Page 1

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CELEBRATING

120 YEARS Happy Father’s DAY!

Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Northern Kenton County

THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 2017

See page 3A for details!

$1.00

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Kentucky OKs hospital’s plan Anne Saker asaker@enquirer.com

Kentucky decided Friday to allow Christ Hospital to construct a $24 million outpatient surgical center on the old Drawbridge Inn site in Fort Mitchell. An administrative law judge ruled that allowing the Cincinnati provider greater access into Northern Kentucky will benefit consumers who now cross into Ohio for some medical procedures. The decision came on Christ Hospital’s certificateof-need application, filed in 2016, for permission to build the 24,000-square-foot facility. Friday’s ruling, coming after nearly a year of paper filings and two extended hearings in August and January, deals a significant defeat for St. Elizabeth Healthcare, the dominant provider in Northern Kentucky. St. Elizabeth had fought Christ Hospital’s proposal as a cherry-picking of well-insured customers at the expense of the indigent and Medicaid patients of the region. The ground won’t be broken yet since St. Elizabeth officials vowed Friday to appeal the decision. But when completed, the project, on highly visible 15 acres at the interchange of Interstates 71-75 and Buttermilk Pike, will include the ambulatory surgical center, a free-standing emergency de-

partment and a diagnostic center. The facility is expected to anchor the Fort Mitchell Gateway Project, developed by Brandicorp of Northern Kentucky, which is planned include a hotel, restaurants, retail businesses and apartments. Christ Hospital already has a doctors’ office in Fort Wright featuring a magnetic resonance imaging machine. Administrative law judge Cheryl R. Neff in Frankfort dismissed St. Elizabeth’s complaints about the ambulatory surgical center and agreed with Christ Hospital that a new ambulatory surgical center would be a benefit to the eight counties of the Northern Kentucky Area Development District (NKYADD). The center “will strengthen the ability of low-income and Medicaid patients in the NKYADD to receive the medical care they need,” Neff said. “There is an increasing number of Kentucky residents using Christ Hospital’s services, which demonstrates a need for Christ Hospital to increase access for its own patients, having a lower cost alternative for outpatient surgery would increase access to (ambulatory surgical care) services in the NKYADD. “There is currently an outmigration of NKYADD patients to Ohio and other areas for outpatient surgery” demonstrating a need for more services in Northern Kentucky, Neff wrote. Mike Keating, president and chief executive officer of Christ Hospital, said in a See PLAN, Page 2A

FILE

The site of the former Drawbridge Inn in Fort Mitchell is where the Christ Hospital Health Network wants to put an ambulatory surgery center. St. Elizabeth Healthcare says the facility will over saturate the market.

ENQUIRER FILE PHOTOS

NKY Hates Heroin members Eric and Holly Specht, of Fort Thomas, raise their hands for high-fives at the 5K fundraiser in Independence.

NKY takes heroin fight to streets with 5K run Terry DeMio tdemio@enquirer.com

They are a front-line family in the fight against heroin in Northern Kentucky, and they’re about to give those hurt by the epidemic more face time. Organizers of NKY Hates Heroin’s 5K race and walk are continuing their mission on June 17 with their fourth event of its kind, in Independence. The extended family of Nicholas Specht, who died at 30 years old in 2013 in his parents’ Fort Thomas home, and dozens of volunteers prepare for and work the race. But on that day, said Nicholas’ mom, Holly Specht, she and her husband, Nicholas’ dad, Eric, are there just for other families who need them. “It’s absolutely a roller coaster of emotions,” Specht said. “The people are seeking Eric and I out, I think because we understand what they’re going through, what they’re possibly feeling. We mingle. We talk. We hug. There are tears. There’s laughter.” With race proceeds, NKY Hates Heroin has purchased the overdose reversal drug naloxone and pushed it into communities. It has helped a Healthy Newborns House for pregnant women in recovery and their infants. It has spread the word about the plight of families and

BEAR-ING DOWN

NKY Hates Heroin 5 K memorial wall of those who’ve died from overdose. Volunteers Kimberly Wright and Mae Corbin helped place photos.

IF YOU GO What: NKYHatesHeroin.com 5K When: Race time is 8:30 a.m. June 17. Race-day registration starts at 7 a.m. at Simon Kenton High School, 11132 Madison Pike, Independence. Where: Simon Kenton High School. For more information: Visit NKYHatesHeroin.com

individuals affected by the heroin epidemic, and the family has been a vocal presence advocating for the health care and rights of those with addiction disease. The race draws some professional runners, but a survey NKY Hates Heroin did in 2015 indicated that about 73 percent of those who attended were

walkers. “That says to me that they were here for the cause,” Holly Specht said. “That’s huge.” In 2014 alone, the first NKY Hates Heroin 5K fundraiser generated $32,000, said Noel Stegner, Nicholas Specht’s grandfather. In addition to help-

Contact us

Vol. 21 No. 33 © 2017 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

News .........................283-0404 Retail advertising .......513-768-8404 Classified advertising ...513-421-6300 Delivery .......................781-4421

Get the latest UC sports news. Download the Bearcats app on both the Apple App Store and Google Play.

See HEROIN, Page 2A

See page A2 for additional information

Customize that piece of furniture you’ve had for decades and make it your creation with vintage furniture paint! We offer you the right paints and tools to do the job, offer classes to teach you how, or can even paint your piece for you! Certified Retailer

Personalized Gifts While You Wait With Our Engraving Machine!

Ask about our Paint Workshops! Gather your friends and schedule a class of your choice with snacks, soda and water provided!

50% OFF

FREE Cotton Stem with any

dresserupvintage.com

Limit 1 per customer, with coupon. ($7 value) While supplies last. May not be combined with any other discounts. Expires 7/29/17.

and and Visit us on see some of our products.

any personalized engraving.

Engraving on in-store purchased items only, with coupon. Cannot be combined with other offers or discounts. Expires 7/29/17.

purchase of $50 or more!

911 Monmouth Street Newport, KY 41071

(859) 414-6874

Hours: Tues., Fri. & Sat. 10-4, Wed. 12-6, Thurs. 10-6 (Closed Sun. & Mon.)

CE-0000678589

Outpatient surgery facility coming to Fort Mitchell


NEWS

2A • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

Former Kenton County judge dies Scott Wartman swartman@nky.com

The Northern Kentucky legal community is mourning the passing of a former judge and attorney who built an impressive legal career over Trusty more than four decades. Frank O. Trusty II died peacefully at his Park Hills home on June 8, the Kenton County Commonwealth’s Attorney Office posted on Facebook. “Frank was both beloved and notorious in the community,” the Facebook post stated. “He was an outstanding litigator as both a prosecutor and a defense attorney.” Trusty began his career as an assistant Commonwealth’s attorney. Voters in Kenton County then elected him Commonwealth’s attorney in 1977. He served as chief prosecutor until 1984. He then worked as a public advocate before serving as a district judge and circuit judge the next two decades. He retired as a district judge in 2012. In retirement, Trusty volunteered for the Commonwealth’s attorney’s office prosecuting preliminary hearing dockets probono. “As a judge, he was an outstanding litigator as both a prosecutor and defense attorney,” the Commonwealth’s attorney’s office stated.

Duke Energy becomes partner in library’s STEM efforts Melissa Reinert mreinert@enquirer.com

ERLANGER – Duke Energy has joined the Kenton County Public Library’s efforts to bring STEM learning to life at the Erlanger Branch. Last fall, construction started on three projects at the branch: A MakerSpace, a large auditorium and meeting room and a separate building to house the administration offices. Duke Energy recently gave a boost to the project. Duke Energy presented the Kenton County Public Library Board of Trustees with a $10,000 grant that will go toward materials and equipment for the new MakerSpace. Republic Bank was the first sponsor of the MakerSpace with a donation of $5,000. Schultz Marketing and Communications and The Lawrence Firm PSC have also contributed. So, what’s a MakerSpace? By definition, it is a place in which people with shared interests, especially in computing or technology, can gather to work on projects while sharing ideas, equipment and knowledge. The library provides the space, equipment and materials, and visitors are the makers. “As we look toward the future, we realize there is great need for a stronger focus to provide STEM and STEAM related activ-

PROVIDED

THE ENQUIRER/NANCY DALY

Mr. Roof workers make headway on steeple repairs at Erlanger Baptist Church. On June 12 they are removing copper.

Erlanger Baptist fixing stormdamaged steeple Nancy Daly ndaly@communitypress.com

ERLANGER – Work is underway on repairing a church steeple and roof damaged in the March 1 wind storm. Scaffolding extends from the steeple at Erlanger Baptist Church, 116 Commonwealth Ave., allowing workers from Mr. Roof to make steeple repairs. The steeple’s weathervane and copper were being removed to make way for repairs on Monday. Butch Bowling, maintenance director for Erlanger Baptist, said the March 1 storm also caused some damage elsewhere in the church roof, causing leaks

Ft. Wright Council names new member Heroin mreinert@enquirer.com

Calendar .............6B Classifieds .............C Food ..................8A Real estate .......... 9B Schools ..............6A Sports .................1B Viewpoints ........10A

ton out of Q-tips which incorporates art and science. With the addition of the MakerSpace and STREAM Center of Learning, there will be more programs such as these offered. When not in use for library programs, the MakerSpace will be open to the public. Children’s staff plans to partner with area schools to work with their students to continue to build the STEM/ STEAM curriculum. Near the MakerSpace, a large auditorium and meeting room is being constructed. Over the past several years, there has been a demand for more public meeting space, according to Erlanger Branch Manager Angela Payer. Recently released statistics from the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives showed that the Kenton County Public Library is the leading library in the state in regards to free programs for children and teens. They are second when it comes to free programs for adults. Additional statistics show that Kenton County Public Library cardholders use the e-books and online items more than any other library in the state. Kenton County is also the second highest provider of books from any other library. Construction at the Erlanger Branch, 401 Kenton Lands Road, will be completed by December.

Duke Energy presented the Kenton County Public Library with $10,000 for its MakerSpace now under construction. Pictured far left Executive Director, Dave Schroeder, Board of Trustees, left to right: Douglas Stephens, Louise Canter, Susan Mospens, Casey Ruschman (Duke Energy), Julie Roesel Belton and Dan Humpert.

Melissa Reinert

Index

ities,” said Library’s Executive Director Dave Schroeder. “STEAM is an educational approach to learning that uses science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics as access points for guiding student inquiry, dialogue, and critical thinking.” According to Schroeder, library staff realized that while STEM and STEAM are “wonderful movements, there is one critical component being left out – reading.” “Without having a strong comprehension of reading and understanding, how can one be expected to follow directions to build a robot, create fireworks in a jar, or code?” he said. “Reading is the basis in which both STEM and STEAM flourish.” The library already conducts many programs with a STEM/STEAM focus. Librarians enhanced the story of “The Three Little Pigs” with engineering practice, having children make houses out of drinking straws, Popsicle sticks and Lego blocks to see which house is strongest. Children have also read about boats and then experimented with water and a variety of objects to see what sinks and what floats. Using the scientific method, they made a hypothesis first before dropping the object in the water. At a Halloween program they made a skele-

FORT WRIGHT – Margie Witt has been appointed to Fort Wright City Council. Witt was selected by current council members to replace longtime councilman Joe Averdick who resigned because he was

moving out of the city. She was one of 11 Fort Wright residents Witt to express interest in the position. The term expires Dec. 31, 2018. Witt grew up in Edgewood and is a graduate of Notre Dame Academy

and Northern Kentucky University. She is employed at LAM Foundation in Cincinnati. Witt has been an active member of Fort Wright for the past 20 years. She served as a member of the city’s vision committee, is a member of the Garden Club and has organized the Clean-up Fort Wright Day the past three years.

Plan

Hospital took advantage of a short-lived loophole in the state law to apply for the certificate of need. The loophole was created in the state health plan during the administration of Democratic Gov. Steve Beshear, then closed by Beshear’s successor, Republican Matt Bevin. St. Elizabeth has claimed that the loophole was unfairly created explicitly to allow Christ Hospital to apply for a certificate of need for the ambulatory surgical center in Fort Mitchell. St. Elizabeth filed suit over this issue, but the case was put on hold until a decision came in the certificate of need, which ar-

Continued from Page 1A

ing community efforts and individuals in the fight against heroin in Northern Kentucky, NKY Hates Heroin has created and distributed a routinely updated resource guide, bracelets and fliers to spread awareness of addiction disease.

through the ceiling. Roof repairs are expected to continue through next week. One of Erlanger’s oldest churches, Erlanger Baptist was dedicated in 1890. It has expanded steadily and undergone many renovations through the generations. The March 1 storm system that snapped trees and damaged buildings in Boone, Kenton and Gallatin counties in Northern Kentucky was caused by straightline winds, not tornadoes, the National Weather Service determined. An EF0 tornado touched down in Anderson Township and an EF1 tornado touched down in Amelia.

Holly and Eric Specht are regular speakers when heroin and funding proposals are heard at the Kentucky statehouse and at local meetings. If you go, you are encouraged to bring photos of loved ones whose lives were lost to addiction disease. “We have a memorial wall,” Holly Specht said. “Every year, it gets bigger and bigger.”

COMMUNITY RECORDER

Find news and information from your community on the Web Fort Mitchell • cincinnati.com/fortmitchell Erlanger • cincinnati.com/erlanger cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

News

Nancy Daly Editor ..............................578-1059, ndaly@communitypress.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051, cmayhew@communitypress.com Melissa Stewart Reporter .....................578-1058, mstewart@communitypress.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-768-8512, mlaughman@communitypress.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@communitypress.com

Advertising To place an ad .................................513-768-8404, EnquirerMediaAdvertising@enquirer.com

Delivery For customer service .........................781-4421 Sharon Schachleiter Circulation Manager .........................442-3464, sschachleiter@communitypress.com

Content submitted may be distributed by us in print, digital or other forms To place an ad in Community Classified, call 513-421-6300 or go to www.communityclassified.com

Continued from Page 1A

statement that the ruling “will provide consumers and our patients with more health care options. We now will be able to extend our exceptional surgical care in the areas of orthopedics, urology and gynecology to the residents of Northern Kentucky.” In contrast, a “disappointed” Garren Colvin, president and CEO of St. Elizabeth, said in a statement that the organization will fight on through appeals. St. Elizabeth officials have said Christ

rived Friday. “We will pursue the appropriate appeals process,” Colvin said. “Our challenge will be directed to the loophole created by the previous administration that has already been removed from the state health plan. Christ Hospital recommended the new language and waited for this loophole to be in place before it applied for a certificate of need. “We’ll let the next process play out. We remain the most committed health care partner that Northern Kentucky has and will continue to support our community.” Kentucky is one of 36 states and the District of

Columbus that requires health-care providers with construction ambitions to get a certificate of need. A provider must show how a new facility would fit into Kentucky’s state health plan, which guides decision-making on the placement and provision of medical services. Neither Ohio nor Indiana has a certificateof-need system. A number of residents have voiced their support for the facility, saying that since the 2008 merger with the St. Luke hospital system, St. Elizabeth has become an 800-pound gorilla in the region, swatting away the competition.


NEWS

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 3A

ALL NATURAL

T

GLUTEN FREE

O

N

ANTIBIOTIC FREE

with card

BO GO

SS

31 /$

NON GMO

LE

Boneless ChickenBreast Chicken Breast

BUY ONE GE

Bi-Color or White SweetCorn

E

FR

R

CELEBRATING

E R VA L U E

We’ve locked in prices through September 4th on over 300 items you buy most

E E O F E Q UA L

O

SAVE $6.19 LB.

120 YEARS Order groceries

ONLINE

Pick-up curbside

Extra Large Red or Green Grapes

Sargento Shredded Cheese 8 oz.

99

25

¢

/$

lb. with card

with card

Pepsi

Signature Double Breaded

2 liters

12 Pc. Fried Chicken

11

10 10

$ 99 Visit www.remkes.com for participating locations

/$

with card

with card

Happy Father’s DAY! Family Pack Bone-In Strip Steaks

6

$ 99

lb. with card

All Natural Hand-Cut Boneless Pork Chops

2

$ 88

lb. with card

Pub Burgers

•Bacon & Cheddar •Blue Cheese •Mushroom & Swiss

5

$ 99

lb. with card

While supplies last, no rain checks. Prices effective through Sunday, June 18, 2017. All Ad Savings are with the Remke Rewards Card.


NEWS

4A • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

K-9 cop purchase leads to donation of service dog to officer’s family Melissa Reinert mreinert@enquirer.com

FORT MITCHELL – The purchase of a K-9 for the Fort Mitchell Police Department led to a generous donation. Tony, a 15-month-old German Shepherd, is the newest addition to the Fort Mitchell Police Department. But he wasn’t the first choice. The first selection was Bruno, another German Shepherd, but after a week of training, handler and specialist Shane Best realized he was too pas-

sive to serve as a police dog. When he returned him to the Michigan-based FM K-9, it was difficult. Best’s daughter, who has special needs, had already developed a strong bond with Bruno. Much to the surprise of Best and the department, the owner of FM K-9 donated Bruno to serve as a service dog for Best’s daughter. “I was speechless,” Best said. “Really, that’s absolutely the greatest thing anyone has ever done for my family.” Police Chief Andrew

Schierberg said it was an “incredible act of kindness.” “FM K-9 could have still made money on this dog,” he said. “This was a very generous and muchappreciated offer. Tony, Fort Mitchell’s certified K-9 cop, was made possible through generosity as well. The new officer was brought on board with zero taxpayer dollars. In November, the department partnered with several local businesses to hold a fundraising campaign to purchase a K-9.

They raised more than $25,000. Tony officially joined the force April 24 and has been “very busy” in just his first few weeks, according to Best. “His second day on the job it got real. We were called to a home invasion to do a track in Bellevue,” Best said. “Tony is very

playful. He’s got a lot of puppy in him yet, but when it‘s time to go to work he turns it on.” And they’re glad to have him on the team, Police Chief Andrew Schierberg said. “He’s the first K-9 in the department’s history, as far as we know,” Schierberg said. “K-9s

are a very versatile tool for us to have. I’ve seen a lot of usefulness out of them. Like every community in the area, we have drugs that come through our city. We have people overdose and those transporting drugs, a K-9 is another tool that gives us the ability to get these drugs off the streets.”

Sinatra • Jack Benny • Buble WMKV

WLHS

89.3 FM 89.9 FM

Streaming everywhere at www.wmkvfm.org Cincinnati’s One Station for Music, Nostalgia, News and Radio Comedies and Dramas! Local 12 News, Weather, and Traffic Big Bands Crooners Oldies CE-0000678702

513-782-2427

PROVIDED

Fort Mitchell Police Department Specialist Shane Best with his new partner Tony.

513-268-1186


NEWS

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 5A

Communications getting upgrade Melissa Reinert mreinert@enquirer.com

The Boone County Fiscal Court, Campbell County Consolidated Dispatch Board and Kenton County Fiscal Court have jointly selected Motorola Solutions to design, build and implement a new radio system at a cost of $19,485,134. Their bid includes the system infrastructure and an 11-year service warranty for parts, service, and software and hardware upgrades. This cooperative effort is the largest joint purchasing project ever approved by the three counties and the collaborative

approach resulted in substantial savings totaling more than $10 million through the combination of direct discounts and the elimination of redundant equipment, county officials said. During the past two years, Boone, Campbell and Kenton counties have engaged in a study of their communications systems utilizing two independent, professional consulting firms: Trott Communications Group and TUSA Consulting Services. The two studies, pursued independently, came to similar conclusions on the systems currently being used. These findings includ-

ed the fact that current technology is at the end of its useful life, coverage is unsatisfactory in many areas of each county, constraints and deficiencies of the current system result in poor signal strength in large buildings and structures and the inability for law enforcement and fire agencies to communicate directly. The individual studies recommended that a P25 700/800 MHz trunked communication system would provide the best proven technology to meet the long-term needs of public safety personnel in protecting the community.

