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FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Fort Thomas

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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Highland Heights breaks ground on new development By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS — Work is now under way on the new Highland Pointe retail center along U.S. 27 in Highland Heights. City officials and representatives from the developer, Thompson Thrift Development,

held a groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday, Feb. 12, for the 1.58acre plot, located across the street from the entrance to Northern Kentucky University. “This is an excellent opportunity for our city to brings in several new businesses,” said Highland Heights Mayor Greg Meyers. “The development of this land, with its central loca-

tion in the center of our city, has been a long time coming.” Chris Hake, director of retail for Thompson Thrift, said the company has been looking at the land for several years and is excited to begin work on the project. The project consists of two retail buildings, totaling more than 13,225 square feet of retail

space, Hake said. Hake said so far, tenants for the space include City Barbecue, Firehouse Subs, Pizza Hut and Fort Thomas Jewelers. Negotiations are under way with three or four more potential tenants. Vince Keairns, owner of Fort Thomas Jewelers, said he’s excited to be relocating to the new,

Trisha and Bryan Shepherd look through some of their son Grayson's favorite toys, which are part of a display in their home in memory of Grayson. The family has started the Grayson Shepherd Foundation with the mission of helping young children suffering from severe heart related illnesses by providing support for their families. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Parents start foundation in memory of their son By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

During his short life, Fort Thomas resident Grayson Shepherd taught those around him about life, love and the strength of the human spirit. Grayson, the son of Bryan and Trisha Shepherd, was born in August 2008 with congenital heart problem where the left chamber of his heart didn’t form. “With all the modern technology we have today, this was something that, with several surgeries, he could lead a fairly normal life with,” Bryan said. “We knew it was going to be a long road.”

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At only three days old, Grayson underwent the first of three open heart surgeries he would need to fix the problem. At two months old, Grayson went into heart failure, prompting his doctors to complete the second surgery ahead of schedule. After working through some complications and spending about 100 days at Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Grayson, who was five months old, went home and lived a life similar to that of other kids. Trisha said even though he had a feeding tube, pacemaker and was on oxygen, he was a happy, loving little boy. Over the next couple years,

Grayson flourished, and from playing and swimming to attending preschool at Johnson Elementary School, he lived a fairly normal, happy life. Since we was a big fan of Walt Disney movies and had a great imagination, Trisha said he would often refer to himself as Prince Charming and her as princesses like Snow White. “He just loved playing make believe,” Trisha said. “He was such a happy little boy.” Since he was doing so well in the summer of 2012, his parents and doctors decided it was time to complete the third and final

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Locals bring recovery group back By Amanda Joering ajoering@nky.com

The Northern Kentucky chapter of a statewide advocacy group working to help those struggling with addiction is being reborn. In light of the recent increase in drug abuse, particularly heroin, local voices who have spoken out to combat this epidemic are coming together to revitalize the NKY Chapter of People Advocating Recovery (PAR). Local advocate Charlotte Wethington, one of the founding members of the statewide initiative, said there used to be an active NKY chapter a few years ago. “This is certainly a good time to revitalize this chapter because of the interest of so many local people wanting to do something about this heroin epidemic, but not knowing what to do,” Wethington said. “So many people out there are feeling hopeless and helpless.” The NKY chapter of PAR will assist these people, Wethington said, by being a tool to bring everyone together to work on solutions and advocate recovery. Recovering addict Jason Merrick, who is serving as the chair of the local chapter, said he is working with Weth-

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vibrant center. The jewelery store, currently located in the Fort Thomas Plaza, has been in business in Fort Thomas for 15 years. “We’re seeing a lot of growth in Highland Heights, and we’re excited to be part of it,” Keairns said. “We plan to be open there

ington and Dr. Jeremy Engel, who spearheaded the forming of the Northern Kentucky Heroin Impact and Response Workgroup, to get this chapter going again. “We know that chemical dependency is really hitting hard in this area, and through this group, we hope to make a difference in this community,” Merrick said. Merrick said the goal is to work towards making treatment more accessible and see that the necessary legislation is passed to address these drug issues. Merrick said one of the first goals of the NKY PAR chapter is to support House Bill 79, legislation that will make Naloxone, a medication that can reverse opioid overdoses safely and easily, more accessible in the community. “This legislation could save so many lives,” Merrick said. “And this is just one of the issues we plan to attack in the community. The sky is the limit really.” To get more people involved, the chapter is holding a focus group meeting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 28, at the Grateful Life Center. For more information, email Merrick at par.nky@gmail.com.

Vol. 13 No. 40 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Grayson

FORT THOMAS RECORDER

Continued from Page A1

open heart surgery needed to correct his heart problem. On the way to hospital for the surgery on July 12, Trisha said Grayson’s spirits were high. “He was sitting in the back seat with his dad singing ‘We’re Off to see the Wizard,’ from the Wiz-

Find news and information from your community on the Web Forth Thomas • nky.com/fortthomas Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

News

Michelle Shaw Editor ..........................578-1053, mshaw@nky.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amanda Joering Reporter ....................578-1052, ajoering@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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ard of Oz, one of his favorite movies,” Trisha said. “He really didn’t have an idea what was going on and what was about to happen.” Since he had been doing so well and had already successfully made it through two open heart surgeries, Bryan said they were positive that they’d be bringing him home from the hospital trip, better than ever. “Never in a million years did we think we wouldn’t be bringing our son home from that trip,” Bryan said. The surgery took more than seven hours and went well, but within a few days, Grayson’s condition started to decline. For reasons doctors couldn’t explain, Grayson’s lung was collapsing, and he started having seizure-like episodes. Though doctors ran several tests and tried several treatments, Grayson continued to decline and started slowly becoming paralyzed. About 30 days after his surgery, doctors told Bryan and Trisha that even if he survived, Grayson’s quality of life would never be the same. “We made the decision

then that if Grayson decided it was time to go, we would let him,” Bryan said. “He had already been through so much and fought so hard, we didn’t want to put him through any more.” After his siblings, an 18-year-old sister and 16year-old brother came to visit him, along with both sets of his grandparents, Grayson passed away August 8, 2012, at the age of 4. Trisha said it was almost as if he was waiting until everyone had a chance to come say their goodbyes. “He really was our little Prince Charming,” Trisha said. “He taught us how to live and he was our hero.” Now, in honor of Grayson and his life, Bryan and Trisha have started the Grayson Shepherd Foundation to help kids like him and their families. Bryan said their goal is to work with the people at Children’s Hospital to find children suffering from severe heart-related illnesses and provide emotional and financial support. “We were really lucky since I have a good job and good insurance and we live so close to Children’s,” Bryan said. “A lot of people

aren’t that lucky.” Along with helping other families, the Shepherds are alsohopingtodonatemoney in Grayson’s name to help enrich Fort Thomas’s preschool program. “I want to do what we can to help make sure they have what they need to work with kids like Grayson,” Trisha said. “I want other kids with special needs to have the chance to go to school and have the same opportunities as other kids.” The Shepherds are holding the first fundraiser for the foundation at 6 p.m. Saturday, March 16, at the Fort Thomas Community Center. The event, including a buffet-style dinner, cash bar and silent auction, is $25 per person. For tickets, send a check payable to the Grayson Shepherd Foundation to 67 Southview Ave., Fort Thomas KY 41075 by Friday, March 8 and tickets will held at the door of the event. Donations of money and items for the silent auction can also be sent to that address. For more call Bryan Shepherd at 513-460-0119 or Trisha Shepherd at 6307831.

Retail

Thompson Thrift has been great to work with. The groundbreaking event, which included the demolition of one of the houses on the land, was bittersweet for some of those who attended. Several family members of Bill and Armella Roth, who lived in the house for about 60 years, attended the event, watching as the house that held many memories for all of them was bulldozed.

“I just made so many memories in that house,” said Cynthia Roth, Bill and Armella’s granddaughter. “But, I think grandpa would have liked this, we was really happy to see Highland Heights grow.” Once the demolition is complete, construction of the new buildings will take place and is expected to be complete by late June, when the buildings will be turned over to the tenants, Hake said.

Continued from Page A1

the end of August, with a new state-of-the-art facility.” Meyers said developing the space, which is referred to as “the island” because of the road that loops around it, has been challenging since it basically offers store fronts on both sides, but that

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Karrick a ‘sound’ inspiration at NKU HIGHLAND HEIGHTS —

For Northern Kentucky University Director of Bands Brant Karrick, the sounds of a successful practice is students humming what they just played as they walk out the door. Karrick, of Alexandria, was awarded the Kentucky Music Educators Association’s College Teacher of the Year at a banquet in Louisville Feb. 8. “I like to walk into a room, and no matter what the music is, try to sort of infect them with some of the same enthusiasms not only about making the music, but just being together,” he said. Karrick said one person playing music is never as incredible as the sum of 10, 20 or 30 people performing together. Karrick said his role is blending all the different people together, firing at the same time, and on the same page with enthusiasm. “Because that’s where it comes alive,” he said. “And that’s what machines and computers can’t really do, they can’t add that little bit of human spirit, that little bit of excitement right at that one little moment.” Live music and symphonies still offer something invaluable, Karrick said. The award is a great recognition by colleagues around the state, but there are other people deserving of the award in NKU’s music department, he said. Karrick said he views his most important professional contributions as making music with college students and spending time visiting high school band students. When Karrick, 52, goes home he said uses his free time to write music. The bottom shelf of a bookcase in Karrick’s office is filled with a row of binders of nothing except his completed composi-

Northern Kentucky University Director of Bands Brant Karrick, left, raises his arm for students in the select symphonic winds group. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

MAKING MUSIC Watch a video of Alexandria resident Brant Karrick directing the sound of Northern Kentucky University’s select student symphonic winds group Friday, Feb. 22.

tions. Karrick comes from a bloodline of musicians. Karrick’s father was a high school band director in Kentucky, and also at Hughes High School in Cincinnati in the 1950s. Karrick said his mother was a proficient professional-level organist who studied performance at the University of Kentucky and music at the College-Conservatory of Music in Cincinnati. “I don’t remember too much of my life where I wasn’t around bands and school,” he said. Karrick said he found music was what he did best in high school – playing trumpet. While studying music education at the University of Louisville he was allowed to sometimes play with the city’s orchestra as an extra when they needed a jazz player, he said. Karrick has previously taught music at Beechwood High School, and he has a doctorate in music education from Louisiana State University.

Karrick said as he teaches students or writes music he’s always looking for the same result. “The ultimate goal of music for me is to have an uplifting aesthetic goosebumpily type of experience,” he said. Randy Pennington, director of choral studies at NKU, said students respect Karrick for always giving 100 percent in the classroom or for performances. Karrick is also a personal friend. “He is, I affectionately call him, the greatest band nerd I know, and I think that he refers to me as the greatest choral geek that he knows,” Pennington said. “We have that kind of relationship.” Karrick drives the students, but has a very caring attitude toward them, Pennington said. “He is very worthy of the honor, and we are delighted that he represents not only NKU, but this region,” he said.

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Northern Kentucky University freshman Conrad Krieger of Lawrenceburg, Ind., slides and plays a trombone during rehearsal for the select student symphonic winds group under the direction of Director of Bands Brant Karrick. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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Northern Kentucky University educators have received the Kentucky Music Educators Association College Teacher of the Year award in four different years. The award was started in 1985. 1994: David Dunevant. 2001: Jon Gresham (along with Lisa McArthur). 2010: Randy Pennington, director of choral studies. 2012: Brant Karrick, director of bands.

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NEWS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

BRIEFLY NKU music offers Bluegrass experience

Severe weather drill set for March 5

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS —

A Bluegrass concert featuring the instrumental quartet Harpeth Rising will be at Northern Kentucky University’s Greaves Hal at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 5. Harpeth Rising will join the NKU String Project and Chamber Choir in the evening’s music performance. The evening’s highlight will be a performance with the chamber choir of the new “Bluegrass Mass.” Admission is $10 for students or $8 with faculty identification. For tickets and information call the NKU box office at (859) 572-5464.

Rolling Thunder planning meeting to be held Friday

A meeting to begin planning the fourth annual Rolling Thunder tribute ride to Washington, D.C. is scheduled for 4:30 p.m. Friday, March 1 at the Bellevue Vets. This is the fourth year local bikers will gather in May to participate in the ride, a tribute American Prisoners of War and Missing in Action soldiers. The is the 25th year that groups from around the nation have participated in the Rolling Thunder event in Washington, D.C. For more information call Eric Hempleman at 781-6110.

Outdoor warning sirens and weather alert radios activate at 10:07 a.m. Tuesday, March 5 for a statewide severe weather drill. The Campbell County Office of Emergency Management has issued sets of detailed instructions available for businesses, schools and nursing homes on how to conduct a tornado drill. On March 5 weather alert radios in Kentucky will be activated by the National Weather Service in Wilmington with a weekly test, according to the emergency management office. The outdoor alert system will be activated weather permitting. For information call the emergency management office at (859) 6351111 or visit the public safety section of the Campbell County website www.campbellcountyky.org.

Watch party

The Northern KY/ Greater Cincinnati U.K. Alumni Association will hold a Game Watch Party on Saturday, March 2 beginning at 3:30 p.m. This event will be held at Beef O'Brady's Restaurant in the Newport Shopping Center. The event is free and food and beverages may be purchased during the University of Kentucky/Arkansas game watch party. Come out and show your support for the University of Kentucky Wildcats basketball team.

Woman still runs tornado lost and found People can also look for missing belongings on Facebook under “Returning Memories to Tornado Victims.” She said she returned a photo in November, and that was the last item anyone contacted her about, but she’s hoping warmer weather will bring more searching, more finding and even more claiming. “If it’s still on the website, then it’s still unclaimed,” she said. “When it warms up, we’ll be out looking around again. I don’t mind helping still. The woods are still full of all kinds of stuff. We don’t know what might still be out there, or what shape it’s in, but you never know. We’re still looking. We’re not finished yet.”

By Amy Scalf ascalf@nky.com

Katrina Payne still has hundreds of photographs, many of which are crinkled, scratched, torn and discolored, that she’s hoping to return to people whose cherished mementos were blown away on March 2, 2012. She’s found books and badges, stamp collections and golf clubs, blue ribbons, cell phones, documents, baseball cards and many, many photos, all pictured on her website, Midwest Lost but now Found. Payne was able to return a cabinet full of photographs to a woman from Crittenden, and she’s returned baby book pages, books and photos to other people. She said she’s returned approximately two-thirds of what she found, but she

Katrina Payne's website, midwestlostbutnowfound.webs.com, displays photos, badges, cell phones, golf clubs and a wedding dress that are still unclaimed. PROVIDED

still has so much left. “No one has claimed this wedding dress, and it was on the news. It was

even on CNN News,” said Payne. The long, white lacy dress was found in Grants Lick in Campbell County.

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

Veterans hall of fame moving forward

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By Stephanie Salmons ssalmons@nky.com

Plans for a proposed Kentucky Veterans Hall of Fame are well under way and organizers hope to install the hall’s first members later this year. Members of the Florence Rotary Club heard an update on the project’s progress at a recent meeting. H.B. Deatherage, founder and president of the Kentucky Veterans Hall of Fame Foundation, said before the meeting’s start that the project first began about a year ago. “This thing has just taken off.” The plan, he said, is to induct up to 20 honorably discharged veterans each year. Deatherage said the big focus will be on “what have you done after the military? What have you done for your community? What have you done for your church? What have you done afterwards?” The statewide hall of fame will only be the fifth of its kind, according to Deatherage. They were speaking at the meeting to give an overview of “what we’re planning to accomplish and where we are in the process,” and just to make the club aware, said foundation board member Gary Griesser. “We’ve made some good progress,” Griesser said. “We’re pleased with

H.B. Deatherage, front, and Gary Griesser discuss the Kentucky Veterans Hall of Fame at a recent meeting of the Florence Rotary Club. PROVIDED/ADAM HOWARD

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Ohio, Greisser said, has been helpful in sharing information as to how a hall of fame might be established. Organizers are still finalizing the permanent location of the hall. “That is still in the process and is being worked on fairly vigorously right now,” he said. They are also in the process of receiving nonprofit status, Greisser said. “We’re not here looking for money,” he told the audience. “We’re here looking for awareness on part of everyone in this room to ask for some support as this goes forward.” Nomination forms and more information can be found online at kyveterans.org.

the process.” The goal, he said, is to “have this thing off the ground” and install the first class of veterans around Veterans Day. “I think the idea here is that we want to give veterans all of the accolades and honor we can as a way of thanking and appreciating them,” Griesser said. “But this particular honor is a bit different from some of the others. Instead of being based on what you did as a soldier, this is what you have done since you were honorably discharged.” During the meeting, Griesser, who addressed the crowd both in person and via a video, said Deatherage has been in touch with the other states with a similar hall of fame.

