third test. “I had a 35, so if I do worse, it would be embarrassing,” she said, calling it a “door-die, last-ditch test kind of thing.” Students can feel such intense pressure to be perfect, said Tracey Carson, spokeswoman for Mason City Schools. Carson didn’t have year-over-year data immediately available, but it’s become the norm for 15 or 16 students in a graduating class to have perfect ACTs at Mason, she said. It’s not to take anything away from students who earn a 36. “We’re obviously very proud, and it’s a huge accomplishment,” Carson said. But Mason schools are consciously trying to remind students they do not have to be perfect. “The students themselves are begging us to have these conversations,” Carson said. “Students describe an atmosphere of intense, sometimes very

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difficult pressure that’s connected with test scores, college admissions, their AP course load, all of that.”

Backing away In 2016, Mason High School valedictorian Alvin Zhang stood in front of his graduating class and admitted he had regrets. Sure, there were a lot of great times during high school, said Zhang, who earned a 35 on the ACT and is now studying applied mathematics at Northwestern University. But if he had it to do again, he would do it differently. He would worry less about grades. He would spend less time studying and doing homework. He would spend more time making friends, trying out a sport or maybe just getting a full night of sleep instead of three hours here and three hours there. “I definitely wouldn’t have wanted to become valedictorian,” Zhang said during his commencement speech. “Unless you are truly passionate (about) what you study, I don’t think overworking yourself for better grades is worth it.” The ACT is still the main vehicle for college admission in Ohio, but some schools are starting to back away from that. The University of Chicago and liberal arts schools including Hiram College and Baldwin Wallace, Denison and Ohio Wesleyan universities all have testoptional admission policies, which means you don’t necessarily have to take the ACT or SAT to get in. At Mason, there are serious conversations, especially in the past couple years, Carson said, about assigning less homework and changing how classes are weighted so the scales aren’t tipped so heavily toward honors and AP classes. Carson remembers Zhang’s speech. It broke her heart and got her thinking: “How do we take our foot off the gas a little bit?” Of course, she said, teachers and principals want students to work hard and do their best. But they also want to make sure students know, perfect ACT score or not, “You are good enough.”

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Community Press West

❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019

❚ 1B

Sports FC Cincinnati’s noise study: No risk of noise in Music Hall Sharon Coolidge Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Wyatt Hudepohl delivers a pitch in the first inning for St. Xavier Wednesday, April 11th at the University of Cincinnati ALEX VEHR FOR THE ENQUIRER

St. X employs Texas-style pitching techniques Shelby Dermer Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

Over a 34-year career of coaching baseball that includes Greater Cincinnati high school stops at Sycamore, Princeton, Moeller, Fenwick and now St. Xavier, Bob Sherlock has maintained the old-school philosophy that defense is the key to winning championships. “I want it all. I want the pitching, the hitting and the defense, but from my end of things, I think pitching and defense is still gonna win the day,” the sixth-year Bomber coach said. “The offense is gonna come and go, but one thing that we really try to establish as a constant is pitching and defense.” Sherlock’s 2019 squad is centered around pitching with junior right-hander Wyatt Hudepohl, a University of Kentucky commit, and senior Joe Auberger, who posted a 1.50 ERA and 29 strikeouts last season and is considered a Division I prospect. While the defensive-minded ideology can be viewed as old-fashioned, the methods surrounding the health and preservation St. Xavier’s pitching staff is anything but antiquated. Now in his eighth season as St. Xavier’s pitching coach, Denny Ehrhardt has brought cutting-edge techniques thanks to more than a half-dozen years of attending the Ron Wolforth’s Texas Baseball Ranch in Montgomery, Texas. “I went down there seven years ago and saw the things they were doing and it was way different than the stuff we were doing up here,” Ehrhardt said. “A lot of major league pitchers will go down there in the offseason whether it’s for arm trouble or for gaining velocity. They will go down there and talk to Ron (Wolforth), who is the ultimate pitching guy with hours and hours of video and different things to work on.” Throughout the dog days of the East Texas summers, Ehrhardt has gathered numerous new-aged pitching methods that promote everything from arm health, mechanics, velocity and more, and brought them to Springfield Town-

St. Xavier pitching coach Denny Ehrhardt demonstrates a connection drill used by Bombers pitchers. SHELBY DERMER/FOR THE ENQUIRER

ship for the Bombers. Ehrhardt said times have changed since he pitched at North College Hill in the late 1960s. “The advances we’ve made in instruction in the last five to 10 years are remarkable. All the things I learned when I was young – tug-and-pull, talland-fall – are all teachings that we found out are not so good,” he said. “The theory years ago was either you had it or you didn’t; that’s really not the case.” In the offseason, Ehrhardt will showcase his new lesson plans with a three-month pitching program that runs weekly from September until Thanksgiving. Pitchers learn velocity through the tradition bands and core belts, but also try variable learning by throwing baseballs with different surfaces, weights and textures from various distances and angles. “We’ll vary the input and let your body figure out what it needs to do to be successful,” Ehrhardt said while demonstrating with a freshman right-hander. “The point of this is to start work-

ing with variable learning and find out that the body adjusts itself better when you have different stimuli.” While the all-mighty calling card for most pitchers in the radar gun reading, Ehrhardt’s teachings stress arm health over other benefits. In one seminar at the Pitching Ranch, a cadaver Ulnar Collateral Ligament (UCL) used in an experiment was torn with 33 Newtons of force. More than 60 Newtons of force is used by a pitcher on any given pitch. UCL reconstruction requires Tommy John Surgery, an operation that is impacting hurlers across the nation at an alarming rate. “The problem with keeping the arm safe is that (a tear) can happen at any time. Even if you do everything correctly, it could happen any second,” Ehrhardt said. “You train proper methods of throwing, you train the muscles around it, you train techniques to deaden the blow. “We start with arm health and arm safety as the priority. There’s no right See PITCHING, Page 2B

Editor’s note: A previous version of the story relied on a summary, rather than the entire study itself. It was updated to reflect the entire study, which as a whole says noise won’t be an issue. A new study done by FC Cincinnati shows crowd noise during games will have no discernible impact on Music Hall. The study by Arup, an international acoustic consulting group contracted by FC Cincinnati, was released Wednesday, May 1. It found there “is an extremely low probability of overlap of peak crowd noise and a quiet pause during a concert at Music Hall.” Peak crowd noise levels at professional soccer matches last less than four seconds, occur only during four percent of a match, the study said. “Based on this report we believe sound conflicts can be mitigated effectively,” said FC Cincinnati President and General Manager Jeff Berding. This coming season, at Nippert Stadium, there are three dates during which FC Cincinnati has a home game and Music Hall has a scheduled performance. The team and Music Hall officials have pledged to coordinate schedules to minimize overlap. And the stadium’s new architect is considering ways to further minimize sound. The study, which used noise data taken during Premier Soccer League games in the United Kingdom, differs from one commissioned by The Cincinnati Arts Association, dated April 9. The Arts Association study, done by Akustiks, raised concerns after Cincinnati City Council approved the West End site. The Arts Association study found nose from a typical game will be “readily audible by the audience and performers” and will interfere with performances and rehearsals in Music Hall’s Springer Auditorium and Wilks Studio, and may affect other gathering spaces inside Music Hall as well. In a joint statement, representatives from the Music Hall Revitalization Company, Cincinnati Arts Association, the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Cincinnati Ballet, Cincinnati Opera and May Festival, who all use Music Hall, said, “As stewards of Music Hall, the venue’s management and performing resident companies are firmly committed to protecting the acoustics and integrity of this iconic City-owned venue.” See NOISE, Page 2B

Thousands attend the ArtsWave free community open house, "Re(New)ed celebration for Music Hall and More," from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, October 7, 2017. The event featured guided tours and performances of Music Hall, which reopened Friday, October 6, 2017 after a 16-month renovation. THE ENQUIRER/MEG VOGEL


2B ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

Berding denounces ‘agitators,’ ‘failed leadership’ and ‘bulls---’ in stadium fight Sharon Coolidge Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