KEEPING UP THE RIGHT HOME INSURANCE FOR EVERY STAGE OF LIFE

thru the gorge

New River

Train ®

Huntington, WV

Hinton, WV

EXCURSIONS Since 1966

From Huntington, WV to Hinton, WV and Return!

October 21, 22, 28, & 29, 2017

When life changes, your insurance needs to keep up. That’s why the expert agents at AAA are ready to help, making sure you always have the coverage you need and the discounts you’re entitled to. So the next time life changes, you’ll be glad you’re with AAA. Insurance that’s not just insurance.

Four, 300 Mile Long Round Trip One Day Excursions through the Majestic & Historic, Grand Canyon of the East, The New River Gorge! Heritage: $179 • Premium: $279 • Dome: $329 • Silver: $550 Premium & Dome includes Breakfast and Dinner! Silver Class Includes Breakfast, Lunch, and Dinner!

15% cancellation fee on and before September 1, 2017. No refunds after September 1, 2017.

866-639-7487 www.NewRiverTrain.com

Go to AAA.com/insurance, visit your local AAA office, or call 855.499.7896 for a quote. Insurance provided by CSAA Insurance Group, a AAA Insurer. © 2017 CSAA Insurance Group

EXPERIENCE CADILLAC LUXURY JUST MINUTES SOUTH OF THE RIVER

JOSEPH SUBARU

JOSEPH AUTO GROUP

OF FLORENCE, KY

2017 LEGACY 2.5i CVT HAB-02

2016 XTS

2017 XT5

MSRP $53,900

LEASE FOR $

LUXURY COLLECTION, ULTRAVIEW SUNROOF, DRIVER AWARENESS PACKAGE, 7,300 MILES. #195809, 1 IN STOCK

SALE PRICE

$

LUXURY COLLECTION, AWD, NAVIGATION, DRIVER AWARENESS PACKAGE, #149455, 4,500 MILES, 1 IN STOCK

38,900

$

MONTHS

DUE AT SIGNING*

169

$

OR BUY FOR

LEASE FOR

2187

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

HDB-01

PER MO. 39 MO. LEASE

2018

0

$

449/39/ 2995 PER M0NTH

LEASE FOR

2017 OUTBACKHAB-02 2.5i CVT

$

CASH DOWN OR TRADE

TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING

RATES AS LOW AS

20,566 0.00%

$

APR for 63 MOS.

198

$

2094

0

2017 FORESTER 2.5i CVT

2292

$

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

OR BUY FOR

PER MO. 39 MO. LEASE

$

CASH DOWN OR TRADE

TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING

RATES AS LOW AS

25,348 0.00%

$

APR for 48MOS.

2017 CROSSTREK 2.0i Premium CVT

HFB-02

HRC-12

2017 XT5

2017 ATS

LEASE FOR $

LEASE FOR $

LUXURY COLLECTION, NAVIGATION DRIVE AWARENESS PACKAGE, 6,700 MILES, #121183, 1 IN STOCK

LUXURY COLLECTION, AWD, POWER SUNROOF, SAFETY AND SECURITY, #160648, 3,500 MILES, 1 IN STOCK

419/39/$2995 PER M0NTH

MONTHS

2017 ATS

PER M0NTH

AWD, POWER SUNROOF, #137531, 4,900 MILES, 1 IN STOCK

LEASE FOR $

MONTHS

DUE AT SIGNING*

* Closed end leases, 10k per year, $2995 down, 25¢ mile overage, due on lease end. First month payment, plus tax, title and license, subject to credit approval. Not available with some other offers. Take delivery by 06/19/2017. ©2017 General Motors. Cadillac®

MONTHS

$

CASH DOWN OR TRADE

JOSEPH CADILLAC LOCATION 7600 Industrial Rd. Florence, KY 41042

SALES 859.795.2112 Mon-Thurs 9am-8pm Fri 9am-7pm Sat 9am-6pm,

SERVICE 859.795.2104 Mon-Fri 7:30am-6pm Sat 8am-12pm

2475

$

TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING

23,849 0.00%

RATES AS LOW AS

$

APR for 48 MOS.

2017 IMPREZA 2.0i Premium CVT HJD-11

LEASE FOR

0

189

$

PER MO. 39 MO. LEASE

2148

$

$

OR BUY FOR

DUE AT SIGNING*

ABOUT US Our unmatched service and diverse Cadillac inventory have set us apart as the preferred dealer in Florence. Visit us today to discover why we have the best reputation in the Florence area.

$

OR BUY FOR

LEASE FOR

PER MO. 39 MO. LEASE

2295

0

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

339/39/ 2995 PER M0NTH

179

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

449/39/$2995

DUE AT SIGNING*

LEASE FOR

CASH DOWN OR TRADE

21,897

$

2338

$

TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING

PER MO. 39 MO. LEASE

2300

0

2498

$

$

SECURITY DEPOSIT

OR BUY FOR

198

$

$

CASH DOWN OR TRADE

TOTAL DUE AT SIGNING

RATES AS LOW AS

23,398 0.00%

$

APR for 36 MOS.

ALL LEASES ARE 10,000 MILES PER YEAR, 15¢ PER MILE OVERAGE, PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE AND DOCUMENTARY FEE. WITH APPROVED CREDIT SUBARU MOTOR FINANCE,700 MINIMUM BEACON SCORE, $300 DISPOSITION FEE AT LEASE END IN ADDITION TO ANY CHARGES FOR EXCESS WEAR AND TEAR. OPTION TO PURCHASE AT LEASE END FOR AN AMOUNT TO BE DETERMINED AT LEASE SIGNING. WITH APPROVED CREDIT THRU SUBARU FINANCE, 700 BEACON SCORE OR HIGHER, NOT EVERYONE WILL QUALIFY. PRICES PLUS PLUS TAX, TITLE, LICENSE AND DOCUMENTARY FEE. OFFERS GOOD THRU 6/30/17.

RATES AS LOW AS

0.00%

APR for 36 MOS.

KY: 859-525-2500 | OHIO: 513-351-5400 Andy Held Doug Schmidt Joe Fangman or Dan Robke

7600 INDUSTRIAL RD., FLORENCE, KY

www.JosephSubaru.com

Mon-Thur 9-8 Fri 9-7 Sat 9-6 Sun 11-4


6A • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

SCHOOLS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@communitypress.com, 578-1059

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Beechwood High School places 4th at Odyssey of the Mind world finals

PROVIDED

Katie Schawe earned the honor of crowning the Blessed Mother by submitting a reflection about how she views Mary as a role model.

NDA honors patroness, breaks ground on 21st Century renovations On May 5 the Notre Dame Academy community gathered to celebrate the school’s annual May Crowning ceremony followed by the ground breaking for its Excellence Without Boundaries - Empowering 21st Century Women program. It was a special day to honor Notre Dame Academy’s patroness, Mary, and to reflect on NDA’s educational mission as a school dedicated to Mary. It also marked the official beginning of phase one of the Excellence Without Boundaries program. Phase one will include the renovation of NDA’s chapel and the construction of a 21st Century Collaborative Learning Center which began May 30. Phase two will include the construction of a food court and student commons and is scheduled to begin at the end of May 2018. For years, Notre Dame Academy has led the way in educational technology, integrating core competencies that enable students to thrive in the 21st century. As the only all-female college preparatory school in Northern Kentucky, Notre Dame Academy has demonstrated a strong commitment to academic excellence and empowering students by giving them immediate access to cutting-edge technology. At NDA, educators believe that fundamental skills such as collaboration, communication, creativity and critical thinking are required for success in today’s global community. “This morning’s celebration was a momentous and historic occasion for Notre Dame Academy,” NDA President Laura Koehl said. “We believe that through our efforts in these areas, we will take our 20th century building, which has served us so well over the years, into the 21st century where it will continue to provide an optimum environment for our NDA community to learn and thrive.”

Beechwood High School seniors Paul Alley, David Dodge, Natalie Sweasy, Sydney Blair, and juniors Reagan Alley and Tate Schroeder competed at the Odyssey of the Mind World Finals at Michigan State University. The team competed with teams from across the United States, British Columbia, Mexico, Hong Kong and Poland. The Beechwood team placed fourth overall. The team is coached by Darlene Alley. Her son Paul made his ninth trip to World Finals. Beechwood had five other teams attend World Finals and set a school record for having six teams qualify. Odyssey of the Mind is an international, educational, problem solving program that meets STEAM Objectives. At the beginning of the school year, teams of five to seven students choose a problem to solve.

PROVIDED

Beechwood High School Odyssey of the Mind Vehicle Team Beechwood High School Odyssey of the Mind team members David Dodge, Natalie Sweasy, Tate Schroeder, coach Darlene Alley, Sydney Blair, Reagan Alley and Paul Alley.

The five competitive problems include a vehicle problem, a technical problem, a classical problem, a structure problem and a performance problem. They present their solution in an eight-minute skit. Teams are required to work within a bud-

get and a timeline. The students are responsible for all aspects of their solution, including research and determining how to solve the problem. Teams that qualify at the state tournament move on to the Odyssey of the Mind World Finals.

For more information, you can contact the team’s coach, Darlene Alley, 859-468-0553, or Sally Andress, Odyssey of the Mind coordinator, sally.andress@beechwood.kyschools.us; 859-331-1220, ext. 6002.

NDA students selected for Ky. Governor’s programs

PROVIDED

Fourteen Notre Dame Academy students were selected to participate in the Kentucky Governor’s Schools Programs. Seven NDA student were chosen as alternates. From left, back row: Jessica Beirl, Emma Hatter, Lauren Judy, Ming Waih Wong Burgess, Livia Ganshirt, Riley Best, Anna Burns, Maddie Mariani, Sara Mathew, Samantha Wichmann and Rachel Darpel. Front row: Olivia Bosch, Bridget Wall, Rachel Massie, Claudia Hillmann, Theresa Berling, Caroline Lucas, Carenna Bohla and Ellie O’Hara.

Fourteen Notre Dame Academy students were selected to participate in the Kentucky Governor’s Scholars Programs. Seven NDA student were chosen as alternates. Juniors Jessica Beirl, Emma Hatter and Lauren Judy have been selected to participate in the 2017 Governor’s Scholars Program. Olivia Bosch, Rachel Massie and Bridget Wall have been selected as GSP alternates. Theresa Berling, Riley Best, Claudia Hillmann, Sarah Rolfsen, Anna Burns, Lindsey Foust, Caroline Lucas, Rachel Darpel and Ellie O’Hara have been selected to participate in the Governor’s School for the Arts program. Carenna Bhola, Sara Mathew, Maddie Mariani and Samantha Wichmann have been selected as alternates. Livia Ganshirt and Ming Waih Wong Burgess have been selected to participate in the Governor’s School for Entrepreneurs.

Notre Dame Academy students are scholarship finalists Three students from the Notre Dame Academy Class of 2017 have been recognized as National Merit Finalists by the 2017 National Merit Scholarship Program. Seniors, Brooke Schulte, Paige Montfort and Abbie Guard have all earned the distinction of National Merit Finalist. These students were among the 16,000 semifinalists named in the National Merit Scholarship Program’s 62nd competition in September recognizing each state’s top students. A total of 1.5 million high school juniors entered the program by taking the 2015 PSAT test. To

become finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Program, these young women submitted scholarship applications that included information about their academic records, cocurricular activities, leadership abilities, honors, awards and employment. “It is an incredible honor for three of our students to be recognized as National Merit Finalists,” Principal Jack VonHandorf . “This accomplishment is a reflecsaidtion of the diligence of our students and dedication of our faculty. We congratulate these young women and their families.”

PROVIDED

Notre Dame Academy National Merit finalists Brooke Schulte, Paige Montfort and Abbie Guard.


NEWS

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 7A

COLLEGE CORNER Blom inducted into Phi Kappa Phi

More College, has been selected from a competitive, national pool of nominees to participate in a faculty seminar on the teaching of interfaith understanding. She is the chair of the college’s Philosophy department. The seminar is offered by the Council of Independent Colleges and Interfaith Youth Core, with support from the Henry Luce Foundation. Twenty-five faculty members will participate in the five-day Teaching Interfaith Understanding seminar June 18– 22 at DePaul University in Chicago, Illinois. The program aims to broaden faculty members’ knowledge and strengthen their teaching of interfaith understanding, with the development of new courses and resources.

Maria Blom, of Villa Hills, was initiated into the honor society of Phi Kappa Phi, the nation’s oldest alldiscipline collegiate honor society. She s pursuing a degree in mechanical engineering at United States Military Academy. Blom is among approximately 30,000 students, faculty, professional staff, and alumni to be initiated into Phi Kappa Phi each year. Membership is by invitation only and requires nomination and approval by a chapter. Only the top 10 percent of seniors and 7.5 percent of juniors are eligible for membership. Graduate students in the top 10 percent of the number of candidates for graduate degrees may also qualify, as do faculty, professional Locals graduate staff, and alumni who have achieved scholarly distinc- from Centre College Several Kenton County tion. residents graduated from Centre College during the Gilkes graduates school’s 194th commencefrom Michigan Tech Emily Gilkes, of Edge- ment ceremony May 21. Graduates include Mawood, was among the nearthias Braboy of Erlanger, ly 1,000 graduates honored at Michigan Technological Carter Richardson of Fort University’s spring com- Mitchell, Megan Turner of mencement on the Hought- Fort Mitchell, Sean Fannin on, Michigan campus April of Independence, and Kirsten Giesbrecht of Villa 29. She graduated with a Hills. Braboy graduated with a bachelor of science in biobachelor of arts in history logical sciences. and politics. He is the son of Sharon and William Braboy Thomas More College professor to and is a graduate of Lloyd High School.Richardson participate in graduated with a bachelor interfaith of science in behavioral neuroscience. He is the son understanding of Brent and Melanie Richseminar Professor Catherine ardson and is a graduate of Sherron, Ph.D., of Thomas Beechwood High School. Turner graduated with a

bachelor of science in biochemistry and molecular biology. She is the daughter of Ruth Kleier and Glen Turner and is a graduate of Notre Dame Academy. Fannin graduated with a bachelor of arts in dramatic arts and economics. He is the son of Amy Fannin and Brian Fannin and is a graduate of Walton-Verona High School. Giesbrecht graduated with a bachelor of science in mathematics. She is the daughter of Kelly Giesbrecht and Martin Giesbrecht and is a graduate of Villa Madonna Academy.

Brolley on dean’s list at Heidelberg University Ian Brolley, of Erlanger, was named to the dean’s list at Heidelberg University for the 2017 spring semester. He is a sophomore education major.

Denn participates in WKU LeaderShape Institute Allison Denn, of Elsmere, participated in Western Kentucky University’s 11th campus-based LeaderShape Institute, an intensive, weeklong experience that teaches students to lead with integrity and believe in the impossible. A group of 48 students spent May 14-19 at the All Saints Center in Leitchfield to participate in the six-day program, full of lectures, simulations and small groups known as family clusters, which focused on their personal values and the visions they have to better the world in which we live.

MUST SEE MOVE-IN READY AVAILABLE IN

INDEPENDENCE PENDENCE

Discover your dream home without the wait.

THE RICHARDSON

Designer Collection 4 BR + Study, 2 1/2 Baths 10072 Meadow Glen Dr $341,990

THE MADISON

Maple Street Collection 3 BR + Loft, 2 1/2 Baths 6286 Clearchase Crossing $229,575

THE GREENBRIAR

Maple Street Collection 3 BR + Loft, 2 1/2 Baths 6262 Holm Oak Court $239,900

Visit

fischerhomes.com for directions Call or text 859-448-7211

©2017 Fischer Homes, Inc.

Overhead Door Company of Northern Kentucky

Schedule a FREE Garage Storage Solution Estim Today! Estimate 513.331.7726 859.759.4246

IT’S NOT POLITE TO STARE, but your GARAGE will get used to it.

10%OFF 10%OFF any cabinet storage kit or wall storage kit

Race Deck garage flooring

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 6/30/17

Not valid with any other offer. Expires 6/30/17

WE PROVIDE PROFESSIONAL INSTALLATION

Visit Vi Our Showroom 2571 Ritchie Ave Crescent Springs, KY 41017 7:30am-4:30pm (M-F) and 7:30-Noon (Sat)

www.OverheadDoorOnline.com

Proudly Servicing Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky for 70 years! Now Providing Garage Storage Solutions


NEWS

8A • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

Make dad a steak feast with Mexican twist My husband, Frank, is a dad who deserves something special to eat on Father’s Day. That usually means grilled steak. I have a feeling there are lots of our Community Press and Recorder dads who would enjoy a meaty, flavorful steak grilled steak. So today I’m sharing a recipe for grilled steak with chimichurri sauce. Rita The steak Heikenfeld can be whatever RITA’S KITCHEN dad likes: filet, sirloin, T-bone, rib eye, flat iron, flank, teres major or whatever. I mention teres major steak because it’s the new “old” kid on the steak scene. Teres major is from the beef shoulder; also called shoulder tender, beef shoulder, petite tender, bistro filet. Shaped like pork tenderloin, it usually weighs no more than one pound, often less. It’s very tender and flavorful. From what I can gather, it used to be included in hamburger, but now chefs are discovering just how yummy this steak is. If your grocer doesn’t carry it, ask to get some in. You’ll be glad you did. I hope each of our community dads has the best Dad’s Day

Corn on the cob with Mexican cheese I ate my first bite of this corn at my friend and Northern Kentucky reader Carolyn Grieme’s home. Carolyn is one of those confident cooks who will try a new recipe on guests, and it never fails to please. A nice side to the steak. Ingredients 6 nice ears corn, boiled or grilled 1/2 cup/1 stick melted butter 1/2 cup mayonnaise 8 oz. shredded Cotija or Queso Fresco cheese Sprinkling of ground cayenne, chipotle pepper powder or smoked hot paprika Lime wedges Instructions Roll cooked corn in butter, then brush with mayonnaise and roll in cheese. Sprinkle with pepper or paprika. Serve with lime wedge. THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Spice up corn on the cob with this simple Mexican style twist.

ever! Tip from Rita’s kitchen: Freeze basil on the stem You read that right. Place bunches in a large baggie. Keep a little air in to cushion basil. Freeze and store flat. Don’t let anything heavy sit on top. Use directly from bag, frozen to make it easier to chop. Use in cooked recipes. Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s Eastgate culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Abouteating.com. Email her at rita@com munitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line.

Grilled steak with chimichurri sauce Steak Olive oil Canadian or Montreal steak seasoning or just salt and pepper Instructions Rub steak with oil and sprinkle on seasoning to taste. Let sit out 20 minutes before grilling to desired doneness. After grilling, tent with foil and let “rest,” allowing juices to redistribute and temperature to rise about 5 degrees or so.

Chimichurri sauce Well, I could just dip bread into this sauce and eat it as is. Go to taste on ingredients. Ingredients 1 bunch parsley, chopped coarsely 5-7 cloves garlic, minced 3/4 cup olive oil 1/4 cup red wine vinegar Squeeze of lemon juice to taste 1 tablespoon diced red onion 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano or to taste Shake of cayenne or black pepper Salt to taste Instructions Put everything in the food processor and process until smooth.