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Campbell County’s Civil War executions By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

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CALIFORNIA — In the spring of 1863, Union Major General Ambrose Burnside sought to eliminate sympathizers for the South in Ohio and Kentucky by issuing General Order No. 38 from his headquarters in Cincinnati. One of the lesserknown results of Burnside’s order, which was famously used to arrest and then expel Ohio Democratic Party leader Clement Vallandigham into the Confederacy, was the execution of two Campbell County Confederates.

Burnside’s General Order No. 38 issued April 13 – five days after their capture. A military commission met in Cincinnati April 22, and charged and convicted the two Campbell County residents on charges including “recruiting within the lines of the United States forces, for the so-called ‘Confederate Army,” according to an April 30, 1863 article in The Cincinnati Enquirer. Recruiting for the Confederacy behind Union lines was punishable by death under Burnside’s order. Corbin’s friend J.C. DeMoss wrote a book in 1897 telling about Corbin’s life

Captain William Francis Corbin and Lt. Thomas Jefferson McGraw, both of the California area, were captured by Union forces in northern Pendleton County near Rouse’s Mill April 8, 1863. Corbin and McGraw were tried as spies by a military commission and shot by a firing squad at the Union prison camp at Johnson’s Island on Lake Erie in Ohio on May 15, 1863. Corbin is buried in a private family cemetery in California off Washington Trace Road, and McGraw is buried in the Flagg Springs Baptist Church Cemetery. The two Confederate soldiers were tried under

in the Confederate army, his capture, and the attempt to stay his execution. According to DeMoss’ book, Corbin did not deny recruiting for the Confederate Army, but expected to be treated as a prisoner of war and not as a spy. Corbin was initially a lieutenant in the state military company organized by DeMoss when he enlisted 60 men from the eastern part of Campbell County in 1860. Kentucky had a position of armed neutrality at the beginning of the Civil War and both Union and Confederate military forces were not welcome. Corbin, and about 25 other men, left the state militia and passed through the federal lines in Paris, and were sworn in as soldiers in the Confederate Army Sept. 25, 1862, according to DeMoss’ book. Corbin was on his way out of the area with recruits he gathered when he stopped at the house of Garrett Daniel near Rouse’s Mill in northern Pendleton County to meet his friend McGraw, according to DeMoss’ book. Corbin sent his recruits on after McGraw did not arrive on time, but waited for his friend. As McGraw arrived at the home, so did 13 Union soldiers from the 118th Ohio Regiment – capturing both men. An attempt to save the life of Corbin was made by DeMoss and Corbin’s sister, Melissa Corbin, according to DeMoss’ book. Corbin’s sister met

The gravestone for Lt. T.J. McGraw, a Confederate solider in the Civil War, is maintained at Flagg Springs Baptist Church in southeastern Campbell County with both a U.S. and Confederate flag. The marker was erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy under the guidance of the Mrs. Basil Duke chapter of the U.D.C. in April of 1914. The Chapter's namesake was the sister of Civil War Confederate General John Hunt Morgan. The monument's inscription reads: "L.T. T.J. JcGraw C.S.A. Shot At Johnson's Is. May 15,1863 By Gen. Burbridge Order for Recruiting in Kentucky. Erected by Mrs. Basil Duke Chap. U.D.C." At the time of McGraw's execution General Stephen Gano Burbridge, a Scott County native and Union officer, and in July 4, 1864 repulsed Morgan's raid. Confederate Captain William Francis Corbin is buried in a nearby private family cemetery in the California area off Washington Trace Road. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

with General Burnside in Cincinnati and made a personal plea to save the life of her brother that was refused. DeMoss and Corbin’s sister then traveled to Washington, D.C. in a failed attempt to meet with President Lincoln. Northern Kentucky University history profess James Ramage, who specializes in Civil War history, said Burnside’s General Order No. 38 was mostly directed against sympathizers for Confed-

erates in Ohio, but the executions show one of the ways it was also used in Kentucky. “The order is exactly that you can’t be proSouthern and be speaking about it, or you’ll be arrested and punished,” Ramage said. Overall, there were more people aligned with the Union than the south in Kentucky, but there were still plenty of people who sided with the Confederacy, he said.

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NEWS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A7

St. E’s snatches top spot for health care By Libby Cunningham Lcunningham@nky.com

EDGEWOOD — St. Elizabeth Healthcare is again named one of the best hospital systems in the United States, a distinction running seven years strong with officials hinting it’s only getting bigger from here. Healthgrades included St. Elizabeth in its America’s 50 Best Hospitals rankings this year and John Dubis, the hospital’s president and chief executive officer, says it’s because of the care the system offers. “What it demonstrates and affirms is that the quality of care here is really superior to most places in the nation,” Dubis explained. Dubis would know. He’s worked in hospitals in Chicago and his hometown of St. Louis, but says St. Elizabeth is the best. “This place is even better than the other organizations I’ve worked with in terms of the continuous and clinical outcomes,” he said. St. Elizabeth is seeing more growth and has invested more than $250 million in itself over the last four years. Although the system isn’t based in Cincinnati, some may not realize that it’s the second largest health care system in the region, said Sandra Sims, director of marketing,

St. Elizabeth Healthcare has been named one of America’s 50 Best Hospitals by Healthgrades again this year. St. Elizabeth has gotten this distinction for the past seven years, something John Dubis, president and chief executive officer, is proud of. LIBBY CUNNINGHAM/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Visit www.nky.com/Edgewood for more community news

Community Recorder

Ten Tristate companies and foundations have come together to donate more than $100,000 to Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Cincinnati during the agency’s annual AdoptA-School campaign. The funds sponsor site-based programs, where adult volunteers are paired with a student. These pairs meet once a week during the school year, usually during lunch or after school. Donations to this year’s campaign came from AEP, Lawrenceburg Plant, Ashland Inc., Citizens Against Substance Abuse, The Charles H. Dater Foundation, Defender Direct, General Cable, The Hatton Foundation, Skyline Chili, The Robert O and Elaine Smith Family Fund and an anonymous donor. Many of the companies also encourage their

Little sister Trinity and her big sister Jennifer Taylor, both of Newport, meet once a week in the school-based Big Brothers Big Sisters program at Crossroads Elementary. Tristate companies and foundations donated more than $100,000 to the Adopt-A-School program, funding these efforts in Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky and Southeastern Indiana. PROVIDED

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SCHOOLS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

CommunityPress.com

FFA crop is leadership, awareness By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — Students in the Campbell County Future Farmers of America Club celebrated FFA Week Feb. 18-22 by dressing the part daily. Students in the club wear dark blue uniform jackets with the FFA logo routinely, but they added daily outfit changes to bond as a group. Lacee Crail, the FFA reporter for the year, said the students take pride in FFA, and had a week full of events. The student officers spent Sunday, Feb. 17, going to lunch, and club members went snow tubing while off school for Presidents Day. Tuesday, Feb. 19, was a hat, camouflage and Carhartt day at school, and Wednesday, Feb. 20, was bowling night. “Wednesday is ‘dress like McCubbins’ day, where we will be rocking bow ties, cowboy boots and beards to look like our Ag advisor, Mr. Andrew McCubbins,” Crail said. Daniel Honaker, a senior of California, said FFA week gets his classmates asking questions about the club. Honaker said he enjoys spending time with oth-

ers in the club and learning more about agriculture, although his interest is to study criminal justice. The leadership skills he learned in FFA opened up a lot of opportunities for future education , Honaker said. Justin Walerius, a senior of California, said he also thinks FFA will help him succeed in college studying criminal justice. “It gives you a lot of opportunities, and it enhances some qualities in you like public speaking and leadership,” Walerius said. McCubbins said FFA Week is about having fun and bonding, but there is also a serious side to introduce all students to the importance of agriculture. “It’s the backbone of America, and it’s here to stay,” McCubbins said. “We need to get people interested.” The high school had an expo for eighth-grade students in February, where it amazed some students that agriculture also meant careers including veterinarians and floral design. “The kids were like, ‘Wow, we thought it was just about farming,’” McCubbins said.

From left, Campbell County High School FFA students Daniel Honaker, Erin Penick and Justin Walerius, all seniors from the California area, clean up crock pots left over from a lunch they served teachers Thursday, Feb. 21. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Celestial lesson offered at St. Philip By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

Perrin Shepherd, outreach educator with the Center of Science and Industry (COSI) talks to Johnson Elementary School students as part of the COSI on Wheels program, which visited the school Wednesday, Feb. 20. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

COSI on Wheels visits Johnson

The COSI on Wheels program from the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus visited Johnson Elementary School Wednesday, Feb. 20 to teach students about weather. The program included hands-on activities and demonstrations covering a series of weather-related topics.

Parent volunteer Yolanda Mills uses a vacuum to demonstrate air pressure to student Lily Arnberg. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

MELBOURNE — St. Philip School teachers will bring the moon to their students and the community – or at least a few small rocks astronauts brought back. A community open house to see the moon rocks, meteorite samples, a presentation from the Cincinnati Observatory staff member, and St. Philip student projects is scheduled in the parish center from 7-9 p.m. Friday, March 8. The moon rocks are on loan from NASA’s Space Center in Houston. Jessica Seibert, a teacher of first and second grade, said the moon rocks will arrive at the school March 4. Students will use microscopes and magnifying glasses to study the rocks, Seibert said. The rocks will show students a physical piece of space, she said. There has been a lack of attention on space in the U.S. in recent years, Seibert said. Students are interested in the topic, but not necessarily very excited, she said. Moon rocks and the observatory visit will help increase student interest in space and science, Seibert said. “It will help them realize that space is really out there, and people actually went to the moon and this is what they brought back,” she said. Principal Kimberly Brewer said Seibert and fifth- and sixth-grade teacher Jennifer Twehues attended a workshop taught by the the observatory staff. Attending the workshop, offered at Tichenor Middle School in Erlanger, entitled the teacher to bring the moon rocks to the school for two weeks, Brewer said.

Studying moon rocks will be incorporated into science lessons in addition to inviting the community to visit, she said. Students have already learned about planets in the solar system, and students in the primary grades have just completed units on the moon, earth and sun, Brewer said. “The younger kids will be using hand-held magnifying glasses to see what the composition of the rocks actually look like,” she said. Students in grades 7-8 are studying constellations right now, Brewer said. Weather permitting, an astronomer from the Cincinnati Observatory will take people outside for presentation March 8, said Twehues. The outdoor viewing has been scheduled to view the newly discovered “Comet PANSTARRS,” Twehues said. The comet is named for the telescope it was discovered by in Hawaii in June 2011, the Panoramic Survey Telescope & Rapid Response System (PanSTARRS). The workshop was also where they met representatives of the Cincinnati Observatory, she said. “Jessica and I decided to have the Cincinnati Observatory come for a presentation during the school day for the students and again in the evening while the samples are on display,” Twehues said. Dean Regas, assistant director at the Cincinnati Observatory will speak to students on the morning of March 6 and again on the evening of March 8, she said. “That evening will also involve stargazing with telescopes provided by the Cincinnati Observatory,” Twehues said.


SPORTS

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A9

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Bluebirds pleased with late-season effort By Adam Turer

presspreps@gmail.com

Highlands swimmers enjoy their state medals in the 200 freestyle, including Beth Ann Griffith, Shelby Whitt, Bailey Fessler and Madeline Huber. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Hill takes 2nd in state diving Young Bluebirds build for future By James Weber jweber@nky.com

LOUISVILLE — While only a sophomore, Carly Hill is a wily veteran on the Highlands swimming and diving team. Hill finished second in the state diving championships Feb. 23 at the University of Louisville. It was her fourth medal in the state diving competition. Hill, a three-time regional champion, scored 447.30 points and lost by 8.35 to Sacred Heart sophomore Erin Duffey. “It was a great competition between two great divers,” said Highlands head coach Amanda Johnson. “Carly is a phenomenal diver. Last year she was sixth so to be runnerup this year is awesome. They’re going to be battling each other the next two years.” Hill led a young Highlands team at the state meet last week. The Bluebirds medalled in the 200-yard freestyle relay, finishing eighth in girls with Bailey Fessler, Madeline Huber, Beth Ann Griffith and Shelby Whitt. Griffith is an eighthgrader, the others are freshmen. The same quartet was 14th in the 400 free relay. Huber and three other youngsters eighth-grader Lily Banks, freshman Katherine Redden and junior Linnea Everland finished 13th in the 200 medley relay. The top eight finishers win medals and the top16 score points for their team. “We had a goal of getting a relay in the top eight and to qualify all three, and to get experience in individual events,” Johnson said. “Their experience this year will help them in the future. It will be exciting for years to come to see what they can do.” Most of those relay racers also qualified for state in a pair of solo events. Whitt scored points by making the consolation finals of both the 200 free and 500 free. Redden also scored two points by finishing 15th in the 200 individual medley. Nine different Bluebirds

See STATE, Page A10

Highlands freshman Katherine Redden finished 15th in the 200 IM. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

FT. THOMAS — Only one team gets to end its season with a win. All those teams that fall short of a state championship are trying to find positives in a season-ending defeat. Highlands High School’s boys basketball team lost its first KHSAA tournament game, yet the Bluebirds were extremely pleased with their season-ending performance. Highlands (12-16) lost its 36th District opener to Newport Central Catholic, 48-37, Feb. 19. The Bluebirds walked off the court with their heads held high. “I thought that was our most inspired effort of the year,” said head coach Mike Flynn. “Our season ended on a real high note.” While some players or teams might be tempted to throw in the towel in the final weeks of a losing season, the Bluebirds gave a collective effort until the final buzzer sounded. Highlands won three straight games to close out the regular season, the team’s longest winning streak of the year. The Bluebirds struggled all year to get shots to fall, but always gave one hundred percent in the areas over which they had the most control. “I was really pleased with our effort and our work on defense (at the end of the year),” said Flynn. “We were playing our best basketball and our team chemistry was at its best.” When Highlands faced NewCath (30-2) on Jan. 22, the Bluebirds were humbled in a 59-22 rout. The Thoroughbreds entered the 36th District tournament averaging 64.3 points per game. To hold one of the state’s top teams 16 points below its season average gave Highlands additional confidence heading into the offseason. “It is a big challenge for a coach to have players still gaining momentum at the end of the

Jake Gronotte of Highlands pulls up short for a jumper in a game against Ryle, who won 64-55 at Highlands. BRANDON SEVERN/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

season,” said Flynn. “It was very gratifying to see that. Now, we have to turn that momentum into offseason energy.” Next year’s squad will benefit from regaining two key contributors who were lost for most of this season due to injury. Junior Brandon Hergott was lost in the second game of the season to a knee injury. The Bluebirds spent the rest of the season trying, to no avail, to find a replacement wing player who could provide a consistent scoring boost off the bench. The team took another hit in midJanuary when Brendan “BB” Buten was lost for the rest of the year. Getting those two experiSee HOOPS, Page A10

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Highlands’ Linnea Everland swims in the 200 medley relay. The state swimming meet was Feb. 23 at the University of Louisville. JAMES WEBER/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

STATE RESULTS HIGHLANDS BOYS

200 medley relay: 23rd (1:47.14) - Owen Downard, Nathan Merkle, Ben Wolber, Mayson Hurtt 200 free relay: 27th (1:36.96) - Nathan Merkle, John Michael Griffith, Greyson Pendery, Mayson Hurtt 400 free relay: 24th (3:32.32) - Nathan Merkle, Owen Downard, Ben Wolber, Mayson Hurtt Owen Downard: 25th in 500 free (4:58.18), 31st in 100 back (59.11) Mayson Hurtt: 23rd in 500 free (4:57.76).