The constant push back FC Cincinnati is butting up against as it builds a new soccer stadium in the West End is “bulls--t” said team President Jeff Berding. In a sometimes-emotional interview with The Enquirer’s editorial board April May 30, Berding tried to rebut concerns about displacement of lowincome residents who live in buildings owned by the team just north of the West End stadium site. But he also revealed his deep frustration, with what he deemed “agitators” and the city’s “failed leadership.” Among his named targets: Josh Spring, executive director of the Greater Cincinnati Homeless Coalition; Margy Waller, an Over-the-Rhine resident who lives near the stadium site; and Brian Garry, who has unsuccessfully run for council and often turns up at City Hall to speak on behalf of social justice issues. Spring, who has helped organize West End residents, said Berding and the team “are creating roadblocks for themselves by ... treating people as if they have no value.” “They (FC Cincinnati) are their own worst enemy,” he told The Enquirer. Garry, in a recent Cincinnati.com op ed, denounced the “greed” that would

prompt someone to push out poor people for a stadium. “This is heartless,” he wrote. Waller is a lawyer who has helped displaced Berding tenants in the past and “is just commenting on what is happening,” she told The Enquirer. Every step has been a contentious battle: Council voted 5-4 to approve the West End site last year. Then when it came time in February for the city to sell the team city-owned land, the deal was held up over a Cincinnati Ballet parking lot that sits on what would be stadium land. Now some council members are throwing up new demands as the team seeks rezoning for some small strips of land in the original stadium footprint. Roughly 14 people have been asked to move out of two West End buildings recently purchased by the team, prompting a council motion ordering the team to keep one building for all the tenants of both buildings to live in. Berding, who said he is not a “Section 8” landlord, deemed the motion a threat that zoning would be held up. And, that Berding said, would delay the stadium’s opening. Councilman David Mann, who sponsored the motion with P.G. Sittenfeld, has said the motion was not a threat,

and was introduced as a solution to help displaced tenants. The city’s planning commission is set to take up the issue May 10, followed by a vote from council. “There are social needs that need to be solved,” Berding said. All city officials agree there is a shortage of affordable housing in Cincinnati. “But that effort needs to be led by elected officials and government. ... At some level there needs to be a comprehensive solution.” And Berding, who is a former city councilman, said solving the city’s affordable housing problems is the job of city council, not a soccer team. “It’s bull--t; it’s failed leadership,” Berding said.”What have you done? Not a whole lot. I think people see through it.” Council, he said, should be embracing the team’s efforts to build a stadium and bring new business to the West End. “This is a private investment,” Berding said. “There’s been none like it since. ... Great American Tower.” He said people are using the stadium to find ways to make money or build their political resumes. And he’s worried city officials and activists will continue to throw up roadblocks, risking more building delays. “They’re treating us like we’re some toxic dump or something,” he said. Berding said the team has pledged

millions of dollars for the neighborhood over the next decade. He and former Mayor Mark Mallory, the team’s community liaison, who joined Berding at The Enquirer, said the team has all along been helping people forced to leave. But the plight of 99-year-old bedridden Mary Page being forced to relocate captured the public’s attention. She and her neighbors are now allowed to stay until they find a new place to live; the team lawyer is working with the Legal Aid Society of Greater Cincinnati, working on the residents’ behalf. “We’re going above and beyond,” Berding said. In hindsight, looking back on his pledge that no one would be displaced, Berding said he would choose his words more carefully. At the time it was unclear where the stadium would be and West End residents living in City West had fake evictions notices placed on their doors as a scare tactic. Berding knew what land he was eyeing, but hadn’t revealed it in hopes the cost wouldn’t skyrocket. But he knew it wasn’t City West. Therefore, he pledged no displacement from the stadium site, he explained. Now those words are being thrown back at him by residents in buildings he bought north of the stadium site. “We’re trying to be one of the good success stories,” Berding said.

Pitching Continued from Page 1B

or wrong way to throw a baseball. People have been throwing things for centuries. But there are more efficient and inefficient ways to throw a baseball and we try to make sure they’re throwing it efficiently.” St. Xavier pitchers go through a “circus” drill, which is a pitchers-specific workout that involves the repetition of 16-20 explosive movements. “It’s a panic for eight seconds. We don’t do long-distance running, but we’ll do short sprints at the highest intensity possible,” Ehrhardt said. “We do that because that’s pitching; pitching is a few seconds of ultimate energy, then you stop.” St. Xavier pitchers all participate in the circus and follow a similar in-season recovery plan of bands, weighted balls, interval sprints, long tosses and light work. But Ehrhardt stresses contrasting plans for each pitcher, knowing no two are exactly the same. In the fall, pitchers go through a functional movement screening led by St. Xavier trainers along with strength and conditioning coaches. The screenings, which assist with arm health, put pitchers through different arm constraints. Some easily fly through certain constraints that others might struggle with. “Then we give them correctional exercises that will promote them being

St. Xavier pitching coach Denny Ehrhardt has brought lessons learned in Texas to Cincinnati and his Bombers pitching staff. SHELBY DERMER/FOR THE ENQUIRER

able to do a certain exercise,” Ehrhardt said. “Every pitcher is different. You can’t have one program or one set of exercises that works for all of them. It puts us ahead and it’s all about arm safety.” Ehrhardt’s playing days ended a few years ago when he stopped playing with and against former major league players in a senior baseball league. He learns

SHORT HOPS Jon Richardson jrichardson@enquirer.com

Baseball ❚ Andrew Braun and Jameson Richmond each drove in two runs in Oak Hills’ 7-3 win over Middletown April 29. ❚ La Salle lost to Moeller 5-4 in extra innings April 29. The Lancers edged Moeller 3-1 May 1. ❚ Elder defeated St. Xavier 6-1 April 29. Zack Williams notched three RBI in

the Panther’s 5-3 win over St. Xavier May 1. ❚ Gamble Montessori handled Hillcrest 15-5 April 29 and Aiken 11-0 May 1.

Softball ❚ Western Hills beat Oyler 10-3 April 29 and Taft 12-2 April 30. ❚ Oak Hills handled Colerain 15-5 as Kayla Roddy picked up her 12th win of the year April 30. ❚ Mercy McAuley handled Seton 13-4 April 30.

something new each time he goes to Texas and sees big-league guys like Trevor Bauer and Justin Verlander studying and experimenting with new methods under Wolforth’s tutelage. “I need to get down there and learn the new stuff because what I learned in high school and college - to go out and throw the ball over the plate is history,”

Noise Continued from Page 1B

They are reviewing the study, but said, it appeared the team-commissioned report “minimizes the noise impact of the planned stadium.” The groups plan to continue to work on solutions with the team. “It is not wise or prudent to take a chance that sound will not be an issue,” the statement said. “Why wait until the FCC stadium is built and under operation to re-evaluate the issue? The time to implement solutions is now.”

Ehrhardt said. “I imagine some schools will do some of this stuff, as well; but it’s a lot different than the old-school teaching that we did. If pitching coaches haven’t done the training to keep up with what they’ve done at the ranch, they’re still teaching things that are outdated.”

FC Cincinnati is building a 26,000seat stadium in the West End, just blocks from Music Hall, where the city’s symphony, orchestra and other performances are held on Saturday nights – when soccer games would sometimes be going on simultaneously. Stadium renderings show a canopy over seating, which is meant to muffle noise. West End and Over-the-Rhine neighbors have also expressed concern about noise. Music Hall, an Over-the-Rhine landmark is fresh off a $143 million renovation, during which acoustics were a primary concern.


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Greater Cincinnati High Schools celebrate theater at Cappies Gala on May 23 The ballots have been cast and the votes are in. On May 23 at the Aronoff Center for the Arts, local high school students will be recognized in a Tony’sstyle awards ceremony for their accomplishments in theatrical performance, technical theater and writing. The nominees have been announced at cincicap.com/nominees. The annual Cappies Gala, organized by the Cappies of Greater Cincinnati, celebrates the hard work of high school theater departments across Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky. This year, more than 150 student critics from 19 local high schools were involved in the local chapter of the international Critics and Awards Program. To complete the program, students must attend at least five theatrical performances at other high schools and write constructive reviews. At the performance, the students participate in a teacher-led workshop where they learn the history and background of the show, participate in structured discussion about their observations, and determine which students should be considered for nomination for various awards categories. Top-ranked student reviews from each performance are featured on the Cincinnati Enquirer website (accessible at cincicap.com/reviews). For the 20182019 season, more than 880 reviews were written by student critics. Cappies critics who completed the program requirements voted earlier this month on the students, ensembles, and technical crews they feel should be recognized at the annual Cappies Gala. Students nominated for a Cappie Award are in the top six in the region. Nominees were announced to participating schools via social media as part of the organization’s first annual Nominees’

In one of the productions Cappies critics reviewed this year, Loveland High School’s “The Drowsy Chaperone,” Follies star Janet Van de Graaff, played by Anna Colletto, tells reporters she “don’t wanna show off no more.” STEVE KOVACS/PROVIDED

Day Celebration, which also featured live “watch parties” as students waited for each category’s nominees to be shared. All the nominees can now be viewed at cincicap.com/nominees. At the 18th annual Cappies Gala, taking place at the Aronoff Center on Thursday, May 23 at 7 p.m., awards will be given across 42 technical, performing, and writing awards categories. Reserved tickets for family and friends go on sale May 8 at the Cincin-

nati Arts Association box office. For information, call the Cincinnati Arts Association ticket office at 513-621-2787 [ARTS] or visit them at CincinnatiArts.org. Information, as well as sponsorship and program advertising details, can be found at cincicap.com/gala. The Critics and Awards Program strives to recognize Greater Cincinnati’s talented community of young writers, performers, and technical crews. High school theater and journalism students

who participate in the Cappies program are trained as critics, attend shows at other schools, and write and publish reviews. At the end of the school year, the student critics vote to give awards to their fellow students for outstanding productions, group and individual performances, and achievements in technical categories. Awards are presented at the annual Cappies Gala. Learn more at cincicap.com. Cappies of Greater Cincinnati