Basil buttermilk dressing clarification When I published this earlier, I forgot to say how much buttermilk. Here’s the recipe again. Dottie K.’s original recipe said 2 green onions, so go to taste. No need to pack the basil tight in the cup. Ingredients 2 cups basil leaves 3/4 cup buttermilk (I used whole buttermilk) 3/4 cup green onions, white and green parts, sliced, or to taste 3/4 cup mayonnaise Salt and pepper to taste Instructions Put basil, buttermilk and onions in food processor and process until smooth. Add mayonnaise and seasonings and process until mayonnaise is mixed in. Good add in: I made this again and added a bit of minced garlic. (I love garlic).

CARPET DESIGNED FOR PETS and THEIR PEOPLE

RESISTS PET STAINS RELEASES PET HAIR REDUCES PET ODOR

513-322-3245 Carpets & Floors

859-687-8057

CALL FOR A FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION

* 20% off requires the purchase of any special order STAINMASTER PetProtect carpet. Not valid on in-stock merchandise. Financing subject to credit approval. See store for details. Some exclusions apply. Not valid on previous purchases. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Photos are for illustration purposes only. Offer ends 6/30/17.


NEWS

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 9A

Tiny Micro-Chip Now In The Ear: Available! Now You See It...

Now You Don’t!

• Miracle-Ear Mirage • One of the smallest custom hearing aids ever made • 48 channel digital signal Tiny micro-processor processing • Digital engineering allows 1,000’s of custom settings TM

PHOTOS PROVIDED

Visitors gather on the north end of the Roebling Suspension Bridge.

RoeblingFest 2017 set for June 17 A day of history, entertainment and fun - RoeblingFest 2017 will celebrate the 150th anniversary of the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge Saturday, June 17. At the time of its completion in 1867, it was the longest bridge in the world. It is now a National Historic Landmark and a National Civil Engineering Landmark and was the forerunner of the famed Brooklyn Bridge in New York City. In the beginning and for 150 subsequent years the Roebling Bridge has connected the North and the South, offering reliable and economic passage between the Commonwealth of Kentucky at Covington and the State of Ohio at Cincinnati. The span is among the most iconic symbols of Greater Cincinnati. This RoeblingFest is a community event, historically focused, that will highlight the 150th anniversary of the John A. Roebling Suspension Bridge, which officially opened to the public Jan. 1,1867.

RoeblingFest is presented by the CovingtonCincinnati Suspension Bridge Committee. This family event, centered at East Third Street and Court Avenue in Covington, will be from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and overlaps in the morning with the Covington Farmer’s Market and in the evening with the Summer Concert Series. A new documentary film will be revealed to our guests on monitors in several locations. A special guest and presenter will be Kriss Roebling, the greatgreat-great-great-grandson of John A. Roebling. Parking will be available in the Yoke Lot, along Greenup Street just north of Third Street, or in the Midtown garage at Scott and Fifth Streets. Roebling Point Merchants Association (Molly Malone’s, Keystone Bar & Grill, Blinkers Tavern, The Gruff, and Roebling Point Coffee & Books) and Smoke Justis will be open during their scheduled business hours to provide food and drink.

Spaces Are Limited Call Today For Your FREE* Hearing Evaluation!

2 Weeks Only! NOW THRU JUNE 24th Miracle-Ear Hearing Centers Cold Spring (859) 353-6087

Colerain Twp. (513) 427-0332

Cynthiana (859) 359-7403

Eastgate (513) 427-0458

Erlanger (859) 340-1633

Florence (859) 353-6098

Georgetown (513) 299-8344

Hamilton (513) 427-0260

Maysville (606) 619-4132

Middletown Lebanon Lawrenceburg (812) 718-4090 (513) 202-4755 (513) 402-1129 Western Hills Springdale (513) 427-0346 (513) 427-0054

One More Thing Some parts of the evaluation include the use of a familiar voice, so if you are married, please bring your spouse with you. Call us today to confirm your appointment time!

The Miracle-Ear Advantage: RoeblingFest celebrates the 150-year history of the Roebling Suspension Bridge.

UP TO

50% OFF! Luke’s Sewing Centers

4005 Dixie Hwy. VIKING & Erlanger / Elsmere, KY JANOME (859) 342-6600 Sewing Machines Hours: Tues - Fri 10am-6pm, SEWING CLASSES NOTIONS - ACCESSORIES

FREE ESTIMATES

Sat 10am-5pm, Closed Sun & Mon Expires 7/15/17

• 100% Satisfaction Guarantee* • 3-year Limited * Warranty** • FREE Lifetime Service • Over 65 Years in Receive 2 Audiotone® Pro Full-Shell ITE Hearing Aids at Business $995 for a limited time only. • Over 1,200 Locations Nationwide

2 for $995 *Limit one coupon per patient at the promotional price during event dates only. Not valid with any other discount or offer. Does not apply to prior purchases. Fits up to 35 db loss. Offer expires 06/24/17.

We Work With Most Insurance Plans

DISCOUNT PRICES! (ALL MAKES & MODELS)

$20 OFF

Any Sewing Machine Repair

CE-0000674831

Luke’s Sewing Centers 4005 Dixie Hwy. Erlanger / Elsmere, KY (859) 342-6600

CODE: NP 2 FOR $995 0517 *Hearing tests are always free. Hearing test is an audiometric test to determine proper amplification needs only, not medical exams or diagnoses. If you are not completely satisfied, the aids may be returned for a full refund within 30 days from the completion of fitting, in satisfactory condition. Fitting fee may apply. Valid at participating locations only. See store for details. **Not valid on Audiotone Pro.


10A • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

VIEWPOINTS

COMMUNITY

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

Childhood poverty is not a new topic With Mother’s Day just behind us and Father’s Day around the corner, parents have been on my mind lately. We know parents are critical to children’s development. Children need stability and nurturing relationships, especially during those crucial early years. We also know that children are critical to their parent’s ongoing development. When children are sick, having difficulties at school, or experiencing other problems, parents working in jobs without paid leave may not be able to fully attend to them without compromising their employment. Further, unpredictable work schedules often require parents to rely on unstable or low-quality child care arrangements. For the most part, Greater Cincinnatians agree on this information, yet properly supporting working parents with young children, who often live in poverty, continues to be a community-wide struggle. In recent months, much attention has been paid to the high rates of childhood poverty in Greater Cincinnati. This is a problem that needs a spotlight. Despite the collective efforts of our community to improve children’s lives, poverty persists. That

is why we must also persist. While this topic might be “new news” to some, the topic and the Florence solutions for Tandy overcoming this complex COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST challenge are COLUMNIST not new to Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission (NKCAC). Fifty years ago, NKCAC was founded to “wage war on poverty.” Daily we win battles, but clearly the war continues. Our staff builds an individualized, integrated and comprehensive approach designed to meet families where they are and help them along a pathway to self-reliance. More times than not, two or three or four of our services, along with partners’ programs, too, are needed to form the pathway; and sometimes these services must be provided more than once. Childhood poverty is a community crisis with no single solution. Results are slow, intensive and not easily replicated; but we know comprehensive interventions work. Time and time again, ser-

vices provided by NKCAC have succeeded in disrupting the cycle of poverty. As an agency, we strive for continuous improvement and help families celebrate the small and large successes along their path to self-reliance. The issues facing low-income families striving to improve their futures needs a spotlight and we are thankful this issue is receiving the attention it deserves. Innovative thinking and integrated resources are key to making a difference. And so are agencies like NKCAC who have a history of successfully fighting this war. At Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission we are ready to help as our community tackles these complicated issues both with new approaches and the blending of those that have shown results for years. If you are a researcher, practitioner, policymaker, a member of the media, or funder, please help us continue to shine a bright light on the issue of childhood poverty. Our children are counting on it. Florence Tandy is executive director of Northern Kentucky Community Action Commission.

After mild winter, mosquitoes are on the rise FILE PHOTO

If you’re a fan of snowball fights, sledding or cold nights sitting by a warm fire, the winter of 2016-2017 was not a good one for you. If you’re a tick or a mosquito, the mild winter and a wet spring has led to a significant bump in your activity. If you’re a Lynne Saddler bat, it’s unclear yet how COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST the mild winCOLUMNIST ter will impact your activity this summer. Experts think it will lead to a shift in the population, but they aren’t sure if that shift will go up or down. Since some insects, bats and rodents can carry disease, changes in their activity and populations are concerning for human health.

Higher population of insects With a mild winter, we’re expecting a higher population of insects locally this year. This means mosquitoes, ticks and other insects are breeding and hatching earlier this spring. Insect activity in Northern Kentucky typically peaks in June, July and August; this year’s unusual weather may lead to an early arrival of a large number of bugs. Rainy, hot and humid weather is perfect for the mosquitoes, so periods of spring and summer storms will only add to the usual pesky population. While most local insects don’t carry disease and are only a nuisance, there is some reason for concern. In Kentucky, we are beginning to see cases of Lyme disease that were acquired in the commonwealth, where in the past, human cases of Lyme were typically found in Kentuckians who’d traveled and become infected elsewhere.

Mosquitoes can transmit the West Nile virus, which can be fatal in some cases in humans. We are also watching the transmission of the Zika virus, which is spread by mosquitoes, too. So far, only five Northern Kentuckians have been diagnosed with Zika, and all contracted the virus outside the United States. But, the possibility of Zika arriving in our local mosquito population, either from a human who contracted the virus elsewhere or the migration of the disease in the mosquito population, is a possibility for which the health department will be monitoring. To protect yourself from insects, use an EPA-approved insect repellent when you’ll be outdoors – even for a short time or in your backyard. Be sure to wear light-colored clothing. When temperatures allow, wear long sleeves and long pants. You can also purchase clothing treated with a chemical called permethrin to repel insects. To control mosquito population, eliminate standing water, which prevents mosquitoes from breeding. Make sure the screens on your windows are in good condition, and repair and seal your septic system.

Sharp rise in bat exposures Bats and rodents are active in the summer, and often come in contact with humans. Locally, we’ve seen a sharp rise in bat exposures among local residents. This is a concern because bites from bats are now the most common cause of rabies in people in the U.S. In 2016, approximately 20 cases of bat exposure

RECORDER

Editor: Nancy Daly, ndaly@communitypress.com, 578-1059

If you’re a tick or a mosquito, the mild winter and a wet spring has led to a significant bump in your activity.

were reported to the health department; 12 bats were available for rabies testing and luckily none of those tested were found to be infected. However, in recent years we have seen bats test positive for rabies locally. Be sure to check your home to make sure bats can’t enter: » Seal up entry points such as gaps under the eaves or soffit » Make sure the flashing on your chimney and the chimney cover is intact and in good condition. » Put screening on attic vents to allow for air flow, but not for bats to enter. » Pest control companies can help you assess your house further. Rodents can also carry infections, such as hantavirus, salmonella and E.coli. To prevent exposures to rodents, don’t have debris outside, including branches, where rodents can nest. Don’t leave food for pets out for long periods of time, as rodents may feed on it. You should also teach children not to touch unfamiliar or wild animals. While the weather forecast can be difficult to predict year-to-year, we do know that the methods to prevent exposure to insects and wild animals—and the disease they may carry – are tried and true. Dr. Lynne M. Saddler is district director of health of the Northern Kentucky Health Department.

CH@TROOM Last week’s question What was the best summer job you ever had? The worst? What made the job so good (or so bad)?

“Worst job by far was prepping tobacco for drying. Best was working the barges on the Ohio River. Even as a busboy, everyone was generous and there was free food and drink.” George Hilbert

“Best: Astrodome Ticket Office early 1980s. A peek into another world. Worst: Astroworld Cash Control. Hours. Heat. Timed cash runs.” Tom Streeter

“One summer while I was in college, I was hired as a ‘helper’ to assist the on-site manager and waitress at a pizza parlor. On my second day on the job, the manager and waitress did not show up – and never came back. Much to the surprise of their spouses, they ran off together. I managed the restaurant by myself the rest of the week – took orders, prepared food, and took money, until the owner got me a helper for the rest of the summer. It was a tough first week, but I learned a lot. C.A.

“I fondly recall a summer spent working at Kings Island. It really was an endless summer! So many of my Walnut Hills ‘78 classmates worked there with me. Most of the girls worked on International Street in the various shops and quite a few of the guys worked as costumed characters. We had a blast and even though we worked five days a week we always seemed to end up there on our days off as well since we got in for free. Occasionally when working late on a ‘closing’ shift someone would get throw in the fountain on International Street. There were some great parties too and Dick Van Dyke came to our employee bash! Fun times ... Can’t remember a worst – maybe Shillito’s department store because I was a parttimer and was thrown into a different department everyday having to relearn everything. Also had mono that summer and it was the summer before freshman year of college.” Julie Phillippi Whitney

“I worked at a daycare. It was really a high school job but I was out by 6 p.m. every night. Perfect for a teenager.” Sarah Elizabeth

“I was an usher at the main sports and entertainment arena in Memphis. I actually got paid to attend all of the events for free!” Elsa Hale

“In regards to my ‘worst’ and ‘best’ summer jobs, At the

THIS WEEK’S QUESTION President Trump visited Cincinnati last week to promote his plans for rebuilding the nation’s infrastructure. What do you see as the most critical infrastructure needs in our area? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via email. Send your answers to ndaly@ communitypress.com with Ch@troom in the subject line.

time, my worst summer job was a my employ in construction for three summers in the mid 1970s. “I was 12-15 years old. I took a 2 buses from Edgewood to White Oak to work for six hours a day at $1.50/hour, digging foundation holes, mixing concrete, framing houses, carrying bricks, and general labor for an independent general contractor who was a hard working, driven immigrant from Germany with roots from the Depression. He was a perfectionist whose demeanor was quick on orders and short on compliments. The work was hot, difficult and tiring, as I often napped on the long bus ride home. “Upon further review, my best summer job was my employ in construction for three summers in the mid 1970s. “Yes, this job was the hardest job that I ever had, but it taught me so much. I learned the simple important concepts of the employer/employee relationship. “1. The independent contractor did not exist in order to employ me, he was out to make a buck, and so was I (quid pro quo)! “2. As I came with little skills, I was paid very little, and was glad to be given an opportunity. I had to compensate my lack of skills with effort. “3. As my skill level increased, and brought more value to the organization (construction site), I had leverage to request more money, OR take my new skills elsewhere. “4. Work is not an ugly fourletter word. I gained skill, confidence and personal satisfaction from a job well done. Our self worth and independence grow exponentially as a result of ‘work.’ “Oh, my employer on my best/worst job was my grandfather!” “Thanks Gramps!” Scott McKinley, Edgewood

June 1 question Cicadas: Neat or nuisance?

“Cicadas are the best! I have been finding them all over my yard and picking up their shells.” Alexander, age 3

FILE ART

“I fondly recall a summer spent working at Kings Island. It really was an endless summer! So many of my Walnut Hills ‘78 classmates worked there with me. Most of the girls worked on International Street in the various shops and quite a few of the guys worked as costumed characters,” said Julie Phillippi Whitney.


JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 1B

SPORTS

COMMUNITY Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

Cincinnati.com/northernkentucky

‘Bulldog’ Martin leads SK to state semis

Pandas proud of state softball run James Weber jweber@communitypress.com

James Weber jweber@communitypress.com

LEXINGTON – Simon Kenton may not be the most talented team of the 16 that came to Whitaker Bank Ballpark this week for the KHSAA state baseball tournament. The Pioneers, however, may be the most confident and fearless. And now they’re one of the last four still playing. Clutch play in all phases of the game lifted SK to a 3-2 win over Muhlenberg County Saturday in the first quarterfinal. SK (26-15) advances to next Friday’s semifinals at 11 a.m. It is the Pioneers’ second state semifinal berth in four seasons after reaching the state final in 2014. The most confident of all on this day was junior pitcher Bailey Martin. He threw a complete game, allowing six hits and one earned run while walking none and striking out five. He threw only 97 pitches and improved to 7-2 for the season. While on the mound, he had four assists, including two occasions in which he retired the lead runner on a sacrifice bunt. At the plate, he was 3-for-3 with an RBI and a run scored. “Bailey is our bulldog,” SK head coach Troy Roberts said. “He’s the littlest guy we’ve got but he’s the toughest guy we’ve got. He’s not cocky; he’s just confident. He fields that position. Our guys know that and they feed off that.” “We play with confidence,” Martin said. “I pitch with confidence because I have a good defense behind me. It’s awesome (going to the semis). Nothing like it. It’s a once in a lifetime thing.” All the scoring happened in the first inning, a frame the Mustangs probably figured they would end with the lead. Muhlenberg scored twice on three hits in the top of first with one Pioneer error. With MC leading 1-0, Nick Casey launched a pitch to the wall in center for a double to make it 2-0. He was caught off second base on the play by senior shortstop Trent Kincaid, who got him in a rundown for the second out while also preventing the runner on third from breaking for the plate. Martin then got the next batter to end the inning. “We got lucky on that one,” Roberts said. “Trent, of course, saw it right away. He’s as heads-up a ballplayer as I’ve ever coached. He sees that right away and immediately gets him in a rundown.” In the bottom of the first, Kyle Taylor led off with a walk. The next two Pioneers were retired, and Brayden Trattles walked. Martin singled to make it 2-1. Zane Fuqua tied it with a hit. Joey Ponder launched a ground-rule double to left, and it was 3-2.

PHOTOS BY THE ENQUIRER/ JAMES WEBER

Simon Kenton’s Bailey Martin pitches to Muhlenberg County during Simon Kenton’s 3-2 win over Muhlenberg County in the KHSAA state baseball quarterfinals.

Simon Kenton senior Trent Kincaid watches his ball during Simon Kenton’s 3-2 win over Muhlenberg County in the KHSAA state baseball quarterfinals June 10.

“At two outs, we just keep going,” Roberts said. “It goes back to the no-quit factor. They don’t give up when they have two outs.” After that, both teams had plenty of opportunities but couldn’t connect with home plate again. Taylor doubled for SK with one out in the second and was left there. In MC’s third, Mike Walker singled to lead off the inning. Madden Sommers bunted to Martin, who got Walker out at second, then Martin retired the next two. SK loaded the bases with no outs in the third when Trattles singled, then Martin and Fuqua both reached safely on sacrifice bunts. The Pioneers followed with a short flyout, a

RECORDER

strikeout and groundout. In MC’s fourth, Jacob Whitmer singled with one out and was picked off first by senior catcher Hunter Faehr. In SK’s fourth, the Pioneers had runners on first and third with one out but Trattles grounded into a double play. In the top of the sixth, MC put the first two runners on before cleanup hitter Payton Lipe bunted to Martin. Martin spun and got the lead runner at third, then retired the next two batters. Clutch defense has been a regular thing in Independence since the postseason started. “I can’t say enough about them,” Roberts said. “They’re not scared to make a play. They’re tough as nails. Every single guy on that field wants the ball. A lot of kids in high school want the ball hit somewhere else in a high-stress situation. Our guys want to make the play.” Martin’s seventh was one of his quietest as he retired the bottom three hitters in the lineup to end the game. They were 0-for-9 combined in the game. If one had reached, Walker, who was 2-for-3 with the out being a long fly out, could have tied the game or put MC ahead. “Bailey pitched his butt off,” Trattles said, “He made great plays as a pitcher fielding bunts, just unbelievable.” The Pioneers will have a chance to make more plays next week. “It’s exciting,” Trattles said. “We’re not just happy to be there. We want to win it. We’re playing good team ball.”

