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Your Community Press newspaper Serving Price Hill and Covedale E-mail: pricehillpress@communitypress.com We d n e s d a y, M a r c h 1 0 , 2 0 1 0

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Street work coming to Warsaw By Kurt Backscheider

One lane of traffic in each direction will be open throughout construction, she East Price Hill residents will have to be said. patient while driving along Warsaw “I think the streetscape Avenue for the next several months, but it made a big difference on the should all be worth it in the end. Kroger side. That was a pretCrews are at work installing a new ty nice improvement,” she water main along the corridor, from said. McPherson to Glenway avenues, and Smith “We’ve worked for quite a when the new water line is installed the few years with the communiroadway will be re-paved and new curbs ty, and we’re on target to finish the project.” will be added. Ken Smith, executive director of Price Hill As part of the second phase of a Will, said area business owners and resistreetscape improvement project in the area, dents are looking forward to the work being the north side of Warsaw Avenue will also completed. get new brick sidewalk pavers, trees and “I think certainly it will help beautify the street lights along the section of the corridor core of the business district, and it will confrom McPherson Avenue to St. Lawrence tinue to expand redevelopment,” he said. Corner. “It should provide some unifying features “It’s essentially going to match the to give us a sense of place in the business streetscape along the Kroger block (across district.” the street),” said Angie Strunc, architect Strunc said work on the streetscape with Cincinnati’s Department of Transporta- improvements will begin when the water tion and Engineering. main installation is completed, which the She said the $1.2 million project is sched- city hopes is wrapped up this month. uled to be completed by August. kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Volume 83 Number 11 © 2010 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

Irish heritage

Glenn O’Dell plans to open his Crow’s Nest on West Eighth Street for a St. Patrick’s Day celebration. – FULL STORY, A2

KURT BACKSCHEIDER/STAFF

In the second phase of a streetscape project along Warsaw Avenue, this side of the street will receive improvements matching the trees, street lights and brick sidewalk pavers that were installed when the new Kroger at the corner of Warsaw and Enright opened.

Seton principal leaving in June By Kurt Backscheider

Spelled right?

A Western Hills woman was a member of the third-place team in the 20th annual Scripps Spelling Bee for Literacy. Some of the words her team had to spell – ultimatum, incommensurable, bellicosity, and fainéant. – FULL STORY, A6

Clean teeth

Do you know where this is in the Price Hill area? If not, it’s time to go hunting in the neighborhood to see if you can find it. Send your best guess to pricehillpress@communitypress. com or call 853-6287, along with your name. Deadline to call is noon Friday. If you’re correct, we’ll publish your name in next week’s newspaper along with the correct answer. See last week’s correct guessers on B5.

Online community

Visit our Web site at Cincinnati.com/community to find news, sports, photos, events and more from your community. You’ll find content from The Community Press, The Cincinnati Enquirer and your neighbors. While you’re there, check out Share, and submit stories and photos of your own.

To place an ad, call 242-4000.

kbackscheider@communitypress.com

Susan Gibbons said she will miss the people in the Seton High School community the most. After she shakes the hands of the members of the class of 2010 at graduation this spring and finalizes all the grade reports in June, she will bid farewell to the school she’s loved for the past 30 years. Gibbons announced she will not return as principal of Seton for the 2010-2011 school year. “It just seemed like the right time,” she said. “Thirty years is a long time. I’ve always felt you should go out while you still have energy. “I’m really happy with where the school is.” Gibbons, whose last official day is June 30, said a favorite Seton memory she’ll always carry with her is the day 225 students and staff gathered on the floor of the gymnasium to cut their ponytails for Pantene’s Beautiful Lengths Project, which turns donated hair into wigs for cancer patients. “I think it was the single-most powerful event we did, just for the symbolism of it and because so many people did it for the right reasons,” she said. “I can remember walking into the gym and thinking, ‘This is what Seton is all about – giving.’” Sister Kathryn Ann Connelly, a Sister of Charity and former Seton principal, hired Gibbons as a math teacher in 1980. Two years

Tribute to a principal

Seton High School is renovating its library and renaming it The Susan M. Gibbons Media Learning Center in honor of the 30 years of service Gibbons gave to the Gibbons school. Kathy Ciarla, Seton’s spokeswoman, said the school is also planning an all-school tribute for Gibbons in May with students and staff, as well as an evening event for alumnae and friends of Seton. later Connelly promoted her to director of student activities. “I am very proud to say that I was responsible for hiring Susie. She has served the Seton community with class, dignity and demonstrated leadership skills,” Connelly said. “She is what I consider a personification of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton. In her dealings with students and in her mannerisms I never questioned the spirituality or faith-based education going on in this institution. Susie is a woman of faith and dedicated to Catholic education, just like St. Elizabeth.” Gibbons was named the school’s assistant principal of academics in 1990, and was promoted to principal in 1997. She is the first lay person to serve as the school’s principal. “I have been blessed to work at a place that I love, and have loved since my first day at Seton,” she said.

“I have enjoyed 30 years of personal and professional growth and feel very fortunate that I was able to change jobs within this great institution.” Kathy Ciarla, Seton’s spokeswoman, said under Gibbons’ guidance the school has taken great strides in curriculum and technology, and it was during her tenure the school began its transformation into the “New Seton,” successfully completing a $13.5 million building and renovation project featuring five state-of-theart science labs, a 1,000-seat gymnasium and commons area, parking garage and new administrative offices. Ciarla said the school now offers 15 Advanced Placement courses, and students and staff keep up with technology through the use of wireless personal Tablet PCs, an advancement Gibbons helped implement. “All the technology we use changes the face of education, and it certainly shatters the ceilings and walls,” Gibbons said. Sister Patricia Cruise, a Sister of Charity and Seton’s president, said she is grateful to Gibbons for her exceptional leadership. She has done a tremendous job of moving Seton forward and helped create an outstanding school that provides young women with an exceptional Catholic education,” Cruise said. “She will be greatly missed, but she will always remain a part of the Seton family and her legacy will live on in all of the students and educational programs at Seton.”

Holy Family student speaks to CISE group The Catholic Inner-city Schools Education Fund had its annual volunteer appreciation event at the University Club in Cincinnati Feb. 25, celebrating the culmination of the 2009 CISE Campaign which raised more than $3.4 million Holy Family School eighthgrader Molly Beck gave a speech directed to the donors and volunteers. Beck spoke with poise, humor and sincerity. She started out by saying, “As I see it, you are investing in the future, and not just ours!” and ended her 10minute speech with a very genuine thank you as she said, “One thing our teachers stress with us is, ‘To whom much is given, much is expected.’ We need

to give back when it is our turn. As I look around this room tonight, I am imagining that in about 20 years, your chairs will be filled by me and other CISE graduates. In the name of all CISE students, I say a very heartfelt thank you, thank you … so, so much!” You can find a transcript of Molly’s full speech at www.cisefund.org. Campaign co-chairmen Tom Heekin and Ed Rigaud, were honored; however, the students representing the CISE schools stole the show. The program opened with an inspiring performance by the St. Francis de Sales Youth Choir led by Angeline Wheeler. They began with “Gabi, Gabi” a South African praise song which translated

PROVIDED.

Molly Beck, an eighth-grader at Holy Family School, spoke at the Catholic Inner-city Schools Education Fund annual volunteer appreciation event. means, “Praise the Father, he frees all the captives and gives the hungry bread.” They followed with a Swahili version of the famous

hymn “All creatures of our God and king.” Catholic Inner-city School Education is a non profit organization supporting eight urban Catholic schools in Cincinnati. CISE provides tuition assistance to students in low income families. Of the more than 1,300 students in the CISE schools, 82 percent are not Catholic and 88 percent are from low income families. In addition, CISE provides scholarship assistance to over 220 CISE graduates enrolled in area Catholic high schools. Information about CISE can be found at www.cisefund.org or by calling the CISE office at 513-4213131.


A2

Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

News

Fashion designer donates to hospital By Kurt Backscheider

of jewelry for teenagers undergoing treatment at Cincinnati Children’s HospiMegan Fenno said the tal Medical Center. mission of her fashion com“My parents brought me pany is to not only create here (Cincinnati Children’s) trendy accessories, but to as a child and I had a great also be an active part of the experience,” said Fenno, community by participating owner and founder of FENin fundraisers, making NOfashion.com, an online donations and raising jewelry, fashion and accesawareness for different sories boutique she runs out causes. of her home. The Green Township res“The doctors and nurses ident stayed true to her all went out of their way to company’s mission by make me feel comfortable recently donating 50 pieces and at ease, and when I found out that a group of children there are under quarantine because of the H1N1 scare, my heart just went out to them.” Knowing the positive impact a high self-esteem can have, especially teens receiving treatment, she said she was excited to do something to lift their spirits. “I know how important it is to feel pretty, espeKURT BACKSCHEIDER/STAFF cially for the Green Township resident Megan Fenno, who owns young girls, and FENNOfashion.com, an online jewelry, fashion and I’m hopeful this accessories boutique, makes a necklace in her home small gift will do studio. Fenno recently donated 50 pieces of jewelry just that,” she to teens undergoing treatment at Cincinnati said. Children’s Hospital Medical Center. C a t h y kbackscheider@communitypress.com

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Westrich, donor relations officer for the hospital, said Children’s was thrilled to receive the donation. “No one ever seems to remember there are teenagers here undergoing treatment when they make donations,” Westrich said. “We receive a lot of toys and gifts more appropriate to children 12 and under – dolls, teddy bears and games like Candyland. I think the teenagers, especially the girls, are going to be thrilled with the jewelry and we’re so thankful to Megan for thinking of us.” A Western Hills native who moved to Florida with her family as a child, Fenno recently moved back to the west side after living in Austin, Texas, where she launched her design business. “I made it back home,” the 25-year-old said. Starting her own business was a dream she had since graduating from the Savannah College of Art & Design, where she earned her bachelor’s degree in fine arts and specialized in fashion and accessory design. Named a 2009 Cincinnati Woman of the Year for fashion by Cincy Chic, Fenno makes vintageinspired jewelry and environmentally friendly handbags, and she plans to expand into fashion design in the near future. “I get to do what I love and it doesn’t feel like work,” she said. To see Fenno’s designs, visit the Web site at www.FENNOfashion.com.

PETER ROBERTSON/STAFF

Owner of the Crow’s Nest Glenn O’Dell will be celebrating St. Patrick’s Day at the Price Hill bar.

Irishman keeps community on west side, opens early By Peter Robertson probertson@communitypress.com

Glenn O’Dell already had a busy life. The owner of the Crow’s Nest on West Eighth Street in Price Hill and Westside Chili on Glenway Avenue in Bridgetown also runs a construction business. But when he heard Willie’s Sport Cafe in Glenway Crossing was facing imminent foreclosure, he bought the restaurant in April 2009. “There were 42 employees. They were going to all go on unemployment and I knew them,” O’Dell said. “They were kids, so I decided to bite the bullet and

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buy another restaurant.” O’Dell remodeled the restaurant, put in a children’s game room and upgraded the food. He said the restaurant now turns a profit. “Did I need to buy it? No. I had my plate full already,” said O’Dell. “But it’s very important for me to keep all that …I feel like I’m giving back to the community.” Now, O’Dell is getting ready to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day at the Crow’s Nest by opening the bar at 6 a.m. Wednesday, March 17. On the menu will be kegs and eggs and bangers and mash. There also will be live bands all day. He expects to meet capacity on the first

and second floor as well as in the beer garden if the weather permits. He was born and raised and has started a family on the west side, and he is anxious to breathe more life into the community here. So along with embracing the history of the west side through pictures and memorabilia all over the walls of his bars and restaurants, O’Dell tries to make his businesses a fun place for families to enjoy local music, drinks and a meal. And, of course, fish for lent. “Even people on the east side come over to the west side to get our fish sandwich,” O’Dell said.

Your Community Press newspaper Serving Price Hill and Covedale E-mail: pricehillpress@communitypress.com

PRESS

Find news and information from your community on the Web Covedale – cincinnati.com/covedale Price Hill – cincinnati.com/pricehill Hamilton County – cincinnati.com/hamiltoncounty News Marc Emral | Senior Editor . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6264 | memral@communitypress.com Kurt Backscheider | Reporter . . . . . . . . . 853-6260 | kbackscheider@communitypress.com Jennie Key | Community Editor . . . . . . . . 853-6272 | jkey@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman | Sports Editor . . . . . . . 248-7573 | mlaughman@communitypress.com Tony Meale | Sports Reporter . . . . . . . . . . 853-6271 | tmeale@communitypress.com Advertising Doug Hubbuch | Territory Sales Manager. 687-4614 | dhubbuch@communitypress.com Sue Gripshover Account Relationship Specialist. . . . . . . . . 768-8327 | sgripshover@communitypress.com Dawn Zapkowski Account Relationship Specialist . . . . . . . . . 768-8215 | dzapkowski@communitypress.com Delivery For customer service. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 853-6263 | 853-6277 Sharon Schachleiter | Circulation Manager. 853-6279 | schachleiter@communitypress.com Classified To place a Classified ad . . . . . . . . . . . . . 242-4000 | www.communityclassified.com To place an ad in Community Classified, call 242-4000.


March 10, 2010

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Delhi-Price Hill Press

News

March 10, 2010

Girl Scout has special delivery

Help sought for mission Craig Kotte is a recent graduate from the University of Cincinnati, a 2004 Elder High School alumnus and a resident of Green Township. He is seeking to raise funds to volunteer his time and services on a three-month volunteer program in Tanzania with Cross-Cultural Solutions. Kotte is volunteering with Cross-Cultural Solutions, a non-profit organization that operates volunteer programs from one to 12 weeks in Asia, Africa, Eastern Europe and Latin America. With the reinvigorated spirit of service and fresh dedication to international volunteering apparent around the world, organizations such as CCS make volunteering overseas possible

PROVIDED.

Craig Kotte is a recent graduate from the University of Cincinnati, an Elder High School alumnus (Class of ’04) and a resident of Green Township. He is seeking to raise funds to volunteer his time and services on a three-month volunteer program in Tanzania with Cross-Cultural Solutions. Here is on a mission trip to Honduras with Elder High School in the summer of 2003. for people interested in short-term experiences. Kotte is looking to raise $6,364 over the next eight months for his volunteer program. This amount goes

Home Heating Help Applications are available for Ohio’s Home Energy Assistance Program (HEAP). The program helps lowincome Ohioans pay heating bills. Income example: Up to $21,660 a year for a single person ($29,140 a year for couples). Seniors can get applications and help completing forms by calling the number for their county.

Clermont County: (513) 732-2277 (option 3) Hamilton County: (513) 345-8643

toward the coordination of his volunteer placement, education on the culture and issues facing the community, lodging at a CrossCultural Solutions home base, all meals and bottled water, in-country transportation, experienced and professional support staff, local and incoming international phone calls, a 24hour emergency hotline, and comprehensive travel medical insurance. For more information on how to help sponsor his volunteer abroad experience, you can e-mail him at craig.kotte@gmail.com or find Kotte through his myCCS account at http://my.crossculturalsolutions.org to make a secure payment. You can also make payments on the CCS Web site at http://www.crossculturalsolutions.org/, where you will need to enter his e-mail address.

Sarah Harding, a senior Girl Scout of Troop 40280, made a special delivery of Girl Scout cookies to Donna Lucas, a local entrepreneur of Video Watchdog magazine. Donna and Tim Lucas publish he magazine “Video Watchdog” from their Price Hill home. This year the Lucases bought 30 boxes of Girl Scout cookies for themselves, but donated 96 boxes through the Girl Scout Cookie Share program to The Andersen Ferry Food Pantry, in Delhi Township. Every year the Lucas family buys at least 12 cases of cookies from this troop. They never turn down a Girl Scout that asks to buy cookies … even if they already bought their 96 boxes. If they don’t eat them, they give them to the UPS driver that picks up the magazine boxes or sometimes they ship them to customers that buy the magazine, but most of the cookies get donated through the Girl

PROVIDED.

Sarah Harding of Green Township, a Senior Girl Scout from Troop 40280, delivers Girl Scout cookies to Donna Lucas, local entrepreneur of Video Watchdog magazine. Scout Cookie Share Program. Donna was a Girl Scout for a short time in her youth and when the family moved to the west side, the school she attended did not have room for her as a Scout. Donna however has not stopped supporting the Girl Scouts. She has donated her time to Troop 40280 leading the scouts through the “Trash to Treasures” badge work when the scouts were in the

fourth grade. She even created her own unique “Trash to Treasures” badge for all 22 of the scouts. Donna and Tim have spoken to the troop when the scouts were cadettes for the professional parts of the cadette/senior/ambassador badges that dealt with writing, computer graphics, editing, entrepreneurship, and publishing.

Artists picked for emerging exhibit By Peter Robertson probertson@communitypress.com

Western Hills native Amanda Nurre is an emerging artist. Nurre, 23, a student at the University of Cincinnati’s College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning, was one of three artists selected for Summerfair Cincinnati's annual Emerging Artist Exhibition recently. “I was just really honored to have been nominat-

PROVIDED.

Mariposa is a rapid screen printing, applique, embroidery and quilting by Western Hills artist Amanda Nurre. ed,” said Nurre who will be graduating with bachelor degrees in fine arts and journalism from UC this June.

Nurre said she felt she had a talent for the arts when she was young, and was grateful to have teachers who worked to support her, including her UC fine arts professor Wayne Enstice, and her high school art teacher Sheila Kappa at Oak Hills High School, who died in 2006 from cancer. “She was so inspirational to everybody at Oak Hills High School. She was just really influential to me, keeping me interested in art,” she said.

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A4


Community

Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

B5

BRIEFLY Opportunities for teens

chased in person at the box office between the same times.