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COMMUNITY NEWS WeTHRIVE! honors Whitewater Township Whitewater Township has been named a 2018 WeTHRIVE! Community by Hamilton County Public Health. The Whitewater WeTHRIVE! team expanded its focus in 2018 as Township trustees adopted the WeTHRIVE! Overall Pathway Resolution. Whitewater Crossing Church partnered with Ohio State University Extension to provide nutrition and cooking classes to residents. The Township’s Community Clean Up expanded to include roadside cleanup. The WeTHRIVE! team supported the Whitewater Neighborhood Watch Program and the installation of a new playground at Whitewater Township park. Sharon Lutz, Whitewater Township’s WeTHRIVE! neighborhood navigator, was honored as a 2018 WeTHRIVE! Community Champion. Lutz helped expand community clean-up events to include roadside clean-up, the Litter Gitters program, and trash collection along the banks of local waterways. She promotes opportunities that address health and safety through nutrition classes and a local neighborhood watch. Lutz also runs the WeTHRIVE! in Whitewater Township Facebook page. For more information about WeTHRIVE! in Whitewater Township, visit WatchUsThrive.org/Whitewater. WeTHRIVE!’s mission is to create a culture of health, safety, and vitality throughout Hamilton County. Visit us at WatchUsThrive.org or find us on Facebook and Twitter (@WatchUsThrive). WeTHRIVE! is an initiative of Hamilton County Public Health. WeTHRIVE!, an initiative of Hamilton County Public Health

WhitewaterTeam photo: Hamilton County Public Health honored Whitewater Township as a WeTHRIVE! Community. From left: Hamilton County Health Commissioner Tim Ingram; Whitewater Township Trustees Willie Pope and Lawanda Corman; Whitewater WeTHRIVE! Neighborhood Navigator Sharon Lutz; Hamilton County Board of Health Officer Tracey Puthoff and Board of Health President Jim Brett. PROVIDED

Hamilton County APS worker honored by Council on Aging Lisa Pitchford, Adult Protective Services Worker for Hamilton County Job and Family Services (JFS), was honored by Council on Aging of Southwestern Ohio for her dedication, commitment and service to vulnerable older adults in Hamilton County. Lisa received Council on Aging’s Outstanding Service Provider Award at the organization’s annual meeting, March 13, at the Sharonville Convention Center. Known by her colleagues as the go-to-person at JFS, Lisa has provided direct service to thousands of older and vulnerable adults in Hamilton County over the last 26 years. If her co-workers or manager run into a stumbling block, they go to Lisa for help getting around it. Lisa has developed such a network over the years that she always knows someone – a police officer, lawyer, banker, volunteer – who will help. Lt. Joe Macaluso, chief investigator for the Delhi Police Department, described Lisa this way: “She’s my point person. Lisa is wonderful. She is always willing to take my calls, no matter what time of the day or night. She’s all-in.” Amy Leonhardt

Celebrate Spring with the Cincinnati Computer Cooperative NonProfit The Cincinnati Computer Nonprofit is welcoming spring with a special event for the community. Now through May 31, the Cooperative is offering everyone an opportunity to win a $200 gift certificate generously donated by the Party Source. The lucky winner will be able to throw the party of the year for friends and family. And of course, community members can always get a great computer at a great price. All refurbished systems always start at $150 including free software and a 1 year guarantee. The Cincinnati Computer Cooperative is a community nonprofit located in Woodlawn, Ohio. The volunteers and staff are dedicated to helping people select the computer they are most comfortable with. The volunteers and staff refurbish high quality donated computers, install free, licensed Microsoft Office software and sell the computers at a very low cost to those in need. As a nonprofit, the Cooperative has a mandate to sell only to those in need. Community members can buy if they are a student (K – postgraduate), buying for a student, over 55 or on any form of public assistance. The Cooperative also sells to schools and nonprofits. Laptops and desktops are Microsoft Registered Refurbished, and come with everything users need, including virus protection, Microsoft Office Software and a 1 year guarantee. The Cooperative is proud to say that everything is pre-installed which means people can use the computers from the very first minute they turn them on. Specifications and prices are as follows: ❚ Laptops range from $150-$350 ❚ Desktop models range from $150-$300 ❚ Monitors are sold separately ❚ All computers have a one-year guarantee ❚ All come with free licensed software ❚ Windows 10 ❚ Windows Defender and Malwarebytes virus protection ❚ This free, fully licensed software: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook

2018 WeTHRIVE! Community Champion Sharon Lutz with Hamilton County Board of Health President and Whitewater resident Jim Brett. PROVIDED

All computers have 4 or more gigs of RAM, with at least a 250 gigabyte hard drive or 120 gigabyte SSD. Processors come in a variety of speeds: the majority have Intel Core i3 or faster processors. The website is http://www.cincinnaticomputercooperative.org/news/ Hours: Tuesday 3-7 p.m., Wednesday 3-9 p.m., Thursday and Friday 3-7 p.m., Saturday 9 a.m. to noon. Call for holiday closures. Location: 49 Novner Dr., Cincinnati 45215, just off 78 bus line. Call 513-771-3262 for more information. Amy Vogelgesang

Dater Foundation grant to assist Homework Help at Main Library, branches The Library Foundation of Cincinnati and Hamilton County is the recipient of one of the grants handed out by the Charles H. Dater Foundation. The Library Foundation was awarded $50,000 to support the Homework Helpers program. “Homework Help is an essential tool the Library offers to students in the community who can’t afford to hire private tutors,” said Paula Brehm-Heeger, the Eva Jane Romaine Coombe Director of the Library. “We want to give every child who comes into the Library opportunities to succeed in school.” The Homework Helpers program provides free help to K–8 students. Homework Helpers, many of whom are retired teachers, help students with homework assignments and provide skills-building assistance on any subject. Homework Helpers work out of the William Hueneke Homework Center at the Main Library, and at 19 branches where the need is greatest for homework assistance and skill-building coaching. The branch libraries that have Homework Helpers are: Cheviot, College Hill, Corryville, Covedale, Deer Park, Elmwood, Forest Park, Groesbeck, Mt. Healthy, Miami Township, North Central, Northside, Oakley, Pleasant Ridge, Sharonville, Reading, Walnut Hills, West End Branch and Westwood. “We are grateful the Dater Foundation’s mission matches our own to help young people thrive in school and build their skills to achieve success in life,” said Staci Dennison, the Thomas W. Jones Executive Director of the Library Foundation. The Dater Foundation makes grants to nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati area to carry out

Lisa Pitchford, 2019 COA’s Outstanding Service Provider Award Winner. PROVIDED

programs that benefit young people and focus in the areas of arts/culture, education, healthcare, social services and other community needs. “This grant is a great fit for the Dater Foundation,” said Bruce Krone, Dater Foundation president. “A public library is a perfect location for an after-school homework assistance program. The more students are exposed to the resources that the library offers, the better off they will be in the long run. Imagine doing homework surrounded by thousands of books. Hopefully a greater appreciation of reading will be an additional byproduct of the program.” The private foundation was established by fourthgeneration Cincinnatian, businessman and philanthropist Charles Dater to ensure that his resources would continue to fund worthwhile community programs after his death. The foundation has made more than 3,000 grants totaling over $49 million since its inception in 1985. Learn more at DaterFoundation.org/. For details , visit cinlib.org/homework. Lisa Mauch

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REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS Camp Washington 2861 Colerain Ave: Pollard Henry & Angela to Harris Mark & Carmel Buckley; $12,000

Cheviot 3316 Augusta Ave: Johnston Andrew J to Jeffrie Lauren; $83,500 3838 Olivette Ave: Caramanian Becky H & John to Gulma Kukuna & Birtukan Mekonnen; $105,150 3967 Lovell Ave: Tinney William N & Mary E to Bank Of New York Mellon The Tr; $67,670 4116 Janward Dr: Uchtman Anne S to Hartman Shawn & Peggy J; $134,900

Cleves 525 State Rd: Erhart Joshua J & Amanda M Rizzi to Chanos Nicholas J Jr & Cara M; $229,500

Crosby Township 11411 Paddys Run Rd: Knollman Farm Inc to Lsr Llc; $200,000 8698 Mt Hope Rd: Neal James Bryan to Minor Thomas P & Jill; $222,000

Delhi Township 1042 Lakeville Dr: Hofmeyer Max P & Jennifer L to Robbins Kyle & Kathleen; $260,000 182 Silverspring Dr: Martin Randall & Crystal to Black Gage; $190,000 335 Anders Ct: Monterey LLC to Lipps Dennis; $132,500 401 Hillbrook Dr: Bauer Rosemary R Tr to Knight Angela & Lucy Knight; $168,000 446 Morrvue Dr: Kelly Terrah to Gnoose Barbara R; $92,000 479 Springarden Ct: Ripperger Ronald A to Hornung Jonathan & Laura; $228,750 4964 Duebber Dr: Uhlmansiek Kathleen to Bryce Tucker Samuel James; $97,500 5205 Glen Creek Dr: Berrens Arlene N to Bucalo Marietta; $162,000 5368 Plover Ln: Napa Investments Inc to Goodrich Nathaniel Q & Kelly R Pitts; $137,500 5392 Whitmore Dr: Nelson Frank W to Hott Holly; $106,250 5423 Cannas Dr: Coleman Marietta C to Mote Matthew & Tammie Neiss-mote; $112,000 5556 Revmal Ln: Key Carl E & Joan R to Waid Christopher J & Emily S; $191,000 5587 Delhi Pk: Zimmerman Teresa M & Thomas V to Ezell Brian C & Deborah; $291,500 5630 Treeview Dr: Shiloh United Methodist Ch to Hugenberg Aaron J & Carla E; $187,700 5643 Alomar Dr: Cb to Herzog Kimberly & Joseph; $192,000 731 Sundance Dr: Luebbe Robert F & Janet L to Beck Guy & Jenna; $255,000 750 Lullaby Ct: Mumford Gregory Scott Tr to Axle Shanikka L & Antonio I; $168,000 835 Neeb Rd: Standriff James A to Cappel Meghan; $99,500 835 Neeb Rd: Standriff James A to Cappel Meghan; $99,500 951 Delight Dr: Weber Shannon Lee to Loh Tonya; $210,000