The most explosive offense in the Ninth Region ran out of firepower Friday in the KHSAA state softball tournament. Notre Dame ran into a pair of buzzsaws as the Pandas lost twice in the double-elimination tourney and saw their season end with a 23-13-1 record. NDA was outscored 17-1 in the two games but it didn’t spoil the success the Pandas had in reaching the state tourney for the second time in the past three seasons and third time overall. “For us, nobody really talked about us getting back to state this year, but we had great senior leadership,” head coach Joe Stephenson said. “They were all very good leaders. Their work ethic at practice, showing up early, staying late. To see the girls reap the rewards of that work was very gratifying.” After a stirring 16-7 win over Boyle County Thursday night, NDA lost 8-0 to Owensboro Catholic (25-11) in the winner’s bracket and were eliminated in the consolation bracket by Central Hardin, 9-1. Before that, NDA had won nine in a row, averaging 12.3 runs along the way. The Pandas averaged nine runs per game for the season. That Panda power exploded for 15 runs in the last two innings against Boyle, avenging a 3-2 defeat May 13. After trailing 3-1 through five innings, Notre Dame scored seven in the sixth on five hits to lead 8-3. Lindsey Meier had two hits in the inning, the first helping the Pandas load the bases with no outs as Kennedy Baugh and Angela Huston followed her with singles. With one out, senior Erica Huston reached on a fielder’s choice, scoring a run. Two runs scored when freshman Serena Paterno grounded to third and Boyle committed a throwing error, scoring two runs. Freshman Maddie Prospero had an RBI groundout and freshman Olivia Meier had an RBI single. Lindsey Meier’s second single scored a run, and senior Cori Ladanyi scored on a wild pitch. Boyle countered with four runs on three hits, with two Panda errors, in the bottom of the sixth, and it was 8-7. The Pandas stormed right back with eight runs in the sev-

enth. Prospero had a two-run double to make it 10-7. Olivia Meier, senior Angela Huston and junior Lauren Durstock drove in runs, then Erica Huston hit a two-run single to finish the scoring. Prospero and Erica Huston finished with three RBI. Lindsey Meier had three hits and scored twice. Angela Huston scored three times. Senior Kennedy Baugh finished with two hits. “It’s happened a lot this year for us,” Stephenson said. “We’ve been a fourth-, fifth-, sixth-inning team. We play to the last out. They knew they were never out of the ball game because we can score runs in bunches.” One key late in the year was getting the youth in the lineup used to varsity ball. “Our freshmen in the 7-8-9 holes started to get clutch hits and we became more of a complete team,” Stephenson said. “It helps knowing you’re not going to struggle in an inning or two.” On Friday, OCath rapped out 14 hits in the first game, scoring seven of its runs in the first three innings. NDA had three hits, two by freshman Maddie Prospero. The Pandas committed three errors as well. The Pandas had similar problems against Central Hardin, allowing five runs on eight hits in the first inning. The Pandas allowed two runs after three errors in the third inning. NDA had six hits in its final loss. The Pandas scored in the fifth when Baugh doubled and scored on a double from Durstock. Baugh had two hits. NDA had five seniors: Kennedy Baugh, Angela Huston, Erica Huston, Cori Ladanyi and Annabelle Lee. Baugh, one of the top players in Northern Kentucky, hit nearly .500 with 49 RBI and five home runs. Angela Huston was second on the team in RBI. Ladanyi and Lindsey Meier hit over .400 and led in stolen bases. “They all play different positions and they can help the younger girls understand those positions,” Stephenson said. “Every position is played differently. Having the seniors explain that to the younger girls is a benefit. When this group was sophomores, they went down to state and they lost 3-0 and 2-1. This time around, they knew what to expect.” JIM OWENS FOR THE ENQUIRER

NDA base runner Maddie Prospero gets the green light for home from head coach Joe Stephenson.

CE-0000679390


LIFE

2B • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

Beechwood stars help West team to football classic win Marc Hardin prepsports@enquirer.com

The West’s 25-7 win in Thursday’s annual Northern Kentucky Football Coaches Association East-West All-Star Game at Dixie Heights High School capped a wildly successful season for Beechwood’s West allstars. Six months after helping Beechwood win its 12th Class A state championship, a handful of Tigers capped their senior seasons with a win in their final prep game in Kentucky. Keying the victory was Beechwood tailback Aiden Justice, who opened the scoring with a 64-yard first-quarter touchdown run. Justice ran for more than 100 yards in the game. “The state championship was the best thing that ever happened to me,” Justice said. “I didn’t expect much tonight. But I saw a lane (on the touchdown run) and they blocked great, and we won.” Other West all-stars for Beechwood were ends Lucas Benson and Dalton Everett and linebackers Josh Dietz and Sam Talley. “I was very pumped about this,” Everett said. “We ended the season on a high with a state championship. And now we win the All-Star Game, 25-7.” Even the Beechwood cheerleaders for the West

NEW

BRANDON SEVERN FOR THE ENQUIRER

Xavier Abernathy of Holy Cross fights for yardage up the middle for the West All-Stars.

got in on the fun as University of Kentuckybound friends Hannah Eberts, Tara-Lynne Skinner and Olivia Sletto cheered their last game together during the winning effort. The West got on the board with Justice’s long scamper on the fourth drive of the game with 1:04 to play in the opening quarter. Ludlow’s TC Eads converted the extrapoint kick for a 7-0 West lead. It was 13-0 with 7:15 to go before halftime on Conner quarterback Walker Buelow’s 23-yard touchdown pass to Boone County receiver Rondell Douglas. The kick failed. Unofficially, the West outgained the East, 152-71 in total first-half yards. The West received a late first-quarter interception from Holy Cross safety Jaylin Williams.

That helped set up the West’s 33-yard drive for a score, punctuated by Douglas’ TD grab. The West’s Clay Centers of Cooper came up with a second-quarter interception, giving the West the ball at the East 24. Two plays later, the West gave it back to the East on a Justice fumble near the 5-yard line with less than a minute to play before the break. That didn’t stop Justice from earning West MVP honors. “We had a lot of fun,” Justice said. A third-quarter interception by Conner’s Brian Manning gave the West the ball at the East 38. Seven plays later, Xavier Abernathy from Holy Cross scored on a three-yard TD run with 28.3 seconds left in the quarter for a 19-0 West lead.

2017 Acura RDX AWD TECH

$339

Per Mo.* Lease 36 MONTHS, $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING *Model #TB4H5HKNW. Plus tax, title, license and fees. Includes down payment, no security deposit required. On approved credit through AFS. Residual $24,270. 10K miles per year, 20¢ per mile over. Offer ends 7/5/17.

NEW 2017AcuraTLX

NEW 2017AcuraMDX

Mo.* $329/Per Lease

Mo.* $439/Per Lease

2.4 TECH

36 MONTHS, $1,599 DUE AT SIGNING

9 SPEED AUTOMATIC

36 MONTHS, $2,999 DUE AT SIGNING

The East scored its touchdown on Dixie Heights tailback Jose Torres’ 20-yard scoring run in the fourth. Torres was named East MVP in the last game on his home field. The West answered later in the quarter with Buelow’s 2-yard keeper, setting the final score with 7:05 to play. Pregame ceremonies featured presentation of three individual awards by the NKFCA. Steve Fromeyer, a coach at Scott, was honored with the Service Dedication Award. Retiring Ludlow head coach Rick Hornsby received the Coaching Excellence Award. Boone County senior Chandler Feinauer was given the Chris Vier Courage Award. At halftime, Covington Catholic’s Hunter Ziegelmeyer was awarded the National Football Foundation Scholar Athlete Award over fellow finalists Dante Hendrix from Cooper and Simon Kenton’s Brian Carter. Ziegelmeyer and Carter were awarded $1,000. Hendrix already has a full scholarship. Halftime recipients of NKFCA/St. Elizabeth Healthcare $500 scholarships were Beechwood’s Josh Dietz (Kentucky), Bellevue’s Adam Hazeres (West Virginia), Bishop Brossart’s Matthew Blank (Morehead State), Boone County’s Feinhauer (Thomas More), Campbell County’s Jeremy Lackey (Northern Kentucky), Conner’s Peyton Van Horn (Eastern Kentucky), Cooper’s Jarod Lonaker (Wittenburg), CovCath’s Jake Kunkel (Kentucky), Dayton’s Buddy Lukens (Georgetown College), Dixie Heights’ Jose Torres (Cincinnati), Highlands’ Sam Taylor (Cincinnati), Holmes’ Tahj Campbell (Thomas More), Holy Cross’ Abernathy (Georgetown College), Lloyd’s Elijah Jouett (Thomas More), Ludlow’s Eads (Berea), Newport’s Markel Garland (Thomas More), Newport Central Catholic’s Anthony Lotz (Northern Kentucky), Ryle’s Bryce Ashley (Cincinnati), Scott’s Bobby Brown (Eastern Kentucky) and Simon Kenton’s Sam LeCount (Eastern Kentucky). West 7 6 6 6 -- 25 East 0 0 0 7 -- 7 W-Justice 64 run (Eads kick) W-Douglas 23 pass from Buelow (kick failed) W-Abernathy 3 run (run failed) E-Torres 20 run (Neff kick) W-Buelow 2 run (kick failed)

SHORT HOPS James Weber jweber@nky.com

Football » NKY All-Star rosters West Beechwood: Aiden Justice, Lucas Benson, Dalton Everett, Josh Dietz, Sam Talley. Boone County: Branden Morgan, Rondell Douglas, Chandler Feinauer, Dylan Kramer, Colin Eickhoff, Logan Eickhoff. Conner: Darrell Marshall, Joey Cooper, Peyton Van Horn, Walker Buelow, Brian Manning, Austin Cain, JJ Reed. Cooper: Jerod Lonaker, Jaden Jackson, Shea Burns, Sander Roksvag, Clay Centers, Austin Yauger. Holmes: Salih Abdullah, Jashaun York, Seth Hille, Tahj Campbell. Holy Cross: Xavier Abernathy, Jaylin Williams, Jake Gerrien, Owen Finke, Kyle Schirmann, Theo Maris. Lloyd Memorial: Lashunn Townsend, Alex Runion, Justin Durham, Elijah Jouett, Keegan Turner, Kobe Maynard. Ludlow: TC Eads. Ryle: Drew Turner, Bryce Ashley, Josh Sandmann, Jeremy Pendleton. Scott: Austin Price, Jason Bosse, Hunter Chalk. East Bellevue: Adam Hazeres, Liam McCarthy. Bishop Brossart: Chase Keller, Derek Schadler, Jake Martin, Matthew Blank, Kory Quitter. Campbell County: Cooper Gray, Jordan Boschert, Noah Sell, Jeremy Lackey, Cameron Sandman. Covington Catholic: David Reisiger, Anthony Best, Josh Galvin, Alex Shelton, Jake Kunkel. Dayton: Trevor Simpson, Cole Young, Elijah Johnson, Buddy Lukens. Dixie Heights: Giante Hicks, Zach Borchers, Logan Robinson, Austin Rice, Jose Torres. Highlands: Trent Buchert, Sam Taylor. Newport: Markel Garland. NCC: Trent Wrobleski, Job Freppon, Austin Neff, Hunter Pittman. Simon Kenton: Trent Kincaid, Luke Vance, Casey Mitchell, Markie Rider, Brian Carter, Mitchell Kreidenweis, Brandon Duwel.

Baseball » NKAC All-region teams Division 1: CovCath – Ben France (Player of the Year), Jack Coldiron, Jack Maile; Campbell County – Colton Hartig, Cory Franzen, Collin Teegarden, Brady Brooks; Conner – Max Sims, Nick Craddock, Tim Sherman; Cooper – Braydenxx Runion, Brendan Reid, Conner Phillips; Dixie Heights – Andrew Daria; Ryle – Thomas Spiritoso. Division 2: Highlands – Drew Rom (Player of the Year), Ethan Doty, Hunter Dreves; Beechwood – Noah Huseman, Logan Castleman, Evan Schlinger; Bishop Brossart – Chase Keller, Zach Hamberg; Holmes – DV Gulley; Holy Cross – Jake Webster, Joey Yancey; NCC – Brian Wells, Gunner Smith; St. Henry – Max Epplen, Will Brady, Nick Ferraro. Division 3: Ludlow – TC Eads (Player of the Year),

YOUTH FOOTBALL AGES 7-14

*Model #UB1F5HKNW. Plus tax, title, license and fees. Includes down payment, no security deposit required. On approved credit through AFS. All incentives applied and retained by dealer. Residual $19,610. 10K miles per year, 20¢ per mile over. Offer ends 7/5/17.

5555 Dixie Hwy. Fairfield,OH 45014

*Model #YD3H3HJNW. Plus tax, title, license and fees. Includes down payment with no security deposit. On approved credit through AFS. Residual $27,015. 10K miles per year, 20¢ per mile over. Offer ends 7/5/17.

513-829-8500

MONDAY - TUESDAY FREE JUNE 19-20 • 6-8:30PM FOOTBALL CAMP • NFL YOUTH FOOTBALL 2017

• • • •

EVERYONE GETS TO PLAY! SHARPEN YOUR SKILLS AND LEARN NEW ONES! EXPERIENCED COACHING STAFF THE NFL: INVOLVED IN YOUTH SPORTS FOR OVER 50 YEARS

EVA G. FARRIS SPORTS COMPLEX

LOCATED AT 4524 VIRGINIA AVE. COVINGTON, KY 41015 (Go to www.hchscov.com for directions)

CE-0000679362

QUESTIONS: Call Coach Bruce Kozerski or Mary Guidugli AT 859-802-2037

Softball » NKAC All-region teams Division I: Cooper – Kayari Suganuma (Player of the Year); Boone County – Olivia Jackson, Karys Black; Campbell County – McKinlee Miller, Ashley Leicht; Dixie Heights – Kaylee McGinn; Notre Dame – Kennedy Baugh, Corey Ladanyi; Simon Kenton – Macy Krohman. Division II: Co-Players of the Year – Haley Meyers (NCC) and Aleah Tucker (Holy Cross); Brossart – Megan Seiter; Highlands – Rachel Gabbard, Brooke Dill; Holmes – Kailyn Cooper; Holy Cross – Tucker; NCC – Meyers, Jenna Fryer, Kacy Zimmerman; St. Henry – Jessie Roark, Ashlee Pollard. Division III: Dayton – Grace Workman (Player of the Year), Megan Downard, Emma Donelan, KIlee Donelan; Bellevue – Reagan Atwood, Arianna Dotson; Ludlow – Jayna Crawford, Bella Sloan; VMA; - Brooke Meier, Anna Wagner.

Boys tennis » NKAC all-region teams Division I: CovCath – Anthony Bosch (Player of the Year), Max Cook, Jared Haught, Benito Trojani, Cristiano Trojani, Evan Gardner; Campbell County – Anderson McDowell, Bryce Coyle; Conner – Nick Elleman, Peyton Lightall, Ben Reis; Cooper – Eric Speagle; Ryle – Max O’Leary ,Jonah Shields, Kurtis Kalbaugh, Nathan Conner. Team champion: CovCath. Division II: Bellevue – Brad Reed (Player of the Year); VMA – Jon-Michael Schulte; Beechwood- Garrett Jordan, John Taylor; St. Henry – Mitchell Berling, Jeff Mollman; Calvary – Cole Moss; Highlands – Peter Laskey, Jeffrey Schenk, Colin Rizzo, Jackson Hopper, Connor Millard; NCC – Blake Huber, Ben Wells; Team champion – Highlands.

Girls tennis » NKAC all-region teams Division I: Ryle – Elizabeth Hamilton (Player of the Year), Amanda Shane; Notre Dame – Lauren Fley, Zoe Moellering, Kylie Moellering, Josephine Meyer-Hogan, Isabelle Bailey, Catherine Meadows; Campbell County – Natalie Smith; Conner – Ally Elleman; Cooper – Ellie Zureick; Dixie – Alaina Moore, Annie Atkinson; Simon Kenton – Cassie Saner, Olivia Bowling, Stephanie Saner; Team champion: NDA. Division II: Beechwood – Claire Johnson (Player of the Year), Savanah Jones, Katherine Taylor; VMA – Paetyn Ashcraft, Elizabeth Nester; St. Henry – Haleigh Goderwis, Emily Rowland, Megan Oldfield; Highlands – Mia Smith, Brooke Hodory, Jana Riffe, Elizabeth Schwalbach; Calvary – Kay Varnado; Team champion – Beechwood.

Track and field

†See website for complete details.

SuperiorAcuraStore.com

Brent Clary, Andrew Noah; Bellevue – Eric Atkins, Brett Seiter; Calvary Christian – Danny McWhorter, Hunter Ellis, Will Fannin; Villa Madonna – Thomas Schutzman, Xavier Ludwig, William Martin, Dan Gerst.

» NKAC all-region teams Boys runners of the Year: DI - Hunter Mitchell (Conner) , DII – Cody Chism (Brossart), DIII – Seth Evers (Bellevue). Boys team champions: DI – CovCath, DII – St. Henry , DIII-- Villa Madonna. Girls runners of the Year: DI – Juliet McGregor (Ryle), DII – Kendall Schuler (Brossart), Tiffany Victor (Ludlow). Girls team champions: DI – Notre Dame, DII – St. Henry, DIII – Dayton.


LIFE

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 3B

Know where chocolate milk comes from? Almost half don’t I just read one of the USA Today “Snapshots” surveys that said 48 percent of Americans don’t know where chocolate milk comes Kathy R. from Byrnes –surprising to me COMMUNITY RECORDER GUEST and I COLUMNIST hope you too. June is National Dairy Month and seems to me it is time to further define some dairy and non-dairy products on the market. Thanks to the Dairy Association and my co-worker Diane Mason for their informative details on this topic. Dairy milk is available in our market primarily as cow’s milk and goat’s milk. Both are sources of high-quality protein, calcium and many vitamins and minerals. Chocolate milk is primarily sold as a cow’s milk product with added

sugar and cocoa. Chocolate, or other flavored milk, have all of the major nutrients found in unflavored milk – calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, potassium, protein, riboflavin, niacin and vitamins A, B12 and D. Chocolate milk has between 8 and 12 additional grams of sugar added. All milk (flavored and unflavored) has the sugar lactose in it. Approximately one-half of the sugar in chocolate milk is naturally occurring lactose found in all milk. There has been a lot of discussion on the subject of non-dairy milks and if they are or are not milks. That is up to you to decide. » Soymilk is made from ground soybeans and filtered water. It may contain sweeteners and flavors. It is often fortified with vitamins and minerals (including calcium) to better compare to cow’s milk. Check the label. » Rice milk is typically made from brown rice and filtered water. It may

FILE PHOTO

One of the USA Today “Snapshots” surveys that said 48 percent of Americans don’t know where chocolate milk comes from.

FREE FULLY INSURED LIFETIME MECHANICAL PROTECTION ON ALL NEW AND PRE-OWNED VEHICLES

have some oil added. It also may be fortified with vitamins and minerals. It tends to be sweeter than cow’s milk. » Almond milk is made from ground almonds and filtered water. It typically contains sweeteners and other ingredients. Some See MILK, Page 4B

FORT THOMAS FARMERS’ MARKET

OUTDOOR MARKET OPEN EVERY WEDNESDAY 3:00 PM-7:00 PM

Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky for helping make us the #1 Chevrolet dealer in Ohio

WE ARE OFFERING ALL CUSTOMERS A

WITH YOUR PURCHASE*

CE-0000678708

Held at Ft. Thomas Antiques & Design Center parking lot.