HIGHLANDS GIRLS

200 medley relay: 13th (1:56.51), Lily Banks, Katherine Redden, Linnea Everland, Madeline Huber 200 free relay: 8th (1:42.79) - Bailey Fessler, Madeline Huber, Beth Ann Griffith, Shelby Whitt 400 free relay: 14th (3:46.39) - Madeline Huber, Bailey Fessler, Beth Ann Griffith, Shelby Whitt Linnea Everland: 25th in 500 free (5:29.59), 32nd in 100 back (1:05.89) Bailey Fessler: 24th in 50 free (25.72), 23rd in 100 fly (1:01.58) Beth Ann Griffith: 31st in 100 free (56.81), 31st in 100 back (1:05.61) Carly Hill: 2nd in diving (447.30) Madeline Huber: 21st in 500 free (5:25.10). Kayla Nehus: 29th in diving (112.90) Katherine Redden: 15th in 200 IM (2:15.26), 26th in 100 breast (1:09.91) Abby Weyer: 31st in diving (108.95). Shelby Whitt: 15th in 200 free (2:00.25), 14th in 500 free (5:21.11)

This Week’s MVP

» Highlands sophomore Carly Hill for finishing second in the state in diving.

Boys basketball

» The Ninth Region tourney is at the Bank of Kentucky Center. The semis are 12 and 1:30 p.m. Saturday, the final is 6 p.m. Sunday. The first semi features Monday’s winners between Dixie/Newport and CovCath/Ryle. The second semi is Tuesday’s winners between NewCath/Holmes and Cooper/ St. Henry. » The 10th Region is at the Mason County Fieldhouse. The semis are 5 and 8:30 p.m. Friday (gym cleared between games). The final is 7:30 p.m. Saturday. Brossart would play in the first semi with a win Monday. Scott would play in the second semi with a win Tuesday. » Highlands lost 48-37 to NewCath in the 36th District. Luke Turner, Drew Houliston and Bailey Witte scored in double figures. Turner was alltourney » Newport Central Catholic beat Newport 50-42 in the

36th District final. Drew McDonald had 22 points for NCC, Marquise Commodore 12 for Newport. McDonald was MVP. Michael Bueter and Nick Seibert were all-tourney, with Commodore and Jashawn Short for Newport.

Girls basketball

» The Ninth Region is at the Bank of Kentucky Center: Friday’s quarterfinals feature Dixie Heights and Ryle at 6:30 p.m. followed by Highlands vs. Holmes. The semifinals begin at 12 p.m. Sunday and the final is 7 p.m. Monday. Wednesday’s first round included Boone vs. St. Henry and Notre Dame vs. Newport and the winners of those games meet in the first semi. » Highlands beat Newport 66-27 in the 36th District final. Brianna Adler had 15 points on five three-pointers and was tourney MVP. Both teams advanced to the Ninth Region tourney. Vanessa Fisse and Leah Schaefer were all-tourney picks for Highlands, and Kylie Orr and Courtney Kilburn for Newport. » NewCath lost 48-40 to Highlands in the 36th District. Nicole Kiernan had 13 points and Stephanie Lewis 10.


SPORTS & RECREATION

A10 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Future bright after 3rd-place finish

Margroum state runner-up in two events for NDA By James Weber jweber@nky.com

LOUISVILLE — She didn’t get to leave high school swimming as a state champion. But Notre Dame Academy senior MacKenzie Margroum of Fort Thomas is proud of the way she and fellow senior Julia Johnson finished their careers Feb. 23 at the

University of Louisville in the KHSAA state championships. The lone 12th-graders on the team led the Pandas to third place in the team standings. “You always try to be No.1, but at the same time my main focus is leading this team,” Margroum said. “Julia and I did a great job of that. We know there’s another future in store for us. We led the team as best we could and we felt Notre Dame did great as a whole.” Margroum graduates

with two state records, coming in the 2011 state meet when she helped the Pandas win the 200-yard medley relay and 400yard freestyle relay. She fell just short of her first solo state title twice, placing second in both the 50 free and 100 free. “She had some great times,” said NDA head coach Emily Knoll. “She got out-touched. What she’s done this season, being a leader on the team, even as a runner-up, she had a great meet.” Margroum was on two of the three Panda relays,

which all finished in the top four. Lilly Morgan, Madeleine Vonderhaar, Katie Summe and Olivia Hagen were also in two of the relays. Johnson and Kat Akin were on one. Vonderhaar, Morgan, Hagen and diver Karly Crail each had one individual top-eight medal. Johnson and Jessica Peck had a pair of point-scoring top-16 finishes in the consolation final. Vonderhaar, a freshman, also finished ninth in the individual medley. “We’re so young, and to have girls in the top

State Continued from Page A9

heat as freshmen and to have our relays coming back in third and fourth, that is something to celebrate,” Margroum said. Fourteen different Pandas competed in solo events. Margroum will join the U.S. Naval Academy this summer and compete on the swimming team there, majoring in nursing. Her grandfather served in the Navy during World War II. “It’s just the opportunity it offers and the chance to represent my country,” she said.

competed in solo events in girls. Seven different male Bluebirds competed at state, though none advanced to the second day of competition. Freshman Owen Downard was a double qualifier and swam on two relays. Senior Mayson Hurtt competed in the 500 free and all three relays. Junior Nathan Merkle, freshman Ben Wolber, junior John Michael Griffith and eighth-grader Greyson Pendery all competed in relays.

Follow James on Twitter @RecorderWeber and check out more photos and coverage at nky.com/preps and nky.com/FortThomas.

Reds Futures Showcase begins March 25 By Scott Springer

Hoops

SHOWCASE SCHEDULE

sspringer@communitypress.com

CINCINNATI — At the Reds Hall of Fame and Museum Feb. 19, the Cincinnati Reds and InGame Sports announced the 64-team field for the second-annual Reds Futures High School Showcase. The event begins March 25 and runs through April 15 featuring teams from southeastern Indiana, northern Kentucky and southwestern Ohio. The event culminates with all 64 teams in a “March at the Majors” parade before the Reds/Marlins game April 21. In a year’s time, the prep showcase has grown dramatically, according to Tom Gamble of InGame Sports. “Last year we had 25 games involv-

Northern Kentucky games for the 2013 Reds Futures High School Showcase presented by PNC: Monday, March 25 Conner vs. Lawrenceburg, 5 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) Tuesday, March 26 St. Henry vs. Simon Kenton, 5 p.m. (St. Henry High School) Thursday, March 28 Covington Catholic vs. Newport Central Catholic, 2 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) ** Ryle vs. Scott, 5 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) ** Saturday, March 30 Beechwood vs. Campbell County, Noon (Northern Kentucky University) Cooper vs. Holy Cross, 2:30 p.m. (Northern Kentucky University) **Reds mascots and the Reds Rover events team will appear at these games. Additional appearances will be announced at a later date.

Reds COO Phil Castellini speaks about the Reds Futures High School Showcase Feb. 19. THANKS TO MICHAEL ANDERSON

ing 50 schools,” he said. “This year, 32 games involving 64 schools and 20 of the schools are new.” Northern Kentucky has numerous representatives playing at NKU, including Newport Central Catholic and Covington Catholic on March 28. “I told them one of the things they get to do is go to the Reds game against the Marlins and be down on the field before the

ONLINE EXTRAS See a related video from the event at: http://bit.ly/XOUUSO

game,” Newport Catholic Coach Jeff Schulkens said. “They’re real fired up about the opportunity.” Tickets for the Reds Futures Showcase games are $5 and good for all games that day. Each

ticket also comes with a voucher good for a free View Level ticket to select Reds regular season games at Great American Ballpark and a cou-

Continued from Page A9

enced players back next season will be a major boost. There is still the matter of replacing the glue that kept this year’s team together. Four seniors—Jake Gronotte, Karl Hinkel, Luke Turner, and Bailey Witte — kept the Bluebirds focused and brought the right attitude and work ethic to practice each day. “A team can only be as good as the leadership of its senior class,” said Flynn. “Our seniors brought positive energy to our program every day. They realized the team was bigger than them and they put the team first. They left a very impactful legacy.”

pon for a free Skyline Chili cheese coney. Tickets will be available at the participating schools and on game days at the host facilities.

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FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • FORT THOMAS RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Michelle Shaw, mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Add accountability to school councils I applaud State Sen. John Schickel’s concern for the children of the commonwealth of Kentucky to be life, work and career ready! The senator’s agenda is a worthy goal to Kevin afford our Kennedy children a world-class COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST education COLUMNIST which can only benefit Kentucky and our nation. His recent column in the Recorder presumes that developing students that are life,

work and career ready is a matter of allowing local school boards and superintendents to set educational priorities. The Kentucky Educational Reform Act of 1990 (KERA) established School-based Decision Making Councils and empowered them to set curriculum; select resources such as textbooks and other instructional materials; determine the number and type of staff a school will employ; recommend personnel decisions; set the local school’s budget; determine the use of school facilities; set school calendars; decide which extracurricular activities to offer and policies that govern student participation; use of

technology, etc., at each local school. SBDM Councils by law are made up of a school’s principal, at least three teachers and at least two parent representatives – none of them publicly elected. Kentucky school boards are not permitted to restrain or oversee a SBDM Council or its decisions. The Kentucky Supreme Court’s 1994 decision upheld in Boone County Board of Education v. Bushee that a school board could not require a SBDM Council to submit for review and approval measurable goals and objectives or a related implementation plan. All of these powers were

Representatives Mike Harmon and Joe Fischer talk on the floor of the Kentucky House of Representatives. THANKS TO LRC PUBLIC INFORMATION/KENTUCKY HOUSE REPUBLICAN CAUCUS

CAMPBELL COUNTY MEETINGS

Address: 1098 Monmouth St., Newport, KY 41071 Phone: (859) 292-3838 Website: www.campbelcountyky.org Meets: 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of the month at the Alexandria Courthouse, 8352 E. Main St. And meets at 5:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of the month at the county administration building, 1098 Monmouth St., Newport. Judge-executive: Steve Pendery (859) 547-1803

ALEXANDRIA

8236 W. Main St. (859) 635-4125 7 p.m. the first and third Thursday www.alexandriaky.org

BELLEVUE

616 Poplar St. 859-431-8888 7 p.m. the second Wednesday www.bellevueky.org

COLD SPRING

MELBOURNE

5694 East Alexandria Pike (859) 441-9604 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Monday www.coldspringky.com

502 Garfield Ave. (859) 781-6664 7:30 p.m. the second Tuesday Website: NA

CRESTVIEW

NEWPORT

14 Circle Drive (859) 441-4620 7:30 p.m. the first Tuesday www.crestviewky.com

DAYTON

514 Sixth Ave. 859-491-1600 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.daytonky.com

FORT THOMAS

998 Monmouth St. 859-292-3687 7 p.m. the second and fourth Mondays www.newportky.gov

SILVER GROVE

308 Oak St. (859) 441-6390 7 p.m. the first Tuesday Website: NA

SOUTHGATE

130 North Fort Thomas Ave. 859-441-1055 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays www.ftthomas.org

122 Electric Ave. 859-441-0075 7:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays www.southgateky.org

HIGHLAND HEIGHTS

520 Licking Pike 859-581-8884 7 p.m. the first and third Mondays www.cityofwilder.com

176 Johns Hill Road 859-441-8575 7:30 p.m. the first and third Tuesdays www.hhky.com

FORT THOMAS

RECORDER

was surprised to find that four middle schools and one high school already permit a student to attain a “D-” average and still be eligible to participate. This type of decisionmaking by councils is not going to prepare our students to be life, work and career ready! As a parent of three children enrolled in the Boone County School District, I would ask Senator Schickel to concentrate his efforts in reforming the system of SBDM Councils to add accountability to parents, school boards and superintendents. Kevin Kennedy is a resident of Union.

A nation’s need to protect its youth

REPRESENTATIVES CHAT

CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT

intended to benefit our children by giving each school an opportunity to own its destiny by removing favoritism that had occurred in some districts prior to 1990. I don’t believe state legislators intended KERA to create a process in which unelected bodies are not held accountable for decisions that may not be in the best interest of students. As a recent example demonstrates, a SBDM Council in the Boone County District discussed a proposal to lower the minimum grade requirement for a student to participate in extracurricular activities from a “C” to a “D-”. After researching other schools’ policies, I

WILDER

A publication of

CAMPBELL COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD

51 Orchard Lane, Alexandria (859) 635-2173 7 p.m. the second Monday www.campbellcountyschools.org

FORT THOMAS SCHOOL BOARD

28 North Fort Thomas Ave. 859-781-3333 7 p.m. the second Monday www.fortthomas.kyschools.us

NEWPORT SCHOOL BOARD 301 East Eighth St. 859-292-3001 Changes month-to-month www.newportwildcats.org

SILVER GROVE SCHOOL BOARD

101 W. Third St. (859) 441-3873 7 p.m. the third Monday www.s-g.k12.ky.us

The alcohol-fueled alleged serial rape of a 16-year-old Ohio girl by two of her similarly impaired classmates – not to mention the drunken videotaped commentary of others – points yet again to the imperative that adult America renews its commitment to address as a true national community those issues that most threaten the health, safety, and forward development of youth. It is a priority that carries with it, in Dr. Martin Luther King’s words, the fierce urgency of now. Indeed, is there a task more pressing than Stephen protecting the Wallace generation that COMMUNITY will follow us as RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST custodians of the future? Probably not. Among the key threats facing our kids are ones often overlooked, underplayed, or enabled by adults: alcohol use and its many negative ramifications, including impaired driving. Over the past decade, our government has laid out a blueprint for reducing “demand” among adolescents and children, beginning with the National Academies report, “Reducing Underage Drinking – A Collective Responsibility.” It is imperative that all members of adult America make it their business to join the legions of agencies, organizations, schools, and families in combating underage drinking and the driving that often follows. But new research reveals we have a long way to go. According to a recently released study of teens by SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions) and Liberty Mutual Insurance, the number of 16- and 17-year-olds reporting that their parents allow them to drink at home, host alcohol-included parties, and drink at parties away from home is on the rise. For example, 37 percent of the teens revealed that their parents allow them to drink with them, up 10 percent from 2010. Some believe that “de-mystifying” alcohol use by allowing kids to drink at home will make it less likely their teens will drink elsewhere. But other research tells a different story. According to a 2005 SADD Teens Today study: Among high school teens, those who tend to avoid alcohol are more than twice as likely as those who repeatedly use alcohol to say their parents never let them drink at home (84 percent

228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017 654 Highland Ave., Fort Thomas, KY 41075 phone: 283-0404 email: kynews@communitypress.com web site: www.nky.com

vs. 40 percent). More than half (57 percent) of high school teens who report their parents allow them to drink at home, even once in a while, say they drink with their friends, as compared to just 14 percent of teens who say their parents don’t let them drink at home. Similarly, between 2010 and this year, those stating that they are allowed to drink without their parents present or to attend alcohol-included parties rose from 21 to 29 percent and from 36 to 47 percent, respectively. Finally, those teens reporting that they are permitted to host parties with alcohol increased slightly over prior years to 15 percent. Given the known – and deleterious – effects of alcohol on evolving teen brains and the link between early alcohol use and life-long problems, this trend represents a significant concern to prevention specialists and educators. Hence the urgency. Fortunately, not all the news is bad. A combination of policy, parents, and peers holds some hope. » Policy: An increasing number of states are enacting – and enforcing – social host liability laws, holding adults accountable if they provide alcohol to minors or allow alcohol-included parties to take place in their homes. » Parents: Mom and Dad remain the most powerful force in their teen’s decision-making. Conversations about safe driving and saying no to alcohol can start with them. » Peers: Friends hold a lot of power, too. Eighty-seven percent of surveyed teens will ask a peer under the influence of alcohol to refrain from driving … and 92 percent of those peers would agree. Thus, let’s make a resolution in our courts, our homes, and our cars to address the scourge of youth substance use and the crash deaths and injuries from car crashes that often result. That is the fierce urgency of now. Stephen Wallace, senior adviser for policy, research and education at SADD (Students Against Destructive Decisions), is an associate research professor and director of the Center for Adolescent Research and Education (CARE) at Susquehanna University and has broad experience as a school psychologist and adolescent/family counselor.