East Price Hill 2680 Lehman Rd: Bakrman LLC to Gundrum Edward; $54,000 2954 Bodley Ave: Mehr Joanne & Hans to Erland Justin S; $31,750 2958 Bodley Ave: Mehr Joanne & Hans to Erland Justin S; $31,750

East Westwood 2335 Baltimore Ave: Johnson Jerome & Daphne to Non Stop Properties Llc; $25,900

Green Township Robert Ave: Tstg Realty LLC to Espich Realty Llc; $5,000 1897 Neeb Rd: Griffiths David James Tr & John Edward Griffiths Tr to Griffiths David J; $280,000 2853 Welge Ln: Depco LLC to Wright Chelsey E & Christian M; $169,000 3253 Deborah Ln: Swadener Lydia R to Conrex Homes Llc; $137,500 3288 Jessup Rkd: Bre Capital LLC to Mutters Nicholas S; $127,000 3444 North Bend Rd: Michel Anthony J & Roberta to Ela Enterprises Llc; $250,000 3468 North Bend Rd: Michel Anthony J & Roberta to Ela Enterprises Llc; $250,000 3541 Jessup Rd: Keene Group Inc The to Filipovich Kira A; $88,000 3646 Coral Gables Rd: Wilcox Alexander to Grzebyk Steven Russell; $146,500 5229 Peterborough Dr: M/i Homes Of Cincinnati LLC to Basquette James & Rita; $353,850 5243 Willowood Ave: Polley David to Kaanapali Renovations Llc; $57,500 5243 Willowood Ave: Kaanapali Renovations LLC to Ostendorf Enterprises Llc; $67,000 5381 Laured Pl: Williams Michael E & Susan C to Bunker Joseph A & Robin; $163,500 5385 Maylee Pl: Catanzaro Mary Ann to Branscum Jason & Sarah; $226,900 5410 Lever Ct: Mcgreevy Ryan K to Schneider Kristopher M; $104,900 5438 Cecilia Ct: Koenig Lawrence W & Susan K to Macon Desiree S; $230,000 5555 Eula Ave: Christos Patricia A to Spurlock Jessica Kate &; $90,000 5646 Bridgetown Rd: Waldeck Jennifer to Grote Terrence P & Jo Anne; $75,000 5654 Cheviot Rd: Burran Investments LLC to Chandler Darlene Y; $69,000 5667 Samver Rd: B R E Capital LLC & Em Smart Investment LLC to Saltsman Charles Howard &; $216,500 5734 Green Acres Ct: Bender Thomas & Sandra to Harmon Tina L; $98,000 5753 Sutters Mill Dr: Schmidt Laura Ann & Stephen Cyril to Scruggs Donald; $314,500 5838 Calmhaven Dr: Rosenacker Cassia M Tr & Robyn L Henning Tr to Taylor Kathleen & Christopher R; $232,000 6024 Eden Roc Pl: Eden Roc LLC to Linnemann Melissa R; $185,000 6185 West Fork Rd: Otto Benjamin & Jillian to Huber Stacey Ann & Ryan J; $330,000 6267 Seiler Dr: Hopkins Rick & Lynda to Goode Tre D; $155,000 6324 Charity Dr: Ebbers Ruth A to Love Kyle L; $130,000 6581 Pownerfarm Dr: East Ray A & Anita

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North Bend Fox Hills Ln: Basquette Jim R & Rita M to Swinger Michelle; $255,000 159 Fox Hills Ln: Brauch April L to Jostworth Thomas E & Bonnie M; $230,000 22 Stonehaven Dr: Young Terry M & Patricia R to Elliott Jeff W & Deborah S; $302,000 400 Three Rivers Pw: Heine Herman to Schepers James Edward &; $82,000

South Fairmount 1991 Fairmount Ave: White Price Harris LLC to Mogambo Llc; $595,000 2478 White St: White Price Harris LLC to Mogambo Llc; $595,000 2486 White St: White Price Harris LLC to Mogambo Llc; $595,000 2486 White St: White Price Harris LLC to Mogambo Llc; $595,000

West End 410 Wade St: Carr Gregory William to Rjcpii Llc; $40,000 410 Wade St: Carr Gregory William to Rjcpii Llc; $40,000

West Price Hill 1011 Glenna Dr: Willms Meghan Kristine to Mcbride Carol Ann; $122,300 1019 Rutledge Ave: Waid Emily S & Christopher J to Jansen Mario D; $120,000 1037 Lockman Ave: Grote Terrence P & Jo Anne to Spitzig Rita C; $119,900 1134 Rutledge Ave: Longevity Blast Off LLC to Howell Laquida Renee; $26,000 1186 Cherevilla Ln: Menner Richard F to Bereka Mengistu & Tikikil Beza; $100,000 3836 St Lawrence Ave: Ott John E Jr & Robin K Ford to Barrera Robert & Maria Ortiz; $79,000 4011 Akochia Ave: Cincinnati Federal to Mendez Eduardo Simon; $41,140 4113 Flower Ave: Barbara Peter A to D P Properties Assoc Llc; $28,035 4321 Eighth St: Hemke Patricia L to Ferrell Martha & Edler Martha; $100,000 4323 Eighth St: Hemke Patricia L to Ferrell Martha & Edler Martha; $100,000 4344 Eighth St: R Baranowitz Investments to Kirby May Andrea Santos; $84,000 4463 Eighth St: Kb Partners LLC to Mlb Realty Llc; $39,900 4729 Loretta Ave: Thormax Properties LLC to Weckenbrock Mary E & Kelvin Jimenez; $122,000 4946 Relleum Ave: Dittrich Katharina to Vehr Alicson M; $124,500 5066 Rapid Run Rd: Miller John R to Agnihotri Rishi; $100,000 5066 Rapid Run Rd: Miller John R to Agnihotri Rishi; $100,000 664 Overlook Ave: Schwab Robert A to Wellbrock Jennifer & Nancy; $22,270 758 Wilbud Dr: Michael David LLC to Carr Dion; $150,000 927 Rosemont Ave: Fordham Investments LLC to Boadi Sylvester; $74,000 948 Woodbriar Ln: Vasiliou Pete to Ogrady Don & Jayne; $122,500

Westwood 2555 Hollenshade Ave: Oaks Property Group LLC to Vb One Llc; $40,000 2832 Werk Rd: Gates Matthew R to Remember Well Llc; $99,500 2863 Orland Ave: Rose Jeffrey C & Judith to Yarrell Waughney; $61,000 2915 Montclair Ave: Gutierrez Richard M to Hbd Holding Group Llc; $30,000 3043 Feltz Ave: Larue Susan J to Eixiel Taboada; $86,500 3043 Montana Ave: Hurd Douglas L & Elana H to Kalaitzoglou Erik N; $113,500 3171 Westbrook Dr: Herrgold LLC to Whalen Dean; $138,000 3245 Brater Ave: Manuel Geoffrey A to Cornelius Giovanni A; $66,500 3280 Brater Ave: Smith Monica A to Richmond Shawntale Renee; $77,500 3385 Kathy Ln: Eifert Marilyn to Knierim Shirley & Christopher; $54,400 3648 Boudinot Ave: Edgar Construction LLC Tr Of Trust 257 to Blye Ebony S; $158,500

Whitewater Township 508 Hooven Rd: Stalf Michael to Gibbons Brandon J; $58,000 6471 Morgan Rd: Asher Joe to Dyer Katherine R; $71,500 8952 Bluejay View Dr: The Drees Company to Obert Laura C Tr; $294,900

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COMMUNITY PRESS WEST ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ 9B

Is your favorite restaurant, kid’s school on the clean kitchen list? Sheila Vilvens Cincinnati Enquirer USA TODAY NETWORK

About 60 restaurants and cafeterias in schools, daycares, and senior communities have been proclaimed among the cleanest in the area. They are included in the listing of first quarter 2019 Clean Kitchen Awards compiled by Hamilton County Public Health. The Clean Kitchen Award was introduced to recognize businesses and facilities that are making great efforts to protect patrons, according to Hamilton County Health Commissioner Tim Ingram. Some of the winners are appearing on the list for the first time. Others are making their seventh, eighth or ninth appearance. Did your favorite restaurant or child’s school make the list? Let’s find out. Clean Kitchen Award recipients this quarter are: Restaurants ❚ Dunkin Donuts, 12045 Lebanon Road, Sharonville (third win) ❚ Arby’s, 3573 Springdale Road, Colerain Township (second win) ❚ The Big Greek Cafe, 1150 Harrison Ave., Harrison (fourth win) ❚ Taco Bell No. 1813, 5060 Delhi Road, Delhi Township (fourth win) ❚ Angilo’s Pizza Northgate,3106 Springdale Road, Colerain Township (second win) ❚ Corner Coffee Cafe LLC, 9440 Main St., Symmes Township (second win) ❚ NYPD Pizza Inc, 5761 Springdale Road, Colerain Township (second win) ❚ The Flying Pizza, 9563 Fields Ertel Road, Symmes Township (second win) ❚ Sprinkles Creamy Whip, 500 N. Miami Ave., Cleves (third win) ❚ Pizza Hut, 9632 Colerain Ave., Colerain Township (fourth win)