The Women’s Connection will host its fourth annual Teen Opportunity Fair from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, March 18, at Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave. This event is free and open to all young men and women ages 14 to 17. Teens will receive valuable information that will allow them to have a fun, safe and educational summer. The goal of the event is to expose young women and men to potential employment and volunteer opportunities that could help them in their long-term career aspirations. In addition, they will be introduced to mentor, volunteering, enrichment and programming opportunities from a wide variety of community organizations that will open the door to a fun, educational and exciting summer. Employers and organizations interested in signing up for the fair, or anyone requesting more information, should contact Jori Cotton, youth programs coordinator, at 4714673 or jcotton@thewomensconnection.org. Information is also available at www.thewomensconnection.org.

Honoring counselors

Pay online

Flower fest

FILE PHOTO

Stained glass

‘Wings of Wonder’

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., continues its Saturday Morning Children’s Series with a visit from the Cincinnati Zoo at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 3. The zoo is bringing its Wings of Wonder Traveling Bird Show to the theater. The show, which was started in 1983, was one of the country’s earliest bird shows. Birds perform a variety of behaviors including flying, calling, mimicking, climbing and outsmarting their trainers. Seven species of birds will be showcased. Tickets are $7 for adults

The Western Wildlife Corridor has its annual Wildflower Festival from 6-9 p.m. Friday, April 9. It will be at the Delhi Township senior/community center, 647 Neeb Road. Call 859-746-8671 for more information.

American Red Cross International Disaster Response Fund, earmarked for Haiti disaster relief. Girl Scout Cookie Booth Sales occur outside of area businesses, such as Kroger, retail stores, businesses and banks. To find the closest booth sale, customers can go to www.girlscoutsofwesternohio.org, click on “Search for Cookie Sale locations nearest you” and enter their zip code.

Last week, the clue for Scavenger Hunt was a stained glass window in St. Lawrence Church on Warsaw Avenue. Here are the readers who called in a correct Last week’s clue. guess: Evelyn and Mar y Adams, Marilyn Leuenberger, William Cash and Tyler Gibson. Turn to A1 for this week’s clue.

and $5 for children. Call the box office at 2416550, between 11 a.m. and 5

p.m. Monday through Saturday, for ticket information. Tickets may also be pur-

Career Quest – along with Cincinnati State Community and Technical College, University of Cincinnati, and Xavier University – is sponsoring the second annual Greater Cincinnati School Counseling Recognition Awards. Nominations are being accepted from school administrators, parents, students, teachers, and anyone else in the community who would like to recognize the ways in which high school counselors help students on their college and career paths. Last year’s award winners include Maureen Ferrell from Walnut Hills, Kevin Jones from Winton Woods, and Sandra Mosley from the School for Creative and Performing Arts. Nomination forms and further information about the awards can be found at www.career-quest.org or by contacting Melissa Fischer at mfischer@ikron.org or 6211117. All nominations are due by March 19.

Scouts helping

Every Girl Scout cookie has a mission: to help girls do great things. This year throughout Girl Scouts of Western Ohio, girls are working together to benefit Haiti. For every case of Girl Scout cookies sold during booth sales, from now until March 21, Girl Scouts of Western Ohio is donating $1 to the

Greater Cincinnati Water Works now offers customers the ability to pay their water bills Online. The free program, called Auto Debit, allows for automatic payment of water bills from customers’ checking or savings accounts as well as Visa and MasterCard. Payments can be made on or before the date the bill is due. Customers are encouraged to use this system to save time and effort. For more information about this service, visit the Web site at www.cincinnatioh.gov/waterbill.

Report potholes

Last year more than 2,000 Cincinnati residents reported potholes located on streets throughout the city. Once again the city is asking citizens for assistance in identifying potholes to ensure faster filling and repair. Crews are already patrolling the streets as a proactive effort to get potholes filled as quickly as possible. Citizens may call 591-6000 or send an e-mail to pothole@cincinnati-oh.gov to report potholes to the Department of Public Services. Be sure to include the exact location – street name, intersection or nearby address – the number of potholes and a description as to

where the hole is positioned (middle of the street, by the curb, etc.) on the street.

Get acquainted

High school students and their families are invited to explore the College of Mount St. Joseph at Get Acquainted Day (GAD) on Saturday, March 20. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The program begins at 10 a.m. in the College Theatre. GAD is a free event that offers high school students the opportunity to tour the campus, learn about financial aid and receive information on the many services the Mount offers its students, such as the Learning Center and the Career and Experiential Learning Center. Representatives from all academic majors and supports are also on hand to answer questions. Following GAD, those attending are invited to the stay for lunch in the campus dining hall. For more information or to register for the event, call the Office of Admission at 513244-4531 or 1-800-654-9314, ext. 4531, or register online www.msj.edu/visit\.

Free drink

Beginning Tuesday, March 16, McDonald’s restaurants of Greater Cincinnati will add a McCafé Frappé blended-ice beverages to its menu. To support the launch, McDonald’s restaurants throughout Greater Cincinnati will offer a free sample to area residents on March 16. McCafé Frappés are thick, blended-ice drinks available in either mocha or caramel, with a hint of coffee, and served with whipped cream and either chocolate or caramel drizzle. The free 7-ounce samples will be available from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. or while supplies last at participating restaurants, no purchase necessary.

Civic Association scheduling fun By Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

The Delhi Civic Association is continuing to add to its calendar of ways to celebrate and contribute to the community. Kevin Kappa, association president, said the fun started in January with a group trip to a Cyclones games. “We’d like to plan more of those kinds of activities, not only for our members, but all residents,” Kappa said. Along with fun, the association is planning a forum this month to provide information for current homeowners on preventing foreclosure and for first-time home buyers. No date has been set for that program. The group does have a Saturday, April 24, date for its Great American Clean Up. The roster of events also includes a blood drive in September, candidates night and another clean up day in October. The association again will be hosting three concerts in the Delhi Township Park staring Wednesday, June 16, with Mike Davis. The group’s second Delhi’s Taste of Rock and

Blues is slated for Saturday, July 10, with three bands. Kappa said they are hoping for better weather than the rain that dampened the first such afternoon and evening event. The third concert will be in conjunction with the Tuesday, Aug. 3, National Night Out. “We’d like to be able to host a fourth concert, but our budget just doesn’t allow that,” Kappa said. With a budget of about

ways to give back to the community,” he said. “It’s also a great way to get involved and get to know your neighbors, have some fun.” The group meets the first Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. The association is meeting at the senior/community center, 647 Neeb Road, until the remodeling project at the Delhi Township Park Lodge is completed. For more information, go to delhicivic.org.

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$2,000, the group is hoping for sponsorships to help defray the $11,000 tab for the three concerts. Along with paying the band, the association has a $500 fee for renting the stage from the Cincinnati Recreation Commission. With a membership of about 70, Kappa said the association is always looking to add to its roster. “We are a community service as well as a social organization looking for

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SCHOOLS A6

Delhi-Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

ACHIEVEMENTS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

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NEWS

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communitypress.com

PRESS

School book fair has reading on the menu By Heidi Fallon

hfallon@communitypress.com

The library at C. O. Harrison Elementary School has been temporarily transformed into a 1950s diner complete with juke box and 45 rpm records dangling from the ceiling. While most of the students weren’t exactly sure what records are, their parents and grandparents appreciated the nostalgic touch. The school’s annual book fair diner theme attracted a notable guest every student did recognize – Ronald McDonald. The fast-food clown was part of the family reading night that opened the fair. School Principal Deborah Haffey said the family night included students performing plays based on a popular book with Cinderella preferring baseball to the fancy ball. “While students rehearsed and made scenery, parents were able to browse through the book fair,” she said. The fair also was open

PROVIDED

Molly and Adam Blome get a bit of help shopping at the C. O. Harrison Elementary School Book Fair from special guest Ronald McDonald.

HEIDI FALLON/STAFF

Michelle Pohlmann helps her son, Tyler, check out the books, games and more at the C. O. Harrison Elementary School Book Fair. Helping take the fourth-grader’s money Michelle Applegate and Cindy Brockhoff, school librarians.

HEIDI FALLON/STAFF

Britney Lee can’t seem to decide which book to buy at her school’s book fair. The fourth-grader opted for both.

HEIDI FALLON/STAFF

Brandon Fuller fills out a raffle ticket hoping to win one of the posters being given away as part of the C. O. Harrison Elementary Book Fair fun.

one night, again for families. “We’re encouraging students to bring their parents and grandparents to come to the fair and spend some time reading together,” Haffey said. Students unsure what they might like to buy can get a sneak preview with

the appetizers outside the library. Cindy Brockhoff, school librarian, said fourth- and fifth-graders created short book reviews that are displayed on a hallway wall. Tyler Pohlmann wasn’t shopping just for something to read. With help from his mom, Michelle,

the fourth-grader decided a microscope was what he wanted to buy. “I can look at bugs,” he said. Melissa Ryan, a C. O. Harrison parent, also was on hand at the diner to help students. “It’s fun and important to be part of the school

activities,” Ryan said. “You get to see how your child interacts with other students and with the book fair, you can help them pick appropriate reading material.” Britney Lee needed a bit of help as she was trying to decide between two books. “I’ve always liked books since I was little,” the fourth-grader said. “My mom gave me money to buy the books I wanted.” After a bit of delibera-

tion and counting on her fingers, Lee decided she had enough money to buy both books. It isn’t all just books. Along with items like Pohlmann’s microscope, the book fair has school supplies, games and a chance to win a poster. Brockhoff said the school’s share of book fair profits helps her buy materials for the library.

COLLEGE CORNER Dean’s list

Lindsay Noell was named to the first semester dean’s list at Loyola University Chicago. • The following students were named to the fall quarter dean’s list at the University of Cincinnati: Kelsey Abel, Danielle Adams, Kaitlyn Adams, Jeffrey Albertz, Stephen Anderson, Samantha Anthony, Joseph Bachman, Olivia Ball, Eric Bambach, Lisa Bambach, Nicholas Barnes, Kevin Baute, Alan Bedinghaus, Amy Bedinghaus, Matthew Bengel, Brian Berling, Jason Berling, Jessica Berning, David Berninger, Ellen Berninger, Joshua Berry, Mwambila Beya, Yana Bjers, Lavita Board, Michael Bosken, Allison Botkin, Lindsey Boyle, Julia Brady, Shayna Brankamp, Mackenzie Broxterman, Jonathan Budde, Krista Budde, Sarah Burns, Bryan Busse, Johnnie Buttelwerth, Nicholas Capal, Kadi Carmosino, Kati Carney, Katelyn Carrothers, Bradley Center, Spencer Chamberlain, Domonique Chapman, Heather Cherry, Kristen Chuang, Gisela Cicci, Michael Cline, Adam Colwell, Julie Cook, Montiel Cook, Benjamin Corcoran, Lori Costa, Colin Craig, Jonathan Craig, Megan Dehne, Robert Delaney, Allison Dinkelacker, James Dinkelacker, Stephan Dixon, Kelly Dorsey, Alexis Doyle, Mary Margaret Doyle, Danielle Driehaus, Laura Droba, Chandra Dubose, Alison Duebber, Ashley Duke, Andrew Dulle, Kaitlin Elliott, Maleah Eubanks, John Eversole, Christina Feist, Zachary Fields, Matthew Fishwick, Kaitlin Fitz, Alice Flanders, Ryan Fleming, Veronica Flowers, Jessica Folz, Ashley Frank, Zach Franke, Joseph Fricke, Jessica Frost, Joseph Frost, Stephanie Fuhr, Brett Geiser, Lyndsey Geiser, Anastasia Gentry, Samuel Geroulis, Deanna Giffin, Noah Goertemiller, Timothy Gregg, Kelly Griffin, Eric Grimm, Krista Grinkemeyer, Jennifer Gross, Manfred Grote, Mark Grote, Christopher Gru-

ber, Alyssa Gugger, Babacar Guisse, Jennifer Hacker, Molly Hackett, Travis Haehnle, Emily Hahn, Yonas Haile, Christopher Hais, George Hakim, Christine Hamburg, Jaclyn Hammersmith, Alex Hand, Marcus Hanrahan, Andrea Harmon, Laura Harris, Benjamin Hart, Regina Hartfiel, Anthony Hartke, Alyssa Hautman, Emily Hautman, Lindsey Hawthorne, Erin Hayden, Erica Heimbrock, Allison Henry, Cheryl Herzner, Meghan Hewitt, Patrick Hirth, Raymond Hoendorf, Daniel Holthaus, Rebecca Holtman, Clark Horning, Loretta Huff, Samuel Huheey, Jennifer Hyde, Lindsay Isaacs, Jerome James, Jennifer Johannigman, Zachary Jones, Kristina Jorg, Colleen Kane, Louis Kayser, Susan Kayser, Emily Keeton, April Kelley, Matthew Kennedy, Akino Kishigawa, Jacqueline Kleinholz, Paula Kleinschmidt, Alex Klingenbeck, Michelle Kluesener, Matthew Knochelman, Daveen Knue, Logan Kolde, Melissa Kramer, Rachael Kroth, Jon Krumpelbeck, Jeffrey Kuhn, Brian Laiveling, Melanie Laiveling, David Lamping, Meagan Lauer, Kara Lawson, Jonathan Leanza, Lauren Lehan, Mark Leisring, Laurie Lewis, Matthew Liguzinski, Kira Loertscher, Denise Lottman, Thomas Mann, Stephanie Martini, Nigel Masamvu, Nicholas Mathews, Samantha Mattar, Keenen Maull, Ebony McBurrows, Sean McCarthy, Megan McDonald, Michael McGowan, Molly McKee, Jesse McWhorter, Wesley Mergard, Krista Mertens, Alexander Meyer, Teresa Meyer, Richard Meyers, Stephen Michel, Kara Miladinov, Garrett Miller, James Miller, Jocelyn Miller, Kathryn Millhoan, Thomas Moore, Jillian Morris, Laura Muenchen, Patrick Mulligan, Joshua Murphy, Michael Murphy, Joelle Murray-Lauck, Matthew Myers, Michael Myers, Katlyn Neack, Robert Neville, Zachary Nieberding, Mark Niehaus, Brett Niehauser, Adam Niemeyer, Dominique Nkata, Jessica Nolte, Michael Nyantakyi, Casey Oaks, Jeffrey Olberding, Ryan Ostmann, Michelle Pap-

athanas, Timothy Pater, Alexander Pellegrino, Monica Pepple, Courtney Perry, Katherine Peter, Michael Peters, Kimberly Phillips, Chelsea Pille, Joseph Piller, Sara Piller, Lea Pirro, Britney Poland, Brian Powell, Jule Quance, Steven Quillin, Tyler Rabanus, Amanda Re, Michael Rebennack, Bryan Rebholz, Evan Renk, Megan Rieger, Matthew Robben, Travis Roberts, Richard Robinson, Tiffany Robinson, Alyssa Rodriguez, Christina Roedersheimer, Jaclyn Roell, Anne Rohrkasse, Ryan Rosenberger, Kevin Roy, Tyler Runk, Jena Russo, Jonathan Ruwe, Carolyn Rydyznski, Sara Ryles, Matthew Santa, Megan Scharff, Zachary Schiering, Audrey Schnur, Carolyn Schoenfeld, Ellen Schoenfeld, Tiffany Schoster, David Schraffenberger, Alexandria Schulcz, JoAnn Schultz, Lindsey Schulz, Christine Schutte, Candice Shepard, Steven Sherritt, Robert Shields, Stephen Shore, Anthony Siemer, Jessica Simpkins, Rachel Simpson-Mulkey, Eric Skalski, Anastasia Smith, Emi Smith, Brittany Spencer, Jennifer Spinelli, Jennifer Sprague, Stephanie Stalf, Lauren Stallo, Gerald Stanley, Justin Stapleton, Athena Stefanou, Krysten Stein, Michael Stoepel, Kara Streckfuss, Trent Sulek, Eric Sunderman, Veronica Sunderman, Kristen Suter, Geraldine Suyat, Katherine Talbott, Rachel Talbott, Eleni Tassopoulos, Ryan Tenbrink, Nathan Terry, Jamie Thomas, Nicole Thrasher, Casey Tritt, Damian Tyree, Autumn Utley, Eric Van Benschoten, Heidi Van Benschoten, Rebecca Ventre, Paul Vincent, Mark Voelkerding, Beth Vonluehrte, Lacey Voss, Brett Wade, Kevin Wagner, Andrew Wahler, Daniel Ward, Kelly Ward, Samantha Washam, Ryan Wauligman, Fallon Webb, Douglas Weber, Melissa Weber, Richard Weber, Zachary Weber, Kaitlin Welch, Walter Welch, Kyle West, Kate Westerhaus, Michael Whelen, Nekia Whitlow, Kathryn Wickelhaus, Brian Wiechert, Michelle Williams, Henry Wilson, Jennifer Wilson, Jessica Wilson, Mary Wilson, Michael Winter, Kathryn Wittich, Joshua Woeste, Laura Woeste, Jenna