Fort Thomas Recorder Editor Michelle Shaw mshaw@nky.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

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THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 28, 2013

LIFE

COMMUNITY RECORDER

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Fort Thomas resident Sydney Beach, 6, gets fancy for a picture during the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY

Cold Spring resident Christina Gogzheyan, 6, colors a picture during the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY

Alexandria resident Sarah Wagner, 7, has fun with some dress up props at the event. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY

RECORDER

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Alexandria residents Katie Wagner, 7; Alexa Robinson, 7; and Katie Wagner, 7, get together for a picture. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

Cold Spring library gets fancy COLD SPRING — The Cold

Spring branch of the Campbell County Public Library brought out all things fancy during its Fancy Nancy Tea Time event Saturday, Feb. 23. Girls from around the area came dressed in their best to the event, which included decorations and activities based on the Fancy Nancy book series.

Cold Spring resident Sabrina Gogzheyan, 1, tries on some sunglasses during the event.

California resident Zowie Rhoden, 5, decorates a picture frame during the Fancy Nancy Tea Party at the Cold Spring Branch of the Campbell County Public Library Saturday, March 23. AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY

Alexandria resident Bailey Farris, 3, makes her picture frame. AMANDA

AMANDA JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER

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JOERING/COMMUNITY RECORDER


B2 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, MARCH 1 Art Openings The Art of Food, 6-9 p.m., Carnegie Visual and Performing Arts Center, 1028 Scott Blvd., Annual exhibition of artistic culinary creations by visual artists and top chefs from the area. Exhibit continues through March 21. $50, $35 members at door; $40, $25 members advance. Exhibit is free after opening night. Reservations recommended. 859-957-1940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Dining Events St. Joseph Church Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., St. Joseph Church Camp Springs, 6833 Four Mile Road, Features Mr. Herb’s baked or fried fish, fried catfish, salmon, deep-fried shrimp, crab cakes and a sampler platter. Dinners and sandwiches available for purchase. Carryout available. $8 and up; $6 sandwiches. 859-635-5652. Camp Springs. Fish Fry, 4-8 p.m., St. Thomas School, 428 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Hand-dipped fish set up in school cafeteria. Shrimp and pizza available along with desserts. Dine in or carry out. $6.50, $5.50 seniors, $4.50 ages 9 and under. 859-572-4641, ext. 242; www.sttschool.org. Fort Thomas. Fish Fry, 4-7:30 p.m., Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Department, 5011 Four Mile, Fish, shrimp, frog legs, macaroni, green beans, hush puppies, fries, onion rings, chicken strips and desserts. 859-441-6251. Silver Grove. St. Catherine of Siena Lenten Fish Frys Around the World, 4:30-7 p.m. Italian menu: Vegetable lasagna, garlic bread, salad and cookie., St. Catherine of Siena Church, 1803 N. Fort Thomas Ave., Undercroft. Feature themed meatless dinners from around the globe. Traditional fish dinners, cheese pizza, grilled cheese and tomato soup will also be available. 859-4428529; www.stcatherineofsiena.org. Fort Thomas. St. Therese Fish Fry, 4:30-7:30 p.m., St. Therese Church, 2516 Alexandria Pike, Featuring baked or fried cod, breaded shrimp, tuna melt, dinners with your choice of mac ’n’ cheese, fries, seasoned green beans and coleslaw. Fish, shrimp or tuna melt dinners $7. A la carte grilled cheese, cheese pizza and hush puppies. Dine in or carry out. Curbside service available. 859-441-9137. Southgate.

Music - Jazz Cohesion Jazz Ensemble, 8 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $10. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Music - Rock Ben Walz Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. The Soulsalesmen, 7 p.m. With the Rusty Van Band, the Middlefork, Another Tragedy and the Apps., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., $8. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy James Johann, 8 p.m.; 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., NKU Corbett Theatre, Nunn Drive, Hit Broadway musical adapted from motion picture follows sorority star Elle Woods. Directed by Jamey Strawn. $14, $11 ages 60 and up, $8 students. Presented by Northern Kentucky University Theatre and Dance. Through March 3. 859-572-5464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

Special Events Northern Kentucky Camper Show, 1 p.m., Northern Kentucky Convention Center, 1 W. RiverCenter Blvd., Vendor booths from generators, storage lots, parts, accessories, home improvement, niche products, trucks and towing equipment. Featuring travel trailers, fifth wheels, motor homes and pop up campers. Sit down and discuss specific problems or questions with certified RV technicians. $6, free ages 14 and

The Northern Kentucky Camper Show will be 1 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, March 1-3, at the Northern Kentucky Convention Center in Covington. Cost is $6; free for ages 14 and under. Call 859-261-1500. FILE PHOTO

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.NKY.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@ communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.NKY.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Legally Blonde will be performed 8 p.m. Friday through Sunday, March 1-3, at the Northern Kentucky University Corbett Theatre. Cost is $14 for adults; $13 staff and alumni; $11 senior; and $8 student. Call 859-572-5464. Pictured is Kathryn Miller. FILE PHOTO under; $1 discount purchasing online. 859-261-1500; rvexpo.net. Covington.

SATURDAY, MARCH 2

.

Films The Metropolitan Opera Parsifal, noon Not rated. Run time: 5:45., AMC Newport On The Levee 20, One Levee Way, Suite 4100, Jonas Kaufmann stars in title role of the innocent who finds wisdom in François Girard’s new vision for Wagner’s final masterpiece. His fellow Wagnerian luminaries include Katarina Dalayman as the mysterious Kundry, Peter Mattei as the ailing Amfortas, Evgeny Nikitin as the wicked Klingsor, and René Pape as the noble knight Gurnemanz. $22, $20 seniors, $18 children. Presented by Fathom Events. 859-261-6795; www.fathomevents.com. Newport.

Including an all spin-by-request set, bring your own records. Also, local/regional-only set. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-4312201; www.facebook.com/ DevoutWax. Newport.

Music - Pop Stephen Geddes' Cylinder Head II (Western Romance) will be featured in the exhibit, Contoured Essence, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, March 1-April 19, at the Artisans Enterprise Center in Covington. Free. THANKS TO PAIGE WIDEMAN

life-long friends go for a boys’ night out in the Heaven Parlor. Music in pop-rock genre. $12. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport. Legally Blonde, 8 p.m., NKU Corbett Theatre, $14, $11 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 859-5725464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

Music - Rock Matt Cowherd, 10 p.m., Jefferson Hall, 1 Levee Way, Suite 2118, 859-491-6200; www.jeffersonhall.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy James Johann, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic

On Stage - Theater

Super Bowl of Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Super Bowl Bellewood, 1211 Waterworks Road, $12 buckets, $3 domestics, $2 jello shots. With DJ Weezy and DJ Love MD. No cover. Presented by Super Bowl. 859-781-1211; www.superbowlnky.com. Newport.

Legally Blonde, 3 p.m., NKU Corbett Theatre, $14, $11 ages 60 and up, $8 students. 859-5725464; theatre.nku.edu. Highland Heights.

Music - Rock HiFi Wise Guys, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy James Johann, 7:30 p.m.; 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Variables: A New Musical, 2 p.m.; 8 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., First original musical produced by Thompson House. Comic story has serious undertones as five

MONDAY, MARCH 4 Civic Campbell County Conservation District Meeting, 9-10:30 a.m., Campbell County Conservation District, 8351 E. Main St., Suite 104, Suite 104. Public encouraged to attend. Through Dec. 4. 859-635-9587; http:// home.fuse.net/campbellcd. Alexandria.

Karaoke and Open Mic Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, MARCH 5 Clubs & Organizations

Sparks the Rescue, 6 p.m. With Rookie of the Year, Jimmie Deeghan, Tidewater and Mandolyn Mae., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., Rock band from Maine. $12. 859-261-7469; www.ticketweb.com. Newport.

Support Groups

Triangle Toastmasters Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Campbell County Fiscal Court, 1098 Monmouth St., Become a confident, more effective speaker. Free. Presented by Triangle Toastmasters. Through April 2. 859-6523348; triangle.toastmastersclubs.org. Newport.

DivorceCare Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m., Florence United Methodist Church, 8585 Old Toll Road, Those suffering from experiencing separation or divorce heal and find hope in shared experiences. Child care provided. $15. Registration required. 859-371-7961. Florence.

Exercise Classes

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 6

Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, $10 drop-in. Presented by Cardio Dance Party. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Health / Wellness Family-to-Family Education Course, 5:45-8:30 p.m., First Christian Church, 1031 Alexandria Pike, Review of biological, medical, psychological, emotional, social and occupational aspects of mental illnesses. Free. Registration required. Presented by NAMI Northern Kentucky. 859-261-4080; www.naminky.org. Fort Thomas.

Literary - Libraries Let’s Talk About It Spring Series, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Discussion on "The Murder of Roger Ackroyd" by Agatha Christie., Fort Thomas-Carrico Branch Library, 1000 Highland Ave., Discuss mystery novels. Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. Presented by Campbell County Public Library. 859-572-5033; www.cc-pl.org. Fort Thomas.

Music - DJ Devout Wax, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Vinyl night. Margaret and Jonathan spin eclectic wax.

On Stage - Comedy Night of Comedy, 7:30 p.m. Doors open 6 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, With comedians Jesse Nutt, Ray Price, Gene Sell and Rob Wilfong from Live Bait Comedy Tour. Ages 21 and up. $10. Presented by Newport High School Band Boosters. 859-4317111. Newport.

THURSDAY, MARCH 7 Exercise Classes Cardio Dance Party!, 7:30-8:30 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, $10 drop-in. 513-617-9498; www.cardiodanceparty.com. Newport.

Karaoke and Open Mic Thursday Karaoke Contest, 9 p.m., The Thompson House, 24 E. Third St., The Rockstar Lounge. Weekly winners receive prizes, ranging from concert tickets to cash. Each monthly winner is entered into the finals and invited to the championship showdown in December 2013. The winner of it all gets the all expense paid trip and a chance to audition for "The Voice.". Ages 21 and up. 859-261-7469; www.thompsonhousenewport.com. Newport.

Literary - Book Clubs

Best of the Best Book Discussion Group, 3 p.m., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Florence.

Literary - Libraries Bring Your Own Lunch and a Movie, 11:30 a.m. Movie: "Robot and Frank.", Lents Branch Library, 3215 Cougar Path, Adults. Free. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Hebron. Computer and Internet Basics, 10 a.m. Weekly through March 28., Florence Branch Library, 7425 U.S. 42, Learn how to use a computer and surf the Internet. Registration required. 859-3422665. Florence. Cake Pops, 6:30 p.m., Boone County Main Library, 1786 Burlington Pike, Fantasy in Frosting provides everything to make cake pops. All ages. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 859-342-2665. Burlington.

Music - Cabaret Don Fangman, 6:30-9 p.m., Knotty Pine On The Bayou, 6302 Licking Pike, Don Fangman sings Frank Sinatra, Dean Martin, Tony Bennett, Neil Diamond, Michael Buble and Andrea Bocelli. Free. 859-781-2200. Cold Spring.

Music - Country Original Hillbilly Thursdays, 10 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Country, bluegrass, Americana and old fashioned hillbilly music. Different artist each week. Includes 50 cents off Jack Daniels. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

On Stage - Comedy DeRay Davis, 8 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, African-American comedian and actor. Special engagement. No coupons or passes accepted. Ages 18 and up. $22. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

On Stage - Theater Tuesdays with Morrie, 8 p.m., Stained Glass Theatre, 802 York St., Comedic autobiographical story of Mitch Albom, accomplished journalist driven solely by his career, and Morrie Schwartz, his former college professor. $20. Presented by Footlighters Inc.. Through March 17. 859-652-3849; www.footlighters.org. Newport.

Recreation Aerial Fitness, 6-7 p.m., Locomotion on the Levee, 1 Levee Way, Work on core body strength and endurance and use aerial equipment for workout. Rigorous course suitable for all fitness levels. Ages 18 and up. $15. Presented by Cincinnati Circus Company. 513-921-5454; www.cincinnaticircus.com. Newport.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Simple ingredients make a delicious quiche The only reason we keep chickens is to get fresh eggs. I grew up eating eggs just about every day, especially on school days. And eggs are so versatile. If I have eggs in the refrigerator, I feel like I’ve got a meal, no matter how lean the budget or how bare the pantry. Think Rita about this: Heikenfeld Eggs are all natural, and RITA’S KITCHEN one egg has lots of vitamins and minerals with only about 70 calories. The nutrients in eggs can play a role in weight management, muscle strength, healthy pregnancy, brain function, eye health and more. Eggs got a bad rap a few years ago but now health professionals are back on the egg bandwagon – just don’t overdo eating them. One of the first table foods we feed the babies for breakfast are eggs. The protein in eggs is the highest-quality protein found in any food.

Simple quiche

Sometimes we forget about the really easy meals. Quiche is one of those. Most of us have eggs, onions and cheese on hand and those ingredients alone, with milk added, make a delicious quiche. When I want to make the quiche special, I

use whipping cream. Now be sure to mince the onions very small so they cook well. Otherwise, just sauté them in a bit of butter until they’re translucent before adding to the egg mixture. I got the original recipe, before I adapted it, from a food magazine, but can’t recall which one. 9- or 10-inch pie pan lined with pie dough 10-12 slices bacon, crisply fried and crumbled (optional, but so good) 1 heaping cup shredded Swiss cheese (or your favorite, try extra sharp cheddar) 1 ⁄3 cup minced onions 4 large eggs, room temperature 2 cups whipping cream, half and half or milk About 1 teaspoon salt and 1⁄2 teaspoon pepper

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sprinkle bacon, cheese and onion in pan. Whisk eggs well and whisk in cream and seasonings. Pour into pan. Pour mixture into pie pan. Bake 45-60 minutes or until knife inserted 1 inch from edge comes out clean.

Tips from Rita’s kitchen

Substitute about 1 cup chopped ham or 1⁄2 pound cooked sausage for the bacon. A few dashes cayenne pepper are good in here. If crust browns too much before quiche is done, make a “collar” of foil around the crust.

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Whisk sugar, flour and baking soda together. Add vanilla, eggs and pineapple and blend well. Stir in nuts Pour into sprayed 9-inch by 13-inch pan. Bake in preheated 350 degree oven for 35-40 minutes until toothpick inserted in center comes out fairly clean. Don’t overbake. Cool, and frost with cream cheese icing. Serves 12 generously.

Nutritious combined with simple ingredients add up to an easy meal. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Pineapple crunch cake

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

Don’t look for a high and fluffy cake here. This is a moist, dense cake that keeps well in the refrigerator. Yes, it’s even better the next day. I’ve tweaked the recipe through the years and now add more vanilla than I used to. I like to toast my pecans in a 350 degree oven for about 8 minutes or so, until they smell fragrant, before chopping. You don’t have to toast the nuts, though. Now if you don’t add nuts, just call it pineapple cake. This is a yummy snacking cake.

By tossing nuts with a bit of flour, they will remain suspended in the cake and not sink to the bottom. Cream cheese icing

⁄2 stick butter or margarine, softened 8 oz, cream cheese, softened 1 to 11⁄2 cups confectioners sugar 2 teaspoons vanilla 1

Beat butter and cream cheese. Add sugar and vanilla. Blend. Frost cooled cake. Sprinkle on nuts if using.

2 large eggs, room temperature, lightly beaten 2 cups sugar 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 teaspoons baking soda 1 tablespoon vanilla 1 ⁄2 to 1 cup chopped pecans mixed with a little of the flour (optional) 1 20 oz. can unsweetened, undrained, crushed pineapple Extra chopped pecans for garnish

SUMMER FUN IS CALLING

Making store-bought icing taste like homemade Check out my blog for this tip. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

FISH FRY GUIDE MARCH St. Mary Parish Fish Fry 4:30-7:30 p.m., Friday, March 1, at St. Mary, 8246 East Main St., Alexandria. Dine-in and carryout. Dinners start at $8.

Standard Club Fish Fry 5-8 p.m. Friday, March 8, at 643 Laurel St., Covington. Cost is $6 a fish sandwich; $4 grilled cheese; $4 fish sandwich only. Beer will be available for $1 until 7 p.m.

Mary, Queen of Heaven Parish Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 1130 Donaldson Hwy., Erlanger. Supports Mary, Queen of Heaven School. Visit http://bit.ly/ bGGAmI. Dine in or call for carryout, 859-371-2622.