❚ Panera Bread, 9530 Colerain Ave., Colerain Township (first win) ❚ Longhorn Steakhouse No. 5548, 9141 Fields Ertel Road, Symmes Township (first win) ❚ The Casual Pint, 110 S. Second St., Loveland (first win) ❚ Ruchi Mess, 12082-B Montgomery Road, Symmes Township (second win) ❚ Tag’s Cafe, 5761 Springdale Road, Colerain Township (second win) ❚ Diane’s Restaurant, 1951 Anderson Ferry Road, Green Township (seventh win) ❚ Gold Star Chili Finneytown, 6531 Winton Road, Springfield Township (third win) ❚ Trio Bistro, 7565 Kenwood Road, Sycamore Township (second win) ❚ The Veg Head, 920 - B LovelandMadeira Road, Loveland (eighth win) ❚ Honey Baked Ham Colerain, 9570 Colerain Ave., Colerain Township (third win) ❚ Noodles & Company, 9719 Colerain Ave., Colerain Township (first win) ❚ Pizza Hut, 6463 Glenway Ave., Green Township (third win) ❚ Loveland Dairy Whip, 611 W. Loveland Ave., Loveland (first win) School cafeterias and daycares ❚ Colerain Middle School, Colerain Township (fifth win) ❚ St. Michael School, Sharonville (third win) ❚ C.O. Harrison School, Delhi Township (third win) ❚ Delhi Middle School, Delhi Township (fourth win) ❚ Play Time YMCA Early Learning Center, Colerain Township (second win) ❚ Glendale Elementary School, Glendale (fourth win) ❚ ABC Early Childhood Learning Center, Colerain Township (second win)

Noodles & Company in Colerain Township makes its first appearance on the Hamilton County Public Health Clean Kitchens. PROVIDED

❚ FHCIC P&G Ivorydale, St. Bernard (second win) ❚ Ameritas Life Insurance, Forest Park (sixth win) ❚ Loveland Early Childhood Center, Loveland (ninth win) ❚ Loveland High School, Loveland (ninth win) ❚ Loveland Intermedia School, Loveland (ninth win) ❚ Loveland Primary School, Loveland (ninth win) ❚ Rainbow Early Learning Center, Northbend (first win) ❚ Winton Woods Elementary, Forest Park (sixth win) ❚ Winton Woods Primary North, Green Hills (sixth win) ❚ Winton Woods Primary School South, Springfield Township (sixth win) ❚ Winton Woods High School, Forest Park (fourth win) ❚ Winton Woods Intermediate School, Forest Park (sixth win) ❚ All About Kids Childcare, Green Township (first win) ❚ Mt. Notre Dame High School Cafeteria, Reading (sixth win)

❚ Cincinnati Early Learning Center, Harrison (sixth win) ❚ Whitewater Valley Elementary, Harrison (eighth win) ❚ Miamitown Elementary, Whitewater Township (second win) ❚ Crosby Elementary, Crosby Township (eighth win) ❚ Harrison Elementary, Harrison (fifth win) ❚ Harrison Junior School, Harrison (third win) ❚ Harrison High School, Harrison (second win) ❚ St. Joseph Home, Sharonville (third win) Senior centers and retirement communities: ❚ Carriage Court of Kenwood, Sycamore Township (second win) ❚ Miami Township Senior Center, Cleves (eighth win) ❚ The Home of Hearthstone, Mount Healthy (fourth win) ❚ Artis Senior Living of Bridgetown, Green Township (second win) ❚ Glendale Place Nursing and Rehab Center, Woodlawn (third win) ❚ Shawnee Spring of Harrison, Harrison (sixth win) To be considered for a Clean Kitchen Award, facilities must: ❚ Have three or fewer violations in the previous two years prior to applying. ❚ Have no “critical” or repeat violations in the previous two years. ❚ Maintain at least two staff members with Level 1 Food Handler certification or at least one staff member with a current ServSafe certificate. ❚ Submit applications along with corresponding documentation. ❚ Have a minimum of two years of inspection data on file with Hamilton County Public Health.

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10B ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

SCHOOL NEWS

University of Dayton senior, Alyssa Ramstetter is a 2015 graduate of Seton High School.

UC hosts annual Oliver Nikoloff Invitational Track & Field Meet With so many colleges now searching nationally and even globally for student/athletes, it’s refreshing to see hometown students choosing and excelling at our local universities. The University of Cincinnati’s annual Oliver Nikoloff Invitational Track & Field Meet featured, among others, three local area women competing for their respective schools: UC, Miami and Dayton. The meet, held at Gettler Stadium and Coy Field on April 5-6, attracted men’s and women’s teams from Ohio, Kentucky, Indiana and Pennsylvania hundreds of athletes from 20 colleges. Terrence Huge, Enquirer contributor

CCDS Stock Market teams score seven of Top 10 places in state Cincinnati Country Day Middle School teams captured seven out of the Top 10 places in the Stock Market Game

CCDS students who captured second place in the state for the Middle School Stock Market Game are, from left, Sohan Gangam of Mason, Josh Williamson of West Chester and Ethan Rezer of Delhi Township. PROVIDED

for Ohio. A total of 130 teams competed. Eighth graders Sohan Gangam of Mason, Ethan Rezer of Delhi Township and Josh Williamson of Liberty Township took 2nd place with a 10.46% gain in 10 weeks. Their virtual portfolio included stocks in Amazon, Cinemark Holdings, Inc., Walt Disney Company, Hyatt Hotels Corporation and Marriott International. Other CCDS teams that placed are: ❚ 3rd Place: Wilson Bagnoli, Leo Joffe, Alex Riemann, all of Indian Hill, and Will Schiff, Hyde Park ❚ 4th Place: Luc Bonomo of Indian Hill, Lucas de Alarcon of Madeira, Will Donovan of Green Township and Carson Yackey of Liberty Township ❚ 6th Place: Josh Back of Loveland, Tristen Davis of Milford and Yousef Mostafa of Mason ❚ 7th Place: Ben Jaccaci, Max Berghausen, both of Indian Hill, and Noah

Mice (from left): Isabella Fontanini, Abigail Kubicek, Angelina Gopal and Lola Plunkett. PROVIDED

Webb of Maineville ❚ 8th Place: Gavin Clark of Sycamore Township, Joe Gibson of Montgomery, Sam Jensen of Loveland and Titan McMullen of Union Township ❚ 9th Place: Matthew Castrucci, Emil Hettich, both of Indian Hill, and Nick Watts of Hyde Park ❚ Eighth-grade math teacher Susie Lewis is their Stock Market Game advisor. Cindy Kranz

Kinderballet performs ‘Cinderella’ across Tristate This year the AVO School of Ballet and the Cincinnati Kinderballet are celebrating 71 years of ballet excellence in Cincinnati. The tradition that Anneliese Von Oettingen began in 1948 still flourishes and enriches the arts in our community today. Our performing company, The Cincinnati Kinderballet will perform the classic “Cinderella” this Ma all across See SCHOOLS , Page 11B

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COMMUNITY PRESS WEST ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ 11B

SCHOOL NEWS

ganizations, the recipients were selected from finalists in the 2019 National Merit Scholarship Corp.’s scholarship program. Finalists were selected from more than 1.6 million juniors attending 22,000 high schools nationally who took the 2017 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test. Each of these scholarships is renewalable for up to four years of college undergraduate study and range in value from $500 to $10,000 annually. National Merit does not provide individual amounts for each scholarship. Typically winners are children of employees, residents of communities the company serves, or students who plan to pursue college majors the grantor wishes to encourage. Those winners from southwest Ohio, by high school, scholarship, and their choice of possible careers, are: ❚ Cincinnati Hills Christian Academy: Chandler Ashman, Fifth Third, medicine ❚ Indian Hill: Priyanka Musti, Siemens, computer science ❚ Mason: Amanda Harper, Macy’s, international business; Pranav Viswanathan, Siemens, medicine ❚ St. Ursula Academy: Madeline Cherry, Fifth Third, veterinary medicine ❚ St. Xavier: Joseph Wiseman, Novartis, medicine ❚ Schilling School for Gifted Children: Sean Swayze, Johnson and Johnson, economics ❚ Springboro: Grace Sullivan, Pfizer, medicine ❚ Sycamore: Mallory Hall, Johnson & Johnson, biology; Nicholas McDonough, Fifth Third, computer engineering ❚ Turpin: Cecilia Russell, Macy’s, physics ❚ Walnut Hills: Rithu Rajagopala, Siemens, business management In Northern Kentucky, Caitlyn Powell, from Larry Ryle High School, received a Macy’s scholarship. She plans to go into chemistry. Sue Kiesewetter, Enquirer contributor