Wolf, Robert Wynn, Lauren Zappardino, Michael Zdinak and Andrew Zimmerman. • The following students were named to the fall semester dean’s list at the College of Mount St. Joseph: Roger Adams Jr., Steven Adams, David Aretz, Brittany Arthur, Nathaniel Asman, Crystal Backscheider, Tara Ballinger, Matthew Ballman, Alissa Beck, Timothy Bell, Lisa Bradow, Amanda Bratfish, Tyler Brisbin, Tyler Busch, Angela Byers, Lauren Byrd, Jane Cearley, Trisha Chastang, Lauren Combs, Catherine Cook, Carla Curry, Corey Daria, Jordan Davis, Benjamin Denier, Rachael Didusch, Symana Dillingham, Rebecca Doll, Lee Ann Doran, Stephanie Drees, Erika Duwel, Jill Eisenhauer, Michelle Essen, Mara Faillace, Michael Forste, Donna Frank, Matthew Gandenberger, Rebecca Gibbs, Sarah Giglio, Jennifer Granger, Julia Gressel, Tarren Gunther, Joyce Hall, Staci Hazenfeld, John Heinecke, Tracy Henderson, Andrew Hoelmer, Ashley Hogue, Linda Hood, Patrick Jeffcott, Kellie Kammer, Tonya Keene, Yoon Kim, Sherrie Kleinholz, Whitney Klosterman, Courtney Kramer, Amber Krimmer, Amanda Lammers, John Lammers, Dana Langenbrunner, Cameron Leech, Andrew Leisring, Laura Leisring, Sue Leisring, Daniel Lind, Samantha Maurer, Greg Mazuk, Candice McCulley, Lauren McDonald, Nicholas McDonald, Christopher Metz, Angela Meyer, Douglas Meyer, Jennifer Meyer, Ashley Mills, Caren Minniti, Jason Modafari, Molly Moran, Leann Moser, Robert Murvine, Stephanie Nash, Erin Olmsted, Steven Panzeca, Mario Pellegrino, Kurtis Penn, Ashley Perkins, Kristina Pfeifer, Jocelynn Ramsey, Gerald Rauen Jr., Patricia Reynolds, Thomas Rich, Anna Richter, Stephanie Schoenfeld, Jeffrey Schroer, Laura Schwendenmann, Todd Schwertman, Amanda Seurkamp, Patricia Siemer, Jessee Smith, Matthew Sprague, Kristina Stegman, Brian Storch, Marsha Sturwold, Bruce

Thompson, Wesley Thompson, Christina Ventura, Lydia Volters, Nicole Walters, Valentine Wanga, Mary Whitfield, Michael Willig, Brent Wilson, Sherry Witterstaetter, Richard Wolf, Jessica Young, Kari Young and Maria Ziegler. • The following students were named to the fall dean’s list at Ohio University: Katie Burkhart, Lisa Candelaresi, Brandon Cassaro, Robert Doll, Matthew Earls, Jill Eichelberger, Joseph Gattermeyer, Courtney Geiger, Douglas Griffiths, Britney Grimmelsman, Adrienne Krueger, Rebekah Meiser, Krista Meyer, Ashley Newman, Jonathan Nutter, Samantha Proctor and Christy Schaible. • D’Andre Axle and Valerie Neumann were named to the fall semester academic merit list at Wilmington College. The students participate in the collaboration between Wilmington College and Cincinnati State Technical & Community College. The academic merit list recognizes students enrolled six to 11 hours who earn at least a 3.6 grade-point average. • Melissa Buschmann was named to the autumn quarter dean’s list at Otterbein College. • Balkissa Abdramane, Amanda Barnes, Eldrenna Bishop, Brahima Camara and Kendra Dorsey were named to the first fall term dean’s list at National College. • The following students were named to the fall semester dean’s list at the University of Dayton: Ian Barron, Thomas Clear, John Puttmann, Alicia Rolf, Elizabeth Stegeman, Nicholas Toth and Kara Wurzelbacher.

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SPORTS TOURNEY UPDATES

The following information describes who advances in the various tournaments.

Wrestling

The following wrestlers placed at the Division I State Wrestling Championships, which were held at the Jerome Schottenstein Center at Ohio State University in Columbus March 4-6. • Elder: Sam Conners (152), 6; Ian Korb (171), 3; Kevin Hyland (189), 4. • La Salle: Max Byrd (119), 6.

Bowling

• The Oak Hills boys’ bowling team qualified to the state championships with its fourthplace performance during the district championship finals Tuesday, March 2. The Highlanders finished at 4,198 pins to advance while finishing behind first-place Kenton Ridge (4,435 pins), second-place Centerville (4,359) and third-place Mechanicsburg (4,256). The state championships concluded Friday, March 5, with Oak Hills finishing sixth. Senior Keith Bunke led Oak Hills with a 625; he finished 17th overall, while seniors Stephen Kluesener and Gary Ostrowski both had a 110 to finishin the top 25. • Mercy finished first in the girls’ Southwest District Tournament with a total score of 4,050 March 1, qualifying them for state. Seton finished sixth with a 2,534, also qualifying them for state. Mercy’s top-finishers were Kelsey Shaible with 638 points (first place), Emily Schmitt with 611 points (third place), Lindsay Doll with 592 points (sixth place) and Katlie Minning with 565 points (12th place). At the state championships, Seton, which finished fourth, was led by Nicole Kettler (637) and Pam Kettler (583), who finished ninth and 24th, respectively. Mercy, which did not qualify for the championship bracket, was led by Minning (546), who finished 33rd.

Boys’ basketball

• No. 1 La Salle (20-2) will play the winner of No. 7 Walnut Hills and No. 11 Woodward in the district final at UD Arena March 13. • No. 10 St. Xavier (12-10) will play the winner of No. 11 Xenia and No. 1 Wayne in the district final at UD Arena March 13.

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Follow the Community Press and Community Recorder newspapers on Facebook! Search “Pages” for Community Press/Recorder Sports and become a fan. On the page, viewers will find photos, story links and discussions. Questions? Contact Melanie Laughman at mlaughman @communitypress.com.

Gibler’s career best

In two games with the Loyola University basketball team the week of Feb. 21, St. Xavier High School graduate Walt Gibler averaged 13.0 points, 6.5 rebounds and one assist, while shooting 71 percent (10 for 14) from the field, in a pair of Loyola University Chicago losses. After recording eight points and a career-best 10 rebounds in a heartbreaking 63-61 loss to Milwaukee Feb. 25, Gibler scored a team-high 18 points and snagged three boards in an 87-71 setback to Green Bay two days later in the team’s regular season finale.

March 10, 2010

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | Editor Melanie Laughman | mlaughman@communitypress.com | 248-7573

Delhi-Price Hill Press

RECREATIONAL

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PRESS

Elder’s 3 state placers lead wrestlers

By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

More than a dozen area wrestlers participated in the Division I State Wrestling Championships at the Jerome Schottenstein Center at Ohio State University in Columbus March 4-6. Leading the locals were eight qualifiers from Elder, which had three stateplacers. Juniors Ian Korb and Kevin Hyland placed third and fourth, respectively. Korb, who won sectional and district titles, finishes the season 39-3. He placed eighth at state as a sophomore at 160. Hyland, a sectional champion and district runner-up, finishes 40-6. Senior Sam Conners (152), meanwhile, placed sixth at state. A sectional champion and district runner-up, Conners finishes 36-13. Senior Ryan Ruffing

(140), who was third at sectionals and fourth at districts, went 2-2 at state to finish 29-11. Senior Pat Nusekabel (215) and sophomore Nick Nusekabel (285), both of whom finished fourth at districts, went 1-2 at state. Pat, who was a sectional champion, finishes 35-12, while Nick finishes 42-10. Senior Jake Meyer and junior Jahday Daniels both went 0-2 at state to finish with records of 36-16 and 28-11, respectively. As a team, Elder finished ninth at state, recording 45 total points. Moeller (52.5) finished sixth, while Wadsworth (172), Lakewood St. Edward (167.5) and Massillon Perry (66) finished first through third, respectively. La Salle sophomore Max Byrd (119), who advanced to state after winning sectional and district titles, finished sixth. He is the 10th wrestler in

ANTHONY AMORINI/STAFF

Oak Hills’ Tyler Weiskittel, top, works to pin his opponent as the ref watches closely Friday, Feb. 26, during the opening match of the Division I District Championships. Weiskittel took second place during districts at 125 pounds while qualifying to state.

ANTHONY AMORINI/STAFF

La Salle’s Max Byrd, top, works to pin his opponent during the opening round of the Division I District Championships on Friday, Feb. 26. Byrd won a district title at 119 pounds while scoring a state qualification this winter. La Salle history to finish sixth or higher at the state meet. The last Lancer to do so was 2005 grad Joe Kaake, who also placed sixth. Byrd went 2-2 at state to finish the season 40-9. He placed seventh at state as a freshman. Oak Hills had three senior state-qualifiers, all of whom went 1-2 at state. Tyler Weiskittel (125), a district champion, finishes 34-6. He went 37-5 as a junior. Brad Baas (103) and Ryan Quinn (171), both of whom placed second at districts, finish with records of 29-9 and 36-7, respectively. Western Hills senior Donnie Ballou (130), who finished third at sectionals and districts, went 0-2 at state to finish the season 42-4.

ANTHONY AMORINI/STAFF

Elder’s Sam Conners, right, takes his opponent to the mat during his opening match at the Division I District Championships on Friday, Feb. 26. Conners finished districts in second place at 152 pounds while qualifying to the state championships.

St. X finds trend in postseason upsets By Tony Meale tmeale@communitypress.com

For the second straight season, the St. Xavier High School basketball team engineered an upset in the Division I sectional final. After downing a highly touted Middletown team in 2009, the No. 10 Bombers bested No. 4 Winton Woods 51-50 at the Cintas Center March 5. “(Winton Woods has) the ability to (deliver) a knockout punch very quickly,” St. X head coach Scott Martin said. But the Bombers withstood the jabs and body shots that had them at a 32-15 disadvantage in the second quarter and down 40-27 heading into the fourth. With the game tied at 50 with 4.8 seconds remaining, senior Alex Longi hit a free throw to give St. X the win. He finished with 15 points, while senior teammate Luke Massa added 14. “Alex and Luke have been consistent scorers all year long,” Martin said. “They are our floor leaders and have been our stability.” Winton Woods entered the game 17-2 on the season with two road losses by a combined three points, including a one-point loss to No. 1 La Salle Feb. 2. The Warriors went a perfect 10-0 in conference play,

winning the Fort Ancient Valley Conference Buckeye division with ease. St. X, meanwhile, advanced to play Winton Woods after knocking off No. 19 Anderson 53-35 in the sectional semifinals. The score was tied at 22 at the half, but the Bombers outscored Anderson 19-3 in the third quarter. “Our team was able to put defensive pressure and offensive pressure together,” St. X head coach Scott Martin said. “When a team does that, they have the opportunity to pull away. We talked about a few things to adjust at halftime, and our guys were able to execute them. They were very focused, and it showed.” It’s been an up-anddown season for St. X. The Bombers opened the year with a win at McNicholas, lost three straight and then won three straight en route to winning the National Jesuit Christmas Classic in Washington, D.C., to move to 4-3. They have since gone 7-7 and have not won or lost more than two games in a row during that stretch. St. X endured an ample amount of midseason heartbreak with three onepoint losses during a ninegame stretch from Jan. 5 to Feb. 5. In the last of these losses – 43-42 at home to Moeller – Crusader forward

Griffin McKenzie scored the game-winner on a put-back at the buzzer. St. X has now lost nine straight to Moeller, including six times by six points or fewer. Martin said those midseason losses have helped his players. “The team has learned that they have to focus the whole game,” Martin said. “They realized plays that happen at any time during the game can have an impact on the final result.” St. X finished third in the Greater Catholic League South division behind La Salle and Moeller, which finished tied for first. St. X, which has advanced to the Final Four four times since 2000, last won the GCLSouth since 2005, when it shared the conference title with Moeller. Aside from Longi and Massa, both of whom are averaging double figures, St. X has gotten key contributions from senior Brandon Polking of Bridgetown, who is shooting better than 50 percent from the floor. “Brandon has probably been our most consistent performer,” Martin said. “He works 100 percent every minute and always does the extra little thing nobody else will do.” Also playing a pivotal role has been senior David Niehaus of Sycamore, who has scored who scored in double figures in four of his

GREG LORING/CONTRIBUTOR

St. Xavier guard/forward Alex Longi passes the ball under the basket during the Division I basketball against Winton Woods March 5 at the Cintas Center. Longi, an Indian Hill resident, had a game-high 15 points for St. X in the 51-50 win. last 11 games. He finished with eight against Winton Woods. “When he produces, he makes us a hard team to beat,” Martin said.

The Bombers advance to play the winner of Xenia and Wayne in the district final March 13 at UD Arena.


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Delhi-Price Hill Press

Sports & recreation

March 10, 2010

14 great athletes to line CPS hall Players

• LaSalle Thompson, Withrow High School Class of 1979 – Named Cincinnati Player of the Year in 1979, First Team All State and a high school All-American. He led the city in three categories in 1979, scoring (22.4), rebounding (24.3) and shooting percentage (64.2 percent). 1979 was the third straight year that he led the city in rebounding. He was ranked No. 4 in the Cincinnati Enquirer Top 100 All Time, and went on to play three seasons at the University of Texas followed by 15 seasons in the NBA. • Tony Trabert, Walnut Hills High School Class of 1948 – The first Ohio high school tennis player to win three consecutive state singles championships, he did not lose a singles match during either his high school or collegiate tennis career. He was voted to the Cincinnati Post All City High School Basketball Team and rated No. 2 in the list of Hamilton County’s Top 20 Basketball Players in 1948. He captured the 1951 NCAA singles championship at the University of Cincinnati and started at guard for the Bearcat basketball team. As a professional tennis player, he won U.S. National, French National and Wimbledon titles. • Deb Gentile, Western Hills High School Class of 1970 – Earned 18 varsity letters in her three years at West Hi (West High did not include ninth-graders at the time). She won three Varsity letters in field hockey, was leading scorer and twice voted MVP. Won three letters and MVP twice in volleyball. She won three letters and was MVP all three years in basketball, and

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earned three letters in swimming and was All City each season in freestyle. In tennis, she was All City as a sophomore and won three letters in softball. She also participated in gymnastics and was captain of the cheerleading squad her senior year. She went on to earn 19 letters in six sports at the University of Cincinnati. • Ricky Calloway, Withrow High School Class of 1985 – Holds the distinction of being Cincinnati’s first McDonald’s All-American. He averaged 15 points per game as a sophomore, 24.6 as a junior and 29.4 as a senior along with averaging 14 rebounds a game. He was voted First Team Enquirer and Post All City Team in 1984 and First Team Enquirer All City, First Team All District and State AAA Player of the Year in 1985. He was recognized as No. 13 in the Enquirer Top 100 All Time list. He was recruited by Bobby Knight to Indiana, he was Big Ten Freshman of the Year and a starter on the 1987 NCAA Championship team. He later played in the NBA. • Robin Freeman, Hughes High School Class of 1952 – Often credited with introducing the jump shot to Cincinnati high school basketball, Freeman set a state and national record averaging 39.5 points per game his senior year. He was voted All-State, selected to the Cincinnati Post All Century Team, ranked No. 2 in the Cincinnati Enquirer Top 100 All Time, was twotime All-American at Ohio State. His 28 points per game average is still the school record. • Reggie McAfee, Courter Tech High School Class of 1969 – Called the greatest distance runner ever to come out of Cincinnati, he was twotime Ohio High School State Champion in cross country in 1967 and 1968. At the 1969 Class AA State Track Meet, he won the 880 yard run in 1:52.5 and the mile run in 4:08 setting a city mile record that lasted 32 years before it was broken in 2001 and was named Ohio’s Class AA Runner of the Year. While at the University of North Carolina, he ran the mile in 3:57.8 becoming the first African-American

From 1921 to 1987

Fourteen outstanding alumni of Cincinnati Public Schools will be enshrined in the first-ever CPS Athletic Hall of Fame. The earliest is from the class of 1921 and the most recent from 1987. “These athletes have distinguished themselves both on and off the field of play” said Dave Dierker, CPS director of athletics. These inductees will be enshrined at a dinner and ceremony on April 29, at the Stadium Club East at Paul Brown Stadium. Emcees will be Lincoln Ware, midday personality on 1230AM WDBZ and John Popovich, Sports Director of WCPO-TV 9. The ceremony and dinner are open to the public. Individuals wishing to purchase tickets or a table may call 363-0411. Here are the inductees. to break the four-minute barrier. • Erbil Barkley, Central High School Class of 1952 – Rushed for more than 1,000 yards both his junior and senior seasons including one outstanding game against St. Xavier where he rushed for more than 300 yards including a 90-yard touchdown carry. He was voted All City by both the Post and the Times-Star. He was one of two juniors to repeat as All City as a senior. As a junior and senior he led Central to back-to-back city, district and state championships in track. He won the 220-yard dash as a junior, finished third to teammate Harold Horne in the 100-yard dash and anchored for the first place 880yard relay team. • Carlos Snow, Cincinnati Academy of Physical Education Class of 1986 – Rushed for 7,866 yards in his four-year varsity career, fourth best in the nation at the time. He scored 106 touchdowns in his career while C.A.P.E. won the Division IV state title in 1985 and the Division III title in 1986. He was three-time winner of the Enquirer Player of the Year Award, voted Ohio Player of the Year, selected to the Parade Magazine All-American Team and named Offensive Player of the Century by the Cincinnati Post. He started three years at guard for the basketball team and won the state title in the 100 meter dash as a sophomore and anchored C.A.P.E.’s state championship 400 meter relay

team as a senior. He played football at Ohio State, ending his career as the fourth leading ground gainer in Buckeye history.

Coaches

• Angus King, Withrow High School (Deceased) – Coached football and baseball at Withrow from 1931 through 1945. He has a football coaching record of 98-30-5 winning nine public high school championships. His baseball teams had a record of 150-51-1 winning six PHSL championships and state AA baseball championships in 1934 and 1941. In recognition of his accomplishments at Withrow, the school’s stadium is named in his honor. He left coaching at Withrow to become the supervisor of athletics for the Cincinnati public school system. • Paul Nohr, Western Hills High School (Deceased) – Started teaching and coaching football, cross country and gymnastics at Western Hills High School when it opened in 1928 remaining on the faculty until his retirement in 1969. He coached gymnastics from 1928-1948. He was head coach from 19281950 for the swimming team that won nine PHSL Championships, finishing second in the state in 1933 and winning the State Championship 1935. He coached baseball from 1928 until 1962, winning four PHSL Championships, four regional champi-

onships and two State AA Championships in 1948 and 1951 while sending eight West High players onto successful careers in Major League baseball.