2017 ANNUAL MEETING FRIDAY, JUNE 16

Grant County High School Dry Ridge, KY EW ATC H

Registration: 4:30 p.m. Business Meeting: 7:00 p.m.

Featuring

• Reptiles & Amphibians Booth • Meal by Grant County Cattlemen • Kids Photo with Lineman • Inflatables • Appreciation Gifts

PL

Olivia Henken

SA

M

Please bring in this ad and present it to your salesperson at time of purchase.

VISIT US 24/7 @ MCCLUSKEYCHEVROLET.COM

FREE Energy

saving ligh t bulbs for members who atten d!

71 TO KINGS AUTOMALL

513.741.1111

75 EXIT 10B AT GALBRAITH RD.

MON – THURS 9 – 9 | FRI – SAT 9 – 6 | SUN 10 – 6 *Offer valid on all new and used vehicle purchases from 6/14/17 – 6/30/17, with a minimum purchase price of $5,000. Must present this ad at the time of purchase to redeem offer. Apple is not a sponsor of or participant in this promotion. CE-0000678830


LIFE

4B • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

Suits That Rock returns to The Carnegie Suits That Rock is back and celebrating 10 years of performing for a cause. On Saturdays, June 17 and 24, 40 local business and community leaders will take to the Otto M. Budig stage at The Carnegie for Suits That Rock X: A Decade of Greatest Hits. Each year Suits performers leave the boardroom behind to get on stage and raise money for youth arts education programming at The Carnegie. Over the past 10 years, concerts have raised $683,569 and that money has made a huge impact. More than 316,000 arts education hours provided to students, More than

30,000 students impacted. More than 60 schools and organizations involved. In honor of the 10-year milestone, the Suits will pay homage to past performances bringing back their greatest hits including songs such as Hotel California, Lady Marmalade Smooth. They’ll also add 13 new songs to the list including “Can’t Stop the Feeling,” “Edge of Seventeen” and “You Belong With Me.” While the core roster of Suits remains the same from year to year, each year a handful of guest Suits join the lineup. Joining this year are Rick Dews, global senior cate-

gory manager, strategic sourcing for Milacron; Steve Tebeau, president of InnerCircle; Matt Godsted, assistant vice president, Western and Southern Financial Group, and Brent Seelmeyer, president, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Cincinnati. Tickets to Suits That Rock X: A Decade of Greatest Hits are $60 for Mezzanine, $85 for Orchestra, per person (reserved seat), and include a commemorative Suits That Rock mug, light bites, and of course a rockin’ good time. A cash bar and valet parking will be available. Doors open at 7

Let s Help You Grow! Investment FlexPlus Savings Earns 0.75% APY* Fewer restrictions than traditional CDs One FREE Withdrawal per Month

p.m. each evening with performances kicking off at 8 p.m. Tickets will be available by calling The Carnegie Box Office at (859) 957-1940 (Tuesday - Fridat noon - 5 p.m.) or online at www.thecarnegie.com.

2017 Suits That Rock line up Cliff Adams - CCM faculty member and musical tradesman; Sheila Baker team leader, Keller Williams Associate Partners; Ramona Blaine - talent placement director, AlliedBarton Security Services; Gary Bockelman chief operating officer, Wood and Lamping LLP; Tom Bosse - principal, Bosse Law, PLLC; Paul Bromwell - chief information officer, Frost Brown Todd LLC; Sarah Cameron - associate attorney, commercial litigation, Dinsmore and Shohl LLP; Kevin Canafax - Midwest vice president public affairs,

Milk Continued from Page 3B

Visit our newly redesigned website for more information!

411 Ludlow Avenue (513) 281-2443 *Annual percentage Yield current as of 6/1/2017. A United Fidelity Bank Checking Account is required to open a FlexPlus Savings. A $25,000 minimum balance is required to open. If balance falls below $25,000, interest rate will change to the current saving rate.

wwww.unitedfidelty.com

of the added ingredients improve the shelf life. It may be fortified with vitamins and minerals. » Coconut milk is made with finely grated coconut meat that is steeped in hot water and then filtered. Regular coconut milk is higher in fat and calories than cow’s milk. Note: cream of coconut is not the same as coconut milk. » Hemp milk is made

PROVIDED

The Carnegie is gearing up for its annual Suits That Rock concerts, coming up on Saturdays, June 17 and 24.

Fidelity Investments; John Caulfield - senior vice president - finance, Phillips Edison and Co.; Don Clare - retired emergency room nurse; Elaine Diehl - On air host, Cincinnati Public Radio, WGUC, 90.9; Jan Diehl - director of bands and music teacher, Guardian Angels School; John Domaschko PBS Foundation Board

member and former CPA/ interim president, Vision 2015; David Ellis - managing director and private wealth advisor, UBS Financial Services; Dick Felger - vice president and part owner, PAR Excellence Systems; Mark Fischer - professor of physics, Mount St. Joseph

from shelled hemp seeds and filtered water. Most contain some sweetener. It is usually fortified with vitamins and minerals. Hemp seeds used in milk making are not the variety of hemp from which marijuana is harvested. It tends to have a “grassy” flavor. » Other seed, nut and whole grain milks can be made with a variety of seeds, nuts and whole grains. There are many on American grocery shelves including oat and hazelnut milks. In other countries you may find

potato milk. » Raw milk from cows, sheep, goats and other animals has not been pasteurized. It may contain bacteria and viruses that could cause illness in humans. It is illegal in most states to sell raw milk for human consumption. Research has not shown a difference in nutrition between pasteurized and raw milk. Kathy R. Byrnes is Kenton County family and consumer sciences agent for University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service.

See CARNEGIE, Page 8B

CE-0000670353

ASSISTED LIVING 8 MEMORY CARE INDEPENDENT LIVING BRAND NEW 2017

PEN

PRE-O

RATAILEABSLE! V NOW A

BUICK ENCORE

STOP by for a visit.

PREFERRED FWD • STK# 38807 • 2 AT THIS PRICE • MSRP $27,185

189 36 $0

$

MONTHS

PER MO. LEASE

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

DUE AT SIGNING

BRAND NEW 2017

BUICK LACROSSE

PREFERRED FWD • STK# R37736 • 1 AT THIS PRICE • MSRP $37,385

379 36 $0

$

MONTHS

PER MO. LEASE

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

DUE AT SIGNING

$0 DOWN + TAX

$0 DOWN + TAX BRAND NEW 2017

BRAND NEW 2017

PREFERRED FWD • STK# 38195 • 1 AT THIS PRICE • MSRP $36,795

SPORT TOURING FWD • STK# R38079 • 1 AT THIS PRICE • MSRP $24,784

BUICK ENVISION

BUICK REGAL

Sales Center Now Open! Our community will feature a Salon, Spa, Movie Theater, Library and other great amenities. Stop by our sales center at Nantucket Circle and learn about our pre-open deposit special.

N

OMERY RD MASON MONTG

IR

75

ET C

275

K TUC

art state ofG tChO e MMUNITY!

71 N AN

’S NEWEST LOV E L A N D

75

TRADITION OF DEERFIE S LD

Y RD MER TGO MON

IN SENIOR LIV

513-583-5170 3455 Nantucket Circle | Loveland, OH 45140

www.TraditionsOfDeerfield.com

349 36 $0

$

MONTHS

PER MO. LEASE

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

DUE AT SIGNING

349 36 $0

$

MONTHS

PER MO. LEASE

NO SECURITY DEPOSIT

DUE AT SIGNING

22/3

$0 DOWN + TAX

$0 DOWN + TAX

GM rebates deducted to achieve sale prices or savings. In stock units only, subject to prior sale. Vehicle/equipment may vary from photo. Closed end leases with $0 Due at signing, No security deposit with qualified and approved credit. Encore, Envision, Regal, Lacrosse: 36 Mo. Closed end lease: 30,000 miles included, $.25 cents per mile excess charge. *With approved credit. Customer responsible for excess wear and tear. Offers plus tax license and fees. Residency restrictions apply. All qualified buyers with approved credit as determined by GM Financial. *With approved credit as determined by GM Finance. See dealer for details. Expires 6/30/17.

4387 ELICK LANE BATAVIA, OH

513-752-3123

WWW.HOLMANMOTORS.COM


LIFE

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 5B

It's starting to look like Summer out there.

UP TO

Everything looks beautiful through Gilkey Windows.

25%

OFF

WINDOWS & DOORS

12 Months No Interest Financing

Cannot be combined with any previous sale and quotes. Not valid with any other offers or discounts. OFFER EXPIRES IN TWO WEEKS. 0 % APR X 12 Months with payments available to well qualified buyers with approved credit. No finance charge is assessed if promo balance is paid in full in 12 months.

SPRING SALE! LIMITED TIME OFFER! “We know that you take a lot of pride in your home. Gilkey windows will match the original look of your home so they won't look like ‘pluggedin’ replacement windows.”

THE GILKEY ADVANTAGE • High

Performance Windows

• Factory

Direct - No Middlemen

• Professional • Peace

Installation - No Subcontractors

of Mind with Gilkey Warranty

- Mike Gilkey President/Owner

Since 1978 WWW.GILKEY.COM

CALL NOW! 513-253-0499


6B • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, JUNE 16

SATURDAY, JUNE 17

Exhibits

Art Events

Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Impact of food from diverse immigrant populations on Northern Kentucky’s social and cultural development is focus of exhibit developed by students in NKU’s Public History Graduate Program, featuring cuisines from different countries, their origins and traditions. Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 491-4003. Covington.

Printer:Faire, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Hellmann Creative Center, 321 W. Martin Luther King Blvd., Celebration of printmaking. Local printmaker vendor booths, workshops, demonstrations, live music, food for purchase. Free. Presented by Center for Great Neighborhoods of Covington. 491-2220; www.artmachineinc.org. Covington.

Festivals MainStrasse Village Original Goettafest, 5-11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Main Street, Goetta, arts and crafts, live music, entertainment, children’s activities. Free admission. Presented by MainStrasse Village Association. 491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Benefits Suits That Rock X: A Decade Greatest Hits, 8 p.m., The Carnegie, 1028 Scott Blvd., Includes light appetizers, commemorative mug and more than 40 prominent business and community leaders rocking for cause. Doors open 7 p.m. Benefits Children’s Art Education Program at The Carnegie. $85, $60. 9571940; www.thecarnegie.com. Covington.

Community Event

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Kroger, 1700 Declaration Drive, Four screenings, risk assessment, and education. $25 per screening. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; bit.ly/2nHFEvu. Independence.

Hands Across the Bridge, 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., Roebling Suspension Bridge, Ky. 17, West pedestrian walkway. Join Ohio and Northern Kentuckians to form human chain to celebrate 150th anniversary of completion of bridge. Free. Registration recommended. Presented by Streets of the Roebling Point Entertainment District. --; bit.ly/2qBc3FZ. Covington.

Music - Concert Series

Exhibits

Summer Concert Series, 8-11 p.m. Buzz Bin., Crestview Hills Town Center, 2791 Town Center Blvd., Bring seating. Free. Presented by City of Crestview Hills. No phone; www.shopcrestviewhillstowncenter.com. Crestview Hills.

Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 491-4003. Covington.

Health / Wellness

Recreation Bingo, 5:30-10 p.m., Erlanger Lions Club Hall, 5996 Belair Drive, Clubhouse. Jitney starts at 7 p.m., regular games at 7:45 p.m. Ages 18 and up. Prices vary. Presented by Erlanger Lions Club. 727-0888. Erlanger.

Festivals Roeblingfest, 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m., Roebling Point Entertainment District, Court Avenue and E. Third Street, Foods from local restaurants, beverage booths, music, art show and sale showcasing local talents and variety of tours. Free. Presented by Streets of the Roebling Point Entertainment District. No phone; www.roeblingbridge.org. Co-

vington. MainStrasse Village Original Goettafest, noon to 11:30 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Free admission. 491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

On Stage - Theater The Dinner Detective Murder Mystery Show, 6-9 p.m., Embassy Suites Rivercenter, 10 E. Rivercenter Blvd., City View. Hilarious evening of murder mystery dinner theater, 4-course meal and prize package for top sleuth. Ages 18 and up. $59.95. Registration required. Presented by The Dinner Detective. Through Dec. 30. 866-496-0535; www.thedinnerdetective.com/ cincinnati. Covington.

Runs / Walks Relay For Life of Kenton County, 6 p.m. to midnight, St. Barbara Church, 4042 Turkeyfoot Road, Everyone is welcome to this family-friendly team event to raise awareness and funds for ACS. Celebrate survivors, remember loved ones and fight back against cancer. Food, music, games, prizes and more. Benefits American Cancer Society. Free. Presented by American Cancer Society. 513-225-8631; bit.ly/2p5VReF. Erlanger.

SUNDAY, JUNE 18 Exhibits Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 1-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 4914003. Covington.

Festivals MainStrasse Village Original Goettafest, noon to 9 p.m., MainStrasse Village, Free admission. 491-0458; www.mainstrasse.org. Covington.

Tours Madison Avenue Food Tour, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hotel Covington, 638 Madison Ave., Meet in lobby. Visit 5 unique tasting locations including family-owned brewery. $59. Reservations required. Presented by Riverside Food Tours. 513-289-0035; riverside-

foodtours.com. Covington.

MONDAY, JUNE 19 Health / Wellness Vitals Screening, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Homan Chiropractic Covington, 713 Scott Blvd., Blood pressure, pulse, height, weight, temperature. Free. 291-0333; www.homanchiro.com. Covington. St. Elizabeth Healthcare Mobile Mammography Unit: Mammogram Screening, 2:30-4:30 p.m., St. Elizabeth Physicians Fort Mitchell, 1200 Chamber Center Drive, Medicare, Medicaid and most insurance companies cover cost; financial assistance available. For women age 35 and up. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 655-7400; bit.ly/2mu4HSm. Fort Mitchell.

TUESDAY, JUNE 20 Exhibits Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 491-4003. Covington.

Health / Wellness Posture and Scoliosis Screening, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Homan Chiropractic Covington, 713 Scott Blvd., Free. 291-0333; www.homanchiro.com. Covington.

Support Groups Recovery International Meeting, 7-8:30 p.m., Immanuel United Methodist Church, 2551 Dixie Highway, Room 32. Park in back parking lot and enter through double doors. Take steps or elevator to 3rd floor. Peer-led self-help meetings offer support, acceptance, hope and cognitive behavioral training to individuals suffering from anxiety, depression and other emotional challenges. Free-will offering. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Recovery International. 331-2701; www.recoveryInternational.org. Lakeside Park.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21 Art & Craft Classes Craf-tea, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Needle Felting., Boone County Public Library - Scheben Branch, 8899 U.S. 42, Different craft featured each week plus refreshing iced tea. Each session requires separate registration; ages 14 and up. Craft supplies and tea provided. Free. Registration required. Presented by Boone County Public Library. 342-2665; www.bcpl.org. Union.

Exhibits Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 491-4003. Covington.

Health / Wellness Whiplash Evaluation and Education, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Homan Chiropractic Covington, 713 Scott Blvd., Free. 291-0333; www.homanchiro.com. Covington.

The Tradition Continues! Five Stages for Your Entertainment!

June 16-18, 2017

Friday 6-10pm - Free Friday Kickoff! Saturday 10am-8pm Sunday 10am-7pm

Adult Tickets $12

Children under 12 are free!

2 Day Pass $18

Children under 12 are free!

Celtic Fest Ohio Cleveland

30 71 75 Dayton

Indianapolis 70

All day music, pipes, drums, dancing, shopping, food and drinks! For tickets, times, and details, go to: www.celticfestohio.com

Toledo

Fort Wayne

74

73

Columbus

70

Cincinnati 52 Huntington

71

Lexington Louisville

75

10542 East State Route 73 Waynesville, OH 45068 513.897.7000 CE-0000678086

CE-0000679176

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to Cincinnati.com/share, log in and click on “submit an event.” Send digital photos to kynews@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a space-available basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to Cincinnati.com/calendar.

St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., Kroger Marketplace Hebron, 3105 N. Bend Road, Four screenings, risk assessment and education. $25 per screening. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; bit.ly/2nHFEvu. Hebron.

Recreation Pub Quiz, 7-9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., Pub. Prizes. $50 gift card for first place $25 for second place teams. Ages 21 and up. Free. 491-6659; covington.mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Chair Volleyball, 10-11 a.m., Elsmere Senior Center, 179 Dell St., Get fit by sitting. Fun way to exercise while making new friends. For seniors. Free. Presented by Holly Ruschman. 727-2306. Elsmere.

Tours Historic Walking Tour: Pike Street Corridor, 10 a.m., Kenton County Public Library Covington, 502 Scott Blvd., Local History and Genealogy Dept. 1-hour walking tour of historic commercial heart of Covington. Runs Wednesdays from May-Sept. Free. Presented by Kenton County Public Library. 962-4060; www.kentonlibrary.org. Covington.

THURSDAY, JUNE 22 Community Dance Dance: Top O’ KY Boogie Club, 6:30-10 p.m., Covington Moose Lodge 1469, 5247 Taylor Mill Road, Rear hall attached to Moose Lodge. Learn East Coast Swing, West Coast Swing, Carolina Shag, Bop and Jitterbug. Beginner lessons at 6:30 p.m. No partner needed. Ages 18 and up. $5, $2 members. Presented by

Top O’ KY Boogie Club. 261-7160; topofky.com/about-us. Taylor Mill.

Exhibits Culture Bites: Northern Kentucky’s Food Traditions, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with museum admission: $9, $8 seniors, $5 children, free members. 491-4003. Covington.

Health / Wellness Learn Good Body Mechanics and Ergonomics to Protect Your Back, 9:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Homan Chiropractic Covington, 713 Scott Blvd., Free. 291-0333. Covington. Death Cafe: The Ordinariness of Grief, 6-8 p.m., Hospice of St. Elizabeth Health Care, 483 South Loop Drive, Confidential, nonproselytizing place to chew on big questions about death. Not a support group, not end of life planning. Free. Reservations required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 549-5399; hellocole.com/death-cafe. Edgewood. St. Elizabeth Healthcare CardioVascular Mobile Health Unit, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m., Five Seasons Family Sports Club Crestview Hills, 345 Thomas More Parkway, Four screenings, risk assessment, and education. $25 per screening. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 301-9355; bit.ly/2nHFEvu. Crestview Hills. St. Elizabeth Healthcare Mobile Mammography Unit: Mammogram Screening, 2-4 p.m., Hathaway Court Apartments, 1200 Highway Ave., Medicare, Medicaid and most insurance companies cover cost; financial assistance available. For women age 35 and up. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 655-7400; bit.ly/2mu4HSm. Covington.

PUZZLE ANSWERS G O B I

O M A N

F E S T

V E R G E S

F L E E T E D

W E A T H E R W O R D S

A G E E S A R S E N I O

S A B L E N E A R

V O G T I O R C S U S E H E A L I A L L O W D I A M O E S S E N

T S A L A A B B O O R R T C F A E R L E L E A R S T N E I N N D E S

F L I E S

D A M O N D O R A

H I T M E H A R R O D S S T A R M A P

O M E R N A L E E R M S S H E F R O S C I A O S A N D T O R K S I G R O M L E U S P O E N O R S S I E A L I E U I T S R O S B I N T E I A G E A N S O L C O T T L A N E

A S S E T O L E A T E

B O T H B L I N D S

A T R A

S H O W E O R S C A D R O T T E A D D O A N

N I S P O A N T H O O F T R U N B Y

S P A D E

H E D E R E B E S B R I D A L T H I N G S

B O R A

S W A Y

E Y E R O L L

L E S T E R

A V O N

L E N O

S L E W


LIFE

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 7B

‘‘I’m tellin’ ya, it just doesn’t get any better than this.’’