Alexandria Masonic Lodge Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at the Alexandria Masonic Lodge at the corner of U.S. 27 and Pete Neiser Drive. Dine in and carry out. Cost is $7 for adults; $5 children. Fish sandwich available for $4. Call 859760-5782.

Wilder Firefighters Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at Wilder City Building, 520 Licking Pike, Wilder. Dine-in and carryout. Dinners cost $7. Call 431-5884.

St. Thomas Parish Fish Fry 4-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at St. Thomas School cafeteria, 428 South Fort Thomas Ave., Fort Thomas. Cost is $6.50 for fish dinner; $6 shrimp; and $1.50 slice of pizza. Call 859-572-4641.

FISH FRY TIME To have your fish fry information included, send the time, date, place, cost and contact information to Melissa Stewart at mstewart@nky.com or Community Recorder, 228 Grandview Drive, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017. 1-29, at 5011 Four Mile Road, Silver Grove. Cost is $6.75 for dinner, $7.50 frog legs ($8.75 dinner); $5 sandwiches. Call 859-441-6251.

St. Augustine Church Lenten Fish Fry 4-7 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at 1840 Jefferson Ave., Covington. Cost is $6.50 fish dinners; $ baked fish or salmon and shrimp. Call 859-431-3943.

Burlington Lodge No. 264 Fish Fry 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at 7072 Pleasant Valley Road, Florence. Cost is $9 a dinner; $1 beverages; $2 desserts; $5 sandwich; $5 children (includes brownie and beverage). Call 859-7463225 or 859-689-4328.

Newport Elks Lodge No. 273 Fish Fry 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March 1-22, at 3704 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring. Cost is $8.50 for dine-in and $8.75 carryout. Call 859-441-1273 for carryout.

Covington Firefighters Annual Fish Fry 5-8 p.m. Fridays, March 1-29, at Covington Firefighters Hall, West 23rd and Howell streets, Peaselburg.

Silver Grove Volunteer Fire Association Fish Fry 4-7:30 p.m. Fridays, March

Take a

STRONG HOLD

of who you want to be.

SUMMER DAY CAMPS

Your neighborhood YMCA has been providing outstanding day camps and specialty programs for boys and girls, ages 2-15, for generations. Located in neighborhoods across Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, the camps provide the perfect settings to appreciate nature, build skills, create memories, and establish friendships that will last a lifetime. Visit any YMCA of Greater Cincinnati on March 2 and we’ll waive your reigstration fee. Visit the website www.MyY.org or call (513) 362-YMCA to learn more!

Weight management focused around your needs.

YMCA CAMP ERNST

Steeped in tradition and built on the YMCA values of caring, honesty, respect, and responsibility, Camp Ernst hosts overnight campers who enjoy top notch counselors, making new friends, and doing a wide variety of activities including zip-line, banana boat, 100 foot waterslide, giant swing, horseback riding, the BLOB, and much more! Come see for yourself at our Open House Sundays: March 3, April 7, and May 5, from 1 p.m. - 4 p.m. Visit the website www.MyYcamp.org or call (859) 586-6181 to learn more!

At St. Elizabeth Weight Management Center, we understand that every patient is unique; that’s why our programs are focused around your needs. We’re a multi-disciplinary center with specialists trained to help you decide the weight management route that’s best for you, whether it’s bariatric surgery or a medically managed program. For more information, please visit us online at

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stelizabeth.com/weightmanagementcenter or call 859-212-GOAL(4625).


LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Watch for insurance rate hikes

Natural disasters around the country and here in the Tristate are leading to higher insurance premiums. Although the Ohio Department Howard of InsurAin ance says HEY HOWARD! auto and homeowner’s insurance rates are among the lowest in the country, increases are coming. The Cincinnati Insurance Board tells me increases can be expected

from more and more insurance companies – and rate hikes up to 30 percent are not uncommon. Wanda Human of Reading said she had been noticing her insurance premiums going up for the past year and a half. It began with her auto insurance. “$341 every six months was very satisfactory. I dealt with it when it went to $395 every six months but when you go up to $514 every six months, come on that’s kind of ridiculous,” Human said. Human called her

insurance agent and was told it was due to Hurricane Sandy and the destruction it caused on the east coast. Human said that came as quite a surprise. “I was told if a disaster happened in your state you could see the rates going up in that state, but not the whole entire United States ... The insurance agent explained to me that she had received many, many calls about this. I said, ‘Are a lot of people dropping you?’ and she said, ‘Yes, they are.’” In addition to her auto insurance, Human says

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she’s seen her homeowner’s premiums going up. She had it renewed once and has seen the premium go from $790 to $981 – almost a $200 increase – and that was even before the east coast storm. In talking with her insurance agent Human says she’s learned her rate hikes aren’t unusual. “She said that there are some increases of 30 percent on some people, people who hadn’t even filed any claims,” Human said. Human says she’s decided to switch to another insurance company. I told her that’s fine

but when she switches she needs to make a change in her deductible. I found her auto insurance policy has a very low $250 deductible. Human said she didn’t think that would be a problem – until now. I told her she can reduce her premium by increasing her deductible from $250 to $500. When it comes to Human’s homeowner’s insurance policy, she can decrease that premium by increasing her deductible to $1,000. Remember, filing a homeowner’s insurance claim will go against

Community Recorder

Art and food come together once again as The Carnegie hosts the opening reception for the seventh annual Art of Food

exhibition 6-9 p.m. Friday, March 1. The exhibition examines the world of food as demonstrated by the culinary inspired creations of local artists and top chefs from across Northern

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Kentucky and Greater Cincinnati. During the opening attendees will have the opportunity to sample edible creations by more than 20 of the area’s top chefs while feasting their eyes on the culinary-inspired artistic works of artists such as Kelly Romer Armstrong, Eric Brass and Leah Busch. Cost to attend The Art of Food opening reception is $25 for Carnegie Members and $40 general admission, in advance; $35 for Carnegie Members and $50 for non-members, at the door. Call 859-9571940. Admission to view the artwork on display in The Art of Food is free after opening night and open to the public Monday through Thursday, March 4-21. Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday and noon-3 p.m. Friday. The Carnegie will be closed Saturday, March 2.

General Admission:$6 Kids under 12: free

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Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Artists, chefs celebrate the art of food March 1

Sharonville Convention Center, Rm 109 Both are excellent opportunities for individuals seeking continuing education credits.

your record and your policy could be canceled if you have too many claims. Therefore, depending on the size of your house, it may even pay you to increase your deductible to $3,000. After all, homeowners insurance is really only designed to cover major losses so it often doesn’t pay to file a claim if the damage is less than $3,000.

Ottos Restaurant staff members Iza McIlvain, Jesse Kramer and Darren Parr man their table at last year’s Art of Food opening reception. THANKS TO SHANNAN BOYER

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

Marsie’s Menagerie: Dog show memories

Here’s a photo of me with my first dog, Zero Amy at the 1968 Girl Scout-a-Bout held on the football field of Highlands High School in Fort Thomas. There was a dog show and Zero won first place in the costume division dressed as a bumble bee. My mother, Marsie Hall Toy Hall, the Newbold Edith Head of Sterling AveMARSIE’S MENAGERIE nue, designed the costume that featured net wings, a yellow tutu and pipe cleaner antenna. If you look really close, you can even see a little stinger sticking up above her tail. Oh, yes, my mother has always been a stick-ler for detail. This was our second foray into dog show-dom that summer and we were feeling pretty unstoppable. Sort of the way that Taylor Swift must about now. And who could blame us? After all, we were coming off the heady experience of taking first prize in the costume division, then going all the way to Best in Show at the Ken-L-Ration Kid’s Dog Show in the parking lot of Kroger in Fort Thomas. That win came complete with a blue ribbon, trophy, an art kit that came in a black, plastic briefcase, $10 coupons good for free dog food and the right to represent the

Marsie Hall Newbold with her first dog at the 1968 Girl Scout a-Bout held at Highlands High School. THANKS TO MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD

Fort Thomas Kroger at the regional Ken-L-Ration Kid’s Dog Show competition at Coney Island. That meant that Zero got to go to Coney Island with my mother, dad and me. Actually as we are fond of saying, Zero took us to Coney Island. Now, being a dog and all, she couldn’t ride the rides, but they did let her into the park. That was a really big novelty. Now, I’m digressing, but since this is my column and I can write what I want, let me ask you this: Do you remember when you were a kid and a dog would somehow get into the school and run around? It was a really big

deal... at least at Robert D. Johnson Grade School. We thought it was the coolest thing ever. The dog would dart into the classroom with our janitor, Uncle Louis, hot in pursuit! We would laugh and cheer and stomp our feet like the audience on American Idol. But, why was this? It wasn’t as though none of us had never seen a dog before. Most of us had one or two waiting for us at home. But a dog in school... wow! Now, that... that was just out of context enough to have us buzzing for the rest of the day. Back to Coney Island... Zero didn’t win at the

“bigs.” My 6-year-old self was kind of miffed about it, but from where I sit the whole thing was a success because it is one my most prized memories because we were invited back to Coney Island to participate again for several years after that. Maybe that’s why to this day, I get a special joy out of taking Nosey anywhere that you don’t usually get to take your dog. Don’t tell the folks at the Starlite that we put Nosey on the floor next to my feet, cover her head with a blanket, stuff her mouth with chicken tenders to keep her quiet and pull up to the ticket window where there is a large sign saying: “no pets” with the radio blasting and practically toss exact payment into the cashier’s hands before speeding off to the very back row, because I don’t think they’d like it. And guess what? Since I’ve been writing this column, I’ve been invited to emcee and serve as a judge at close to a dozen local “Just for Fun” dog shows. My life has come full-circle! For more Marsie’s Menagerie, visit www.marsiesmenagerie.com. If you have any ideas for future stories please contact Marsie Hall Newbold at marsolete@insightbb.com. MARSIE HALL NEWBOLD IS A RESIDENT OF HIGHLAND HEIGHTS.

IN THE SERVICE Paul graduates recruit training

Marine Corps Pvt. Justin D. Paul, son of Martha Chomyszak of Alexandria and Craig Paul of Harrison, Ohio, earned the title of U.S. Marine after graduating from recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C. For13 weeks, Paul stayed committed during some of the world’s most demanding entry-level military training in order to be transformed from civilian to Marine instilled with pride, discipline and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Training subjects included close-order drill, marksmanship with an M-16A4 rifle, physical fitness, martial arts, swimming, military history, customs and courtesies. One week prior to graduation, Paul endured The Crucible, a 54-hour final test of recruits’ minds and bodies. Upon completion, recruits are presented the Marine Corps emblem and called Marines for the first time.

Eberle graduates recruit training

Marine Corps Pvt. Derek A. Eberle, son of Tina M. Menke of Cold Spring and Robert W. Eberle of New Richmond, Ohio, earned the title of U.S. Marine after graduating from recruit training at Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island, S.C. For 13 weeks, Eberle stayed committed during some of the world’s most demanding entry-level military training in order to be transformed from civilian to Marine instilled with pride, discipline and the core values of honor, courage and commitment. Training subjects included close-order drill, marksmanship with an M-16A4 rifle, physical fitness, martial arts, swimming, military history, customs and courtesies. One week prior to graduation, Eberle endured The Crucible, a 54hour final test of recruits’ minds and bodies. Upon completion, recruits are presented the Marine Corps emblem and called Marines for the first time.

One of America’s 50 Best Hospitals seven years running Healthgrades™ 1A( &96='&+69 .'/ 0"&<A>6'1 &= '16&3 annual listing of America’s 50 Best Hospitals for the seventh consecutive year. This prestigious, independent award ranks us among '16 ':8 ,- &= '16 =A'&:= 4:3 :$63A"" ;"&=&;A" 6!;6""6=;6/

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EDGEWOOD


LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Experience St. John’s Bible Some seeds keep several years Community Recorder

Thomas More College will host The St. John’s Bible 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 20. Guest speaker will be Tim Ternes, director of The St. John’s Bible, who will present “From Inspiration to Illumination, an Introduction to The St. John’s Bible” in the Student Center. The Saint John’s Bible is the first handwritten, illuminated Bible commissioned since the advent of the printing press. It was commissioned in 1998 by the Benedictine monks of St. John’s Abbey and University “to ignite the spiri-

A two-page spread of Seven Pillars of Wisdom in the Wisdom Books. THANKS TO TERRY ANDERSON PHOTOGRAPHY

tual imagination of believers throughout the world and to illuminate the word of God for a new millennium.” Through video, reproductions and rich visual images, attendees at the lecture will be guided

through the story of The St. John’s Bible. Guests will learn about the processes, tools, methods and materials behind the making of The St. John’s Bible, as well as explore several artworks through guided imagery discussions. Participants are invited to examine vellum samples and a quill, and see large reproductions of several entire volumes, including Pentateuch, Wisdom Books and Gospels and Acts, the three volumes that are on display at Thomas More College through September courtesy of the Hillenmeyer Family and the Ketteler Family Memorial.

NOW IS THE TIME FOR A LOW COST REFINANCE! VICTORY Community Bank 15 YEAR FIXED RATE

30 YEAR FIXED RATE

6 2.875%/2.921 1%APR* 3.625 /3.656 $ 00 %

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APR is Annual Percentage Rate. Terms and Conditions Apply - APR referenced above is guidance and is based on available rates as of Feb 15, 2013 for a 30—year fixed rate and a 15 year fixed rate refinance, a loan amount of $250,000 in Kentucky, at least 20% equity in the subject property, a single-family home, primary residence, minimum 720 credit score and verifiable income for the borrower(s) with a total Debt-to-income ratio below 38%. An Escrow account for property taxes is required. Rates mentioned in any advertising are guidance and are based on a sampling of available rates. Specific rates and terms offered to our applicants may vary. Rates are subject to change daily without notice. Not available in all states.The Principal and Interest payment on a $250,000 loan at 3.625% 30 year fixed rate is $1,140.13/month and 15 year fixed rate at 2.875% is $1,711.46/month. CE-0000546124

A special conference for parents, educators and families! Are you interested in outdoor play, getting your child ready to read or how your child learns through play? Well, these topics and dozens more will be covered at the fifth annual Learning Through Play conference on March 2, 2013. But this isn’t your typical “conference.” You can bring your kids! We have many family interactive sessions where your children can create art, learn about insects or sign and dance while you learn how these activities are important for your child’s development. Our popular event also consists of a free Information Fair, held in our Rotunda and open to the public, where you can meet with representatives from more than thirty local organizations dedicated to educating and supporting young learners and families. For full descriptions of each session visit cincymuseum.org/learningthroughplay. Sessions range from $15 to $25 and parking is $6.

Promotional Partner:

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Question: I have some old vegetable seeds left from 2012 and 2011. Will they still grow, or should I throw them out and buy all new seeds? Answer: When properly stored, most vegetable seeds will remain viable, or able to germinate, for three or more years, including tomato, carrot, pumpkin, cucumber and cabbage. However, a few vegetables (spinach, onion, and sweet corn) produce seeds that remain viable for less than two to three years. Thus, it’s best to buy fresh seeds of these vegetables every year or two. It’s easy to check the viability of vegetable seeds that are more than one year old by using the “rag doll test.” Simply wrap 10 to

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SERVICE TIME Sunday, 10:45 a.m.