Posthumous

• William DeHart Hubbard, Walnut Hills Class of 1921 – Graduated from Walnut Hills High School where he played football, baseball, gymnastics and ran track while maintaining an excellent academic record. When the League Athletic Board declared him ineligible to play because he was African-American, the entire Walnut Hills football team refused to play without him. He earned a “full ride” scholarship and graduated with honors from the University of Michigan where he was a three-time National Collegiate Athletic Association champion (1923 and 1925 outdoor long jump, 1925 100yard dash) and seven-time Big Ten Conference champion in track and field (1923 and 1925 indoor 50-yard dash, 1923, 1924 and 1925 outdoor long jump, 1924 and 1925 outdoor 100-yard dash). His 1925 outdoor long jump of 25 feet 10 inches stood as the Michigan Wolverines team record until 1980, and it still stands second. His 1925 jump of 25 feet 3 inches stood as a Big Ten record until Jesse Owens broke it with what is now the current record of 26 feet 8 inches in 1935. He was the first African-American to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event; the running long jump at the 1924 Paris summer games. He subsequently set a long jump world record of 25 feet 10 inches (7.89 m) at Chicago in June 1925 and equaled the world record of 9.6 seconds for the 100-yard dash at Cincinnati a year later. He died in Cleveland in 1976 and was posthumously inducted into the University of Michigan Hall of Honor in 1979. • Willard Stargel, Jr., Woodward High School Class of 1940 – Voted All League and a unanimous choice for All City in football. He played guard on the basketball team that won 21 straight

games before losing in the state semi-final game. He was city track and field champion in the high hurdles. He entered UC in 1940 only to have his college years interrupted by military service in Europe during World War II. He began his high school coaching career at Taft High School in 1955 and went on to Walnut Hills in 1965 as head football and wrestling coach until his retirement in June, 1979. In recognition of his long and valued service to the Cincinnati school system, the football/track stadium behind Taft High School is named in his honor. • Glenn Sample, Western Hills High School Class of 1949 – Was a three-sport star at West High in football, basketball and baseball. In 1948, he was All City, All State and All American as a center and linebacker and Most Valuable Player in the North-South Football All Star game played in Massillon. He was selected as Most Outstanding Defensive Player in West Hi history spanning the years from 1928 to 1979. He played third base on West High’s State Championship baseball team in 1948. Turned down major college and professional offers for baseball and football to play football and baseball at U.C. He played on 1950 Sun Bowl team coached by Sid Gillman. After graduation in 1953, he coached football as an assistant at UC for five years, was wrestling coach for five years and head baseball coach for 21 years, winning 404 games. • Harold Horne, Central High School Class of 1952 – Led his Central High School team to back-toback state championships in track and field in 1951 and 1952. He won the 100-yard dash in a time of 10.1 and ran a leg on the first place 880-yard relay team as a junior at the state meet in 1951. As a senior, won both the 100yard dash in a time of 9.8 and the 200-yard dash in a time of 21.8 at the state meet. He was appropriately nicknamed “The Wind” by his teammates.

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River’s Edge Indoor Sports is conducting registration for its Sunday adult coed soccer league, which starts play March 7; and its Thursday adult coed league starting March 11 at River’s Edge Indoor. Team fee is $350 per team each night or play in both leagues for $550, referee fees included. Friday night adult coed soccer league starts March 19. Register at riversedgeindoor.com or call 264-1775.

Indoor spring soccer

Indoor soccer registration going on now through March 7, at Western Sports Mall for indoor soccer for high school co-ed, men, U16 and U18 boys and girls, women, and co-ed. Leagues play for nine weeks and the top four play in the tournament. There is potential for 11 games for one low price of $490, plus ref fees. For online registration, go to www.westernsportsmall.net. Call 451-4900 or e-mail cmitchell@fuse.net.

Short indoor session

Indoor soccer registration going on now through March 7 at Western Sports Mall for a four-week indoor session for teams ages U7-U14. The session starts March 21 and runs for four weeks for $200, plus ref fee. A co-ed team is also available for ages 13 and 14. For online registration, visit www.westernsportsmall.net.

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Bengals Pro-Bowl wide receiver Chad Ochocinco has announced dates for his Chad Ochocinco Football Camp presented by CBTS. This two-day event will be from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., Thursday, July 22, and Friday, July 23, at Sycamore High School. Ochocinco will be on site to direct the activities of the camp and provide instruction. The camp will also feature a selection of the top prep and collegiate coaches in the Cincinnati area. The camp will be open to all boys and girls ages from 7 to 14. Each day, the campers will experience various stations, specializing in fundamental skills and the team concept of football. Individual groups will be small to assure that each camper gets maximum personalized instruction. In addition to seven hours of football instruction, all campers will receive an autographed camp team photo with Chad, a camp T-shirt and the opportunity to win additional contests and prizes. Cost of the camp is $185. In addition to CBTS, camp partners include Bridgestone, Outback, Local 12, Cincinnati Parent, and 101.1 the Wiz. Campers are encouraged to register early, as spots are limited. Additional information and registration is available at www.CampOchocinco.com, or at 793-CAMP.

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VIEWPOINTS

March 10, 2010

EDITORIALS

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LETTERS

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COLUMNS

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

|

Price Hill Press

CH@TROOM

communitypress.com

A9

PRESS

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Promote Delhi

I am not much of a gambler, but I am willing to bet you will never hear someone say: Wow, I think I will open or move my business to Delhi because there is a new McDonald’s, UDF or Delhi Pike is being re-paved. It is wishful thinking to think that two “staple” businesses rebuilding their 30-something-yearold stores is going to attract businesses to Delhi. Instead of the township administration rehashing (two years now) what to do with the recycling bins or whether or not the park lodge should get new urinals, they should be promoting Delhi and the benefits to the potential business owners. For example: The close proximity Delhi is to downtown Cincin-

About letters & columns

We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in The Delhi Press and The Price Hill Press. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: westnews@communitypress.com Fax: 853-6220 U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to The Delhi Press and The Price Hill Press may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms. nati, the court house, CVG and MSJ. Just a thought. Kevin Rhodes Gwendolyn Ridge Delhi Township

CH@TROOM Last week’s question: Would you consider or are you considering a Toyota for your next car, given the company’s recent recalls and safety concerns? Why or why not? “No. I still think that we should keep as much money in the U.S.A. as we can. With the way that there problems are playing out I think they have hidden much from the public.” S.H. “Yes, I have owned several Toyota’s and they are dependable, good resale value, and reasonable maintenance cost. GM and Ford have had more than 100 recalls in the past several months involving thousands of cars and very little is said about their problems. Toyota employs thousands of workers in America. We need them and they need us.” B.B. “I was planning on purchasing a Toyota this spring. In light of the recalls and the general uncertainty regarding the integrity of the company, I decided to purchase another make of car. Giving Toyota a rest for while may be a good idea. When size and volume take hold, it seems complicity and greed follow suit. In a few years, they will no doubt emerge as a better, more humble car company.” L.D. “I have owned several Toyotas. However, if I were to buy today, I probably would not buy a Toyota. I’m mostly concerned that they knew about the problems and chose not to fix them until forced to do so. My Hyundai is looking like a better choice every day.” B.N. “After the first recall I figured that they would bounce back quickly, but they seem to be caught up in a downward spiral. I say no to a Toyota product.” C.A.S. “No! No! No! I think they knew they rushed production to meet a deadline, and which kind of ‘dead’ line are we talking about?” S.B. “We definitely would! My husband and I each have been buying Toyotas since 1980 and leasing since 1995 and I have had only one repair in all that time. We have had Corollas, Camrys, Rav4s and even a MR2! Two years ago when the lease was up, I went to a Nissan Ultima since the Camry didn’t change much and the lease amount was lower,

About Ch@troom This week’s question: How would it affect you if the U.S. Postal Service discontinued Saturday service? Every week The Community Press asks readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answer to westnews@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line. but that car was recalled four times! I still say Toyota are the most reliable car ever.” L.S.B. “Yes, if I was to buy a new car I would look at the Toyotas, because over the years they have been a reliable car and a lot of the innovations they brought about other car companies were forced to adapt to stay competitive.” L.S. “No. I would buy a Ford because they took no government stimulus money and are doing better than the other manufacturers.” W.H. “Unfortunately for America, foreign automakers such as Honda and Toyota make superior vehicles, so all my cars will continue to be either Toyota or Honda. One or two problems over the last 40 years pales in comparison to the millions of recalls we’ve had for American cars. Until the auto unions are abolished and we stop paying people to make inferior cars, I’ll stick with Toyota and Honda. Wake up, American auto industry.” G.C. “We have had Toyotas in the past and been happy with them; however, whether we buy another one depends on how well their vehicles meet our needs. Reliability is critical; we stopped buying American cars for this very reason. The Japanese will be sorry if they don’t learn from the Detroit companies.” D.H. “Only if I got a hell of a deal so that my bank account accelerates. Then I will make sure to throw the new Toyota in to neutral when it accelerates!” L.D. “Absolutely! We have owned Toyota cars over the past 30 years with very good results. We currently own a 2002 Camry which has a very smooth ride with no problems. We may just start looking for a new Toyota!” K.K.

Needs information

On the evening of Feb. 23, around 7:30 p.m., my 2-year-old dog, Paix, was killed on our street. I live on Riverwatch Drive across from Spyglass Court. Paix was tied in the backyard to go to the bathroom and must have spot-

ted someone or something around our house. He pulled at the leash and it broke. My next-door neighbor called to say he was pulling into his garage when he saw Paix lying motionless near my mailbox. Hysterically, I tried stopping traffic by standing in the middle of the street while I covered my dog. I was in shock. We are in our early 60s and he was our first dog. A man in a red van got out and carried Paix to the curb. I now understand how dog owners feel. Animals become a huge part of your family. Enduring such grief compelled me to write to the Delhi Press asking for any information as to how Paix died. I am posting my cell number, 4609985. Please call if you saw or know anything about his last moments. I would like closure

PRESS

Welcome sign

I hate to burst Mike Davis’ bubble, but UDF and McDonald’s aren’t going to attract businesses to Delhi, but two “Welcome to Delhi” signs might. The brilliance of all the Delhi trustees never ceases to amaze me. Keep up the good work guys. Mike Scapicchio Plumridge Drive Delhi Township

Alcohol fight consumed 19th century Liquor was a very controversial subject in the United States, during the whole 19th Century. In our area, Delhi Township was the only place where drinking was allowed. The town had mixed feelings and fought the hottest battle in Ohio history over liquor. Women of Delhi were tired of falling over drunks hanging at the bus stop on Gracely Drive. They circulated petitions, hung posters, and demanded a prohibition election after a man was killed in drunken brawl. The election was held and the wets won. The village of Fernbank was plotted with deed restrictions against manufacturing or drinking of spirits wines, malt and intoxicating liquor. The village of Home City passed an ordinance prohibiting the manufacturing and drinking of liquor in 1887. It only permitted the use of liquor for medical or religious purposes. These actions were typical of the 1800s. In the beginning of the 1800s, there was a world-wide movement pushing for moderation in drinking habits or complete abstinence. Ministers used moral persuasion to address the problem. It kept growing because women and children who had endured the punishment of men who were uncontrollable drinkers, pushing it. At the time alcohol was blamed for many of societies, severe health problems, destitution and crime.

Moral persuasion didn’t really work. But Carry Nation came on the scene with her hatchet and got results. She was born on a plantation in Kentucky Betty Kamuf in 1846. She grew Community up a staunch Bible believer. In 1867 Press guest she married a columnist young physician, Charles Gloyd, in Belton, Mo. Unfortunately, he was a heavy drinker, and could not hold a steady job. When their only child was born sickly, Carry blamed his alcoholic habits. She divorced him and moved on. In 1877, she married David Nation. He was a preacher, lawyer and editor 19 years older than her. The family moved to Medicine Lodge, Kansas in 1889. He became the pastor of a church and Carry taught Sunday school. She became a jail evangelist and helped to establish a local chapter of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union. She grew tired of saloon keepers ignoring the Prohibition laws Kansas residents voted for in 1880. She was going to change that. In 1890, she prayed in front of saloons. The next year she threw rocks and bricks at saloons. When that didn’t close saloons she went

for the hatchet. The nearly 6-feettall, strapping woman stormed the saloons and chopped up the brew until she closed all saloons in Medicine Lodge. With her success came requests from citizens in other towns to help them close their saloons. She entered states even where liquor sales were legal. Her hacking and chopping sent her to jail repeatedly for disorderly conduct and disturbing the peace. Her fines were paid by the sale of pewter hatchet pins. Even her sworn enemies acknowledged her success with enforcing the law. The Nations were divorced in 1901 and David died in 1903. Carry’s last speaking tours ended in 1910. In June of 1911, Carry Nation died isolated and dirt poor in Leavenworth, Kansas. Prohibition would become nationwide eight years later with ratification of the 18th Amendment. • Sunday March 14, from noon to 5 p.m., Sayler Park School will hold an open house. All the renovation plans will be on display. There will be a silent auction of clocks, brass door knobs and other school memorabilia. Hope to see you there. Betty Kamuf is a winner of Griffin Yeatman Award for Historical Preservation. She lives in Sayler Park. You can reach her at sp.column@fuse.net.

Covedale: Victim of identity theft Our identity is a reflection of the community in which we live. Our community’s image is perhaps the single most identifiable thing by which people judge and accept us. It’s what gives us our “sense of place” and standards of behavior to guide us. Our sense of place is equally affected by our primal need to territorialize. According to anthropologist Franco La Cecla, “The lack of a sense of boundary is the chief cause of disorientation.” Now area residents, when observing the many Price Hill signs that line Glenway Avenue, west of Rapid Run, are scratching their heads and saying, “I thought this was Covedale.” It’s puzzling that our elected city officials and self-proclaimed “west-side advocates” choose not to acknowledge that Covedale exists, even though history and public opinion clearly proves that it does. So, what is the underlining motive of what appears to be a cruel joke? The obvious intent is to improve the image of Price Hill

by simply branding Covedale, a perceived nicer area, as “Price Hill” – a seemingly convenient solution considering that the city no longer recogJim Grawe nizes Covedale. Community You might ask, difference Press guest “What does a name columnist make? Why not just accept the Price Hill identity?” Let’s be honest. We live in a class society and, right or wrong, there is a west-side social order. Many Covedale residents moved from Price Hill just as others moved from Price Hill to Delhi, Bridgetown, etc., in the pursuit of self-expression and upward mobility – a right that they freely exercised. But now, because the Price Hill signs steal the Covedale identity, Covedalians are denied this same right. The residents of Covedale are not naïve. We fully understand

A publication of Your Community Press newspaper Serving Price Hill and Covedale

wondering how someone could hit a dog and not at least stop to see if he/she was breathing. Although I’m not close to my neighbors, several came out to help. For that my husband and I will be forever grateful. Linda Athon Riverwatch Drive Delhi Township

Price Hill Press Editor . . . . . . . .Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com . . . . . . .853-6264

that the real estate community selectivity markets homes in Price Hill as Covedale. However, for the Price Hill Civic Club to counter punch by pretending that “Covedale exists only perceptually” and to flippantly ignore the sensitivities of this issue by erecting Price Hill signs in Covedale (with our tax dollars), which adversely affects the marketability and the value of our homes, is perhaps more irresponsible, reprehensible and arrogant. The people of Covedale choose not to be the innocent victims of the Price Hill Civic Club’s grudge match with the real estate community. And we are adamant in seeing that our Covedale heritage does not vanish. Covedale is more than a neighborhood. It is a story. And now, the struggle to preserve the history, identity and character that is uniquely Covedale is a part of the story. Jim Grawe is the co-founder of the Covedale Neighborhood Association.

s

Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m., Monday-Friday | See page A2 for additional contact information. 923-3111 | Fax 853-6220 | 5556 Cheviot Road, Cincinnati, Ohio 45247 | e-mail pricehillpress@communitypress.com | Web site: www.communitypress.com

E-mail: pricehillpress@communitypress.com


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March 10, 2010

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Readers on vacation

These readers took their Community Press newspaper on vacation. When you take your next trip, take along your newspaper, snap a photo, and e-mail it to westnews@communitypress.com.

PROVIDED.

Jerry and Marylyn Brengelman took the Price Hill Press to Disney World to celebrate their 40th anniversary. Joining them was their son Craig, daughter-in-law Carol and their grandchildren, Avery, Lydia and Andrew.

PROVIDED.

PROVIDED.

Brianna and Andrew Rhoton show off the Delhi Press while on a family vacation to Disney World in Orlando, Fla.

Friends and family celebrate Rick and Sandy Poland’s 10th wedding anniversary on St. Pete Beach, Fla., where they were married. Pictured from front left are Jeanne Shannon, Cathy Misch, Sandy Poland, Ashlyn and Raelyn Tiberio, and Amy Elliott; second row, Harry Clark, Bev Poland, Rick Poland, Ruth Branigan, Anna Tiberio and Barb Branigan; third row, Tom Misch, John Waymeyer, Dennis Poland, Nick Tiberio, Lori Morgan, Kathy Foegle, Mary Adams, and Mary and Eddie Glacken.

PROVIDED.

Kathy Doering and her daughter, Stephanie, took the Delhi Press down under on a recent vacation to Australia. They are pictured in front of the boat Reef Experience, which took them out on the Great Barrier Reef for diving and snorkeling. PROVIDED.

Donai, MaHalle’ and Jailah Long of Delhi Township at the Rose Bowl 2010 in Pasedena, Calif., took their Delhi Press with them.

YOU DESERVE A JOB AND A HIGH-FIVE.

START BUILDING © 2009 CareerBuilder, LLC. All rights reserved.