Continued from Page 10B

the Tristate. We have partnered with local schools, libraries, and community organizations to present this classical ballet story in an engaging format to children and adults alike. Information about dates, times and locations for all performances can be found at avoballet.org or call 513-4810092. Most performances are free and tickets are not required. The AVO School of Ballet and Cincinnati Kinderballet is supported by the generosity of almost 40,000 contributors to the ArtsWave Community Campaign. www.ArtsWave.org. Laura Taphorn

The Drama Workshop closes its season with the musical ‘Working’ The Drama Workshop concludes another great year of theatre in its home in the Cheviot business district with the classic musical “Working” from May 3 through May 19. Performances are at The Glenmore Playhouse, 3716 Glenmore Ave, Cheviot. “Working’” by Grammy and Academy Award winner Stephen Schwartz, is based on Studs Terkel’s best-selling book of interviews with the American workforce. It is a loving portrait of the workday told from the perspective of those that the world so often overlooks – the schoolteacher, the housewife, the fireman and the waitress among many. It includes a wide range of musical styles, including contributions from five-time Grammy Award winner James Taylor and Pulitzer Prize winner LinManuel Miranda. Director Amy Waldfogle has wanted to do this show for years, and is grateful for the chance to stage it at TDW. “I love that the lyrics and the text of the monologues are all taken from real words that real people said about themselves and their job,” she explained. “There’s a rawness and honesty that permeates every single line because it’s all real, not an

Garrett Liette, Cathy Judge, Mitch Ruth, Jazz McMullen, Liz Taylor and Kevin Noll play a variety of roles in The Drama Workshop’s production of “Working,” based on the book by Studs Terkel. KRISTY RUCKER/PROVIDED

author trying to present a realistic portrayal.” Actor Clare Hingsbergen agreed. “This show does a great job at sharing stories of real people and I think people like coming to the theatre and feeling connected with the piece they are seeing. I think everyone can connect with something in this show.” “Working” is Elizabeth Taylor’s first time performing with TDW, and says she’s enjoyed working with the diverse group of actors who bring the show to life. “Working” is directed and choreographed by Waldfogle and produced by Mark Waldfogle, with musical direction by Allen Lindsey. The rest of the creative team includes Whitney Ball, Amanda Borchers, Elaine Volker, Eric Bardes, Greg Schaper, Jason Cox, Ray Persing, and Valeria Amburgey. The cast consists of veterans from around Cincinnati: Clare Hingsbergen, Kyndra Jefferies, Cathy Judge, Garret Liette, Jazzmann McMullen, Harold Murphy, Kevin Noll, Cather-

ine Ross, Mitch Ruth, Helen Swartwout, Jim Swartwout, and Elizabeth Taylor. “Working” contains adult language. Tickets to “Working” are $18 if ordered in advance, or $20 the day of the show. Show dates and times are May10, 11, 17 and 18 at 8 p.m., May 5, 11, and 19 at 2 pm, and May 16 at 7:30 p.m. Tickets can be ordered through The Drama Workshop’s ticket line at 513598-8303, or online via the TDW website at www.thedramaworkshop.org. Ray Persing

13 receive corporate-sponsored National Merit scholarships Thirteen seniors from 12 southwest Ohio and Northern Kentucky high schools are among 1,000 students nationally who are receiving corporatesponsored National Merit Scholarships. It is the first of four announcements of scholarship recipients between today and mid-July. Funded by about 160 companies, foundations, and other business or-

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12B ❚ WEDNESDAY, MAY 8, 2019 ❚ COMMUNITY PRESS WEST

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 0505 WORDS OF INTRODUCTION

1

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ Brendan Emmett Quigley is a professional puzzle maker in Brookline, Mass. He says he’ll make puzzles for pretty much any market that will cut him a check — ‘‘not to mention a few others that still owe me money.’’ Brendan sold his first crossword to The Times in 1996, when he was a senior at the University of New Hampshire. This is his 182nd puzzle for the paper. — W.S. AC R O S S 41 Data for auto 81 ____ Zion Church 10 2002 or 2019 Super

RELEASE DATE: 5/12/2019

1 Thieves often go by them 8 Do well 14 Rhyme scheme of “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner” 18 A little 19 Didn’t strictly follow one’s diet, say 20 The Princess of Power, in cartoons 21 KIND words? 23 Steadfast 24 Pulitzer-winning playwright Zoë 25 Ranking 50th among all states, say 26 Simon & Garfunkel song about emotional detachment 28 Home to the Triple-A Aces 29 Sports org. based in Indianapolis 30 Porridge ingredients 33 Wife of Jared Kushner 34 Craft measured in cubits 35 HAS words? 38 Retreat 39 Need for a restricted area 40 Needs for some touring bands Online subscriptions: Today’s puzzle and more than 4,000 past puzzles, nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year).

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11 “How was ____ know?” 12 Game meat 13 Work that includes the Skáldskaparmál 14 Now, in Nogales 15 BAD words? 16 What Polly wants 17 1990s war locale 19 Bank posting 20 Macedonian, e.g. 22 Howard ____, “The Fountainhead” protagonist 27 “Cool” sum 29 Pest control targets 31 Motrin competitor 32 Bolshevik’s foe 35 Unceasing critic 36 Mate’s affirmative 37 Employs as 39 Whittles (down) 41 Belgian river to the North Sea 42 Fish that can swim backward 43 Queen Elizabeth’s husband 44 LAST words? 46 Cause of a paper jam 48 Gobsmacked 49 Old SeaWorld attraction 50 Colonial merchant Samuel after whom a famous island is named

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2012 Nissan Xterra Pro 4 X, 4X4 2004 Toyota 4 Runner SR5 4WD 2014 Jeep Grand Cherokee Summitt 2015 GMC Sierra Dbl Cab SLE 2014 Audi TT Quattro, 2 Dr. Coupe 2009 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4 Dr 2012 Ford Explorer XLT, 3rd Row Seat 2010 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Sahara, Low Miles 2013 Chevrolet Avalanche 4WD LT 2013 Honda CRV AWD LX 2012 Toyota 4 Runner LTD, loaded 2014 Ford Fusion Titanium AWD 2016 Toyota Corolla LE 2017 Nissan Altima 2.5S 2016 Chevrolet Cruze Limited

WE SERVICE ALL MAKES & MODELS - WE HONOR ANYONE’S COUPONS!

$16,488 $8,488 $21,988 $26,988 $19,988 $15,688 $12,995 $21,388 $24,988 $12,495 $23,488 $15,488 $13,988 $14,988 $13,988


MAY 8, 2019 μ WEST - COMMUNITY μ 1C

Classifieds cincinnati.com

HOMES

JOBS

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Homes of Distinction VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

LIS JUS TE T D

5028 AIRYMEADOWS DRIVE Our buyers just bought this newly updated home with an inground pool and finished lower level. Nearby Vinoklet Winery. Congratulations from The Deutsch Team!

MT. AIRY

R YE HT BU OUG B

2302 RAEBURN TERRACE

We helped our buyers moving back to Cinti find the perfect home for their new life and focus! They chose a beautiful home in the Raeburn Neighborhood. Cheers! from The Deutsch Team

LIS JUS TE T D

COLERAIN WEST

R YE HT BU OUG B

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

BLOI BJUUYS SUTG ETR EHDT

OAKTREE CONDOS DELHI

513-460-5302

CE-0000708971

829 NEEB ROAD Our buyer sold their ranch and we helped him find the perfect condo for simple and down-sized living. We can help you reach your real estate goals.

R YE HT BU OUG B

WESTWOOD

LIS JUS TE T D

CE-0000708972

We just sold this 2-family investment property. If you’re looking to buy or sell a multi-family, give us a call! 513-460-5302 Tom Deutsch, Jr.

Tom Deutsch, Jr.

513-460-5302

CE-0000708974

Homes for Sale-Ohio

513-460-5302

CE-0000708975

Homes for Sale-Ohio

Real Estate

Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

The University of Kentucky is accepting applications for the position of Extension Staff Assistant/ Receptionist located in Boone County. Major duties of this position include face to face and multiple-line telephone interaction with the general public; word processing including Microsoft Office, Access & Publisher; filing, maintaining databases, meeting room reservations, & mailing lists, and providing support for county agents and staff. High school diploma or GED required. Previous experience as a receptionist in an office setting preferred. The salary range is $12.00-15.00 per hour. To apply for RE#18128 a UK Online Application must be submitted to http://ukjobs.uky.edu/ postings/227322. Application deadline is May 15, 2019. For more information or assistance call 859-586-6101. The University of Kentucky is an equal opportunity employer and encourages applications from minorities and women.

CE-GCI0183524-01

Rentals

PRICE HILL, W- 1BR, 1BA, kit, patio, yard, w & d hkup, wtr incl, $595 + utils & dep. No sec 8. approved Call 513-885-3139, between 10am - 8pm

great places to live... All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.