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720 York St., Newport KY 41071 859-581-4244 Pastor: Gordon Milburn Sunday School: 9:30 am Sunday Morning Worship: 10:30 am Sun. & Wed. Eve Service: 6:00 pm

20 seeds from each packet in a paper towel that’s moist, but not dripping wet. Mike Roll or Klahr fold the HORTICULTURE paper CONCERNS towels to enclose the seeds and put towels in a sealed, air-tight plastic bag. Put a label in with the seedcontaining paper towels, or mark the outside of the plastic bag. Put the plastic bags in a warm area where the temperature will range from 70 to 80 degrees Fahrenheit. Viable seed should germinate in one to two weeks. If 75 percent or more of the seeds germinate from any given packet, plant those normally as you would in the garden. It’s still okay to use seeds if about 50 percent germinate from a packet. However, you might want to use twice as many seeds as normal to make up for the lower germination rate. If 30 percent or fewer of the seeds in a packet germinate, it’s best to order or buy fresh seeds. If you depend on a good harvest from some major crops such as snap beans, sweet corn, butternut squash or pickling cucumbers, it’s probably wise to plant a mixture of new and old seeds. Buying some extra fresh seed is cheap insurance that

COMING UP Pruning Fruit Trees and Other Fruits: 1-3:30 p.m. Friday, March 8, starts indoors at the Boone County Extension Office, Burlington, then drive cars to a local orchard for actual outdoor pruning demonstration. Dress for the weather. Call 859-5866101 to register, or enroll online at www.ca.uky.edu/boone.

you’ll have fresh produce available when you’re ready to preserve it. If you have some vegetable seeds remaining from this growing season, the following tips will help you keep them viable for next year’s garden. Storage conditions are very important to maintain high germination rates of leftover seeds. Try to keep seeds as dry as possible. Although refrigeration isn’t necessary, keeping seeds cool, but not freezing, also will prolong their lives. Enclose packets of seeds in an air-tight sealed container such as a glass jar or plastic food storage container to keep them dry and protect against insect infestations and rodent feeding. Put an inch of dried powdered milk in the bottom of the jar to absorb any moisture that might be present. Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.


LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

EXPLORING THE FIRE DEPARTMENT

The Cold Spring Fire Department hosts the Cub Scouts Den 3 and Den 1 from Pack 86. THANKS TO SHARI LECKY

Reducing your energy costs devices use electricity when plugged into an outlet whether or not they Diane are in use Mason or chargEXTENSION ing. NOTES The easiest way to reduce phantom energy use is to unplug these products when they are not needed. Sometimes this is easier said than done, especially if you regularly use the product. If you find yourself in that situation, consider purchasing a smart power strip to manage a group of electronics or a conserve power switch for small appliances. Smart power strips are equipped with control outlets, switched outlets and constant outlets. The control outlets manage much of the power coming into

the strip. When you plug a device into a control outlet and it goes into sleep mode, the strip will cut off the power to it and other devices placed on the switched outlets. The constant, or hot, outlet continuously provides power only to the product plugged into it. This is beneficial if you have devices like a fax machine or digital video recorder (DVR) that need to stay on regardless. Smart power strips are available at office supply stores and supercenters. Conserve power switches are handy if you find it cumbersome to unplug all your small appliances or electronics after each use. These have an on/off switch that you can flip to control the power to a device, so you’re not constantly plugging and unplugging your appliances or electronics. These switches are

available online. Reducing phantom energy use is one way to become more energy efficient. If you’re interested in learning about other ways to manage your home energy use, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service has a program to teach you how to use an online home energy self-assessment tool. This tool can help you understand how your home uses energy. For more information on this program contact our office at 859-5866101 or your local Cooperative Extension Service office.

Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.

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Energy costs fluctuate throughout the year, since much of our heating and cooling usage depends on Mother Nature. However, you can make your home more energy efficient and reduce some of your energy expenses by locating and switching off sources of phantom energy in your home. Plugged-in devices that are not performing their primary duty but still using electricity are said to use phantom energy. Phantom energy users include many products that have a standby mode, such as microwaves, coffee makers and similar products that constantly display the time. Devices with remote controls, external power supplies and battery chargers are other examples of phantom energy culprits. These include televisions, cell phone chargers and cordless phones. These

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Offering words to encourage

A few weeks ago, I had the blessing and opportunity to speak with four very different (or so I thought) groups of people throughout the week. Although the situations were unique, my overall goal was the same: to inspire or motivate each group on some level. Within the varying groups were a small group of inner city teen girls at risk for becoming overweight; 15 kindergarten and first-grade students ready to take on a season of cheerleading (most for the first time); men and women living

with the all-consuming challenge of homelessness; and to close the Julie House week, COMMUNITY nearly RECORDER GUEST COLUMNIST 100 children, teens and adults. What became so interesting, in hindsight was not how different the groups were, but the similarities they shared. I would learn throughout that week, that no matter

the situation; homeless or sleeping inside a warm home; addicted to drugs or alcohol, overweight or seemingly healthy, all of us long, more than almost anything, to be understood. Young girls struggling with their weight want someone to understand that it’s hard to eat healthy. Fifteen 5-yearolds just want to be noticed and told how well they’re doing. Men and women living with homelessness just want someone to acknowledge them and their hurts and pains. Teens, just want someone

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I TRY TO CALL ON ALL OF US TO BE OUR BETTER SELVES. TO GIVE US A VISION OF WHO – ON OUR BEST DAY – WE CAN BE. Cincinnatians get it. They’re not bystanders. When they see a need, they step up to help, again and again and again. It’s what I love most about them. From bags of reader mail and impromptu grocery store chats to Twitter & Facebook posts, readers are right there with me developing each story. That tells me I’m exactly where I’m meant to be.

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to understand them and their unique struggles. More than anything, I was struck by the one gesture that seemed to instantly transform a hurting person. A hug. A hug throughout the week said, “You will be OK. You are loved. You are doing great. I want to help. I want to listen.” Without words, (which are sometimes hard to come by) a hug can lift a person’s guilt, change their perspective and offer them hope and direction. This is exactly what I was called to do. As my family recently celebrated the fourth anni-

versary of my brother’s heavenly birthday, I long to remember and share the message I was taught by his life and death (and he lived with homelessness and severe alcoholism.) It is not my place to judge, preach, or force someone into a new lifestyle or new way of thinking. I was put here on this earth to love. The Bible says, “You must love the Lord your God with all your heart, all your soul, all your strength, and all your mind. And, love your neighbor as yourself. Do this and you will live.” Luke 10:27 and 28.

So many of us struggle to love those that hurt us, and words in the past have only made situations worse. This week as you are encountered with people who are struggling, and you fight to find the right words to say, give up the fight, and remember, all it takes is a hug. Julie House is a resident of Independence, and founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christian based health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 802-8965.

Leaders unite to support education, literacy Community Recorder

In November nearly 200 city, county, business and education leaders came together at the Northern Kentucky Chamber of Commerce’s Mayors for Education Government Forum to focus on early childhood literacy. According to national research, it is estimated that one in six children who are not reading proficiently in third grade do not graduate from high school on time, a rate four times greater than that for proficient readers. In Cincinnati and

Northern Kentucky, more than 2,500 third-grade students are not reading on grade level by the end of the school year. Following the event, local elected officials signed a pledge to support Read On. Collectively, local leaders have agreed to: » Advocate. Raise public awareness and concern about the importance of third grade reading proficiency. » Cultivate. Cultivate a culture of attendance and encourage broad community engagement and sustained civic action. » Participate. Support

volunteer, tutoring, coaching and parent engagement strategies that help improve reading proficiency. » Connect. Help connect existing local resources and community stakeholders with schools. Read On is a multiyear, multi-dimensional campaign to improve early literacy in Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky, encompassing seven counties and 19 public school districts. The campaign is managed by the Northern Kentucky Education Council and the Strive Partnership.

STRIKE UP A CONVERSATION WITH ME IN THE GROCERY STORE OR VIA FACEBOOK. I CAN’T WAIT TO HEAR YOUR STORY. Connect with KRISTA RAMSEY kramsey@enquirer.com facebook.com/krista.ramsey.52

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LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

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LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

POLICE REPORTS ALEXANDRIA ARRESTS/CITATIONS

John E. Ruthman Jr., 54, 11360 Washington Trace Drive, speeding, DUI - first offense at AA Highway and Ridgewood Drive, Jan. 22. Nathan E. Futrell, 27, 700 Brentwood Lane #S, DUI - first offense - aggravated circumstances at Alexandria Pike and Viewpoint Drive, Jan. 26. Christopher M. Hughes, 28, 488 Union St. #1, second degree possession of controlled substance - codeine, prescription controlled substance not in proper container - first offense at 375 Crossroads Blvd., Jan. 28.

Incidents/investigations Second degree terroristic threatening Students reported overhearing another student make statement he "was going to bring a gun to school and rave it up."

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS The Community Recorder publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence.

at 8000 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 24. Report of juvenile threatened to kill another juvenile with a knife or gun at 8000 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 31. Theft by unlawful taking Report of DVDs and other items taken from two vehicles in driveway at 11 Cedarview Drive, Jan. 23. Report of money taken from business by ex-employee at 8109 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 22. Report of heater taken from construction site at 113 Jefferson St. S, Jan. 21. Theft of identity of another without consent Report of money taken from bank account at 13 Rosewood Court N, Jan. 21. Third degree criminal mischief Report of shoe polish used to scribble obscenities on body and windows of vehicles at 21 Broadfield Court, Jan. 20. Report of shoe polish markings left on vehicles in subdivision with obscene language at Brookwood Drive between Ridgewood and Ashwood, Jan. 20. Report of markings left in chalk on vehicle in parking lot at 6711 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 20. Report of juvenile caught flooding bathroom sink with paper towels at 8000 Alexandria Pike, Jan. 28. Third degree terroristic threatening - domestic

Legal Notice Surplus Property - Request for Bids The Campbell County Board of Education will accept sealed bids at the Central Office, 101 Orchard Lane, Alexandria, Kentucky until 10:00 a.m. on Thursday, March 7, 2013, at which time they will be opened and read aloud for the sale of following surplus equipment: Used Computer Processors The contract(s) will be awarded to the highest and/or best bidder. All bidders must use approved forms and base their bids on specifications that are available at the Board of Education’s Central Office. The Board of Education reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Bids should be sent to Susan Bentle, Finance Director, Campbell County Board of Education, 101 Orchard Lane, Alexandria, KY 41001. 1750395 NOTICE TO BIDDERS City of Crestview, Kentucky The City of Crestview will accept sealed bids until March 5, 2013 at 7:00 p.m., local time at which time they will be opened and read aloud in the City Building, for concrete repair on Dorothy Drive. Plans and specifications for this work are available from Kyle Sparks at ksparks64@hotmail.com. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids and accept the lowest and best bid. Publish ed February 27,2013 in the Campbell County Recorder. 1750225 CITY OF CRESTVIEW CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE ___ 2013-01_______ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF CREST VIEW, RETAINING THE HONORABLE JAMES A. DALEY AS ATTORNEY FOR THE CITY OF CRESTVIEW CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY WHEREAS, for from time to time, and during the monthly meetings of the Commission for the City of Crestview, Kentucky, it is necessa ry to employ the services of legal counsel advice on certain matters; BE IT ORDAINED BY THE CITY OF CRESTVIEW, KENTUCKY: SECTION I That James A. Daley, Attorney at Law, licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, shall be, and is hereby retained as City Attorney for the City of Crestview, Campbell County, Kentucky. He shall be paid the sum of $350.00 per month. This sum shall be for a minimum of two hours. Any and all other time shall be billed at $150.00 per hour. For this sum he shall attend all regular city commission meetings or have an attorney attend in his place. The City Attorney, shall in addition to the sum listed above, be paid the sum of $150.00 per hour for all additional time as billed. It is recognized that from time to time the City attorney is requested to attend meetings and perform other functions for the City. While performing these functions he shall be paid the sum of $150.00 dollars per hour. SECTION III This payment ordinance shall begin January 1, 2013 and terminate on December 31, 2014. SECTION IV This ordinance shall be signed by the Mayor, attested by the City Clerk, recorded, and published. The same shall be in effect at the earliest time provided by law. FIRST READING: SECOND READING: ADOPTED:

Jan. 15, 2013 Feb, 19, 2013 Feb. 19, 2013

SIGNED:____________________________ C. J. Peters, Mayor ATTESTED:__________________________ Max Dawson, Clerk 1750224

Reported at at Greenup Street, Jan. 29.

BELLEVUE Arrests/citations Elanor Combs, 24, 16 Arbor Circle Apt. 1622, possession of heroin, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia, disorderly conduct at 100 block of Fairfield Ave., Feb. 2. Lorenzo Angeles, 29, 147 Oneida, second degree burglary, first degree criminal trespassing, first degree criminal mischief at 137 Center St., Feb. 3. Janis Anderson, 43, 654 West Miller, possession of heroin at 258 Foote Ave., Feb. 6. Terry Martin, 41, 258 Foote Ave., possession of heroin, tampering with physical evidence at 258 Foote Ave., Feb. 6. Donald Rardin, 19, 446 Clark St., theft by unlawful taking at 446 Clark St., Feb. 18. Herbert Bishop Jr., 50, 10935 Timerwood Lane, careless driving, DUI, possession of open alcohol container in a motor vehicle, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license at I-471 north, Feb. 4. Dwayne Rusk, 23, 2147 Hannaford Ave., driving on a suspended license, DUI, possession of synthetic cannabinoid agonist or piperazines, possession of drug paraphernalia at Dave Cowens Drive, Feb. 2. Forrester Walton, 19, 808 Sixth Ave., DUI at Sixth Avenue, Feb.

2. Gary Chenault Jr., 23, 2126 Kindel Ave., trafficking marijuana, DUI, possession of an open alcohol container in a motor vehicle, possession of drug paraphernalia at Fairfield Avenue, Feb. 3. Delbert Honaker, 32, 615 Clay St., theft by unlawful taking at 615 Clay St., Feb. 8. John Greely, 40, 424 Berry Ave., fourth degree assault at 424 Berry Ave., Feb. 9. Preston Akemon, 18, 330 Lindsey, theft by unlawful taking at 53 Donnermeyer Drive, Feb. 10. Nicholas Wrobleski, 24, 903 Sixth Ave., DUI at Donnermeyer Drive, Feb. 10. Warner Kroth, 48, 615 Fairfield Ave., fourth degree assault at 615 Fairfield Ave., Feb. 13. Billy Dowell, 31, 108 Ward Ave., alcohol intoxication in a public place at 125 Ward Ave., Feb. 14. Stanley Fisk, 49, 634 Scott, warrant at Berry at Donnermeyer, Feb. 14. Jamie Rasnick, 39, 209 West 13th St. No. 4, third degree trespassing at Fairfield Avenue, Feb. 18. Curtis Anderson Jr., 27, Foote Avenue, warrant at Foote Avenue, Feb. 17. Jeffrey Courtney, 43, 724 Covert Run Pike No. 3, alcohol intoxication in a public place at 724 Covert Run, Feb. 17. Helen Gross, 33, 4107 Houston Ave., warrant at 114 Memorial Parkway, Feb. 1. Timothy Strickley, 52, 304 Eden Ave., warrant at 200 block of

Request For Proposals The Housing Authority of Newport (HAN) is Requesting Proposals for specific Realty services. In brief, HAN is seeking a qualified firm or individual to engage in Realty services to HAN and its entities in the advertising, promotion and selling of up to four homeownership units. Requests for Proposals are due no later than 12:00 p.m., local time, March 22, 2013, at the offices of the Housing Authority of Newport, located at 30 East 8th St. Newport, KY 41071. The RFP packet may be obtained by contact Randy Schweinsger at 859-581-2533, 217, by email at rschweinzger ext @neighborhood foundations.com or may be downloaded from the HAN website at www.neighborhoodfoundations.com. The hearing and/or speech-impaired may call our TDD line at (859) 581-3181. The Housing Authority of Newport reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposal, and to should it be reject any/all proposals deemed in the best interest of The Housing Authority of Newport to do so. It is the intent of The Housing Authority of Newport to award a contract to the lowest responsible and responsive bidder. The Housing Authority of Newport, Kentucky is an Equal 1001750382 Opportunity Employer.

Request for Qualifications for Professional Services OHIO RIVER PUMPING STATION NO. 2 CONDITION ASSESSMENT AND OPTIONS EVALUATION The Northern Kentucky Water District is requesting qualifications statements for professional services relating to the condition assessment and evaluation of options for its raw water pumping station. RESPONSES WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (OWNER) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: March 15, 2013 Time: 2:00 p.m. local time

The purpose of this Request for Qualifications is to solicit qualifications for these services and to identify a shortlist of firms to receive a Request for Proposal. The selected firms will be offered a contract with possible extensions for future phases. Copies of the Request for Qualifications may be obtained from the District’s office at the address indicated herein or by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. It may be downloaded from the website at www.nkywater.org. There is no charge for these documents. Each submitted response will be reviewed and rated by the District’s Selection Advisory Committee and a recommendation will be made to the District’s Board. The District reserves the right to reject any or all responses. Minority firms are encouraged to respond. Richard Harrison, V.P. Engineering, Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 0196

Union, Feb. 11.