B2

Delhi-Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 1 1

ART & CRAFT CLASSES Intermediate Sewing Classes, 9:30 a.m.12:30 p.m., The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Child care available. Classes offered on a six-week rotating schedule. Participants must have completed beginner classes. Free. Registration required. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 471-4673; www.thewomensconnection.org. West Price Hill. Beginner Quilling Class, 2-4 p.m., Scrap-Ink, 5515 Bridgetown Road. Learn to create intricate designs with tiny pieces of rolled papers. All materials provided except scissors and double-sided adhesive. Ages 18 and up. $18. Reservations required. 389-0826; www.scrap-ink.com. Green Township. ART EXHIBITS

Winter Wear: Craig McDaniel, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 5701 Delhi Road. Works in variety of media that chart feelings of love and longing, themes of spirituality and mystery and settings such as fairy tales and imaginary scenes that blend together with artist’s aim of enchanting the viewer. Presented by College of Mount St. Joseph. 244-4314. Delhi Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Restore the Core, 6:30-7:30 p.m., New Hope Community Church, 3707 Edgewood Drive, Get ready for summer and bathing suit season. First class is free. $10. Presented by StrollerFit Inc. 205-9772; www.strollerfit.com. Green Township.

LITERARY - BOOK CLUBS

Horror Book Club, 8 p.m., Monfort Heights Branch Library, 3825 West Fork Road. “Black House.” Presented by Monfort Heights/White Oak Civic Association. 369-4472. Monfort Heights.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Comic Potential, 8 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, 3017 Harrison Ave. Comedy. Jacie Tripplethree is a beautiful actress with an uncanny sense of humor and perfect comedic timing. Television writer Adam wants to build a series around her. The problem? She’s an actoid, a robot designed specifically for acting. Contains adult language and situations. $15, $14 advance online. Presented by Drama Workshop. 5988303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Westwood. F R I D A Y, M A R C H 1 2

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Beginner Card-Making Class, 10-11 a.m., Scrap-Ink, 5515 Bridgetown Road. All supplies provided. Bring adhesive. Family friendly. $8. Reservations required. 503-1042. Green Township. Piecemakers, 2-4 p.m., The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Quilters and sewers create projects to benefit the community. Child care available. Free. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 471-4673; www.thewomensconnection.org. West Price Hill.

BENEFITS

Ladies Night Out, 6-9:30 p.m., Cheviot United Methodist Church, 3820 Westwood Northern Blvd., Preschool. Crafters and vendors. Silent auction, grab bags and door prizes. Benefits Cheviot United Methodist Church Preschool. $2. Presented by CUMC Preschool. 3893060. Cheviot.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS

Butler Squares, 7:30-10 p.m., Miami Whitewater Township Firehouse, 6736 Ohio 128, Plus-level square dance club open to all experienced dancers. $5. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 929-2427; www.so-nkysdf.com. Miamitown.

EXERCISE CLASSES

StrollerFit, 9:40-10:40 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, 6720 Home City Ave. Cross training class for moms of all ages. Bring child in stroller. Bring water and mat for core work. $10. Presented by StrollerFit Inc. 2059772; www.strollerfit.com. Sayler Park.

FOOD & DRINK

Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., VFW Post 6428, 140 Main St., Fish sandwiches, fries, coleslaw, and macaroni and cheese. Beer, soda and carryout available. $9. 941-6428. Addyston. Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Lawrence Church, 3680 Warsaw Ave. Heritage Hall. Includes breaded shrimp, baked salmon, cod sandwiches, spaghetti, grilled cheese sandwich, pizza bread, sides, desserts and beverages. Carryout available. Benefits PTO. $1-$7. 921-4230. East Price Hill. Fish Fry, 5-7:30 p.m., American Legion Post 485, 29 E. State Road. Fried, cod, ocean perch and tilapia. With macaroni and cheese, stewed tomatoes, fries, coleslaw and tartar sauce. Carryout available. Benefits Miller Stockum American Legion Post 485. $8. 941-1643. Cleves. Fabulous Fish Friday, 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Bridgetown Finer Meats and Catering, 6135 Bridgetown Road. Includes fish sandwich, fries, macaroni and cheese, green beans and fruit salad. Carryout available. $1-$7. 5743100. Green Township. Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. William Church, 4108 W. Eighth St., School Cafeteria. Fried and baked fish, fried shrimp, crab cakes, pizza, macaroni and cheese, soup, baked goods and ice cream. Beer and soft drinks available. Carryout and drive through available. $3-$7. 921-0247; www.saintwilliam.com. West Price Hill. Wine Tasting, 6-8 p.m., bigg’s Delhi, 5025 Delhi Road. St. Patrick’s day beers. Three samples with snacks. $2. 354-1700. Delhi Township. Lenten Fish Fry, 4-7 p.m., St. Aloysius Gonzaga School, 4390 Bridgetown Road. School Cafeteria. Fish and shrimp dinners, baked or fried fish sandwiches, pizza, sides and beverages. Carryout and drive through available. Benefits Parish’s youth athletic programs. $1.25-$10. Presented by St. Aloysius Gonzaga Church. 574-4035. Green Township. Lenten Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., Our Lady of the Visitation School, 3180 South Road. Includes fried or baked fish, crab cakes and shrimp, sides, Trotta’s pizza, sandwiches and more. Children’s activities. Call ahead. Free delivery for shut-ins. Presented by St. Joseph of the Three Rivers Council Knights of Columbus. 347-2229. Green Township. Fish Fry, 5-7 p.m., St. Antoninus Parish, 1500 Linneman Road. Fried fish sandwich, grilled salmon, jumbo fried shrimp, pizza, baked potato, macaroni and cheese, salad, green beans, cole slaw, french fries, onion rings and soup of the week. Family friendly. $5.50-$7.50 dinners; $1.50-$3.50 à la carte. Presented by St. Antoninus Boy Scout Troop 614. 922-5400; www.saintantoninus.org. Green Township. Boy Scout Troop 271 Fish Fry, 3:30-7:30 p.m., St. Teresa of Avila Church, 1175 Overlook Ave. Fish sandwiches and dinners, salmon dinners, shrimp and shrimp dinners, clam chowder, macaroni and cheese, kids meals and other Lenten favorites. Desserts available for sale by local Girl Scout Troops. Benefits St. Teresa Boy Scout Troop 271. 348-2043. West Price Hill. Fish Fry, 4:30-8 p.m., St. Dominic Church, 4551 Delhi Road, O’Connor Hall. Carryout and drive-through available. 471-7741. Delhi Township.

For more about Greater Cincinnati’s dining, music, events, movies and more, go to Metromix.com. S A T U R D A Y, M A R C H 1 3

EXERCISE CLASSES Spinning, 8-8:45 a.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, 5490 Muddy Creek, Endurance Ride Saturday classes. Strength Ride Sunday classes. $12; free members. Registration required. 451-4233; www.westerntfc.com. Green Township. HEALTH / WELLNESS

Weight Management Class, Noon-1 p.m., Curves - Miami Heights/Cleves, 3797 Shady Lane, Free. Registration recommended. 4671189. Miami Heights.

HOME & GARDEN

Seminars in a Snap: Tree & Shrub Pruning 101, 11-11:30 a.m., White Oak Garden Center, 3579 Blue Rock Road. Educational opportunities for busy people who want to enhance their outdoor living space with style and beauty. Free. 385-3313; www.whiteoakgardencenter.com. White Oak.

Local R&B band II Juicy performs Saturday, March 13, at Poppy’s Tavern, 5510 Rybolt Road. beginning at 9:30 p.m. For more information, call 574-6333. For details about the band, visit www.iijuicy.com.

LECTURES

EDUCATION

Reasons To Believe, Cincinnati, 1:15-4 p.m., Cincinnati Christian University, 2700 Glenway Ave. Professors Dan Dyke and Hugh Henry teach how study of words can be tool to increase understanding of difficult passages in Bible, specifically demonstrated in creation account. Includes questions-andanswer session. Family friendly. Free. Presented by Reasons To Believe. 614-5540539. East Price Hill.

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Used Book Sale, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, Free. 369-6961. Green Township.

ON STAGE - THEATER

Comic Potential, 3 p.m., Westwood Town Hall Recreation Center, $15, $14 advance online. 598-8303; www.thedramaworkshop.org. Westwood. S U N D A Y, M A R C H 1 4

ART EXHIBITS

Winter Wear: Craig McDaniel, 1-5 p.m., Studio San Giuseppe Art Gallery at the College of Mount St. Joseph, 244-4314. Delhi Township.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Spinning, 12:45-1:30 p.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, $12; free members. Registration required. 451-4233; www.westerntfc.com. Green Township.

FOOD & DRINK

Used Book Sale, Noon-6 p.m., Green Township Branch Library, 6525 Bridgetown Road. Fiction and nonfiction books for adults and kids, CDs, cassettes, audio books and videocassettes. Free. Presented by Friends of the Public Library. 369-6961. Green Township.

Chili Cook-Off, 3-7 p.m., Purcell Council Knights of Columbus, 3621 Glenmore Ave. Includes split-thepot, silent auctions, raffles and more. Benefits Adoptive Parents Outreach Program of Catholic Charities of Southwestern Ohio. $10. Presented by Catholic Charities SouthWestern Ohio. 241-7745; www.catholiccharitiesswo.org. Cheviot.

MUSIC - BLUES

MUSIC - OLDIES

LITERARY - LIBRARIES

Chuck Brisbin & the Tuna Project, 9 p.m., Miss Kitty’s Cafe, 3670 Werk Road. Free. 922-7612. Green Township.

Lee’s Junction, 7-10 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. 251-7977. Riverside.

FILE PHOTO

M O N D A Y, M A R C H 1 5 Your Financial Health Personal Education Program, 7-8 p.m., Taylor High School, 36 E. Harrison Ave. Free. How to Live Forever: Creating Your Financial Legacy. Presented by Three Rivers Local School District. Through May 10. 941-6400. North Bend.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Cardio Tennis Class, 8-9 a.m., Western Tennis and Fitness Club, 5490 Muddy Creek, Includes warmup, cardio workout and cool down. No tennis experience required. $15, $12 members. Registration required. 4514233. Green Township. StrollerFit, 9:40-10:40 a.m., Sayler Park Community Center, $10. 205-9772; www.strollerfit.com. Sayler Park. Restore the Core, 6:30-7:30 p.m., New Hope Community Church, $10. 205-9772; www.strollerfit.com. Green Township. T U E S D A Y, M A R C H 1 6

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Beginner Sewing Classes, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Child care available. Classes offered on a six-week rotating schedule. Free. Registration required. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 4714673; www.thewomensconnection.org. West Price Hill.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Retired Engineers and Scientists of Cincinnati Luncheon Meeting, 11:30 a.m., Evergreen Retirement Community, 230 W. Galbraith Road. Bob Grace of Turner Construction presents "Cincinnati's Tallest Building, The Queen City Tower Project." $13. Reservations required by March 11. 5204338; www.resc.org. Hartwell.

DANCE CLASSES

About calendar

To submit calendar items, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to “life@communitypress.com” along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to “www.cincinnati.com” and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page. W E D N E S D A Y, M A R C H 1 7

ART & CRAFT CLASSES

Intermediate Card-Making Class, 10-11:30 a.m., Scrap-Ink, 5515 Bridgetown Road. Learn new techniques and intermediate level folds. Family friendly. $8. Registration required. 389-0826. Green Township. Technique Savvy, 7-9 p.m., Scrap-Ink, 5515 Bridgetown Road. Rubber stamp and paper crafting artists learn more challenging techniques, styles and patterns. Family friendly. $22. 389-0826. Green Township. Scrapbooking, 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m., The Women’s Connection Learning Center, 4022 Glenway Ave. Child care available. Free. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 4714673; www.thewomensconnection.org. West Price Hill.

CIVIC

Green Township Democratic Club Monthly Meeting, 7 p.m., Nathanael Greene Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road. Discussion of current issues. Split the pot. Includes refreshments. New members welcome. Free. 5983100; info@greentownshipdems.org. Green Township.

CLUBS & ORGANIZATIONS Pioneer Antique & Hobby Association, 7:30 p.m., Nathanael Green Lodge, 6394 Wesselman Road, Mulberry Room. Speaker is Kathy Kiefer, “The Lone Ranger Came to Northside.” Guests are welcome. 451-4822. Green Township.

COMMUNITY DANCE

Line Dancing, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. 251-7977. Riverside.

DANCE CLASSES

Square Dance Class, 10-11:30 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

SUPPORT GROUPS

Western Hills Job Satellite Group, 9-10:30 a.m., Westwood First Presbyterian Church, 3011 Harrison Ave. Community members welcome to learn from and support each other in job-seeking process. Speakers present valuable content about latest in electronic résumés, networking, interview skills, available funding and community resources. Group members provide support and accountability to one another during this stressful time. Free. 662-1244. Westwood. T H U R S D A Y, M A R C H 1 8

JOB FAIRS

Teen Resource Fair, 5-7 p.m., Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave. Open to teens 14-17. Advice and guidance on ways to find summer jobs to help them in long-term career aspirations, mentorship, volunteering and programming opportunities. Free. Presented by The Women’s Connection. 4714673. West Price Hill.

ON STAGE STUDENT THEATER

The Diviners, 7:30 p.m., Oak Hills High School, 3200 Ebenezer Road. Holt Auditorium. Drama. Skip Bandonsky, thespian director. $5. 703-5496. Green Township.

Line Dance Class, 10-11 a.m., Dunham Recreation Complex, 4356 Dunham Lane, Line dancing with Jerry and Kathy Helt, instructors. Wear smooth-soled shoes. No partner dances and no prior dance experience required. $4. Presented by Southwestern Ohio/Northern Kentucky Square Dancers Federation. Through Dec. 28. 321-6776. West Price Hill.

EXERCISE CLASSES

Core Power, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Party Hoppers, 6131 Cleves Warsaw Pike. $5 per class. Reservations recommended. 373-6469; www.partyhoppersonline.com. Delhi Township. Fit Chix Cross Training for Women, 7:308:30 p.m., Party Hoppers, 6131 Cleves Warsaw Pike. Bring hand weights, jump rope, water and towel. $5 per class. Reservations recommended. 373-6469. Delhi Township. Restore the Core, 6:30-7:30 p.m., New Hope Community Church, $10. 205-9772; www.strollerfit.com. Green Township.

MUSIC - OLDIES

Bop Club Dance, 7-11 p.m., Jim & Jack’s on the River, 3456 River Road. Dance lessons 7 p.m.-8 p.m., except last Tuesday of month. $3, members free. Presented by Cincinnati Bop Club. 251-7977; www.cincibop.com. Riverside.

PARENTING CLASSES

FILE PHOTO

The Cincinnati Wine Festival returns for its 20th year March 12-13, in the Grand Ballroom at the Duke Energy Center, 525 Elm St., downtown CIncinnati. The Grand Tastings will be 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Friday, March 12, and Saturday, March 13, 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.-9 p.m. Tickets range in price from $60 to $110 depending on time, date and if the Special Tasting is included. For details or to buy tickets, call 513-723-9463 or visit www.winefestival.com.

Families in Crisis Situations, 6-7:30 p.m., Carson Elementary School, 4323 Glenway Ave. Parents learn about problems and issues facing their children and the impact it is having on them. Parents and children provided with tools and support to successfully deal with issues while strengthening skills and relationships. For families in following zip codes only: 45205, 45211, 45238, 45225 and 45223. Free. Reservations required. Presented by Beech Acres Parenting Center. 363-9849; www.beechacres.org. Price Hill.

Come out for the 139th edition of the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. The Zing Zang Zoom show features Zingmaster Alex and his assistant Levitytia leading the audience through a kaleidoscope of color, imagery and fun Thursday March 11, through Sunday, March 14, at the U.S. Bank Arena, 100 Broadway, downtown Cincinnati. Shows start at 7 p.m. with 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. matinees on Saturday and Sunday. Tickets range from $14.50 to $85. For details or tickets, call 513-562-4949 or visit www.usbankarena.com.


Life

March 10, 2010

Delhi-Price Hill Press

B3

Our enemy fear attended the Olympics

The Olympics are majestic but they are no match for fear. W e e n j o y watching the games for various reasons: our patrio t i s m , competiFather Lou tive spirit, Guntzelman love of Perspectives sports, or even for the vicarious thrill of imagining ourselves in some of the athletes. Yet, if we are competing, how well would we handle our fears? The Olympics, like life itself, confronts humans with various fears. In our lives, “Each morning two grinning gremlins sit at the foot of our bed. One is called Lethargy and one is called Fear. Either will gladly eat us alive … for they daily renew their interest in possessing our soul,” writes analyst Dr. James Hollis. The success of our lives will be found in our struggle to achieve as much meaning and depth as possible by going beyond the bounds

these two enemies try to set upon us. Do Olympics participants battle these same gremlins as we do in our lives, jobs and responsibilities? Definitely! For example, in the Feb. 26 edition of USA Today, sports columnist Mike Lopresti wrote of the unnoticed departure of the Netherlands bobsled team. “Its team has pulled out of the four-man bobsled competition before even starting – not because of injury or controversy or lousy times. The pilot is Edwin van Calker, and he has lost his nerve to compete,” Lopresti states. “They’ve seen the crashes at the Whistler Sliding Centre. They are haunted by the death of the Georgian luger. Edwin had an awful time of it last week in the two-man competition,” notes the columnist. Edwin’s brother and teammate, Arnold, agreed with him. He is 33 years old and has a wife and daughter who saw the luger’s death back in Holland on television. Some will condemn their withdrawal from the Olympics, others will try to

understand. But we must remember that the gremlin of fear sits at the foot of every one of our beds, and in every one of our endeavors. “Fear defeats more people than any other one thing in the world,” says Emerson. Was the bobsledder’s decision to withdraw his succumbing to cowardice or the summoning up of courage (not caring what others will say and think of him)? Or, back in the beginning of his bobsledding career choice years ago, was he fearful of changing his choice or of future failure? We do not know. What we do know is that life is not our enemy, fear is. Throughout life we must ask ourselves in every dilemma we face between the difficult and the easy; in every relationship in which we’re called to make risks and sacrificial choices; in every commitment we’re called upon to make; every responsibility to a spouse or child, “Is it basically fear or lethargy that’s holding me back? Does my choice diminish me or enlarge me?”

times fear of death, either for myself or a loved one. “Most of all, I have wrestled against the fear of not mattering, of being cast out because I did not fit in, of being overlooked because I was not significant, and of being shamed because I was not worthy. I have at times been paralyzed by this feeling. I have let it hold me back. And what I now want is liberation from that fear.” Courage is not the absence of fear. It is the per-

Only the boldest among us can acknowledge the role that fear plays in our lives and then to do something about it. In the beginning of his book, “Face Your Fear: Living with Courage in an Age of Caution,” Rabbi Shmuley Boteach writes for all of us when he reveals, “I have struggled my whole life against fear, as many of you have. I have known fear of failure, fear of humiliation, fear of injury, and some-

ception that some things are more important to us than what we fear. Father Lou Guntzelman is a Catholic priest of the Archdiocese of Cincinnati. Contact him at columns@communitypress.co m or P.O. Box 428541, Cincinnati, OH 45242.