3144 WESTBROOK DRIVE

Extension Staff Assistant/Receptionist Boone County Extension Service RE18128

Cincinnati Family & Senior Low Income Apts. Section 8. 1-3BR. 513-929-2402 Equal Opportunity Housing Cincinnati Low Income, Section 8 Apartments. Affordable Housing, Rent Based on Income. 2-3BR. Call 513-929-2402. Ebcon Inc. Mgt. Equal Opportunity Housing

FT. THOMAS. 1 & 2 BDRM APTS & 1 BDRM TOWNHOMES 859-441-3158 MT. LOOKOUT 1 & 2 BDRM Grandin Bridge Apartments 513-871-6419

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

HILTON HEAD CONDO June 15-22nd, 2bd, 2ba, $950 843-802-4965

FARM EMPLOYMENT Middletown Monroe Lebanon Trenton West Chester Hamilton Fairfield Loveland Cincinnati 1-4BR $575-$1925. (ASK ABOUT SPECIALS) 513-737-2640 OR WWW.BBRENTS.COM NEW CONSTRUCTION Hamilton West 4BR Homes Cincinnati 4BR Homes $1575- $1695 (Ask about specials) 513-737-2640 OR www.BBRENTS.com

North Avondale 3BR, 3 Family, equipt kitch, coin laundry, on bus line. $700/mo+dep. 513-314-7220

Wanted dependable, mature individual to help with mowing and various odd jobs. •Perfect Job Opporunity for Retiree •Seasonal. Flexible Hours •Experience with farm machinery •References Required •Be able to pass a Police background check. Please Call Cindy at 859-393-5856 & leave a message

HILTON HEAD ISLAND, SC Sea Pines. 3BR, 3 1/2BA Townhome on golf course & near Sea Pines beach club. Rented only by the owners. 513-314-7987

SERVING OHIO, INDIANA & KENTUCKY

OPEN SATURDAY 12-1:30

OPEN SATURDAY 10-11:30

Bridgetown - 6877 Kildare 4 Bdrm/3 ba $239,900 Dir: Werk to L on South to st. H-1032

Bridgetown - 1660 Neeb 3 Bdrm/3 ba $329,900 Dir: Neeb Road, 1 door north of Julmar. H-1049

Bridgetown - Hard to find Condo in Oak Village! Well maintained 2 bedroom with a study, vaulted ceilings in LR, balcony, and garage. $124,900 H-9913

Bridgetown - Outstanding 4 bdrm 3½ ba Br 2 sty on Cul de sac st! Fin LL w w/o to Ingr Pool w/ Outside Bar! Side Entry Gar! New Mech! $424,900 H-9997

Bridgetown - Sharp 2+ bedroom condo at 6563 Chesapeake Run w/full finished basement – 3 baths, `1 car att gar & more! $149,900 H-1057

Cheviot - Charming 2 bd, 2 ba 2 story. Renovated kit, new roof, updated baths, newer wwc, tankless HWH, fin LL, 1 car det gar, level lot. $127,000 H-1038

Cheviot - Sharp 1,162 sf 5 rm, 2 bdrm, 2 full ba entry 1st fl condo. Disability access w/ wide drways/no step shower. Newr appl/mechs. Det gar. $74,900 H-1062

Brian Bazeley

Jeanne Rieder

Doug Rolfes

Marilyn Hoehne

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Jeanne Rieder

Cheviot - Exciting business opp to run a restaurant, bar or entertainment facility. Existing business up for sale with Real Estate. $239,900 H-9916

Cheviot - Zoned Commercial, can be used as single occupant or multi occupant. Great off street pkg. 1653 SF plus finished LL.$57,900 H-9946

Colerain - Well maintained 3 bedroom ranch with full basement & 1 car garage! Level fenced yard! New roof/HVAC/ Appliances! $99,900 H-9998

College Hill - Handy Man Special set up as a two family. Needs rehab. Priced to sell! $50,000 H-1058

HoetingWisselDattilo

HoetingWisselDattilo

Jeanne Rieder

Brian Bazeley

Covedale - Large 2 family w/2 –bed, 1-bath units & sep utilities including C/A. Located on quiet dead-end st. $89,900 H-9745

East West Chester - Outstanding brick 4 bd 4 ba 2 sty on cul de sac! Open flrplan. Bright kit/ SS appl. Flat yd/wood view! Big deck. Fin Ll. Ovrszd gar! $339,900 H-1043

Green Twp. - Large 3 bdrm, 1.5 ba Bi-Level Home! Move-in ready w/LL fam rm, study and much more! Hdwd floors, big deck, fen in yd. $139,900 H-1028

Green Twp. - Prime location for retail office development. Almost an acre on busy intersection. $675,000 H-1045

Green Twp. - Beautiful Ott Home! 3/4 bdrms, Great Rm w/GFP, 1st fl Master,up-dated eat in kit, LL w/new wwc, wine cellar, wrkshp,2 car gar. $369,900 H-9982

Harrison - Beautiful no steps, 2 bdrm with study, 2 car garage, gourmet kit with granite tops,Mbdrm with adj bath + wic covered patio.$219,900 H-1053

Miami Twp. - Many options.Beatiful 3 + acres for bldg. with a 3 bd Mobile Home included.Home has new deck. Could divide into 3 lots. $52,000 H-9728

Doug Rolfes

Jeanne Rieder

HoetingWisselDattilo

Brian Bazeley

Heather Claypool

Heather Claypool

Dan Nieman

Miami Twp. - Move in ready! 4 bd,3.5 bath, 2 sty! 1st fl fam rm w/ wbfp! Fin LL with study/5th bd, rec rm & w/o! Fen yd w//wooded view! 2 car gar. $197,500 H-9987

St.Bernard - 2 Family,both spacious 4 room, 1 bedroom units. Sep furnaces,2 car garage.Ideal location, 2 minutes to I-75. $99,900 H-1031

Westwood - Must see! Elevator, heated pkg gar, safe and secure. 2 bd, 2 ba, newer mech,washer & dryer hookup in unit.Pets under 30# OK. $68,900 H-9999

Westwood - Great location. Separate entrances. 2 car detached garage. Old world charm $89,900 H-1059

White Oak - 4 Bd 2 Sty, Fam Rm Add w/ Stone FP + Vauled Beamed Ceilings,Fen LevYd. Newer HWH &AC.Immediate Occupancy $172,900 H-1054

White Oak - Orig owner 9 rm, 4 bd, 2 full + 2 half ba 2 sty.2 car att gar! Newer equip kit! Gas FP! Grand LL rec rm! Cov’d patio/ lev yd. $235,000 H-1061

White Oak - Nice 4 bd, 2 ½ ba 2sty! Updated kitchen & baths. New roof, doors, driveway. 2 car oversized garage,quiet cul-de-sac st. $235,000 H-1051

Lisa Ibold

Mike Wright

Hamad - Doyle

Brian Bazeley

Heather Claypool

Jeanne Rieder

Winkler Team


2C μ WEST - COMMUNITY μ MAY 8, 2019

Find a home that fits your family in a neighborhood that fits your life.

Your dream home should come with a dream neighborhood. That’s why Cincinnati | Homes provides exclusive details on neighborhoods, lifestyles and area amenities with every listing.

cincinnati.com/Homes


MAY 8, 2019 μ WEST - COMMUNITY μ 3C

Community

Assorted

Careers

Adopt Me

Announce

Stuff

Jobs

Pets

announcements, novena...

all kinds of things...

new beginnings...

find a new friend...

Special Notices-Clas HARRIS DIATOMACEOUS EARTH FOOD GRADE 100% OMRI Listed-For Organic Use. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com

2-ABOVE GROUND BURIAL CRYPTS, ST. JOSEPH NEW CEMETERY. $5,498 FOR BOTH; 513-518-8268

HANDYMAN Experienced, Reasonable, No Job Too Big or Too Small. Including electric & plumbing. Steve 513-491-6672

We are seeking Full-time Banking Customer Service Representatives at our Florence, KY location to provide excellent customer service in daily transactions, customer inquiries, and problem resolution in accordance with Bank policies. No evenings or weekends required.

Preferred requirements for the Banking Customer Service Rep include: - High School Education or equivalent experience - Computer proficiency - Prior cash handling and customer service experience Direct inquiries to: denise.sigmon@cdbt.com EOE/AAP

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things...

AKC English Golden Retrievers 8 wks old, shots, dewormed, & vet checked, Health Guarantee, Asking $1,500. Call or Text 937-603-2272 Golden Retriever Pups - AKC Family-raised! $500 Very Loyal Companions! Call 765-853-5751 Irish Setter Puppies, 10 weeks old, males & females, current on vaccines & dewormed, $400 740-225-0332

Labrador pups- AKC-6wkschoc females- shots and vet checked (859)588-6727

Sunday, May 19 -----------8am-3pm $4.00/Adult Early Buying 6am-8am $6/Adult Rain or Shine 513-922-6847 burlingtonantiqueshow.com

BUYING 35mm Photo Slides primarily railroad & transportation related 1940’s- 1970’s, Comic Books 1940’s - present, 1920’s -1950’s Dectective & Pin-up Pulp Magazines, 513-325-4913

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.