FORT THOMAS Arrests/citations Steven Ferguson Jr., 22, 4811 East Indian Trail, warrant at I-471, Feb. 16. Matthew Couch, 29, 2306 Haven Drive, warrant at I-471, Feb. 15. Steven Reynolds, 44, 508 Rosemont Ave., DUI, leaving the scene of an accident at 115 Grand Ave., Feb. 17. Shauntez Pettus, 21, 921 Central Parkway, warrant at North Grand Avenue, Feb. 15. Robert Messer, 34, 1126 Fourth Ave., warrant at 830 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 18. Courtney Roberts, 21, 3226 Charter Oak, first degree possession of a controlled substance at North Grand Avenue, Feb. 18. Adam Vender, 23, 139 Green Hill Drive, first degree possession of a controlled substance at North Grand Avenue, Feb. 18. David Parker, 25, 28 Home St. First Floor, first degree possession of a controlled substance at North Grand Avenue, Feb. 18. Tonya Skeens, 34, 953 Meadowland Drive, first degree possession of a controlled substance at 85 North Grand Avenue, Feb. 18. Exar Gonzalez-Cruz, 35, 1010 Hamlet Apt. 1, DUI, failure to maintain insurance, no license, careless driving at I-471 south, Feb. 16. Gregory Pelphrey, 42, 40 Hollywoods Drive No. 5, warrant at 525 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 7. Tyler Weber, 22, 310 Macarthur Lane, DUI at Saratoga Street at Fourth Street, Feb. 10. Scott Haynes, 24, 1321 Alexandria Pike No. 105C, DUI, failure to maintain insurance, no registration plates at 800 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 9. Maram Safi, 39, 15 Lacresta Drive, warrant at I-471 north, Feb. 10. Clarence Smith, 39, 234 East Eighth St., alcohol intoxication in a public place at Grand Avenue, Feb. 10. Constance Moreaux, 38, 611 South Fort Thomas Ave. No. 2, alcohol intoxication in a public place at South Fort Thomas Avenue at Military Pike, Feb. 1

Incidents/investigations First degree criminal

mischief At 180 Stonewall Drive, Feb. 16. Second degree burglary At 31 Hollywoods Drive, Feb. 19. At 821 Highland Ave., Feb. 6. Theft by unlawful taking At 1907 North Fort Thomas Ave., Feb. 15. At 38 Tremont Ave., Feb. 8. At Tremont Avenue, Feb. 8. Theft of identity At 58 Grant St., Feb. 7. At Grand Avenue, Feb. 7. Highland Heights Arrests/citations Johnny Shields, 25, 2120 River Road, possession of drug paraphernalia, warrant at I-275 at I-471, Feb. 11. Brian Bonnick, 33, 93 Rose Ave., operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license, warrants at Lamphill at Noonan, Feb. 11. Gary Cheeks, 39, 923 Alvin St., warrant at I-275, Feb. 9. Ricky Collins, 32, 222 Lakeview Drive, warrant at 40 Bon Jan Lane, Feb. 9. Kenneth Schweinzger, 35, 2474 Cherry St., warrant at 40 Bon Jan Lane, Feb. 9. Jessica Godby, 29, 4394 Eastwood Drive Apt. 3114, operating a motor vehicle on a suspended license at I-275 at I-471, Feb. 8. Lyndsay Donaldson, 24, 1027 Winding Way, warrant at I-275 at I-471, Feb. 8. Mohammad Fayer Alshehri, 23, 232 Meadow Trail Drive, third degree criminal trespassing at 2557 Alexandria Pike, Feb. 8. Erin Clifford, 35, 3921 Mack Road Apt. 45, possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of marijuana at I-275 at I-471, Feb. 7. Marylyn Marie Wood, 29, 3027 Glenmore Ave. Apt. 2, first degree disorderly conduct at 5 Fifth Ave., Feb. 7. Corey Powell, 20, 6501 Black Forest Court, possession of drug paraphernalia, first degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 east, Feb. 6. Jacob Rose, 18, 3216 Eastwood Drive Apt. 4394, first degree possession of a controlled substance at I-275 east, Feb. 6. Joshua David Cremer, 30, 1250 Pleasant Field Road, warrant at I-275, Feb. 6. Incidents/investigations Criminal possession of a forged instrument At 303 Highland Trace, Feb. 11. Theft of mail matter At 2424 South Main St., Feb. 6.

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations for Campbell County, Kentucky and Incorporated Areas The Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency has issued a preliminary Flood Insurance Rate Map (FIRM), and where applicable, Flood Insurance Study (FIS) report, reflecting proposed flood hazard determinations within Campbell County, Kentucky and Incorporated Areas. These flood hazard determinations may include the addition or modification of Base Flood Elevations (BFEs), base flood depths, Special Flood Hazard Area boundaries or zone designations, or the regulatory floodway. Technical information or comments are solicited on the proposed flood hazard determinations shown on the preliminary FIS report and/or FIRM for Campbell County, Kentucky and Incorporated Areas. The preliminary FIRM and FIS report can be http://www.bakeraecom.com/index.php/ at viewed kentucky/campbell/. These flood hazard determinations are the basis for the floodplain management measures that your community is required to either adopt or show evidence of being already in effect in order to qualify or remain qualified for participation in the National Flood Insurance Program. However, before these determinations are effective for floodplain management purposes, you will be provided an opportunity to appeal the proposed information. For information on the statutory 90 day period provided for appeals, as well as a complete listing of the communities affected and the locations where copies of the FIRM are available for review, please visit FEMA’s website at http://www.fema.gov/plan/prevent/fhm/bfe, or call the FEMA Map Information eXchange (FMIX) toll free at 1-877-FEMA MAP (11001748896 877-336-2627). LEGAL NOTICE HIGHLAND HEIGHTS PLANNING & ZONING PUBLIC HEARING The City of Highland Heights Planning and Zoning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing on Tuesday, March 12, 2013 at 7:00pm at the City Building, 176 Johns Hill Road. THE PURPOSE OF THE PUBLIC HEARING IS TO REVIEW THE 2013 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN. The Public Hearing will be held for all interested parties to hear and present evidence relative to the above captioned application. If there is a need for the City to be aware of a specific disability, you are encouraged to contact the City Building at 859-441-8575 so that suitable arrangements can be considered prior to the date of the meeting. The City Office is open Monday - Friday 9:00am 5:00pm. The City will make every reasonable accommodation to assist a qualified disabled person in obtaining access to the meeting. Immediately following the Public Hearing, the regularly scheduled Planning and Zoning meeting will begin. Jean A. Rauf, City Clerk/Treasurer CMC Planning & Zoning Secretary

1001750238


LIFE

FEBRUARY 28, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B11

DEATHS Paula Anderson Paula Kay Anderson, 48, of Crescent Springs, died Feb. 14, 2013, at her residence. She was a cashier for Remke Markets in Crescent Springs, a former caregiver for Children’s Inc. and maid for Maid Pro., a member of First Christian Church in Covington, and alumna of Holmes High School and Gateway Community College. Survivors include her daughter, Nina Renee Anderson of Crescent Springs; mother, Sondra Alexander Anderson of Covington; father, Clayton Anderson of Lisbon, Ohio; brother, James D. Anderson of Elsmere; and sister, Deborah L. Barnard of Cold Spring. Interment was at Highland Cemetery in Fort Mitchell.

Helen Barbara Helen Claire Barbara, 90, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 18, 2013, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker, an executive secretary for the Cincinnati Community Chest, a graduate of Notre Dame Academy and a member of St. Thomas Church in Fort Thomas. Her husband, David M. Barbara, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Dave Barbara of Columbus, Ohio and Mark Barbara of Cincinnati; daughters, Sue Barbara of Huntsville, Ala., Fran Nieporte of Alexandria and Beth Bell of Winchester, Ohio; sister, Betty Dabbelt of Cincinnati; 13 grandchildren; and a great-grandchild. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: Carmel Manor, 100 Carmel Manor Road, Fort Thomas, KY 41075, or Notre Dame Academy, 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills, KY 41011.

Glenn Black Glenn Paul Black, 52, of Alexandria, died Feb. 20, 2013, at his residence. He was retired from the city of Fort Thomas, was a part time driver for M.C. Steel, and a member of the Creekside Social Riders. Survivors include his girlfriend, Necia McDaniel; son, Nick Black; daughter, Kelsey Lynn Black; brothers, J.D., Roger, Greg and Donald Black; and sisters, Esther Black, Wanda Sorrell, Emma Thornberry and Lyda Black.

Pamela Bowling Pamela June “Pam” Bowling, 61, of Alexandria, died Feb. 17, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She graduated from Jennings County High School in 1969 and had retired from the Internal Revenue Service as an appeals settlement officer in the Cincinnati. Survivors include her children, Laura Bowling of Elsmere, Tasha Bowling of Alexandria and Jason Bowling of Paintsville; mother, Winifred Vogel of Seymour, Ind.; sisters, Margaret “Peggy” Ad-

ams of Vincennes, Ind., and Debbie Matney of Commiskey, Ind.; brother, Danny Vogel of Louisville; and four grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: The Pamela Bowling Memorial Fund, Bank of Kentucky, 7612 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria, KY 41001.

Christine Dennis Christine “Penny Donnelly” Dennis, 77, of Latonia, died Feb. 19, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a nurse at Rosedale Green Nursing Home in Latonia, a member of Epworth United Methodist Church and a life member of United Methodist Women, as well as a volunteer with Red Cross. Her husband, Kenneth Dennis, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Greg Donnelly of Lakeside Park and Mark Donnelly of Villa Hills; former husband, William P. Donnelly of Fort Thomas; sisters, Juanita Hallman of Fort Mitchell and Jean Mitchell of Latonia; and four grandchildren. Interment was at Hopeful Lutheran Church Cemetery in Florence. Memorials: Epworth United Methodist Church, 1229 Highway Ave., Covington, KY 41011.

Adrienne Fischer Adrienne Lloyd Fischer, 41, of Bellevue, died Feb. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a front desk clerk and night auditor with Garfield Suites in Cincinnati and the Hampton Inn-CVG. Her husband, James R. Fischer, died previously. Survivors include her son, Justin Fischer; daughters, Kimberly Fischer, Kristen Fischer and Erin Fischer, all of Bellevue; father, Richard Ernest “Gean” Lloyd of Tucson, Ariz.; mother, Sandra Carpenter Lloyd of Cincinnati; brother, Richard Earl Lloyd of Cincinnati; sister, Janice L. Lea of Cincinnati; half sister, Crisa McIntosh of Huntsville, Ala. Memorials: Memorial Fund for the Children of Adrienne Fischer, any PNC Bank.

Naomi Ginn Naomi F. Ginn, 81, of Bellevue, died Feb. 18, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker. Her husband, Leland Ginn, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Karen Walls of Covington; five grandchildren; and 21 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Fleming County Cemetery. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Edward Heitzman Edward A. Heitzman Sr., 80, of Highland Heights, died Feb. 16, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas.

He was a retired pattern maker with Wright Way Pattern Co., a member of the St. Joe’s Seniors in Cold Spring and the Wendy’s Lunch Club in Cold Spring. He was an Army veteran of the Korean War. Survivors include his wife, Alice L. Heitzman of Highland Heights; daughter, Teresa Rose Zins of Cincinnati; sons, George J. Heitzman of Fairview Heights, ILl., Edward A. Heitzman Jr. of Fort Thomas and Larry E. Heitzman of Newport; eight grandchildren; and brother, Delbert Heitzman of Cincinnati. Burial was at St. Stephen Cemetery in Fort Thomas. Memorials: St. Joseph Church Grow Fund, 4011 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076 or St. Anne Convent, Sister of Divine Providence, 1000 St. Anne Drive, Melbourne, KY 41059.

Rosemary Henderson Rosemary “Mickey” Henderson, 88, of California, died Feb. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker, a member of the Ladies Auxiliary of Campbell County, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post No. 3205 of Alexandria, St. Joseph Parish in Camp Springs and a former member of the Happy 100’s. Her husband, Morgan “Bud” Henderson, died previously. Survivors include her daughters, Lois Wagner, Joyce Pfefferman, Peggy DeJaco, Anita Cox, Mary Ellen Allender and Karen Franzen; 14 grandchildren; and 19 great grandchildren. Interment was at Mount Gilead Cemetery in Carthage. Memorials: Camp Springs Volunteer Fire Department, 6844 Four Mile Road, Melbourne, KY 41059 or St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Edward Hering Edward Victor Hering, 94, of Southgate, died Feb. 14, 2013, at Carmel Manor Nursing Home in Fort Thomas. He was a machine operator for American Tool Works in Cincinnati, a graduate of Newport Catholic High School, a member of St. Therese Church in Southgate and an Army Air Corp

NOTICE TO BIDDERS

Bids will be opened and read immediately after the deadline for submission and reviewed at the next regular Council Meeting. Specifications and Contract Documents may be examined at: CARDINAL ENGINEERING CORPORATION 1 MOOCK ROAD, WILDER, KY 41070 TELEPHONE (859) 581-9600 Copies of the Specifications and Contract Documents may be obtained upon payment of $25.00 for each set. Bids shall be accompanied by a certified check or bid bond in an amount equal to ten (10) percent of the bid to insure the execution of the contract for which the bid is made. In case the bid is not accepted, the check or bid bond will be returned to the Bidder, but if the Bid is accepted and the Bidder shall refuse or neglect to enter into a contract with the City within ten (10) days from the time he is notified of the acceptance of his bid, the check or bid bond shall be forfeited to the City as liquidated damages for failure to do so. No bidder may withdraw this bid for a period of sixty (60) days after closing time for receipt of bids. The successful bidder will be required to furnish an acceptance performance bond in the amount of One Hundred Percent (100%) of the contract price. The City reserves the right to reject any and all bids, to waive formalities and to negotiate with the apparent qualified best bidder to such extent as may be in the City’s best interest.

Jean Rauf, City Clerk/Treasurer City of Highland Heights, KY PUBLISH CCR: 2-28-2013

CE-1001749942-01

Jim Kocher Jim Kocher, 91, of Bellevue, died Feb. 17, 2013. He graduated from Newport Catholic High School in 1939 and earned his bachelor’s degree in physics from Villa Madonna College. He was an Air Force of World War II and had retired from the John R. Greene Company, was the maitre’d at the Clubhouse at Turfway Racing Club, and delivered Meals on Wheels in Newport. His wife, Betty Kocher, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Sue Breving, Sally Kocher Miller and Anne Livingston; nine grandchildren; and a greatgrandchild. The body was donated to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center. Memorials: Children’s Tumor Foundation (Ending Neurofibromatosis), 95 Pine St., 16th floor, NY, NY, 10005-4002 or Brighton Center, 741 Central Ave., Newport, KY 41071.

Charmaine McAndrew Charmaine V. McAndrew, 84, of Newport, died Feb. 18, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a Kentucky Colonel and a cafeteria supervisor at Grandview Elementary in Bellevue. Survivors include her son, David McAndrew; daughters, Sharon Howard, Gale Humphreys and Charmaine Haines; seven grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. Visitation will be 5-8 p.m. Thursday, Feb 21, at Fares J. Radel Funeral Home in Newport. Services will be 10 a.m. Friday, Feb. 22, at the funeral home. Burial will be at Evergreen

Cemetery.

Diana Monoskie Diana S. Monoskie, 61, of Williamsburg, Ohio, died Feb. 16, 2013, at her residence. She was a nurses aid. Her parents, George Rankins Pope and Cora Lee Herrington; husband, Phillip R. Monoskie; a daughter, Michelle L. Coffey; and a sister, Joyce B. Pope, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jeff Coffey of McDermit, Ohio, and Kenny Coffey of Georgetown; daughter, Rebecca Coffey of Mount Orab; brothers, Wayne Pope of Crittenden, Jerry Pope of Alexandria, Bill Pope of Cincinnati, Denny Pope of Florence, Jack Pope of Melbourne and David Pope of Olympia, Wash.; sisters, Carol Schlosser of Alexandria, Wanda Brock of Elsmere and Georgette Lyons of Alexandria; eight

grandchildren; and three greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Decatur Cemetery. Memorials: Meeker Funeral Home.