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B4

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Life

March 10, 2010

Have a taste o’ the green this St. Paddy’s Day The wild yellow aconite which dear friend Ike Leaf gave me starts of so long ago is now starting to cover our little patch of woods with bright yellow and green. The snowdrops are up, too. I’m always amazed at the courage of Mother Nature to push these delicate looking flowers through the frozen ground and snow. Spring is not far behind! And don’t forget to start saving those papery onion

skins for coloring E a s t e r Eggs. I’ll share that r e c i p e soon. Meanwhile, St. Rita P a t r i c k ’s Heikenfeld Day is just around Rita’s kitchen the corner, so here are some favorites to celebrate.

Eileen Bittman’s St. Pat’s Jell-O salad

1

Eileen is a friend of mine and a marvelous cook. Eileen likes lime gelatin, but you can use your favorite. 1 can, 20 oz., crushed pineapple in juice 1 box, 6 oz., lime gelatin (or flavor of your choice) 2 cups buttermilk 1 carton, 8 oz., whipped topping 1 cup chopped pecans, toasted (optional but good)

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Let the kids have a tiny bit in espresso cups, sans the whiskey, of course!

Pour 1 to 2 tablespoons whiskey and 1 to 2 teaspoons sugar in each mug, stir and pour coffee in. Top with the whippedcream.

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Combine pineapple and gelatin in saucepan. Heat until gelatin melts, but don’t boil. Cool slightly and add buttermilk and whipped topping. Combine well and add nuts. Pour into molds or bowl and chill until firm.

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⁄2 cup raisins, dried cherries (chopped) or currants 2-3 teaspoons caraway seed (optional) 1 cup sour cream Milk Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Mix flour, soda, salt, sugar and butter until mixture is crumbly. Add raisins, caraway and sour cream. Beat until blended. Form into mound-shaped circle on sprayed cookie sheet. Brush with milk. Bake 4555 minutes.

Ruth Lyons coffeecake

I hope this is what several readers wanted. I haven’t had time to try this. Let me know if you have. 1 stick margarine 1 cup granulated sugar 1 cup brown sugar 2 cups flour 2 eggs 1 cup buttermilk, or sweet milk with 1 teaspoon of vinegar 1 teaspoon baking soda Now here’s what the rest of the recipe had in it and which one reader said was not in the original, so if you want, leave it out. 1

⁄2 cup raisins ⁄2 cup coconut 1 ⁄2 cup chopped pecans (optional)

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Passover brisket Virginia Bakery coffecake Naturally colored Easter eggs

Can you help?

Like Milan Railroad Inn’s tuna salad: For Cathy, who said the owner told her it was a secret recipe. Cathy also asked if there’s a difference in tuna with albacore or chunky white? I’ve used both, and like the chunky white a bit better. Like Karlos & Johnny’s country penne: Tom Ohmer has asked again to find a similar recipe. “I found the ingredients: roasted chicken, mild Italian sausage, broccoli, tomatoes toasted in a cannelloni bean broth with penne.”

Combine margarine, granulated and brown sugars, and flour. Mix well and

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is Macy’s certified culinary professional. Email columns@community press.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-2487130, ext. 356.

Grant will help meals on wheels program tion Impact Grant helps Wesley Community Services meet our equipment needs to efficiently provide meals to seniors,” says Stephen Smookler, Wesley Community Services executive director. ”This grant will help us improve our meals delivery by simplifying paperwork and reducing clerical staff time.” Smookler said. The Wal-Mart Foundation is spending more than $2 million nationwide through meals-on-wheels association in 2010 to make sure Meals-On-Wheels programs have the equipment they need to maintain their operations.

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Coming soon

1

Wesley Community Services has been awarded $15,000 through a WalMart Foundation grant to the Meals-On-Wheels Association of America. The money will provide partial funding to purchase Mobile Computing Devices to establish a meals-onwheels bar code tracking system, which will dramatically improve the delivery of meals to seniors in Greater Cincinnati neighborhoods. This financial support is needed as many Meals-OnWheels programs across the country are struggling to survive during this economic downturn. “The Wal-Mart Founda-

{That’s why my doctor and I chose minimally invasive gynecologic surgery.}

save 1⁄2 cup for topping. Add eggs, buttermilk and baking soda. Mix well and then add raisins, coconut and pecans. Put in two floured and greased round cake pans. (I’d just use cooking spray). Put reserved dry ingredients on top and press some pecans on top of each cake. Bake at 350 degrees for 35 minutes (I’d check after about 25 minutes).

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Community

Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

B5

BRIEFLY Opportunities for teens

chased in person at the box office between the same times.

The Women’s Connection will host its fourth annual Teen Opportunity Fair from 5-7 p.m. Thursday, March 18, at Seton High School, 3901 Glenway Ave. This event is free and open to all young men and women ages 14 to 17. Teens will receive valuable information that will allow them to have a fun, safe and educational summer. The goal of the event is to expose young women and men to potential employment and volunteer opportunities that could help them in their long-term career aspirations. In addition, they will be introduced to mentor, volunteering, enrichment and programming opportunities from a wide variety of community organizations that will open the door to a fun, educational and exciting summer. Employers and organizations interested in signing up for the fair, or anyone requesting more information, should contact Jori Cotton, youth programs coordinator, at 4714673 or jcotton@thewomensconnection.org. Information is also available at www.thewomensconnection.org.

Honoring counselors

Pay online

Flower fest

FILE PHOTO

Stained glass

‘Wings of Wonder’

The Covedale Center for the Performing Arts, 4990 Glenway Ave., continues its Saturday Morning Children’s Series with a visit from the Cincinnati Zoo at 11 a.m. Saturday, April 3. The zoo is bringing its Wings of Wonder Traveling Bird Show to the theater. The show, which was started in 1983, was one of the country’s earliest bird shows. Birds perform a variety of behaviors including flying, calling, mimicking, climbing and outsmarting their trainers. Seven species of birds will be showcased. Tickets are $7 for adults

The Western Wildlife Corridor has its annual Wildflower Festival from 6-9 p.m. Friday, April 9. It will be at the Delhi Township senior/community center, 647 Neeb Road. Call 859-746-8671 for more information.

American Red Cross International Disaster Response Fund, earmarked for Haiti disaster relief. Girl Scout Cookie Booth Sales occur outside of area businesses, such as Kroger, retail stores, businesses and banks. To find the closest booth sale, customers can go to www.girlscoutsofwesternohio.org, click on “Search for Cookie Sale locations nearest you” and enter their zip code.

Last week, the clue for Scavenger Hunt was a stained glass window in St. Lawrence Church on Warsaw Avenue. Here are the readers who called in a correct Last week’s clue. guess: Evelyn and Mar y Adams, Marilyn Leuenberger, William Cash and Tyler Gibson. Turn to A1 for this week’s clue.

and $5 for children. Call the box office at 2416550, between 11 a.m. and 5

p.m. Monday through Saturday, for ticket information. Tickets may also be pur-

Career Quest – along with Cincinnati State Community and Technical College, University of Cincinnati, and Xavier University – is sponsoring the second annual Greater Cincinnati School Counseling Recognition Awards. Nominations are being accepted from school administrators, parents, students, teachers, and anyone else in the community who would like to recognize the ways in which high school counselors help students on their college and career paths. Last year’s award winners include Maureen Ferrell from Walnut Hills, Kevin Jones from Winton Woods, and Sandra Mosley from the School for Creative and Performing Arts. Nomination forms and further information about the awards can be found at www.career-quest.org or by contacting Melissa Fischer at mfischer@ikron.org or 6211117. All nominations are due by March 19.

Scouts helping

Every Girl Scout cookie has a mission: to help girls do great things. This year throughout Girl Scouts of Western Ohio, girls are working together to benefit Haiti. For every case of Girl Scout cookies sold during booth sales, from now until March 21, Girl Scouts of Western Ohio is donating $1 to the

Greater Cincinnati Water Works now offers customers the ability to pay their water bills Online. The free program, called Auto Debit, allows for automatic payment of water bills from customers’ checking or savings accounts as well as Visa and MasterCard. Payments can be made on or before the date the bill is due. Customers are encouraged to use this system to save time and effort. For more information about this service, visit the Web site at www.cincinnatioh.gov/waterbill.

Report potholes

Last year more than 2,000 Cincinnati residents reported potholes located on streets throughout the city. Once again the city is asking citizens for assistance in identifying potholes to ensure faster filling and repair. Crews are already patrolling the streets as a proactive effort to get potholes filled as quickly as possible. Citizens may call 591-6000 or send an e-mail to pothole@cincinnati-oh.gov to report potholes to the Department of Public Services. Be sure to include the exact location – street name, intersection or nearby address – the number of potholes and a description as to

where the hole is positioned (middle of the street, by the curb, etc.) on the street.

Get acquainted

High school students and their families are invited to explore the College of Mount St. Joseph at Get Acquainted Day (GAD) on Saturday, March 20. Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The program begins at 10 a.m. in the College Theatre. GAD is a free event that offers high school students the opportunity to tour the campus, learn about financial aid and receive information on the many services the Mount offers its students, such as the Learning Center and the Career and Experiential Learning Center. Representatives from all academic majors and supports are also on hand to answer questions. Following GAD, those attending are invited to the stay for lunch in the campus dining hall. For more information or to register for the event, call the Office of Admission at 513244-4531 or 1-800-654-9314, ext. 4531, or register online www.msj.edu/visit\.

Free drink

Beginning Tuesday, March 16, McDonald’s restaurants of Greater Cincinnati will add a McCafé Frappé blended-ice beverages to its menu. To support the launch, McDonald’s restaurants throughout Greater Cincinnati will offer a free sample to area residents on March 16. McCafé Frappés are thick, blended-ice drinks available in either mocha or caramel, with a hint of coffee, and served with whipped cream and either chocolate or caramel drizzle. The free 7-ounce samples will be available from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m. or while supplies last at participating restaurants, no purchase necessary.

Civic Association scheduling fun xBy Heidi Fallon hfallon@communitypress.com

The Delhi Civic Association is continuing to add to its calendar of ways to celebrate and contribute to the community. Kevin Kappa, association president, said the fun started in January with a group trip to a Cyclones games. “We’d like to plan more of those kinds of activities, not only for our members, but all residents,” Kappa said. Along with fun, the association is planning a forum this month to provide information for current homeowners on preventing foreclosure and for first-time home buyers. No date has been set for that program. The group does have a Saturday, April 24, date for its Great American Clean Up. The roster of events also includes a blood drive in September, candidates night and another clean up day in October. The association again will be hosting three concerts in the Delhi Township Park staring Wednesday, June 16, with Mike Davis. The group’s second Delhi’s Taste of Rock and

Blues is slated for Saturday, July 10, with three bands. Kappa said they are hoping for better weather than the rain that dampened the first such afternoon and evening event. The third concert will be in conjunction with the Tuesday, Aug. 3, National Night Out. “We’d like to be able to host a fourth concert, but our budget just doesn’t allow that,” Kappa said. With a budget of about

ways to give back to the community,” he said. “It’s also a great way to get involved and get to know your neighbors, have some fun.” The group meets the first Thursday of the month at 7 p.m. The association is meeting at the senior/community center, 647 Neeb Road, until the remodeling project at the Delhi Township Park Lodge is completed. For more information, go to delhicivic.org.

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$2,000, the group is hoping for sponsorships to help defray the $11,000 tab for the three concerts. Along with paying the band, the association has a $500 fee for renting the stage from the Cincinnati Recreation Commission. With a membership of about 70, Kappa said the association is always looking to add to its roster. “We are a community service as well as a social organization looking for

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B6

Delhi-Price Hill Press

Community

March 10, 2010

‘Queen City Gothic’ details some of area’s cold cases side of Cincinnati’s history. With full access to the Cincinnati Police D e p a r t ment’s cold Townsend case squad files, Townsend exhumed the details of 13 high profile murder cases that took place from 1904 to 1971, but remain unsolved mysteries today. Cases include the murder

J.T. Townsend, a freelance writer and lifelong resident of Cincinnati, will discuss his new book “Queen City Gothic: Cincinnati’s Most Infamous Murder Mysteries at the Main Library, 800 Vine St. at 1 p.m. Saturday, March 13, in the Huenefeld Tower Room. A book signing with the author will immediately follow the discussion. Queen City Gothic takes readers on a riveting, sinister journey through the dark

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of Greenhills High School cheerleader Patty Rebholz; the slaying of the Bricca family of Bridgetown and the Dummler Family of Mt. Lookout; and the terror of the Cincinnati Strangler. Townsend is a freelance writer and lifelong resident of Cincinnati. He is the former true crime historian for Snitch Magazine, and his work has appeared in the Cincinnati Enquirer, Cincinnati Magazine, Word Magazine, and Clews. In addition, he appeared in the 2008 British Documentary “Conversations With a Serial Killer.” Queen City Gothic is his first book. He lives in Wyoming. The murder cases featured in Queen City Gothic were front-page news stories in their day. Using the Library’s newspaper microfilm collection, Townsend uncovered details about the murders straight from the headlines of their time. He kept a scrapbook of this research and used the details to paint readers a picture of each crime scene and the murder’s effect on the Cincinnati community.

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Susan Wendel from UPS, who lives in Western Hills, came in third place in the Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati’s 20th annual Scripps Spelling Bee for Literacy presented by Great American Insurance Group. With her are co-workers Peter Bauer, center, and Tony Waker.

DELHI HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH

“Come Hear The Story of Jesus” 5421 Foley Rd. • 513-922-8363 Rev. Bob Overberg Sunday School................................ 10:00a.m. Sunday Morning Worship................ 11:00a.m. Sunday Evening ................................ 6:00p.m. Wednesday Evening Bible Study ...... 6:00p.m.

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UNITED METHODIST SHILOH UNITED METHODIST

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place in the Best Spellers in Cincinnati at the Literacy Network of Greater Cincinnati’s 20th annual Scripps Spelling Bee for Literacy presented by Great American Insurance Group. She was joined on the three-person team by Peter Bauer of College Hill and Tony Waker of Clifton representing United Parcel Service Inc. Proceeds from the $850 per team entry fee are used to support the Literacy Network’s many programs; during the seventeen years of spelling bee competitions, over $260,000 has been raised. WCPO’s Tanya O’Rourke emceed the event. After four grueling rounds, only three teams

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remained, UPS, Ascendum, and Bridge Worldwide. UPS fought a good fight by correctly spelling: ultimatum, incommensurable, bellicosity, and fainéant. During the championship round they were eliminated and named third place after misspelling ‘sesquipedalian.’ Wendel and fellow team members were awarded one-night stays at the Comfort Suites Riverfront, Holiday Inn Interstate 275 North, or Cincinnati/Riverfront Hampton Inn. Each also received two tickets to the Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, a $25 gift certificate to Blue Agave, and a $5 gift certificate to Busken Bakery.

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THE RECORD

ON

Virgie Bailey

Virginia “Virgie” Bailey, 95, formerly of Cincinnati, died Feb. 28. Survived by stepson Byron (Sharon) Bailey; great-niece Julie Carlton; greatgreat-nieces Becki (Chris Stripling), Sarah Carlton; greatgreat-great Bailey niece Skylar Stripling, great-great-great-nephew Xander Carlton. Preceded in death by husband Robert Bailey, stepson Gary Bailey, siblings Fannie Yeary, Roy, Tom Disney, Ora Broadus, Ruby Utz. Services were March 4 at Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home.

Muriel Bilbrey

Services for Muriel Evans Bilbrey, 77, were March 3 at Venice Cemetery, Ross, Ohio. She was a homemaker. Survived by brother Sherman Evans; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by parents Gordon, Pearl Evans, siblings Bobby, Gordon Jr., Paul, Gloria, Mary Evans.

Thomas Corcoran

Thomas L. Corcoran, 82, died Feb. 12. He worked for the United States Postal Service. He was a Navy veteran of World War II and Korea. Survived by brother Patrick Corcoran; sisters-in-law LorCorcoran raine McAllister, Sue Corcoran; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by wife

March 10, 2010

BIRTHS

|

DEATHS

|

POLICE

|

REAL

Editor Marc Emral | memral@communitypress.com | 853-6264

Madeline Corcoran, siblings Helen Bohman, James Corcoran. Services were Feb. 16 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home. Memorials to: Our Daily Bread, 1730 Race St., Cincinnati, OH 45202 or a charity of the donor’s choice.