BUYING-RECORD ALBUMS & CDs, METAL, JAZZ, BLUES, ROCK, RAP, INDIE, R&B & REGGAE. 513-683-6985 CASH FOR RECORDS Private collector buying 45’s & LP’s Up to $10 per record, small & large collections. Roger 513-575-2718 I can come to you! I buy pre-1980’s home contents: bikes, stereo, records, jewelry, keyboards, guitars, etc. Call: 513-4735518 I BUY STEREO SPEAKERS, PRE AMPS, AMPS, REEL TO REEL TURNTABLE, RECORDS, INSTRUMENTS, ETC (513) 473-5518 # I BUY VINYL RECORDS Rock, Metal, Punk, Indie, R&B, 78s, etc. We make house calls. 513-428-4695

INSTANT CASH PAID For Baseball Cards Coins, Gold, Silver, Antiques, Old Toys, Watches, Comics, Case Knives Military, Trains, Autographs, Many Others! We Pick-up. 513-295-5634

$$$ PAID for LPs, CDs, CASSETTES -ROCK, BLUES, INDIE, METAL, JAZZ, ETC + VINTAGE STEREO EQUIP, DVDs & MEMORABILIA. 50 YRS COMBINED BUYING EXPERIENCE! WE CAN COME TO YOU! 513-591-0123

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347 WE BUY COMIC BOOKS! Top Prices Paid Will Come To You 1-888-88-COMIC ComicBuyingCenter.com

Morkies beautiful black and white F & M, tiny 1-2 lbs, 9 wks old, first shots, $700. 513-324-9642

find a new friend... Dog, Pyrenean Shepherd, Female, $$1200, 8 weeks, Black, Loyal, intelligent, athletic To approved home only. Both parents AKC CHAMPIONS. â??Rough Faceâ?? variety. Health guarantees. (937)213-1897 jds@steddoml aw.com

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

1 BUYER of OLD CARS CLASSIC, ANTIQUE ’30-40-50-60-70s, Running or not. 513-403-7386

Rides

$ ALL VINTAGE MOTORCYCLES WANTED PRE-1980 ANY SHAPE CASH PAID $ ALL MAKES & MODELS CALL 845-389-3239 or cyclesndmore10@gmail.com

best deal for you... Mechanics Automotive Hand Power Tools Socket sets (1/4", 3/8", 1/2" and 3/4") and power tools along with it ; 5 Snap-on tool boxes (bottom, center, top, and 2-side hang on boxes); Hand tools: wrenches (box end & open end); 5HP air compressor w/ a 30-gallon tank; 2.5 ton floor jack Tools are brand name: Snap-on, Mac, and Cornwell Looking for best offer Call 513-582-8449

Buying All Vehicles Not Just Junk up $3000 Fair cash price, quick pickup. 513-662-4955 We buy junk cars and trucks cash on the spot û†û 513-720-7982 û†û

Service Directory CALL: 877-513-7355 TO PLACE YOUR AD

Hendel’s Affordable ó Tree Service ó Cost EffECtivE ConCrEtE thE nEw & improvEd mEthods drivEways-sidEwalks-patios EtC.. Just Call Calvin 513-307-3502 spring forward-frEE QuotEs

CE-0000708867

Call today for Autumn & Discount Pricing! ± 513-795-6290 ± ± 513-266-4052 ± CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys

Garage Sales neighborly deals...

Florence Estate Sale 15 Sanders Drive Florence. 5/11 & 5/12 Sat 10-3 #’s @ 9:45 Sun 1-3 Contents of home & garage. Grand Union Tea box, hump back trunk, old chests, dressers, chairs, rockers,old. Dr. Bag, Misc tins, primitives, lots of iron shoe horns, glassware, pie safe, lots of books, baseball cards, prints, patio set, Crocks, misc. Tools, file cabinets, office desk, Chainsaw, golf clubs, bikes, Fishing Poles, stereo receiver, speakers etc. lots of misc. smalls. Too much to list all priced to sell! Info & Pics hsestatesales.com or 859-468-9468. Dir- Dixie Hwy - Sanders Dr (between Turfway Rd & Kentaboo Ave

Spring Craft Show! Miami Township Senior Center May 11th 9am-2pm. 8 North Miami Ave. Cleves OH 45002 We will have many crafters and vendors here that will sure have something you need or want. Lunch will also be available for purchase.

10907 Old Colerain Ave. Saturday May 11th, 9a-2p. Vintage, household, & holiday items. Table, furniture, new tool box, & much more. Colerain Villages of Northgate, Large Community Sale. Streets include Amberway, Sunbury, Haddington, Statewood, Pebblebrook, Woodstate, Crosley Farm Dr., Stateland, (All off Commons) Saturday, May 11th 9a-2p Rain Date: May 18th 9a-2p Delhi- Hickory’s Multi Family Annual Sales 1192 Hickorylake Dr. Sat. May 11, 8:30am-? Rain or Shine

Adopt Me

Pets

CINCY STREET RODS 49 Annual Car Show & Swap Meet, Sun 5/19, 9a-4p, Butler co. Fairgrounds, Rt 4, Hamilton, OH Open to all years. Pre-registrations & cruise-in, Sat 5/18, 5p-9p, 513-235-3978, cincystreetrods.com

Labrador pups- AKC - shots and vet checked, male and female, $400, 6 wks, chocolate (859)588-6727

Automotive BURLINGTON ANTIQUE SHOW Boone County Fairgrounds Burlington, KY

BUYING ALL TYPES OF KENNER TOYS & HISTORICAL MEMORABILIA. Help add to the largest private STAR WARS collection in Ohio! Did you or a family member used to work for Kenner? We are LOCAL paying CASH for prototypes, packaging samples, displays, artwork, paperwork, and toys in all conditions. Heck, we will even buy your KENNER business card! Looking specifically for STAR WARS, M.A.S.K., Jurassic Park, GI Joe, Alien, Stretch Armstrong, The Real Ghostbusters, and most character lines. 1980’s and older only please. Help keep Kenner history here in Cincinnati! Call or text 513.500.4209 - Please leave a voicemail if we don’t answer, or email us at CincyStarWarsCollector@gmail.com . Save this ad- we buy all year !

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that on May 20, 2019 at 6:45pm, a public hearing will be held on the Tax Budget prepared by the North Bend Village Council of Hamilton County, Ohio, for the next succeeding fiscal year ending December 31, 2020. Such hearing will be held at the office of the North Bend Administration Building, 21 Taylor Avenue, North Bend, Ohio 45052. WHP,May8,’19#3529583

Miami Township Senior Center May 10th 9am-2pm. 8 North Miami Ave. Cleves OH 45002 Come support our annual yard sale/bake sale/ jewelry sale. You never know what you might find! A lunch will be available for purchase.

Garage Sale! Miami Heights, Sat. May 11th, 8am-1pm. 8218 Jordan Ridge. Variety of items, art, country primitive, household items, furniture, lots of misc.

Sell your car. VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

CHECK OUT CLASSIFIED online at cincinnati.com

GRAND ANTIQUE MALL 9701 Reading Rd., Cinti,

OH 45215 513-554-1919 www.grandantiquemall.com

JOIN US FOR OUR ANNUAL TENT/ YARD SALE Multi-Dealers, DJ, concessions 9:00am-6:00pm Saturday, May 11th Rain Date: May 12th May 11th 9am-1pm. 2 Yard Sales in One neighborhood Furniture and household items no early birds Griststone Circle in Shaw Estate Ind., KY White Oak- 3429 Wheatcroft Dr. Fri 5/10 & Sat 5/11, 8a-3p & Sun 5/12, 8a-12p. Plants, perennials, iris’s, 60’s Davis end table, & Misc.

White Oak; Plant Sale! May 2nd 3rd and 4th 930am230pm. Hostas, ferns, perennials, native wild flowers, house plants, dollar table, free garden magazines, 3506 Jessup Rd 45239 White Oak; Plant Sale! May 9th, 10th and 11th 930am-230pm. Hostas, ferns, perennials, native wild flowers, pond plants, dollar table, free garden magazines, 3506 Jessup Rd. Yard Sale: 224 JUPITER DR. Delhi 10/6 8:30a - 2:30p Baby Sleepers, Blankets, Sheets, Bounce Chair, Swing, Booster Seats, Gates, Play Yard, Etc. Girl’s 3mo - Sz 18, Boy’s 3mo - Men’s 3X, Women’s Clothes 50 cents each (5 for $2), Shoes, Halloween Costumes, DollsBarbies, Bratz, Monster High, Cabbage Patch, Polly Pockets. Lego Table, Sm & Lrg Legos, Mega Bricks, Lincoln Logs, Trucks, Dinosaurs. Little Ponies, Kid’s Kitchen & Dishes, Toolbench, Games, Books, Puzzles, Sm Bike, Tricycles, Riding Toys, Scooter, Chalkboard, Linens, Miscellaneous. Rain Date Oct 13th.


4C μ WEST - COMMUNITY μ MAY 8, 2019

Your generous monetary donation provides shoes, coats, glasses and basic necessities to neediest kids right here in the Tri-state. With so many children living in poverty, it’s a great way for you to help the children who need it most. So, step up for Neediest Kids of All and send your donation today!

GIVE TO NEEDIEST KIDS OF ALL Yes, I would like to contribute to NKOA. Enclosed is $___________________. Name______________________________________________________________________________________ Address_______________________________________________________________ Apt. No. ___________ City_______________________________________________________ State_________________ Zip___________ Please send this coupon and your check or money order, payable to: NEEDIEST KIDS OF ALL, P.O. Box 636666, Cincinnati, OH 45263-6666

Make a credit card contribution online at Neediestkidsofall.com.

Neediest Kids of All is a non-profit corporation now in its 64th year. Its principal place of business is Cincinnati, and it is registered with the Ohio Attorney General as a charitable trust. Contributions are deductible in accordance with applicable tax laws.

Profile for Enquirer Media

Price Hill Press 05/08/19  

Price Hill Press 05/08/19