James Mulcahey James Edward Mulcahey, 74, of Fort Thomas, died Feb. 14, 2013, at Greystone Nursing Home. He attended Holy Cross High School, was the star centerfielder and Mr. Graduate of his class in 1957. After high school he became active in the Kenton County Men’s Democrat Club and was elected as their youngest president. He was also a Kentucky Colonel. His companion, Harviettia Engelhart, died previously. Survivors include his brother, Robert Mulcahey of Florence;

See DEATHS, Page B12

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

INVITATION TO BID Date: February 28, 2013 PROJECT: Colony South Drive Water Main Replacement City of Lakeside Park, Kenton County, Kentucky SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

March 13, 2013 1:00 PM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,190 linear feet of 6" PVC water main together with the appurtenances and related work along Colony South Drive in the City of Lakeside Park, Kenton County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at:

LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on March 12, 2013, 7:00 P.M. at the Campbell County Courthouse, 8352 E. Main Street, Alexandria, Ky. for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 118-13-ZMA-01 APPLICANT: Vincent & Renai Keairns LOCATION: An 8.4378 acre located at 10622 Woeste Road, Unincorporated Campbell County. REQUEST: The submitted request is for approval of a zone map amendment proposing a change in zoning from R-RE(P) to A-1 for the purpose of creating a vineyard. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Peter Klear /s/ Peter Klear, AICP Director of Planning & Zoning 1001750423

Sealed bids for the furnishing of all labor, materials, equipment and services for the “Knollwood Concrete Replacement” will be received by the City of Highland Heights, Kentucky until 3:00 P.M. E.S.D.T. on March 7th, 2013. The work consists of the removal and replacement of 3,755 square yards of concrete pavement.

veteran of World War II. A sister, Margaret Retzler, and brothers, Frank, Bernard, and the Rev. Otto Hering, died previously. Survivors include his sister, Dorothy Wilson of Alexandria, and many nieces and nephews. Burial was at St. Joseph Cemetery New in Cincinnati. Memorials: Father Ralph Beiting, St. Jude Mission, 332 Riverbend Road, Louisa, KY 41230.

Date: February 22, 2013 Published: February 28, 2013 Campbell County Recorder

NOTICE OF ADOPTION, TITLE AND SUMMARY OF ALEXANDRIA ORDINANCE 2013-01 I hereby certify that the following is the Title and Summary of Ordinance 2013-01 of the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, which was adopted by City Council on January 3, 2013: ORDINANCE NO. 2013-01: AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF ALEXANDRIA, IN CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY, DECLARING ITS INTENT TO ANNEX UNINCORPORATED TERRITORY AND ITS INTENT TO AMEND ITS COMPREHENSIVE PLAN AND OFFICIAL ZONING MAP TO INCORPORATE AND ESTABLISH ZONING OR OTHER LAND USE REGULATIONS FOR THE "TOLLGATE" PROPERTY PROPOSED TO BE ANNEXED, CONSISTING OF 46.292 +/ACRES OF LAND LOCATED GENERALLY WEST OF US 27, AT THE WEST END OF FAIRVIEW DRIVE (PRIVATE) AND CARRIAGE PARK SUBDIVISION, ALONG THE NORTH SIDE OF WRIGHT COURT SUBDIVISION AND ALONG THE EAST AND NORTH SIDES OF REED ACRES SUBDIVISION, AND BEING ADJACENT OR CONTIGUOUS TO THE CITY’S BOUNDARIES AT SEVERAL LOCATIONS, ALL AS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AND DEPICTED IN THE EXHIBITS TO THIS ORDINANCE; AND CONTAINING A DECLARATION THAT IT IS DESIRABLE TO ANNEX AND ZONE THE UNINCORPORATED TERRITORY AFFECTED BY THIS ORDINANCE, ALL ACCORDING TO CHAPTERS 81A AND 100 OF THE KENTUCKY REVISED STATUTES. This is the ’Intent To Annex’ Ordinance for the 46.292 acres shown on the attached Exhibit. *************************************** I, Michael A. Duncan, an attorney licensed to practice law in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, for Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys for the City of Alexandria, in Campbell County, Kentucky, do hereby certify that this Notice of Adoption, Title and Summary of Ordinance 2013-01 was prepared by me, and that it represents an accurate description of the summary of the contents of the Ordinance. The full text of the Ordinance, and other information relative to the Ordinance, is on file at the office of the City Clerk/Treasurer, 8236 West Main Street, Alexandria, Kentucky 41001. /s/ Michael A. Duncan Michael A. Duncan, attorney For Ziegler & Schneider, P.S.C., City Attorneys 1750487

Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or CDS Associates, Inc. 7000 Dixie Highway Florence, Kentucky 41042 Phone: (859) 525-0544 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of CDS Associates at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Complete set of Bidding Documents Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested)

Charge $ 30.00 $ 15.00

Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001750354


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • FEBRUARY 28, 2013

Bunbury Music Festival lineup announced Community Recorder

Bunbury Music Festival has announced the lineup for its return to downtown Cincinnati’s Sawyer Point and Yeatman’s Cove for three days of music across six stages on Friday through Sunday, July 1214. The lineup is as follows:

Friday, July 12

Walk the Mood, Tegan and Sara, Devotchka, Tokyo Police Club, Youngblood Hawke, Delta Rae, Sky Ferreira, The Fea-

tures, Red Wanting Blue, The Dunwells, Everest, Those Darlins, Beat Club, American Authors, Seabird, Buffalo Killers, Jay Nash, Josh Eagle, We are Sanpdragon, State Song, Ohio Knife, Old Baby, Alone at 3 a.m., Public, The Mitchells, Pete Dressman and Billy Wallace.

Saturday, July 13

Cake, Twenty One Pilots, Altlas Genius, Chairlift, We Are Scientists, Oberhofer, Robert DeLong, Civil Twilight, The Mowglis, Empire, Ambassadors, Vacation-

er, Bear Hands, The Pinstripes, You, You're Awesome, Ben Walz Band, Christopher Paul Stelling, Culture Queer, Black Owls, The Bears of Blue River, Messerly & Ewing, New Vega, The Ready Stance, Tim Carr (of Arlo McKinley & The Lonesome Sound), Taylor Alexander and Margaret Darling.

Sunday, July 14

Belle & Sebastian, Yo La Tengo, Camera Obscura, Black Joe Lewis & the Honeybears, Night Terros of 1927, A Silent Film, Gregory Alan Isa-

kov, Joe Purdy, Savior Adore, Daniel Martin Moore, Benjamin Francis Leftwich, Gringo Star, DAAP Girls, The Hiders, Channing & Quinn, The Harlequins, Bethesda, The Upset Victory, Mia Carruthers, Mark Utley, Jake Kolesar and Ben Knight. All artists are subject to change without notice. Tickets cost $55 for a one-day pass and $110 for a three-day pass. Visit http://bit.ly/zYw5mN.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Tricia Brown, 33, and James Hounshell, 36, both of Fort Thomas, issued Feb. 7. Michelle Twehues, 31, of Cincinnati and Jeffrey Abramis,

31, of Fort Thomas, issued Feb. 8. Amy Weinberg, 35, and Michael Futscher, 34, both of Fort Thomas, issued Feb. 8.

INVITATION TO BID Date: February 28, 2013 PROJECT: E. 2nd Street Water Main Replacement City of Silver Grove, Campbell County, Kentucky

Amy Frey, 37, of Covington and Steven Thomas, 41, of Cincinnati, issued Feb. 11. Stephanie Fridman, 33, of Cincinnati and Matthew Lenahan, 33, of Elk Grove, issued Feb. 12. Patricia Swanner, 38, in Cincinnati and David Clifton, 42, of Toledo, issued Feb. 12. Galadriel Craig, 24, of Newport and Eric Walters, 26, of Cincinnati, issued Feb. 14. Sherry Crow, 72, and Robert Browning, 76, both of Cincinnati, issued Feb. 14. Kayla Urda, 24, of Lovelock

and Mark Vaugt, 27, of Cincinnati, issued Feb. 14. Jennifer Nichols, 31, of Fort Thomas and Mauro Lopez, 28, of Mexico, issued Feb. 14. Laura Williams, 49, of Grand Rapids and Dennis Eberstein, 55, of Vicksburg, issued Feb. 14. Kathryn Richardson, 45, of Hamilton and David Carpenter, 50, of Blancher, issued Feb. 15. Nicole Blizzard, 30, of Orlando and Joshua Harris, 34, of Barton, issued Feb. 15. Briana Shand, 20, of Latrobe and Richard Barton, 21, of Atlanta, issued Feb. 15.

SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

INVITATION TO BID February 28, 2013

March 12, 2013 9:00 AM (Local Time)

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Construction of approximately 1,260 linear feet of 8" ductile iron water main together with the appurtenances and related work along E. 2nd Street {Four Mile Road to Linden Street} in the City of Silver Grove, Campbell County, Kentucky. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Or Viox & Viox, Inc. 466 Erlanger Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Phone: (859) 727-3293 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the office of Viox & Viox, Inc. at the address indicated herein. Charges for all documents obtained will be made on the following basis: Charge Complete set of Bidding Documents $ 30.00 Mailing and Handling (U.S. Mail) (if requested) $15.00 Charges for Bidding Documents and mailing and handling, if applicable, will not be refunded. Bids will be received on a unit price and/or lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400).

PROJECT: Waterworks Road Pump Station Variable Frequency Drives (VFD) Replacement Project SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road P.O. Box 18640 Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 UNTIL:

Date: Time:

March 14, 2013 due by: 10:00 p.m., local time.

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Removal of the three existing 500 HP, 480 volt variable frequency drives at the Waterworks Road Pump Station and furnish and install three new variable frequency drive units to match existing equipment ready for service. The work shall also include the successful startup and testing of each unit and all necessary operational training to Northern Kentucky Water District staff. All Bids must be in accordance with the Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the Water District’s office at the address indicated herein by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. For inspection of the site and any questions on the Waterworks Road VFD Replacement Project please contact Dave Enzweiler, Pumping Supervisor at (859) 547-3265. Bids will be received on a lump sum basis as described in the Contract Documents basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring/bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A.490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400).

Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, nonresponsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner.

Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner.

Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid.

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance.

Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001750340

Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 1001750390

DEATHS Continued from Page B11 sister, Marcia Smith of Wisconsin; a niece; and two nephews. Burial was at St. Mary Cemetery in Fort Mitchell. Memorials: Alzheimer’s Association of Cincinnati, 644 Linn St, Cincinnati, OH 45203.

Paul Ponder Paul Ponder, 77, of Taylor Mill, died Feb. 15, 2013, at his residence. He was a former printer for The Cincinnati Post, and a member of Queen City Dog Training Club and Clermont County Dog Training Club. His wife, Margie Ann McClellan Ponder; brother, Charles Ponder; and sister, Rosalie Ponder, died previously. Survivors include his daughters, Marjorie Manyet of Fort Thomas and Deborah Ashcraft of Taylor Mill; sister, Roberta Roser of Gainesville, Fla.; two grandchildren; two stepgrandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Interment was at Floral Hills Memorial Gardens. Memorials: Scottish Terrier Rescue c/o Ginger McAfee, 420 Ash Drive, Baxter, TN 38544 or donor’s choice.

Gracie Ritchie Gracie Hicks Ritchie, 78, of Bellevue, died Feb. 15, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker, enjoyed quilting, and was a member of the Grace Fellowship Baptist Church in Elmwood, Ohio. Her husband, Woodrow Ritchie, and two children, Freddie and Linda, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jackie Ritchie of Lancaster, Jeff Ritchie of Dry Ridge, Jesse Ritchie of Covington, Jerry Ritchie of Erlanger; daughters, Brenda Sargent of Covington, Sandra Wells of Bellevue, Sinda Henson of Dry Ridge, and Roma Ritchie and Donna Collins, both of Bethel, Ohio; eight grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. Burial was at Corinth I.O.O.F. Cemetery in Corinth. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 483 South Loop Road, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Leslie Roach Leslie “Lee” Roach, 83, died Feb. 14, 2013, at his residence in Cold Spring. He was a veteran of the Korean War, a member of Fowler Creek Free Will Baptist Church and a retired clerk for the Cincinnati Post. Survivors include his wife, Sibbie; sons, Charles Morgan, Dale Morgan and Jack Morgan; daughters, Marilyn Adams, Paulette Thompson, Charlotte Morgan and Sherry Morgan; 17 grandchildren; and 19 greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Pleasant Grove Baptist Cemetery.

Mary Scarberry Mary J. Scarberry, 77, died Feb. 16, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. She was a homemaker and a life long member of the Dayton Church of God in Dayton. A son, Jim Stewart; and four brothers, Dayton Honaker, Harvey Honaker, Gerald Honaker and Willard Honaker, died previously. Survivors include her son, Paul E. Scarberry of Elsmere; daughters, Renona Perry of Falmouth and Deborah Johnson of Dayton; brother, William L. Honaker of Dayton; sisters, Joyce England of Dayton, Linda Woodall of Bellevue and Barbara Patterson of Greenfield, Ind.; nine grand-

children; and 15 great-grandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate.

Jessica Shearer Jessica Rae Shearer, 21, of Cold Spring, died Feb. 17, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a telephone supervisor for Sirs in Cold Spring, and enjoyed music and concerts. Survivors include her parents, Jim and Toni Shearer; sisters, Kelly and Molly Shearer; brothers, James and Tyler Shearer; paternal grandparents, Jim and Jeanette Shearer; and a niece.

Angelene Shouse Angelene Shouse, 78, of Alexandria, died Feb. 13, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a member of Grants Lick Baptist Church, worked as a seamstress for Dr. Scholls in Falmouth and made life jackets for SafeGuard. Her husband, Price Shouse; and a sister, Isa Deaton, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Mary Jane Smallwood; sister, Tillie Hatton; four grandchildren; and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery in Grants Lick.

Mickey Smith Mickey Smith, 59, died Feb. 14, 2013, at Georgetown Community Hospital. He was a general contractor in the residential construction industry who began working at his trade as a teen. He also was an avid gardener and fisherman who loved hot rod cars and trucks. His parents, Robert and Minnie Smith, and a sister, Doris, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Lisa West-Smith; daughters, Sarah Dorr of Hendersonville, Tenn., Ariel Phillips of Fort Thomas and Adriane Smith of Cincinnati; four grandchildren; and siblings, Garry Smith, David Smith, Laura Gay Pollard, Rhonda Robinson, Ronnie Vearl Smith, Tim Smith, Tammy Roads and Chasity Mazon. Visitation and celebration of life will be 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 23, at Johnson’s Funeral Home in Georgetown. Words from family and friends will immediately follow. A graveside service will follow at the family cemetery in Mount Vernon. Memorials: Check Your Genes, 157 Barnwood Drive, Suite 201, Edgewood, Ky. 41017.

Ruth Smith Ruth M. Smith, 87, of Cold Spring, died Feb. 14, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. Her son, Jack Howard Jr., died previously. Survivors include her stepson, Jerry Smith, three grandchildren; 11 great-grandchildren; sister, Vonnie Walker; and brother, Ralph Williams. Burial was at Peachgrove Cemetery.

Kenneth Stover Kenneth Stover, 52, of Alexandria, died Feb. 15, 2013, at his residence. He worked at Andrew’s Lazer Works. His wife, Deborah Kenny, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Anthony Tolbert and Allen Stover; daughters, Christie Moermond and Angela Stover; mother, Marian Stover; brothers, Ronald and Chris Stover; and sisters, Dorothy Taulbee and Barbara Noble. Memorials: Redwood School and Rehabilitation Center.

Free singing lessons offered Community Recorder

The Southern Gateway Chorus, a premier men’s a cappella group and 2012 World Choir Games Silver Medalist, is offering men in the Cincinnati area free group singing lessons. This series of 90-minute lessons will be given on five Tuesday evenings (March 5, March 12, March 19, April 2 and April 9) at Harmony Lodge, 646 E. Epworth Ave. in Cincinnati. Topics covered include

posture, breathing, singing basics, vowels, diphthongs and dynamics. The series concludes with an opportunity to perform a song with Southern Gateway Chorus at an April 16 performance. This is a no cost, no obligation opportunity to receive group vocal instruction and experience the thrill of singing with 100 other men. Space is limited. Visit www.SouthernGateway.org/sing or call 1-877-474-2463, ext. 2, for more information.


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