Jean Florence

Jean Collier Florence, 88, died Feb. 12. She was a sales associate for Mabley and Carew. Survived by niece Alexis Collier, nephew Michael Collier; friends Carol, John Carraher, Nicholas, Kevin Carraher. PreFlorence ceded in death by husband Ora Florence. Services were Feb. 18 at St. William. Arrangements by Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Alberta Geisler

Alberta Reiff Geisler, 85, died Feb. 10. She was a homemaker. Survived by children Ronald (Louise), Robert (Janet), Thomas (Donna) Geisler, Barbara (the late Jimmy) King, Kathleen (Emmett) Weise; 14 grandchilGeisler dren; 14 greatgrandchildren; one great-greatgrandchild. Preceded in death by husband Frederick Geisler, siblings Audrey Jones, Richard, Robert, Billy Reiff. Services were Feb. 13 at Ralph Meyer & Deters Funeral Home.

Delhi-Price Hill Press

ESTATE

communitypress.com

DEATHS Vernon Haynes

Vernon Lee Haynes, 81, West Price Hill, died Feb. 27. He was caretaker of the United Jewish Cemetery for 44 years. He was a member of Kings Run Baptist Church. Survived by wife Irene Haynes Haynes; children Gary (Susan) Haynes, Kathy Kirby; granddaughter Paula (Tim) Miles; great-grandchildren Devon, Makayla; brother Levi Haynes. Preceded in death by siblings Veston Haynes, Mary Akres. Services were March 3 at Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to the Hospice of Cincinnati.

Kenneth Lipps

Kenneth Joseph Lipps, 81, died March 3. He was assistant chief of the Delhi Township Fire Department. He was cofounder of the Delhi Skirt Game and a veteran of Korea. Survived by wife Joan Lipps; Lipps children Patty Middendorf, Debbie (Joe) Ruhe, Mike (Victoria) Lipps, Bev (Kevin) Warnock-Gough; siblings Eugene (Gerri) Lipps, Evelyn Cummiskey; 12 grandchildren; nine great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by siblings Elmer, Clara, Marie, Ralph, Ruth, Herbert, Frank. Services were March 6 at Our Lady of Victory. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to the Delhi Skirt Game or a charity of the donor’s choice.

James Maloney Sr.

James J. Maloney Sr., 89, Price Hill, died March 1. He was a salesman. He was an Army veteran of World War II. Survived by children Rita Korb, Mary Sanderson, James Jr., Brother Brian, OFM, Daniel, Terry, Timothy, Stephen Maloney; 13 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by wife Anna Mae Maloney. Services were March 5 at St. Lawrence Church. Arrangements by Radel Funeral Home. Memorials to: Franciscan Friars, 1615 Vine St., Cincinnati, OH 45202.

Helen McFarland

Helen Stiles McFarland, 84, Price Hill, died March 2. Survived by daughter Patricia (Ernie) Ryan; two grandchildren; three greatgrandchildren. Preceded in death by husband John McFarland, grandson Brandon. Arrangements by B.J. McFarland Meyer Sons Funeral Home. Memorials to: Wesley Hall Memorial Fund, 315 Lilienthal St., Cincinnati, OH 45204.

Dot Mertz

Dorothy “Dot” Dean Mertz, 86, died Feb. 26. Survived by husband William Mertz; children Mary Lou Greenwood, Bill (Terri), Richard (Angela) Mertz, Susan (Greg) Meyer, Deborah Mertz (Harold) Lipps,

B7

PRESS

About obituaries

Cynthia (David) Rodgers, Peggy (Robert) Martin; grandchildren Jerry, Michelle, Lisa, Billy, Nick, Ben, Carrie, Katie, John, Kim, Nicole, Myles, Natalie, Molly; eight great-grandchildren. Services were March 3 at St. Dominic. Arrangements by Vitt, Stermer & Anderson Funeral Home. Memorials to Vitas Hospice or the Triple Creek Retirement Community.

Thelma Meyer

Thelma M. Meyer, 93, died March 3. Survived by children Pat (Bill) Hargreaves, Judy (late Tom) Wickersham, Jack (Jeanne) Zint, Kathy (Wes) Smith; sister Jeanette Feldhaus; 12 grandchildren; 12 great-grandchilMeyer dren. Preceded in death by brother Charles "Bud" Meyer. Services were March 6 at Our Lady of Lourdes. Arrangements by Neidhard-Minges Funeral Home. Memorials to: Mark-Age Inc., P.O. Box 10 Pioneer, TN 37847.

Timothy Petrie

Timothy J. Petrie , 57, Delhi Township, died Feb. 28. He was a former member of the Knights of Columbus. Survived by children Brian, Katie, Julie Petrie; parents Bill Petrie; siblings Toby (Michelle), Paul, Terry (Sheryl), Pat (Pam) Petrie, Debbie (Mike) Cappel, Mary Kay (Jerry) Studer, Rebecca (Edward) Schloemer, Melissa (Frank) Hunckler. Preceded in death by mother Jean Petrie, brother Billy Petrie. Services were March 6 at St. Antoninus Church. Memorials to: St. Rita School for the Deaf, 1720 Glendale Milford Road, Cincinnati, OH 45215.

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 853-6262 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 2424000 for pricing details.

Richard Schwartz

Richard W. Schwartz, 57, West Price Hill, died March 2. Survived by wife Janet Schwartz; son Jim Schwartz; mother Ruth Schwartz; siblings Thomas (Debbie), Joseph (Angie) Schwartz, Kathy (Steve) Nierlich; many nieces and nephews. Preceded in death by father Richard Schwartz. Services were March 6 at St. Martin of Tours. Arrangements by Final Wishes. Memorials to: Hospice of Cincinnati, P.O. Box 633597, Cincinnati, OH 45263.

Corrine Walton

Corrine Griffith Walton, 71, died Feb. 6. She was a secretary for Rumpke Waste Management. Survived by husband William Walton; daughters Vicky (Denny) Lietz, Penny Vettel; stepchildren Steve (Cheryl) Walton, Pat (Dan) Hornbach, Walton Petty (Ron) Witt, Kathy Otting; brother Lowell Griffith; nine grandchildren; 17 step-grandchildren; nine step-great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by children Tina, Joe Vettel, brothers Henry, Everett, Robert, Donald Griffith. Services were Feb. 9 at Our Lady of Lourdes. Memorials to: Western Hills Retirement Village, 6210 Cleves Warsaw Pike, Cincinnati, OH 45233.

POLICE REPORTS The Community Press publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department: • Delhi Township: Chief Jim Howarth, 922-0060. • Cincinnati District 3: Captain Kim Frey, 263-8300. Kelley Coomer, 48, 463 Pedretti Ave., driving under suspension at 400 block of Pedretti Avenue, March 1. Michael Mahon, 21, theft at 5000 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 25. Juvenile, domestic violence at 400 block of Pedretti Avenue, Feb. 25. Glenn Kuhlman, 32, 4478 Fehr Road, domestic violence at 4478 Fehr Road, Feb. 26. Kristi Hands, 44, 5282 Rapid Run Road, deception to obtain dangerous drugs at 5200 block of Rapid Run Road, March 1. Jeaninne Baker, 18, 5701 Delhi Road, obstructing official business at 900 block of Neeb Road, Feb. 22. Rita Weilbacher, 19, 5521 Newport Road, obstructing official business at 900 block of Neeb Road, Feb. 22. Noel Walker, 24, 4362 Delhi Road, domestic violence at 4362 Delhi Road, Feb. 22. Brian Simmons, 42, 3958 Washington Ave., operating vehicle under the influence, carrying concealed weapon, drug possession, failure to comply at 1500 block of Linneman Drive, Feb. 22. Juvenile, drug paraphernalia at 4000 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 22. Holly Techarira, 26, 578 Rentz Place, theft at 5080 Delhi Road, Feb. 23. Robert Moore, 57, 240 Ihle Drive, operating vehicle under the influence at 300 block of Bob Lane, Feb. 21. Robert Oliver, 28, 5373 Pembina Drive, driving under suspension at 4600 block of Foley Road, Feb. 23. Joseph Williamson, 26, 3906 W. Liberty St., driving under suspension at 4900 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 23.

Incidents Aggravated burglary

Woman reported break-in at 4652 Mount Alverno Road, Feb. 19.

Assault

654 Roebling Road woman reported being hit in the face at 4400 block of Fehr Road, Feb. 17.

Attempted breaking and entering

Shop Quick reported break-in attempt at 4470 Glenhaven Road, Feb. 22.

Criminal damaging

Woman reported tires slashed at 3959 Delhi Road, March 1.

Identity theft

Woman reported bank information used at 5024 Clarevalley Drive, Feb. 17.

Theft

Woman reported money stolen from purse at 939 Villa View Court, Feb. 21. Man reported stereo equipment stolen from vehicle at 4461 Glenhaven Road, Feb. 21. Wendy’s reported money stolen at 5066 Delhi Road, Feb. 18. United Dairy Farmers reported receiving counterfeit $20 at 5692 Rapid Run Road, Feb. 19. Man reported GPS stolen from vehicle at 5125 Whitmore Drive, Feb. 15. Woman reported medicine stolen at 4732 Delhi Road, Feb. 24. Man reported tools stolen at 1056 Hickory Lane, Feb. 28. Man reported tools stolen at 590 Rentz Place, Feb. 22. Woman reported books, iPod stolen from vehicle at 5038 Troubador Court, Feb. 22.

Theft, criminal damaging

Kathman Electric reported tools stolen from vehicle at 4300 block of Skylark Drive, Feb. 26.

CINCINNATI DISTRICT 3

Arrests/citations

Dwayne Clark, born 1988, theft under $300, 240 Monitor Ave., Feb. 28. Albaro Macario, born 1979, falsification, 900 McPherson Ave., Feb. 26. Alisha A. Calhoun, born 1983, simple assault, 3120 Warsaw Ave., Feb. 19. Antonio Stevens, born 1982, possession of drugs and tampering with evidence, 3641 Warsaw Ave., Feb. 25. Billy Lattimore, born 1976, domestic violence, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Feb. 22. Billy Taylor, born 1964, disorderly conduct and illegal possession of prescription drugs, 3510 Rosecliff Drive, Feb. 28. Brandon L. Long, born 1989, possession of drugs, 3050 Mickey Ave., Feb. 28. Donald Scott, born 1984, drug abuse, obstruction of official business, tampering with evidence and unlawful use of vehicle joyriding, 3703 Glenway Ave., Feb. 24. Edward Kelly, born 1988, criminal damaging and endangerment and menacing, 3201 Warsaw Ave., Feb. 28.

Elbert Amison, born 1983, aggravated burglary, 944 Chateau Ave., Feb. 24. Harold Lafond, born 1968, possession of open flask, 1250 Quebec Road, Feb. 24. John Mosley, born 1962, felonious assault and having weapon with conviction or indictment, 3050 Mickey Ave., Feb. 23. Kenneth L. Lillard, born 1962, disorderly conduct, 3725 Warsaw Ave., Feb. 21. Khirhy Jones, born 1992, city or local ordinance violation, 3101 Price Ave., Feb. 19. Levenski Crossty, born 1989, theft under $300, 3646 Laclede Ave., Feb. 27. Marcus D. Manley, born 1979, domestic violence, 1885 Provincial Court, Feb. 22. Michael Alan Banks, born 1975, theft under $300, 3528 Rosecliff Drive, Feb. 23. Robert McAfee, born 1965, possession of open flask, 980 Hawthorne Ave., Feb. 22 Andrew Stenger, born 1987, possession of open flask, 814 Pedretti Ave., Feb. 17. Catharine Gregory, born 1974, assault, 4003 W. Eighth St., Feb. 22. Charles Dewey McDonald, born 1962, assault and domestic violence, 1842 Ashbrook Drive, Feb. 27. Chelsey E. Herndon, born 1991, disorderly conduct, 4535 W. Eighth St., Feb. 17. Christina Hulsman, born 1987, liquor sale to minor, 4520 W. Eighth St., Feb. 18. Christine Marie Love, born 1974, possession of open flask, 4528 W. Eighth St., Feb. 17. Daniel Hess, born 1965, disorderly conduct, 4441 W. Eighth St., Feb. 22. Donald Volmer, born 1986, theft under $300, 5092 Glenway Ave., Feb. 27. Germelle Dewberry, born 1970, drug abuse, possession of drugs and trafficking, 2001 Sunset Lane, Feb. 22. James Pierson, born 1978, domestic violence, 3905 St. Lawrence Ave., Feb. 23. Jane Brandhorst, born 1963, disorderly conduct, 800 Nebraska Ave., Feb. 17. Joey Isaac, born 1982, assault, 2000 Sunset Lane, Feb. 27. Joseph M. Hall, born 1980, possession of drug paraphernalia, 4173 Pleasure Drive, Feb. 24. Keith Williams, born 1986, possession of open flask, 4520 W. Eighth St., Feb. 18. Kenneth P. Thornton, born 1966, disorderly conduct, 800 Nebraska Ave., Feb. 17. Kevin D. Klayman, born 1963, assault, 2000 Sunset Lane, Feb. 27. Klark David Klayman, born 1990, criminal damaging or endanger-

ment, 2000 Sunset Lane, Feb. 27. Lucas Apollo Klayman, born 1988, assault, 2000 Sunset Lane, Feb. 27. Paul V. Williams, born 1989, possession of drugs and trafficking, 4200 W. Eighth St., Feb. 27. Sarah J. Andrew, born 1986, possession of open flask, 4520 W. Eighth St., Feb. 17. Sean Robinson, born 1990, liquor sale to minor and possession of open flask, 4537 W. Eighth St., Feb. 17. Teresa Johnson, born 1977, assault and domestic violence, 1842 Ashbrook Drive, Feb. 27. Terrance Knox, born 1979, possession of open flask, 4520 W. Eighth St., Feb. 17. William L. Young, born 1972, domestic violence, 611 Trenton Ave., Feb. 25.

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CE-0000387237.INDD

1001541035-01

About police reports

Man reported guns stolen at 534 Greenwell Ave., Feb. 19. Man reported break-in at 4402 Hillside Ave., March 1. Woman reported computer, jewelry stolen at 461 Wilke Drive, Feb. 23.

Cincinnati, Ohio 45246

1001541033-01

Arrests/citations

Charles Noel Jr., 40, 1670 Kellywood Ave., using weapons while intoxicated, aggravated trespassing, resisting arrest at 5000 block of Foley Road, Feb. 9. Erin Alcorn, 25, 3338 Augusta Drive, drug paraphernalia at 500 block of Anderson Ferry Road, Feb. 10. George Cordell, 47, 430 Morrvue Drive, operating vehicle under the influence at 5100 block of Foley Road, Feb. 9. John Kelley, 27, 2134 St. Michael St., drug possession at 5000 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 11. Joshua Prost, 22, 1269 Fairbanks Ave., drug possession at 5100 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 9. Steven McCollum, 35, 530 Hibernia Drive, driving under suspension at 4000 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 13. Marcus Washington, 27, 1658 Westwood Ave., drug possession at 400 block of Pedretti Avenue, Feb. 20. Richard Freudiger, 52, 1223 Mckeone Ave., drug possession, operating vehicle under the influence at 5200 block of Cleves Warsaw Road, Feb. 13. Norbert Bauer, 58, 4566 Patron Court, open container at 4500 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 17. Ruth Burke, 36, 530 Hibernia Drive, drug possession at 4600 block of Foley Road, Feb. 17. Amber Wagers, 19, 4158 Delhi Road, driving under suspension at 4000 block of Delhi Road, Feb. 20. Justin Bancroft, 19, 6839 Home City Ave., driving under suspension at 5900 block of Bender Road, Feb. 20. Corey Jones, 29, 578 Rentz Place, driving under suspension at Neeb and Rapid Run roads, Feb. 19. Richard Tucker, 23, 1239 Sliker Ave., protection order violation, Feb. 21. Zachary Thomas, 20, 5019 Alverno Ridge Drive, criminal trespass at Francisview Drive, Feb. 20. Juvenile, theft at 5300 block of Plumridge Drive, Feb. 20. Ashley Vorderbrueggen, 23, 5758 Sadleridge Road, operating vehicle under the influence, child endangering at 700 block of Neeb Road, Feb. 19. Two Juveniles, receiving stolen property at Wilke Drive, Feb. 18. Jordan Warner, 25, 4278 Delryan Drive, theft at Neeb Road, Feb. 17. Candace Gross, 23, 2955 W. McMicken Road, theft at 5925 Delhi Road, Feb. 16. Travis Watson, 18, 5006 Clarevalley Drive, drug possession at 2300 block of Wilke Drive, Feb. 25. Tafari McDade, 18, 2288 Wolff St., drug possession at 400 block of Pedretti Avenue, Feb. 28. Michael Wilson, 24, 5709 Glow Court, driving under suspension at 5000 block of Delhi Road, March 2.

Burglary

0000381765

DELHI TOWNSHIP


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Delhi-Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

Community

YMCA searches for teens with values In Greater Cincinnati, there are many young people who are giving selflessly of themselves for the good of others. Through their volunteerism, mentoring, advocacy, leadership, and caring they are making a positive difference in the world around them. They exemplify the four core character values of the YMCA – caring, honesty, responsibility and respect – and the YMCA of Greater Cincinnati is looking for them. Nominees must be

between 12 and 18 years of age; be enrolled in an elementary, junior or senior high school; reside within the Greater Cincinnati Tristate area; and must be available to attend the orientation on April 20 and the Awards Event on Mary 24. Nominations will not be accepted for groups. Nominations for the 2010 YMCA Character Awards are being accepted through March 15. The YMCA will be honoring 40 teens, ages 12 to 18, at the YMCA Character

awards event, beginning at 7 p.m. on Monday, May 24, at the 20th Century Theatre in Oakley. The nomination form is available online at: http://bit.ly/CharacterAwards or by calling the YMCA at 513-362-YMCA (9622). The form can be filled out online, or can be faxed to 513-961-3201. It can also be mailed to: YMCA Character Awards; 1105 Elm Street; Cincinnati, Ohio 45202.