Squirrels are notorious chewers.

. . . including you-know-who.

(And apparently enjoy taunting you.)

And saves you from a nasty fall.

So imagine what they’re doing on your roof,

Get 75% off installation labor

hanging out in the gutters.

on LeafGuard brand gutters,

Simplest thing to do?

the patented one-piece

Replace your gutters with ours.

seamless gutter system guaranteed

Keeps everything out . . .

75% OFF

installation labor for LeafGuard brand gutters

through 6/30/17. Some restrictions may apply. Call for details.

513-909-3407 I www.gutterscincinnati.com

never to clog or we clean them for free.


LIFE

8B • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

Carnegie Continued from Page 4B

University; Larry Flemer - retired attorney; Mickey Foellger - retired family court circuit judge, Commonwealth of Kentucky; Gregg Fusaro - regional development partner, Capital Investment Group; Nancy Grayson - director of strategic initiatives, Northern Kentucky Education Council; Ed Hughes - retired president, Gateway Community and Technical College; Kathy Laverde - financial advisor, Mercury Financial and a member of the Cincinnati Estate Planning Council; Melissa Lutz principal/director of marketing, Champlin Architecture; Dave Miller - retired president, Buddy Roger’s Music; Susan Morgan - vice president, American Mortgage Service Co; Graeme Murray - independent consultant and mission worker; Lenny Murray - broker/owner, Murray Real Estate Associates; Ken Poleyeff - application architect, Cornerstone Brands; Chuck Reed president, River City Productions; Mills Rouse - attorney, Rouse and Rouse, PSC; Tim Ryan - associate director of sales, Florence Freedom Professional Baseball and principal, creative development, management, and distribution, Kaleb Hensley Productions; Tim Schigel - fund manager, Fund of Funds at Cintrifuse; Greg Shumate - corpo-

DEATHS

rate and commercial lawyer, Frost, Brown, Todd; Melissa SingerReed - Vice president, business development, Planes Cos.; Mark Tipton - licensed funeral director/embalmer, Tufts Schildmeyer Funeral Home; Gary Wright senior managing director, Integra Realty Resources.

Hazel Armstrong Hazel “Aunt Jackie” Faye Littrell Armstrong, 98, of Elsmere and formerly of Covington, died June 4 at Woodscrest Care Center in Elsmere. She was a homemaker and a member of Billy Graham Ministeries and Community Family Church in Independence. Her husband, James Armstrong; stepson, Jack Keith Armstrong; stepgranddaughter, Sherie Armstrong; caregiver, Phyllis Kilgore; brothers, Russell, Harley, and James Conner Littrell; and sisters, Anna Grace Stehenson, Mabel Ross, Della Murel McGee, and Stella Sizemore, died previously. Survivors include her caregiver, Janice and Tom Bates. Memorials: Community Famly Church, 11875 Taylor Mill Road, Independence, KY 41051.

2017 guest suits Rick Dews - global senior category manager, strategic sourcing, Milacron; Steve Tebeau president, InnerCircle; Matt Godsted - assistant vice president, Western and Southern Financial Group; Brent Seelmeyer - president, Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Cincinnati.

Valerie Gadomski

2017 Suits That Rock sponsors

Valerie Osborne Gadomski, 59, of Crescent Springs, died June 1 at University Hospital in Cincinnati. She won numerous awards throughout her nursing career, including multiple Florence Nightingale Awards and the Daisy Award. She spent much of her career in the cardiac ICU, but was most proud of her work as the VAD Coordinator for Christ Hospital. She had a passion for cooking, baking, and reading and had a love of the beach. Her daughter, Jessica Gadomski; and father, James G. Osborne, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Jim Gadomski; children, J. Zachary Gadomski, Jacob Gadomski, and Alexa Gadomski; mother, Karen Osborne; and siblings, Greg Osborne, Judge Lisa Bushelman, and Brady Osborne. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211 Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Gold Sponsors - PNC Bank, Toyota, QualIT Resources, Fidelity Investments. Silver Sponsors - Art Design Consultants, CForward, Champlin Architecture, Deloitte, Rumpke, Scooter Media, The Tapke Dusing Group - Robert W. Baird and Co., UBS Financial Services. Bronze Sponsors American Mortgage, Chris and Valerie Bopp, Dinsmore, Marian Development Group, Riverpoint, Sara and Michelle Vance Waddell, Ultimate Air Shuttle, Western and Southern Financial Group. Copper - Buddy Roger’s Music, InnerCircle, Ken and Bernice Reeder, VonLehman CPA and Advisory Firm. Print Sponsor - OneTouchPoint.

Lawrence Faehr Lawrence Allen Faehr, 62, of Morning View, died June 5 at his home. He retired from Stor-O-Pack as a maintenance worker and he enjoyed fishing, hunting, NAS-

HyGIeaCare Prep ®

• Exclusively prescribed by Ohio GI and Liver Institute physicians • Replaces traditional colonoscopy prep

Jessie Iles Jessie James Iles, 70, of Ryland Heights, died June 3 at his home. He retired from Lingo Manufacturing, was and avid hunter and fisherman, and enjoyed working on cars. His sister, Shirley Bradford; and brothers, Tommy Iles and Earl Iles Jr., died previously. Survivors include his wife; children, Larry Simons, Jeff Iles, Jason Iles, and Mary Beth Kemper; siblings, Bessie Younger, Mary Parks, Linda Fields, Billy Iles, Mickey Iles, Richard Iles, Kenny Iles, Terry Iles, David Iles, Lee Iles, and Jackie Iles; and 10 grandchildren along with four great-grandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Christine Janszen Christine T. Rauen Janszen, 77, of Fort Wright, died May 2 at St. Elizabeth Hospice. She was a homemaker and was active with Redwood Rehabilitation School, where she worked in the kitchen and other did other volunteer duties. She was a member of St. Agnes Church and the Kolping Society. Survivors include her husband, Bill Janszen; children, Billy Janszen, Steve Janszen, Theresa Bamberger, and Tim Janszen; brothers, Ed Rauen and John Rauen; and four grandchildren. Memorials: Redwood Rehabilitation School, 71 Orphanage Road, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017

Connie Lewis-Centers Connie S. Lewis-Centers, 58, of Fort Wright, died June 2 at her home. She loved holidays, especially Christmas, and she loved cooking big meals for her family. She also enjoyed fishing, camping, being outdoors, and shopping. Her sons, Abraham and Isaac Centers; parents, Jimmy Lewis and Mable Barnett Lewis; sister, Bonnie Kennedy; and brother, John Jillson, died previously. Survivors include her husband, John Centers; children, Pat Lewis, John Caleb Centers, and Lacey Dessree Centers; sisters, Lavona Sholler and Loretta Napier; and two grandchildren. Memorials: Senior Veteran’s Service, 76 S. Riverside Drive, 3rd Floor, Batavia, OH 45103.

Thomas Louderbeck

FDA cleared No need to drink huge quantities of liquids Safe • Easy • Convenient • Hygienic

No need to constantly run to the toilet

CAR, and watching baseball and football. He was very fond of his red 1995 Chevrolet truck and the sweet sounds of Led Zepplin. His father, Louis Faehr; and brother, Tim Faehr, died previously. Survivors include his mother, Margie Faehr; children, Tori Egan, Tiffany Rupert, and Jered Faehr; siblings, Rick Faehr, Jim Faehr, and Debbie Fehler; and five grandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 2808 Reading Road, Cincinnati, OH 45206.

Get a good night's sleep *No need to get up at night to take prep

$245 *

HyGIeaCare Prep

®

Thomas L. Louderbeck, 80, of Taylor Mill, died June 4 at St. Elizabeth Edgewood. He was a U.S. Marine Corps veteran, and drove trucks for McLean Trucking. Survivors include his brother, Robert Louderbeck.

Sister Mary Lutkenhoff

Sue Ann Shields

Sister Mary Joanne Lutkenhoff SND, 87, of Kenton County and formerly of Bellevue, died recently. She attended Sacred Heart School, Our Lady of Province Academy, and St. Anthony Commercial School. She became inspired by the Sisters of Notre Dame and joined the Sisters at 27-years-old. She ministered as a childcare worker for 24 years, most of them at the Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home. After her years in childcare, she lived in various convents, where her service consisted in cooking nutritious meals for her sisters and assisting in the local schools. In 2008, she retired to Lourdes Hall Care Center. Her quiet nature exhibited the simplicity of her commitment to God and her community. Her brothers, James and Reverend Bernard Lutkenhoff; and sister, Dorothy Lutkenhoff, died previously. Survivors include her sister, Virginia Stiers. Memorials: Sisters of Notre Dame, 1601 Dixie Highway, Park Hills, KY 41011.

Sue Ann “Susie Q” Shields, 73, of Erlanger, died May 28. Her daughter, Debbie, died previously. Survivors include her mother; Margie; sister, Beth; daughters, Terri and Kelly Renee; and four grandchildren.

Debbie Mulford Debbie Tackett Mulford, 56, of Morning View, died June 4 in Edgewood. She was owner and operator of the Doll House in Walton, an employee of the Walton Kroger floral department, and member of Walton First Baptist Church. She was a longtime board member for Eagle Creek Country Club, where she was the organizer of the Monday Morning Women’s Golf League and the chair of the Chrystal Tournament. She was also an organizer with Christian Shoebox Ministry. Her mother, Lula Johns Tackett Fields; and sister, Betty Tackett, died previously. Survivors include her husband, Dewey L. Mulford; son, Brent M. Mulford of Anderson Township, Ohio; father, Robert Gene Tackett of Walton; sister, Lois Tackett of Crittenden; stepbrothers, Bill Stevens of Verona and Bruce Stevens of Union; stepsisters, Anette Kay Wolterman of Cincinnati and Mickey Roberts of Sanders; and two grandchildren.

Dennis Patrick Dennis Ryan Patrick, 63, of Park Hills and formerly of Morrow, Ohio, died May 31, at his home. He was a longtime employee for DHL and also worked in landscaping at Kings Island. He enjoyed music, playing the saxophone, and dancing. His parents, John Langley and Mary Ruth Prater Patrick, died previously. Survivors include his fiancée, Patricia L. Lohre of Park Hills; daughters, Katie Clark of Cincinnati, Leah Patrick and Amanda Patrick, both of Lebanon, Ohio, and Sarah Patrick of South Lebanon, Ohio; son, Austin Patrick of South Lebano; brothers, David Patrick of Crittenden and Johnny Patrick of Batavia, Ohio; and six grandchildren. Memorials: St. Elizabeth Hospice, 1 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, KY 41017.

Leo Toebbe Leo Edward Toebbe, 95, of Erlanger, died May 28 at Villaspring Care Center. He worked as an engineer with General Electric’s aviation division for 36 years. He was a member of St. Joseph Church in Crescent Springs for 65 years and a U.S. Navy veteran of World War II. His wife, Mary “Jeanne” Gastright Toebbe; brothers, Frank Toebbe and William Toebbe; sisters, Mildred Edmonds and Helen Gough; and grandson, August Toebbe, died previously. Survivors include his sons, Greg L. Toebbe of Villa Hills, Gary R. Toebbe of Fort Wright; daughters, Marianne Burke of Villa Hills and Cathy Jo Ficke of Villa Hills; brother, Donald Toebbe; sisters, Mary Jo Maytum, Betty Kuhlman, Jeannine Omohundro, and Margie Unkraut; friend, Susan Wilson; and 12 grandchildren along with 23 great-grandchildren. Memorials: Notre Dame Academy, 1699 Hilton Drive, Park Hills KY, 41011.

Carroll Trenkamp Carroll R. Trenkamp, 72, of Pinellas Park, Florida and formerly of Independence, died May 8. He retired as a lead ramp service employee with TWA and enjoyed attending his children’s and grandchildren’s events. His sister, Anita Vickers, died previously. Survivors include his wife, Cindy Ash Trenkamp; daughter, Melissa Patton; sons, Chris Trenkamp and Matt Trenkamp; sisters, Melanie Trenkamp, Pamela Finan, and Betty Trenkamp; brothers, Ferd Trenkamp, Leo Trenkamp, Don Trenkamp, Jim Trenkamp, and David Trenkamp; and 11 grandchildren along with 10 greatgrandchildren. Memorials: Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, 4370 Glendale Milford Road, Blue Ash, OH 45242.

Melvin Vinson Melvin Jones Vinson, 83, of Independence, died June 1. He was a retired quality control inspector for Avey Machinery and a member of Hickory Grove Baptist Church. He enjoyed being outdoors working in his yard or in his garden and spending time with his family. Survivors include his wife, Rosemary Martin Vinson; sons, Jeffrey Alan Vinson and Steven Scott Vinson; sisters, Marguerite Blackburn and Ruby Martin; and four grandchildren along with five greatgrandchildren. Memorials: American Heart Association, 5211, Madison Road, Cincinnati, OH 45227.

Achieve excellent outcomes

*You may use your FSA or HSA accounts/cards

Limited Time Only

For further information and scheduling please call

Delivering better GI outcomes

www.hygieacare.com

We need 21 people with difficulty hearing, especially in noisy situations, to evaluate award winning, BEST-IN-CLASS features in hearing technology. We will perform thorough hearing consultations FREE of charge, then choose qualified candidates for this program.

HyGIeaCare’s Scheduler at: (513) 569-1343 4746 Montgomery Rd. Ste 200, Norwood, OH 45212.

www.ohiogi.com

Limited Time only Don’t Miss This Opportunity

Call Today to Reserve Your Spot 859-795-4456 www.nextgenerationhearingcare.com


LIFE

JUNE 15, 2017 • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • 9B

REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS COVINGTON 823 Bakewell Ave.: Christopher Kromer to Alissa and Kyle Knapp; $95,000. 610 E. 18th St.: Mark Campbell to Retta and Robert Wihite III; $110,000. 43 E. 41st St.: Three-J Investment Group Inc. to Ryan Studer; $84,500. 3313 Emerson St.: Leopoldo Mora-Cruz to Amanda Owens; $77,500. 2637 Fishing Creek Drive: Jeana and John Owens to Teri Roberts; $153,000. 9296 Hawks Ridge Drive: Cynthia and Gregory Cahill to Jennifer and Cameron Capek; $142,500. 1238 Highway Ave.: Vina International LLC to Rachel and Jonathan Ehlen; $172,500. 1707 Holman Ave.: Deborah and Gary Haynes to JR Castles LLC; $130,500. 1563 Jefferson Ave.: Aline Summe to Margaret Lorenz; $123,500. 4 Lorup Ave.: Lawrence Schell to Beth and William Bauscher; $218,500. 2869 Madison Ave: Annie and Caleb Miller to Mariah Stanforth; $104,500. 86 Pitman Court: Jessica and Joseph Daft to Kristine and Anthony Sexton; $150,000. 2485 Rolling Hills Drive, Unit 6-304: Fischer Attached Homes II LLC to Margaret and Joshua Goble; $189,500. 708 W. Southern Ave.: Deborah Smith to Elbert Stanton; $76,000. 37 Waterside Way: Kelly and Jason Kampsen to Hillary Pendelton; $110,000.

CRESCENT SPRINGS 2263 Edenberry Drive: Lorne Weeter to Carol McGowan; $185,500.

CRESTVIEW HILLS 112 College Park Drive: Andrea and Jacob Beil to Michelle and Marshall Reid; $226,500. 599 Palmer Court, Unit 305-4: Rebecca and Henry Vittetoe to Evelyn and James Eck; $452,000.

307 Springside Drive: Judy and David Taylor to Mary Meek; $222,000. 2829 University Drive: Kimberly Bogart to Patricia Verst; $171,000.

EDGEWOOD 3232 Laurel Oak Court: Anne Miller and Douglas Gorman to Frederick Hamon; $165,000.

ELSMERE 38 Erlanger St.: Susan and Beau Brake to Michael Follmer; $92,000.

ERLANGER 422 Forest Ave.: Hilary and Joshua McCain to Courtney Arlinghaus; $115,000. 404 James Ave.: Babara Davis to Rachael and Adam House; $120,000. 411 James Ave.: Victoria Smith to Benjamin Belbot; $97,000. 165 Kincaid Lane, Unit 2: Judy VonHandorf to Mary DeVore; $142,000. 887 Lakerun Lane: The Drees Co. to Laura Berkemeier and Jay Gossettt; $387,000. 3438 Misty Creek Drive: Katherine and Anthony Maynard to Melva Hernandez Dominguez; $163,000. 811 Stevenson Road: Jean and Gilbert Vogt to Faye and Ryan Hutchinson; $150,000. 104 Valleywood Court: Angela and Timothy Hurlbert to Donna Layne; $130,000.

FORT MITCHELL 3 Beechwood Road: Whitney and Craig Donnachie to Gina and Timothy Earle; $437,500. 85 Burdsall Ave.: Kathleen and Michael Murphey and Christopher Ritter to Amber Mitchell and Victor Mitchell; $165,000. 360 Longmeadow Lane: Margaret and John Thomson to Catherine and Michael Bishop; $485,000.

FORT WRIGHT 552 Beaumont Court: Karen Berling to Carolyn and Charles Lambert Jr.; $375,000. 543 Fincastle Lane, Unit 3E:

Brad Erickson to Celeste Gallenstein; $199,000. 131 Kennedy’s Road: Jonie Finnell and Gary Leach to Joshua Heller; $157,000. 1610 Marcella: Jacqueline Bising to Stephen Campbell; $151,000. 463 Morris Road: Robert Averdick to Marianne and Patrick Navin; $355,000. 418 Morris Road: Patricia and Frederick Fiore to Benjamin Fishback and Mark Hasselbeck; $330,000. 1409 Sleepy Hollow Road: Heather and Matthew Lanham to Taylor Brashear and Michael Brashear; $144,500.

INDEPENDENCE 1046 Alpine Court: RIG Holdings LLC to Christian Jones; $102,000. 10266 Calvary Road: Celestial Building Corp. to Patricia and Matthew Johnson and Donnie Johnson; $191,000. 41 Carrie Way Drive: Darlene and Kenneth Pabst III to Alyssa and Terry Hermann; $128,000. 10740 Chinkapin Circle: Kellie and Matthew Short to Cody Michael; $170,000. 1219 Constitution Drive: Alison and Dustin Swanson to Kelly Russell; $171,500. 10165 Falcon Ridge Drive: Paula and Eric Hunt to Jennifer and Jared Brewster; $186,000. 5038 Jonathan Way: Jennifer and Brent McDowell to Andrea and Paul Hess; $200,000. 2995 Lakeview Drive: Jessica and Paul Cooper III to Amanda Smith and Derek Cavins; $205,000. 10576 Pepperwood Drive: Teresa and Rick Burton to Jessica and Brandon Taylor; $229,500. 3100 Silverbell Way: Arlinghaus Builders LLC to Patti and David Agnello; $196,500. 930 Waterpointe Lane, Unit 116-F: Federal National Mortgage Associaion to Rebecca Perry; $165,500. 6355 Waterview Way: Melissa and Robert Wilfing to Donovan Wayland; $155,000.

6354 Waterview Way: Celestial Building Corp. to Lisa Hartig; $147,500.

LAKESIDE PARK 71 Locust Ave.: Travis Hanser to Katherine and James Schierer; $345,000. 101 Yancey Drive: Amy and Michael Mason to Hannah and Aaron Schklar; $185,000.