Classes show how to stay active for life Physical activity is an increasing topic of interest, but it can be daunting to begin a program that fits into our daily lives. Adults aged 50 and older can learn how to begin and maintain a more active lifestyle with the Active for Life program. The Hamilton County health department is offer-

ing the program at Community Wellness at Bayley Place in Delhi Township, 401 Farrell Court, from 1011:15 a.m. Thursday beginning April 15. Facilitated discussions, a self-help workbook and interactive activities provide the basis for the 75 minute weekly sessions. The $15

fee covers all costs associated with the 13-week program. For more information or to sign up for a class, call Hamilton County Public Health at 513-946-7813 or go to www.hamiltoncountyhealth.org.

FLORIDA

NEW YORK

SOUTH CAROLINA

MANHATTAN--NYC HOTEL $109/2 persons. Singles $104. Suites $119-$139. Lincoln Ctr area, Hudson River views, 18 flrs, kitchenette, 5 mins to midtown, safe, quiet, luxury area. RIVERSIDE TOWER, Riverside & 80th St. Call 1-800-724-3136 or visit: www.riversidetowerhotel.com

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH, SC Fantastic Specials Available!!

DESTIN. 2 great condos , 2 br, 2 ba golf, pools, dazzling Gulf view . Check our website for availability & rates. Local owner, 513-561-4683 Visit arieldunes.us or twcondo.us

BED AND BREAKFAST THE DOOLIN HOUSE INN. Premier Inn. Gourmet breakfast. Minutes from Lake Cumberland. Join us for a romantic weekend/women’s retreat. 606-678-9494 doolinhouse.com

FLORIDA

Beautiful Seagrove Beach Rent & Relax. Nr Destin, between famous Seaside & Rosemary Beach. Cozy Cottages to Gulf Front Condos. Web Specials. 1-800-537-5387 www.garrettbeachrentals.com

CLEARWATER - Indian Rocks Beach 2br, 2ba Gulf Front condo. Heated pool, balcony. Many up grades. 513-771-1373, 260-3208 www.go-qca.com/condo

NORTH CAROLINA EMERALD ISLE. Ocean Front luxury vacation homes with community pool. Call for free brochure. 1-252-354-5555 Spinnaker’s Reach Realty www.SpinnakersReach.com

SOUTH CAROLINA

DESTIN. Local owner, 1 or 2 luxury condos. 2 BR, 2 BA overlooking gulf, sugar white beaches. Heated pool, hot tubs & more. 937-767-8449,or visit www.majesticsunindestin.com

DESTIN. Luxury 2 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condos. Heated pool, spas, kids pool & tennis. Sleeps 6. Local owner. www.us-foam.com/destin. D 513-528-9800, E 513-752-1735

EAST COAST, NEW SMYRNA BEACH Luxurious oceanfront condos & vacation homes. Closest & best beach to Disney. Ocean Properties Vacation Rentals 800-728-0513 www.oceanprops.com

CLEARWATER TO ST. PETE BEACHES Gulf front & bay side condos. All prices & sizes! Florida Lifestyle VAC. 1-800-487-8953. Jan. 2011, Monthly Discounts • www.ourcondo.com

DESTIN, FLORIDA 50 Steps to the beach! Beautiful lowrise condos w/pools. 850-830-8133, email destinbeaches4u@yahoo.com or visit www.asummerbreeze.com

PROVIDED.

Marilyn Murphy and Judy Helmes, both of Delhi Township, deliver Treasure Boxes for the children at the Shriner's Burn Hospital for Children. Helmes is the chairman of the service projects the Greater Cincinnati Decorative Artists do throughout the year.

FRIPP ISLAND û A great family vacation destination! 3 BR, 2 BA oceanfront condo on private resort island next to championship golf course. Sleeps 8. 513-451-7011

Decorative artists meeting March 14 The Greater Cincinnati Decorative Artists will be have its monthly meeting at 11:45 a.m. Sunday, March 14, at the Springfield Township Senior Center located at

100’s of Oceanfront/view Homes & Condos

Call for free brochure 866-780-8334 www.northmyrtlebeachtravel.com

and an annual retreat offsite. Go to www.GCDApainters.com for the newsletter and more details on registering for the paint class that day and the spring retreat in April. The 23rd annual Painting Retreat will be April 16, 17 and 18 at West Harrison, Ind. A complete list of classes and a registration form can be found at www.GCDApainters.com. Classes are offered for every painting level in acrylics, watercolors, oils, colored pencils, pen and ink, and fabric. The deadline for retreat registrations is March 15.

SEABROOK EXCLUSIVES Villas & Private Homes. Ocean, golf, tennis, equestrian. Pet friendly rentals. Free brochure. Book online! 888-718-7949. www.seabrookexclusives.com

TENNESSEE 1-7 Affordable, Deluxe Chalets & Cabin Rentals. Pigeon Forge in the Smokies. Vacation/Dollywood Specials. Free brochure. Call 1-800-833-9987. www.firesidechalets.com

A Beautiful Cabin Getaway Gatlinburg/Pigeon Forge. Hot tub, jacuzzi, fireplace, gas grill. $85/nt, 5 nt special $375. 800-793-8699. smokymtncrossrdrentals.com

PROVIDED.

The College of Mount St. Joseph presents pianist Gregory Partain in concert on Thursday, March 18

Pianist in concert at the Mount HILTON HEAD û Luxury condo at Westin Resort w/FREE Golf, during "Heritage" Weeks, April 10-24. 2BR, 4some or family. Many guest extras! 1-843-705-9805. Owner has pics. N. MYRTLE BEACH Coastal Condos, Inc. 1-4 bdrm oceanfront & ocean view units. Call 1-800-951-4880 or visit www.coastalcondos.com

CHALET VILLAGE www.chaletvillage.com Cozy cabins to luxurious chalets Fully furnished, hot tubs, pool tables. Check SPECIALS, availability and book online 24/7, or call 1-800-722-9617 GATLINBURG. Affordable rates. Fully furnished. 1-8 bdrms. Chalets, Cabins, Privacy, Views, Hot Tubs, Jacuzzis, Fireplaces. 1-800-235-2661 www.alpinechaletrentals.com

GATLINBURG. Choose a 2 or 3 BR chalet, conveniently located, richly appointed and meticulously main tained. Pet friendly. 877-215-3335 or visit www.marysescape.com SIESTA KEY. Gulf front complex. Directly on Crescent Beach! View of Gulf from the balcony. Bright & airy decor, nicely appointed. Weekly from April 3rd. Local owner, 513-232-4854

9158 Winton Road, Finneytown. Jan Bowen will be teaching a two-hour class with the Easter theme. Reservations for the class must be made before attending the meeting; there is a supply fee charged. This group of multifaceted people range in experience from beginners to certified teachers with many years of experience. Members have experience in the art of watercolor, sketching, oils, colored pencil and acrylics. New members, guests and the public are welcome. The group also sponsors painting classes, seminars

NORTH MYRTLE BEACH. Oceanfront condos. 1, 2 & 3 bedroom units with pools, spas & tennis. Hi-speed Internet, kiddie waterslide. 800-345-5617 www.oceancreek.net

www.AUNTIEBELHAMS.com Gatlinburg-Pigeon Forge. Vacation in a beautiful log cabin or chalet with hot tub, Jacuzzi, views & pool tables. Call about specials! 800-436-6618

The College of Mount St. Joseph presents Gregory Partain in concert at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 18, in the Recital Hall. The recital is free and open to the public. In his 23 years on the concert stage, Partain has appeared as recitalist, chamber musician and concerto soloist throughout the United States, as well as in Germany, Poland,

Guatemala, Costa Rica, Russia and Greece. He is a professor of music and the music program director at Transylvania University in Lexington, Ky. The program at the Mount will feature the music of Beethoven, Schubert and Chopin. For more information about the recital, contact the Mount’s Music Department at 513244-4863.

Movies, dining, events and more


Delhi-Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

B9

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Pella Window and Door Showroom Montgomery 9869 Montgomery Road Calculated based on NFRC ratings for a Pella Designer Series® Low-E triple-pane wood window compared to a single-pane wood window in winter conditions. 2 The Pella Windows and Doors Visa® Card issued by Wells Fargo Financial National Bank is a dual-line card. Special terms until January 1, 2012, apply to purchases charged with approved credit to the Pella Windows and Doors card. Regular minimum monthly payments are required during the promotional period. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date at the regular APR if the purchase balance is not paid in full within the promotional period or if you make a late payment. For new accounts opened through 2/21/2010, the regular APR is 23.90% and the default APR is 27.90% through 2/21/2010, after which the default APR will no longer apply. For accounts opened after 2/21/2010, the regular APR is 25.99%. All APRs may vary based on the prime rate as of 1/1/2010. If you are charged interest in any billing cycle after 2/21/2010, the minimum interest charge will be $1.00. If you use the card for cash advances, the cash advance fee is 4% of the amount of the cash advance, but not less than $10.00. Offer expires 3/27/10. 3 Discount applies to retail list price. Valid only for replacement projects installed by Pella Professionals. Not valid with any other offer or promotion. Prior sales excluded. Other restrictions may apply. See store for details. Offer ends 03/27/10. 4 Consult with your local Pella Professional to determine which products are eligible. Consult with a qualified tax advisor to confirm eligibility. Visit pella.com/taxcredit for more information. 5 Pella received the highest numerical score among window and door manufacturers in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2007 – 2009 Windows and Patio Doors Satisfaction StudiesSM. 2009 study based on responses from 2,856 consumers measuring 8 brands and measures opinions of consumers who purchased new windows or patio doors in the previous 12 months. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed in March – April 2009. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com. © 2010 Pella Corporation PL085-14-92421-1

CE-0000387472.INDD

1


B10

Delhi-Price Hill Press

March 10, 2010

ADVERTISEMENT

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Local Residents in Amazement as Collectors Provide a Stimulus Package to Cincinnati! By Jason Delong

Treasure Hunters Roadshow STAFF WRITER

Gold and Silver pour into yesterdays Roadshow due to highest prices in 40 years.

is buying. “Gold and silver markets are soaring.” says Archie Davis, a Roadshow representative. “Broken jewelry and gold or silver coins add up very quickly. I just finished working with a gentleman that had an old class ring, two bracelets, and handful of

Yesterday at the Duke Energy Convention Center, hundreds lined up to cash antiques, collectibles, gold and jewelry in at the Roadshow. The free event is in Cincinnati all week buying gold, silver antiques and collectibles. One visitor I spoke with

“If you go to the Roadshow, you can cash-in your items for top dollar. Roadshow representatives will be available to assess and purchase your items at the Duke Energy Convention Center through Sunday in Cincinnati.”

“It is unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37.” yesterday said “It’s unbelievable, I brought in some old coins that had been in a little cigar box for years and some old herringbone necklaces and in less than fifteen minutes I left with a check for $712.37. That stuff has been in my jewelry box and dresser for at least 20 years.” Another gentlemen brought an old Fender guitar his father bought years ago. “Dad had less than fifty bucks in that guitar.” The Roadshow expert that assisted him, made a few phone calls and a Veterinarian in Seattle, Washington bought the guitar for $5700.00. The seller continued, “I got another $150.00 for a broken necklace and an old class ring, it’s not everyday

Above • A couple waits with anticipation while Roadshow expert examines their antiques and gold items. The Roadshow is at the Duke Energy Convention Center this week. someone brings six thousand dollars to town with your name on it.” Jeff Parsons, President of the Treasure Hunters Roadshow commented, “Lots of people have items that they know are valuable but just don’t know where to sell them. Old toys, trains, swords, guitars,

Collectors desire vintage military items, Items from both U.S. and foreign origins from the Civil War, World War I, World War II, Spanish-American War, Revolutionary War and Calvary times have great value. Items such as swords, daggers, medals, hardware bayonets, etc.

pocket watches or just about anything old is valuable to collectors. These collectors are willing to pay big money for those items they are looking for.” This week’s Roadshow is the place to get connected with those collectors. The process is free and anyone can brings items down to the event. If the

Roadshow experts find items their collectors are interested in, offers will be made to purchase those items. About 80% of the guests that attend the show end up selling one or more items at the event. Antiques and collectibles are not the only items the Roadshow

www.treasurehuntersroadshow.com The Roadshow is featured this week:

March 8th-14th

Monday 8th - Sunday 14th: 9 AM - 6 PM Every Day

FREE ADMISSION & PARKING

Gold Prices High, Cash In Now

“It’s a modern day gold rush,” said Jeff Parsons. Gold is now trading at 40 year highs, and you can cash in by bringing your items to the Treasure Hunters Roadshow.” All types of gold are wanted, including gold coins, Krugerrands, Maple Leafs, and other gold bars, etc. All gold jewelry, including broken jewelry is accepted. Anything gold is wanted. All silver items, including silver coins, bars and American Eagles are accepted. Sterling silver items like flatware, tea sets, etc. are welcome.

Roadshow Coin and gold expert Paul Dichraff examines a large presentation of coins, gold and collectibles.

Duke Energy Convention Center 525 Elm St., Cincinnati, OH 45202

The entire process only takes a few minutes The Treasure Hunter’s Roadshow event continues through Sunday in Cincinnati. CE-0000387567.INDD

We have been directly involved in millions of dollars worth of rare cash and coin sales over the past 15 years.

Our private collectors are seeking all types of rare coins and currency. We have the resources available to pay you top prices for all types of rare coins or entire collections. We can arrange a private discreet meeting with you at your bank or in one of our private suites. Whether you are ready to sell your life long collection or you are settling an estate we are at your service. We are professional, honest and discreet.

Cash in with the power of the International Collectors Association Treasure Hunters Roadshow represents over 5000 members worldwide who are paying TOP DOLLAR the following types of items. • COINS - Any and all coins made before 1964. This includes all silver and gold coins, dollars, half dollars, quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies. All conditions wanted! • GOLD & SILVER - PRICES AT 40 YEAR HIGH! for platinum, gold and silver during this event. Broken jewelry, dental gold, old coins, pocket watches, Kruggerands, Gold bars Canadian Maple Leafs, etc.

• WATCHES & POCKET WATCHES - Rolex, Tiffany, Hublot, Omega, Chopard, Cartier, Philippe, Ebel, Waltham, Swatch, Chopard, Elgin, Bunn Special, Railroad, Illinois, Hamilton, all others.

Here is how it works:

We represent many of the world’s top numismatic coin collectors

Directions (513) 419-7300 Show Info (866) 306-6655

• JEWELRY - Gold, Silver, Platinum, diamonds, rubies, sapphires and all types of stones, metals, etc. Rings, bracelets, necklaces, all others including broken jewelry. Early costume jewelry wanted.

• Gather items of interest from your attic, garage, basement, etc There is no limit to the amount of items you .can bring • No appointment necessary • If interested in selling, we will consult our collector ’s database to see if a buyer exists. 90% of all items have offers in our database • The offer is made on the spot on behalf of our collectors making the offer • If you decide to accept the offer, we will pay you on the spot and ship the item to the collector. The collector pays all shipping and handling charges • You get 100% of the offer with no hidden fees

silver dollars,… his check was for over $650.00. I would say that there were well over 100 people in here yesterday that sold their scrap gold.” One gentleman holding his check for over $1250.00 in the lobby of the event yesterday had this comment, “I am so happy I decided to come to the Roadshow. I saw the newspaper ad for the event and brought in an old German sword I brought back from World War II and some old coins and here is my check. What a great thing for our community. I am heading home now to see what else I have they might be interested in.” The Roadshow continues today starting at 9am. The event is free and no appointment is needed.

• TOYS, TRAINS & DOLLS - All types of toys made before 1965

including: Hot Wheels, Tonka, Buddy L, Smith Miller, Nylint, Robots, battery toys, Mickey Mouse, train sets, all gauges, accessories, individual cars, Marklin, American Flyer, Lionel, Hafner, all other trains, Barbie Dolls, GI Joe, Shirley Temple, Characters, German, all makers accepted.

• MILITARY ITEMS, SWORDS - Civil War, Revolutionary War, WWI, WWII, etc. Items of interest include swords, badges, clothes, photos, medals, knives, gear, letters, The older the swords, the better. All types wanted. • ADVERTISING ITEMS - Metal and Porcelain signs, gas companies,

beer and liquor makers, automobile, implements, etc.

From a single item to complete collections, the most sought after types of coins are: • Any coins dated prior to 1820, especially those dated 1700’s • High Grade Early Coins • Graded Coins • Proof Coins • Gold Coins with C, D,O and CC mint marks • Rare Dates • Complete Coin Type sets • Rare Paper Currency

GREAT PRICES PAID FOR: 1950’S & 1960’S Era Electric and Acoustic

GUITARS

- Dobro - Fender - Gibson

Silver and Gold Coin Prices Up During Poor Economy.

Collectors and Enthusiasts in Cincinnati with $2,000,000 to Purchase Yours!

Got Coin? It might be just the time to cash in. This week starting Monday and continuing through Sunday, the International Collectors Association in conjunction with Treasure Hunters Roadshow will be purchasing all types of silver and gold coins direct from the public. All are welcome and the event is free.

- Martin - Gretsch - Richenbacker - National - And others

Profile for Enquirer Media

price-hill-press-031010  

Glenn O’Dell plans to open his Crow’s Nest on West Eighth Street for a St. Patrick’s Day celebration. – FULL STORY, A2 Visit our Web site at...

price-hill-press-031010  

Glenn O’Dell plans to open his Crow’s Nest on West Eighth Street for a St. Patrick’s Day celebration. – FULL STORY, A2 Visit our Web site at...