LUDLOW 620 Church St.: Eric Wilfong to Jesica Brandner; $110,000. 26 Euclid St.: Rod Nolting to Michael Lucarelli; $66,550. 541 Riversbreeze Drive, Unit 31-302: Cartus Financial Corp. to Michael McGowan; $135,000. 411 Southwind Lane, Unit 103: Kylie and Chad Riegler to Sundae Niehaus; $131,500.

TAYLOR MILL 6202 Greyoakes Drive: Diane and Colin Liu to Cheryl and Richard Mason; $220,000. 3265 Huntersridge Lane: Fischer Single Family Homes III Ltd. to Carrie and William Hipple; $265,000. 5223 Roselawn Drive: Meghan and David Tieman to KoufTren Investments LLC; $167,000. 105 Sunset Place: Heather and Gary Kelly to Janey Harmon and Eric Buschard; $122,000. 5222 Woodland Drive: Barbara Falgner-Syphax to Lauren Trame and Griffin Hughes; $167,000.

VILLA HILLS 983 Appleblossom Drive: Kendra Rogers to Deborah Shclueter; $477,500. 16 Steven Court: Joyce and Stephen Meier to Zai Hlei Lang and Than Ling; $195,000.

WALTON 12253 Percival Road: Mark Clark to Stephanie Murray; $145,000.

AT

THIS

PROVIDED

Bill Mell Jr. and Bill Mell Sr. (Alexandria), Robin Getz (Taylor Mill) and Bill Butt (Walton) represented Flipdaddy’s in the Stepping Stones Sporting Clays Tournament, and took home a team prize for shooting.

First-time Sporting Clays Tournament nets more than $35K for Stepping Stones At the inaugural event of its kind for the organization, Stepping Stones netted more than $35,000 at its Sporting Clays Tournament to benefit yearround programming for children, teens and adults with disabilities. One hundred shooters competed in the tournament April 28 at Elk Creek Hunt Club in Owenton, Kentucky. The presenting sponsor was PLK Communities, with significant support from the Austin E. Knowlton Foundation, platinum sponsor; Wyler Automotive Family, gold sponsor, and Stihl, games sponsor. The event’s co-chairs were Peter Borchers and Stepping Stones Board of Trustees Member Brian Folke, both of Indian Hill. The Sporting Clay Tournament winning teams represented Flip-

FREE SEMINAR,

daddy’s (Bill Butt, Walton, Kentucky; Robin Getz, Taylor Mill, Kentucky, and Bill Mell Jr. and Bill Mell Sr., Alexandria, Kentucky) and Forbes Food (Eppa Rixey, Indian Hill; Scott Rosson, Terrace Park, and Dinah and Roger Winters, Terrace Park). Individual winners were Gerry Addison of Harrison and Ryan Moeller of Mount Adams. Stepping Stones is a United Way partner agency serving more than 1,000 people with disabilities in day and overnight programs that increase independence and promote individual success. The 53-year-old agency provides educational, recreational and social programs at locations in Indian Hill, Batavia, Norwood and Monfort Heights. www.steppingstonesohio.org.

YOU’LL LEARN:

• How to simplify the distribution of your assets without fees or delays of probate. • How to protect your life’s savings from the rising cost of probate and Long-term care. • How to avoid guardianship and get help managing your affairs should you become incapacitated. • How to alleviate any financial and emotional hardships by learning how you can qualify for Medicaid and Veterans Benefits earlier. • How to take the next steps in putting your estate plan into action today!

ERLANGER Tuesday, June 20 • 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Kenton County Library – Erlanger Branch 401 Kenton Lands Road (Refreshments) 1-800-782-6461

Your Pursuits Are Our Primary Goal. They say that getting there is half the fun. And every journey goes smoother when you have a co-pilot helping you along the way. Someone like The Christ Hospital Physicians. Our primary care physicians are currently accepting new patients in your area, and we’re backed by a network of the region’s best nurses, doctors and specialists. We would love to learn about your life, and do our part to help make all of your pursuits a reality. The Christ Hospital Health Network—we’re here for your pursuits.

Accepting new patients. Call 513-585-1000 to schedule today.

With clinical research in Migraine Headaches

Change is Possible CTI Clinical Research Center is looking for adults 18 to 75 years old who suffer from migraine headaches to participate in a clinical research study. If you qualify for the study, you may receive study-related physical examinations and lab tests, plus financial compensation of up to $400

Be a Life Changer. Enroll now. 513.721.3868. TheChristHospitalPhysicians.com/PrimaryCare

www.ctifacts.com/enquirer CE-0000678491


LIFE

10B • COMMUNITY RECORDER/KENTON • JUNE 15, 2017

NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE

ANSWERS ON PAGE 6B

No. 0611 THINK TWICE

1

BY CHARLES M. DEBER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

54 Intimates 1 Zip along 55 Wash’n ____ (towelette brand) 7 Example of 22- and of 65-Across 56 Caribbean land whose capital 12 Conscience-stricken is St. George’s 19 Opposites of alphas 59 It’ll knock you out 20 It may be grand 60 Ricochet 21 “Hah!” 62 Ambition for 22 7- and 112-Across an actor 24 Flashing lights 64 In view 25 What scouts gather 65 7- and 31-Across 26 Intentions 67 “So long,” for short 27 Donkey’s call 69 Part of a machine 29 Naval engineer assembly 31 Example of 65-Across 71 Like Odin or Thor and 39-Down 72 Titter 33 Subsides slowly 73 Some scratchy attire 37 Org. for ex-G.I.s 74 “Sprechen ____ 40 Diddley and Derek Deutsch?” 41 Farewells 75 Lowest points in Florence 76 Car for which you 42 Take temporarily “listen to her tachin’ up now, a 44 First lady listen to her whine,” before Bess in a 1964 hit 47 116-Across and 78 Land in the Seine 96-Down 79 “I cannot tell ____” 49 Levin who wrote “A Kiss Before 81 “Nuh-uh!” Dying” 82 Film critic Christopher 50 Silver, for example, in the opening 83 112-Across and to TV’s “The Lone 96-Down Ranger” 86 Dress adornment 51 Torah receptacles 87 Lathers (up) 52 A professional may 89 Not esos or estos need one to practice: 90 Coiled killer Abbr. 91 Nikon product, 53 Work unit for short Online subscriptions: Today’s 92 “____ Rebel” puzzle and more (1962 No. 1 hit) than 4,000 past puzzles, 93 Example of 34-Down nytimes.com/crosswords ($39.95 a year). and 108-Across AC R O S S

94 Dimes, essentially 97 Straight 100 “Othello” traitor 101 Milky gems 105 Admit 108 93- and 116-Across 112 Example of 83- and 22-Across 113 “Little Women” author 114 Ruined 115 Dead Sea Scrolls sect 116 Example of 108- and 47-Across 117 “See ya!” DOWN

RELEASE DATE: 6/18/2017

1 Desert crossed by the Silk Road 2 Gulf state 3 Celebration 4 Writer/critic James and family 5 Animal with luxurious fur 6 Org. with a “3-1-1” rule 7 Twenty-one words 8 Give ____ all 9 Damage 10 Blight victim 11 Film again 12 Money in the bank, e.g. 13 This and that 14 Razor brand 15 Example of 39- and 34-Down 16 Lang. heard in Haifa 17 Before, to a bard 18 ____ Moines

20 Bugs about the trash 23 Toil 28 Competitor of PetroCanada 30 Scrub, as a mission 31 Squealer 32 They may be high in a fallout zone 34 93-Across and 15-Down 35 When repeated, a Polynesian getaway 36 What trees do in fierce storms 37 Is on the brink 38 Passed quickly 39 31-Across and 15-Down 41 Len of stage and screen 42 They’re often pulled at night 43 131/2-inch gold-plated figure 45 Hall of fame 46 A mere stone’s throw from 47 Upscale London retailer 48 Fatty-acid compound 55 One of a pair of best friends in Greek legend 56 Heights of achievement 57 Witherspoon of “Legally Blonde” 58 Fussed over, as a grandchild 60 Like some diplomats 61 AOL alternative 63 Skeptical response 65 Dudes

2

3

4

5

6

7

19

9

10

23

25

26 29 38

27 31

40 45

46

32 42

56 61

62

63 67

79 84

107

75

80

81

85

86

89

98

90

91

94

99

95

100 108

109

110

102

103

104

111

113

114

115

116

117

84 ____ the Explorer 85 Guide to studying the night sky 86 What “Mc-” means in a name 88 Richard Strauss opera 90 Sired, biblically 93 Is disposed 94 Need for a professional designer

96

101

112

66 Puts forward 68 Holt of NBC News 70 Part in an animated film 72 “Well, look what I did!” 75 Lightly bite 76 Word of wonder 77 “Really!” 79 Ear: Prefix 80 Den denizen

68

72

93 97

36

58

74

92

106

57

71

88

35

53

78

87

34

43

66

83

33

52

73

82

18

51

70

77

17

49

65 69

16

48

60

64

15

47

55

59

14

28

41

54

13

24

50

105

12 21

30

39

44

76

11

20

22

37

8

95 “Me So ____” (1989 rap chart-topper) 96 Example of 47- and of 83-Across 98 Excited cry in a casino 99 Highest score in baccarat 100 Privy to 102 ____ Barksdale, drug dealer on “The Wire”

103 Jay who preceded Jimmy 104 Big bunch 105 Juice drink 106 Fleur-de-____ 107 ____ Palmas, Spain 109 90° bend 110 Obama health law, for short 111 Old, clumsy ship

JOE KIDD AUTOMOTIVE 40TH ANNIVERSARY

SALES EVENT CELEBRATING 40 YEARS OF SERVING THE EAST SIDE WITH GREAT SALES AND SERVICE SPOTLIGHT SPECIALS

2016 Chevrolet Malibu LT

2016 Chevrolet Impala

2016 Chrysler 200S

2016 Jeep Compass Sport 4x4

Black, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, P Sunroof, Alum. Wheels, 8k Miles

Blue, LS, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Cruise, 18K Miles #H8067

$17,985

$17,988

White, Auto, A/C, Leather Trim Seats, PW, PL, Alum. Wheels, Less than 300 Miles, Like New

$18,485

Black, Auto, Leather Trim Seats, Sunroof, Alum. Wheels, 9K Miles, Like New #H8071

Black, Auto, A/C, ABS, 4WD, Cruise, 4k Miles, #H8066

Red, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Cruise, Alum. Wheels, 60 Miles

Cargo Van, V8, Auto, Air, PW, 10K Miles

V6, All Power, 4x4, 11K Miles

$32,988

$21,988

$20,988

$20,988

2016 Dodge Durango SXT

LUXURY RIDES AND LATE MODELS

2016 Honda HR-V EX

TRUCKS & SUVs

$19,998

2015 GMC Savana

2015 Jeep Cherokee Latitude

BUDGET BUYS

2012 Chevy Cruze R/S.................................................$10,995 2016 Dodge Journey SE ...............................................$16,985 2004 Lincoln LS.............................................................. $2,588 White, LTZ, Sunroof, Leather, Excellent Condition! Grey, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, 3rd Row, Low Miles, Clean #H8041 V8, Sunroof 2013 Dodge Avenger SE ..............................................$11,488 2008 Cadillac Escalade................................................$19,985 2003 Nissan Pathfinder ................................................. $4,888 White, Auto, A/C, CD, PW, PL #G8061 Black, V8, Leather, Sunroof, Rear DVD, PW, PL, Cruise, CD, Heated Seats, Chrome Wheels 4x4, Auto, Air 2015 Honda Civic LX ...................................................$13,988 2012 RAM 1500 Quad Cab 4x4 ....................................$19,985 2004 Buick Ranier.......................................................... $5,488 Grey, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, 39 MPG HWY, Low Miles V8, Auto, A/C, PW, PL, Excellent Condition #F8205 AWD, V8, Loaded 2009 Cadillac CTS ........................................................$14,498 2012 Ford F-150 XLT 4x4 .............................................$20,585 2005 Chrysler PT Cruiser................................................ $5,995 Gold, V6, Auto, A/C, Leather, PW, PL, AWD, 30K Miles, Nice #H8045 Red, Super Cab, V6, Auto, A/C, Excellent Condition #F8141 Red, Auto, A/C, Sunroof, Very Economical Car 2016 Dodge Dart SXT...................................................$14,975 2016 Ford Transit 250 ..................................................$22,488 2007 Jeep Compass LTD ................................................ $6,977 Black, Auto, A/C, Sunroof, Alum. Wheels, Bal of Factory Warranty # H8047 V6, PW, 11K Miles$22,488 Auto, A/C, Alum. Wheels, Stereo CD, Great School Car

5QT Oil & Filter Change

$24.95

Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply. Expires 6/30/17.

1065 OHIO PIKE

JUST 3 MILES EAST OF I-275, EXIT #65

www.joekiddauto.com

Friendly and Courteous Salesmen

CAR GOT THE SHAKES? CompleteFrontEndAlignmentService

$49.95

Most vehicles. Some restrictions apply. Expires 6/30/17.

513-752-1804 SALES HOURS: Mon-Thu 9-8 • Fri 9-6 • Sat 9-5:30


Classifieds

JUNE 15, 2017 µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ 1C

cincinnati.com

Homes for Sale-Ohio

JOBS

To place your ad visit: cincinnati.com/classifieds or search: classifieds

Homes for Sale-Ohio

The Cincinnati Enquirer has carrier routes available in the following areas: All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicap or familial status or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newpaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. Kentucky Commission on Human Rights 800-292-5566 H.O.M.E. (Housing Opportunities Made Equal) 513-721-4663

4 efficiency units - Quiet location Ft Wright. Family owned 40+ years, Settling estate. $165,000. 859-391-7007

WALTON 2 acre residential lots, (Homes Only), 2 mi. South of Walton. Price Reduced, $48-$52K 859-802-8058

Homes for Sale-Ky

Ft Wright: 2BR, 1.5BA, equipped kitchen, C/A, W/D hkup, Gar,. $850/mo No Pets. 859331-4168 / 859-816-4231

Jobs

30 Ac, Carroll County, pasture, woods, 2 small ponds, ideal for livestock, hunting, city water, $76,900, $3,000 down, $695 per mo. TRI-STATE LAND CO. Walton, KY (859) 485-1330

CRESCENT SPRINGS- Triple Lake Sub. 2007 Lakelyn Ct. Lg 4 BR 2 sty w/2 full/2 half BA, eat-in kitchen w/granite countertops & SS appls., Great Rm & din rm, fin bsmt, 2 car gar, on wooded fenced lot, approx 3000 sq.ft. $284,900 or $1500/mo. rent + 1 mo. dep. 859-907-8669 Villa Hills/ 3BR, 2 bath, Fam rm w/WB Fpl, finished lower level w/full bath, covered patio & privacy rear fence, 2 car gar., $190K. 513-476-4686

Real Estate

Rentals

new beginnings...

itelligence, Inc. Cincinnati, OH seeks SAP Solution Architects (ID #8282) to identify, design, & lead SAP solution architecture internally & on client SAP implementation &/or support projects. Must have Bachelor’s in Comp. Sci., Engineering, Business, or related field & 7 yrs of SAP project implementation &/or support exp. in Production Planning (PP) module, which must include MRP & SFC [OR Master’s & 5 yrs of exp., gained before, during, or after degree]. 4 yrs of integration experience w/ PP-PI, QM, or MM; and 4 yrs leadership experience on SAP implementation projects/support projects. Any experience configuring multiple SAP modules OR any experience across multiple industries. Experience in multiple, full lifecycle SAP project implementations. Foreign equivalent degrees acceptable. Residence anywhere in the U.S. Travel required up to 100%. Apply online at www.itelligence group.com/us/careers. E-Verify Employer.

great places to live... ALEXANDRIA, KY Alexandria Manor Apts 1 BR Avail. now. ELDERLY, OR DISABLED Prices based on income. Call for info M-F 8-5. 800-728-5802TDD 7-1-1. Ashcraft Real Estate Services, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity ERLANGER, KY-Ashwood Apts & Townhomes 1 & 2 BR, avail. Start $500. Sec 8 ok, 3510-3534 Kimberly Dr, 621-623 Debbie Lane, 859-727-2256 M-F 8-5. TDD 7-1-1 Ashcraft Real Estate Services, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity

FT. THOMAS. 1 & 2 BDRM APTS & 1 BDRM TOWNHOMES MT. LOOKOUT 1 & 2 BDRM Grandin Bridge Apartments 513-871-6419 TAYLOR MILL Only 1.3 Miles from I-275 1 & 2 Bedroom 859-431-5754

Walton, KY - Walton Village Apts, 1BR Avail. now. ELDERLY, OR DISABLED Prices based on income. 35 School Rd Call for info M-F 8-5. 800-728-5802 TDD 7-1-1. Ashcraft Real Estate Services Inc. Equal Housing Oppty.

WHITE OAK WOODSIDE APTS Newly renovated deluxe 1 & 2 BR apts, W/D hkup, pool from $525mo. 513-923-9477

Destin, FL, Gulf front, 2BR, Condo Rentals, in Beautiful Destin, Local owner. 513-528-9800 Office., 513-752-1735 H

The Cincinnati Enquirer is currently recruiting RELIABLE and DEDICATED Independent Contractors for newspaper routes. Our customers look forward to receiving their paper 7 days/week - rain - sleet or snow. As a contractor, you have the right to personally perform the deliveries and have the ability to arrange and compensate a sub-contractor to perform deliveries in your absence. Subscribers expect to receive their paper in the early morning hours; between 2am & 6am. There are no collections involved. ∂ A valid driver’s license and auto insurance are required. ∂ Must be available early mornings 7 days a week. ∂ Must have reliable transportation. ∂ Access to the internet via PC, smartphone or tablet essential. Contractors are compensated weekly. Your revenue potential is up to you! The more papers you deliver timely pursuant to customer requests, the more money you will make!

OPEN INTERVIEWS: June 27th & 29th 10:00am – 3:00pm. RNs, LPNs & CNAs - Center interviewing for all shifts. New wage scale, maximum shift premiums & sign-on bonuses are available for certain openings. Qualifications: Candidates’ license/certification must be valid and in good standing with the KBN. Must possess excellent customer service skills & have maintained a good attendance record with previous employers. Applicants must have a strong work ethic & maintain a positive attitude while encompassing teamwork & problem-solving skills. We offer competitive compensation, medical, dental, vision benefits, 401(k), vacation time, growth opportunity and more. Apply online: www.genesiscareers.jobs Email: lisa.bass@genesishcc.com Phone: (859) 371-5731 Genesis HealthCare is an EO Employer- Veterans/Disabled and other protected categories.

Drivers - CDL-A

OTR & Regional Runs CHEMICAL DRIVERS Up to $80,000 per year + Sign-On Bonus & Benefits Required: CDL-A, X endorsement, TWIC and 3 yrs chemical OTR exp.

SLEEPING ROOM FOR RENT $125/week + Deposit 859-468-2388

Careers

7 Ac. Pendleton, co., pasture, w/septic system, water & electric hook ups, drive way, $2,500 down, $420 per mo10 Ac. Pendlton Co., rolling wooded, barn, pond, corner lot, city water, close to Hwy 27 $59,900, $2,5000 down

Potential gross revenue of $1,600 - $2,000 per month or more including tips delivering newspapers. By going the extra mile with your customers, tips will start rolling in.

Butler Ky-Country living, front porch, equipped kit w/ W/D hkup, 859-472-5229

1 Ac. So Grant., 2BD & 1 Ba single wide, fixer upjper, city water, $52,900 $5,000, $440 per mo

5 Ac. Grant Co., pasture, small pond, lays great, paved frontage, city water, $42,900, $2,000 down

Ê West Chester Ê Mason Ê Fairfield Ê Hamilton

Genesis HealthCare is now hiring at Bridge Point Center located in Florence, KY.

Must be 18 with a valid drivers license and proof of insurance. If interested please call: 1-855-704-2104 deliveryopportunities.gannett.com/

31 Ac. Pendleton Co., Hwy 22 mostly wooded, secluded home site, city water, $109,900. $4,000 down

4 Ac. Northern Pendleton Co., pasture, woods, view,doubl wides, welcome, city water, $2,000 down, $370 per mo

PETS & STUFF

RIDES

HOMES

GROOMING ASSISTANT. FT or PT. $10.00-11.50/Hr. WILL TRAIN. Rich Benefits. Email resume to jobs@nkypets.com or apply online http://jobapp.petwow.com

MEDICAL DELIVERY Well est. medical delivery co. sks. 1 Full Time dependable, honest, non smoker independent contractor w/ van or SUV. Great pay and earning potential. Must pass bkground checks and drug screen. 513-841-1159

PET GROOMER: FT. Great Pay. Rich Benefits. Great Schedule. Email resume to jobs@nkypets.com or apply online www.petwowgroomerjobs.com

Housekeeper/Set-up Person Local Temp housing company hiring employees for turn cleans and set-ups/move-outs on apts. Part-Time-up to 28 hours/wk Pay varies from $12/Hr Call: 513-271-4900

GSF USA, Inc. IS HIRING!!!! ■ 1st Shift Floor Technicians (Montgomery Cincinnati Area) ■ Part-Time and Full-Time Janitorial Positions (Hebron-KY Area) - Multiple Shifts available Full Benefits Available Health, Dental, Vision, Long term disability, Short term disability, and 401K matching program!!!! Email Resumes to HRCincy@GSF-usa.com Other Positions available throughout Kentucky and Cincinnati surrounding area, Please visit www.gsf-usa.com CE-0000679231

Community

Announce announcements, novena... Special Notices-Clas ATTENTION GE EVENDALE (1961-70) & FERNALD (FMPC) (1951-83) FAMILIES: Did you, your spouse or your parent become ill after working @ GE or Fernald? You maybe entitled to up to $400,000 from the United States. For more information, call Attorney Hugh Stephens at 1-800-548-4494, even if your claim has been accepted or denied. We assist with claims, dose recontructions, appeals, impairment ratings, wage loss, health care and home care. We also handle other Federal Workers Comp. (OWCP/FECA) 2495 Main St, Suite 442, Buffalo, NY 14214. In search of DUSTY OLD BOURBON AND WHISKEY COLLECTIONS!, Please email me at dustybourbonandwhis key@gmail.com with what you have. Collectible pourposes only.,

Assorted

Stuff all kinds of things...

BURLINGTON ANTIQUE SHOW Boone County Fairgrounds Burlington, KY Sunday, June 18 -----------8am-3pm $4.00/Adult Early Buying 6am-8am $6/Adult Rain or Shine 513-922-6847 burlingtonantiqueshow.com

hotpoint refrigerator, freezer, side by side, ice maker inside works ,white, age? 23 cubic ft, $100.00. (859)3412686 ceesreeftoo@gmail.com Washer (Maytag) & Dryer (GE), very good cond., $150/both. 859-468-7009

Girls 4pc twin bedroom set with or without canopy$350. 859-371-6005 Solid Oak & cherry Caskets

ONLY $500. ( $4,000-$8,000 at funeral homes) While they last. Delivery available Call Today 513-383-2785 thecasketcompany.com Brass Urns only $99 We also have Reds, Bengals, Air Force, Nascar, Harley Davidson & Police Officer wrapped caskets each is one of a kind (Beautiful). STORING CLOSING SPECIALS Living Room, Dining Rooms, Mattresses, Bunkbeds, Futons, Electric Adjustable Beds w/ m emory foam mattresses. REALLY LOW MATTRESS PRICES FAST DELIVERY 100’s of premium king sets Lots of floor model specials. SHOP US TODAY! 50% OFF MOST FLOOR MODELS EVERYTHING MUST SELL MAKE US AN OFFER No Reasonable Offer 8455 Winton Rd* Brentwood Plaza Call me, BILL, w/ your questions 513-383-2785! Mattress & Furniture Express mattressandfurnitureexpress .com Apply online everyone approved. Guaranteed financing, No Credit Check

GMC PICKUP LONG BED FIBERGLASS CAP. BEST OFFER. 859-250-9912

WELDING SHOP CLOSING. ALL EQUIPMENT MUST GO. 859-250-9912

Musical Instruction

2 PIANO LESSONS 49 yrs. exp.; 859-727-4264

877-246-1856

www.DriveWithDupre.com #1 ALWAYS BUYING-Retired Vet pays top cash for antiques and vintage items. Single item or complete estate. 513-325-7206 Buying ALL Sports Cards Pre 1970. Please Contact Shane Shoemaker @ 513-477-0553

BUYING Comic Books 1940’spresent, 1920’s - 1950’s Dectective & Pin-up Pulp Magazines, 35mm Photo Slides, 1940’s - 1970’s primarily railroad & transportation related. 513-325-4913

CASH PAID for unopened unexpired Diabetic Strips. Up to $35 per 100. 513-377-7522 www.cincytestrips.com

WE BUY TOYS We are buying all types of vintage toys from the 70s, 80s, and 90s in good to excellent condition. Check your closets, basement, and garage for Star Wars, The Real Ghostbusters, Jurassic Park and other Kenner products. We are also on the look out for Barbie, G.I. Joe, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, LEGO and other pop culture toy lines. CompleteSet is a nationally recognized trusted source for toy collectors so you will be sure to get an accurate and fair price for your items. Call or text 513-800-2024 or email us at sell@completeset.com

Yard and Outdoor

Arrasmith Daylillies Farm 100’s of colorful varieties June 10th, 17th & 24th & July 8th & 15th, 10am-4pm. 3595 Fender Rd Camp Springs Ky. 859-630-1711 www.arrasmithfarm.com

Adopt Me Wanted - All motorcycles pre-1980. Running or not, any condition. Cash paid. Call 845-389-3239 or email: cyclesndmore10@gmail.com

WAR RELICS US, German, Japanese Uniforms, Helmets, Guns, Swords, Medals Etc, Paying Top Dollar Call 513-309-1347

We Buy STAMP Collections! Old Letters U.S. & World 40 years in business 513-624-6800 randyschollstampcompany.com

  VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

Pets find a new friend... BOSTON TERRIER PUPPIESCKC reg, shots, wormed, cute & ready $350. No Sunday Sales 859-265-7598 German Shepherd Pups, 7 wks old AKC reg., POP, vet ckd, shots & wormed, $700. 765-265-0233 GOLDEN Retriever Pups: AKC reg,. english cream, POP. 7 weeks, ready to go. vet checked, 1st shots/ wormed. $850 859-496-7013 Great Dane Puppies, AKC, M&F -Fawns-$800 Blk M&F$600, Parents on site. 859-967-7428 or 859-967-7427 Maine Coon Mix Kittens 10 weeks, $35/ea. 859-393-6053

Automotive

Rides best deal for you... CASH for junk cars, trucks & vans. Free pick up. Call Jim or Roy anytime 859-866-2909 or 859-991-5176


2C µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ JUNE 15, 2017

Find your new home today Stress-free home searches

powering real estate search for over 365 newspapers ©2014 HomeFinder.com, LLC. All rights reserved

Equal Housing Opportunity


JUNE 15, 2017 Âľ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY Âľ 3C

Your Source

General Auctions

Legals

General Auctions

AUCTION SATURDAY JUNE 17, 2017 9:30 AM Located at 3030 Lawrenceville Rd. Corinth, Ky 41010.

for the latest...

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION

TAKE I-75 TO Williamstown Ky. EXIT 154 GO EAST ON RT-36 TURN RIGHT SOUTH ON US 25 5 mile TO RIGHT ON LAWRENCEVILLE RD 4 mile TO AUCTION ON LEFT. RON COVINGTON HAVING SOLD HIS FARM HAS CONTRACTED US TO AUCTION THE ITEMS LISTED THIS IS A PARTIAL LIST MORE BEING UNPACKED. Farm Equipment, Tools and Horse Items LX172 John Deere Lawn Mower 42inch cut, New Holland tractor TB 100 100 hp. approximately 350 hrs. 2wd , New Holland BR 730 4x4 round baler ..Craftsman 15 hp Lawn Mower 42inch Cut, 3pt Roll Bay Mover, 3pt 6ft Scraper Blade, Bush Hog, 16ft Wagon w/New Bed, 3pt Disk, Bog Harrows, Soil Shurger, 2 New Holland Sickle Bars 7ft, 3 Bottom 14inch Ford Plows, 6ft Rotovator, Single Row Tobacco Planter, Cyclone Seed and Fertilizer Sower 12 Volt Motor, Hay Rack, 16ft Tag a long Trailer 3 axle, New Holland Sickle Bar Mower, Diesel Fuel Tank, Large Set of Platform Scales, Water Trauth, Misc Barrels, Platform Carts, Small Trailer, Bolt Bin, Wheel Barrel, Self-Propelled Toro Push Mower 6 ½ Horsepower, Stihl 028 Chainsaw, Stihl Weedeater, DieHard Battery Charger, Misc Concrete Chisels and files, Misc. Hand Tools, 12 Drawer Tool Box, Tool Bench, Sprayers, Tool Handles, Misc Fans, Air Compressor, Delta Drill Press, Large Vise, Large anvil, Craftsman 10inch Table Saw, Bottle Jacks, Mantis Tiller, Grinder, Campbell Haus Feld Pressure Washer, Shop Vac, Hydraulic Press, Air Tanks, Iron Welding Bench, Gas Water Pump, Rigid 24inch, Socket and Ratchets, Sledge Handle Hammers, ž Drive Socket Set, Misc. Tires, Brass Back Pack Sprayer, Ax Handles, Pipe Treading Tools, Metal Table, Broad Ax, Metal Cabinet, Woven Wire, Concrete Blocks, Misc. Log Chains, Railroad Jacks, Black Tool Box, 275 Gallon Fuel Tank w/pump, Squirrel Cages, Small Platform Scale, 220 Portable Air Compressor, Grease Guns, Metal Gate, Fence Stretchers, Misc. Funnels, 2 sets of Aluminum Ladders, 18ft. Extension Ladder, 10ft Fiberglass Extension Ladder, Cast Iron Kettle w/Stand, Kenmore Refrig, Child Rocking Chair, Griswold Meat Grinder, Antique Oak Straight Back Chair, Metal Desk, Antique Buck Saw, Antique Wash Stand, Old Kerosene Can, Old Corn Jobber, Old Sie, Antique Implement Seats, Wooden Rocker, 6 Cain Bottom Chairs, Coat Rack Shelf, Wooden Box, 2 Wooden Door w/glass in Center, Round Oak Table, Old Cream Cans, 2 Metal Beds, Glass Top Kitchen Table w/chair, Old Recktor Set, Oak Board w/Hooks, Radio Flyer Wagon, Coleman Camping Lights, Gas Stove, Propane Cooker, Meat Saw, Wood Carpenter Box, Galvanized Tub, Card Table, Ham Hooks, #9 Wire, Shoe in Stock, Horse Collars, Horse Hames, Misc. Saddles, Saddle Rack, Antique Baby High Chair, Horse Drawn Work Sled, Pie Safe, Horse Blankets, Double Tress, 4 Aluminum 16inch Wheels for Chevy, Running Board for Chevy.

PUBLIC NOTICE The following storage units from Stronghold of Kentucky will be sold at public auction by Don Bates Auctioneers, at 3700 Holly Lane, Erlanger, Kentucky, 41018 on June 27, 2017 at 10:00 A.M. and will continue until all items are sold Unit #219, Daniel Hamilton, 1120 Putnam Street, Apt, #1, Newport, Ky 41071 Unit #220, Daniel Hamilton, 1120 Putnam Street, Apt, #1, Newport, Ky 41071 Unit #243, Dominique Guifoye, 405 Electric Ave, Southgate, Ky 41071 Unit #323, Dominique Guilfoye, 405 Electric Ave., Southgate, KY 41071 Unit #369, Mike Bailey, 1953 Silverleaf Drive, Hebron, Ky 41048 Unit #444 ,Kimberly Murphy, 196 Main St, Newport, Ky 41071 KNT,Jun15,22,’17#2183805 Legal Notice The complete audit report for the 31 December 2015 Fee Account and Tax Settlement of the Kenton County Sheriff’s Office for 2015 per KRS 424.220 are on file and available at no cost for public inspection in our Covington Office, 303 Court Street, Room 409 during normal business hours (M-F 08:30 AM to 4:00 PM). If you would like a personal copy, there is a duplication cost of .15 cents per page that is due upon request. KNT,Jun15,’17#2197266

Terms are cash or check with proper I D No buyer’s premium 6 % Sale tax charged if dealer bring copy of sales tax number

KANNADY & MOORE AUCTION SERVICE

Toyota ’14 Corolla S, like brand new loaded, new tires, 26,000 miles, Dark Metallic Red, sporty, $13, 500 859-640-7063 VW ’68 Bug, restored-$ 5,000. Roadmaster tow dollie$1,100HD. 4 whl handicap kart w/hitch carrier-$1,000. 859-240-5252

2016 Harley FXDL Dyna Low Rider, cosmic blue pearl, leather saddle bags, backrest, detachable windshield, chrome foot pegs, winter cover. Transferable 5 yr/unlimited mileage HD extended service plan. $17,500. Mike (859)6696070

MERCEDES ’96 BENZ 320E ’94 CHEVROLET GEO TRACKER, auto, Must Sell. BOTH RUNS GOOD. 859-331-0059

UPDATED ALL DAY.

Toyota 2011 Camry, Sedan, 57000 mi., 4 dr., Automanual, Very good cond., Black ext., Gray int., 04 Cylinders, FWD, A/C: Front, A/C: Rear, Airbag: Driver, Airbag: Passenger, Airbag: Side, Alarm, Alloy Wheels, Anti-Lock Brakes, Bucket Seats, Cassette Radio, CD Player, Cruise Control, DVD Player, Fog Lights, Leather Interior, Memory Seats, Navigation System, Power Locks, Power Seats, Power Steering, Power Windows, Premium Sound, Rear Window Defroster, Rear Window Wiper, Remote Keyless Entry, Sunroof, Third Row Seats, Tinted Glass, Tow Package, TV/VCR, Camry SE, power sunroof, power windows, power seats,premium sound, new tires, premium wheels, runs great, accidents free, one owner, $4100. Ethan Thompson (440)573-1168

Morningview & Williamstown, KY AUCTIONEERS Randy Moore Steve Kannady 859-393-5332 859-991-8494 Also check out pictures on auctionzip.com ID # 1411

NOW THAT’S REFRESHING.

Garage & Yard Sale VISIT: cincinnati.com/classifieds TO PLACE YOUR AD

Great Buys

Garage Sales neighborly deals... Cincinnati , Estate Sale , 3344 Hidden Creek #85, Fri: 9-3, Sat: 9-3, Vintage furniture, home decor, jewelry, art, Christmas items, kitchenware, bedroom sets, grandfather clock, Dir: No parking on main streets. Please park on Commons Cir and walk to back door

DELHI ESTATE SALE 472 PALMERSTON DR CINCINNATI, OH 45238 Antiques & collectibles – beer advertising pieces/ signs & taps etc. Railroad lanterns, milk cans, horse collar mirror, old tins, records, old scythes, old sleds, cedar chest, rockers, vintage ladies bike, old coolers, oak dining room set. Misc. chairs & tables, wood boxes, yard tools. Too much to list – all priced to sell! Info and pics – hsestatesales.com or 859468-9468. Directions – Foley – Stillwater – Palmerston drive.

Symmes Township Estate Sale. 11957 Carrington Ct Cincinnati OH 45249 6/17, 9-4. #’s @ 8:45 SATURDAY ONLY Contents of two-story home & garage. Patio furniture, dining room table/1 leaf/ 8 chairs/China cabinet. Two matching couches/love seats. Broyhill full bed/ chest/desk/ nightstand. King bed/ armoire. Full bed/ armoire/2 nightstands/ mirrored dresser. Twin bed, glass coffee table, bookshelves, misc. chairs & tables, stores, pictures, linens, lamps, Bakers rack, mini fridge, desk, ladders, some yard & handtools, leaf blower, trimmers, lawn Seeder. Lots of kitchen & misc. items. Too much to list – all priced to sell! Info and pics – hsestatesales.com or 859–9 92–0212. Directions – Mason Montgomery Road – Chapel Square Lane – Nathan’s Hill Lane – Cypresspoint- Carrington Ct

Garage Sales British Car Day July 9th, 9am-4pm at Harbin Park, Fairfield. Details & registrations at: www.bccgc.com WANTED ARTISTS & CRAFTERS Sharonville Kiwanis Arts & Craft Show. Sharonville Community Center. Sun Sept 24. 513-563-1438 email: patchacetaylor@gmail.com

Ft Wright Look Out Heights Civic Club 1661 Park Rd. Saturday, June 17,9A-2P: Outdoor sale, inside if raining. many varied sellers w/ a variety of merchandise. Sellers welcome-$10 a space includes 2-8’ tables. Reserve a place. Call 859-630-0957

Garage Sales ALEXANDRIA - Pond Creek Subdivision Neighborhood Garage Sales, Behind Campbell County HS Sat 6/17, 8-1pm, Bellevue City Wide Sale Saturday, June 17- 8am-?? furniture, household goods, clothing, treasures throughout the entire city and along Historic Fairfield Ave. Maps available. www.shopbellevueky.com

BURLINGTON - Garage Sale, Fri 6/16 & Sat 6/17, 9am-3pm, 2115 Blugrama Dr, variety of items Eastgate, Community Garage Sale, Roland creek, Fri: 9:00 3:00, Sat: 9:00 - 3:00, Community wide Sale, something for everyone!, Dir: Clough Pike to Wetherby Farms and the Estates Of Shayler Ridge or Shayler to Roland Creek ERLANGER - Garage Sale, 3414 Misty Creek Drive, Fri & Sat: 9-2, Lift chair, Subaru pick-up rims, yarn, glass top end table, wicker stool and so much more., Dir: off Turkeyfoot Road across from Stevenson Road. FLORENCE, GARAGE SALE, 22 ACHATES DR., Fri: 8 AM 3PM, Sat: 9AM - 1 PM, SOME OF EVERYTHING, DEHYDRATOR, MOTORIZED WHEEL CHAIR, FURNITURE, SOME TOOLS, HOUSEWARES, GLASS WARE, MATERIAL AND MORE. Dir: HOPEFUL CHURCH RD TO SURFWOOD, SECOND STOP SIGN LEFT ONTO YEALEY DR., TO RIGHT ON ACHATES DR., HOUSE ON RIGHT Florence/KY - Yard Sale, Sat. 6/17, 9-2pm, 6423 Parkwood Place, appliances, furniture, household clothing, & misc.,

HEBRON, KY: W. Horizon Dr Street Sale (off 237) June 16 & 17 9a-3p furniture, household, antiques, clothes, pottery, tools, electronics, kids items/toys, & lots of misc Hebron Moving Sale 1619 Battery Cir. Sat 6/17, 8A-12P. Longtime Derby collector seliing his collection! Glasses, programs, pins, keeneland bottles, chart books, ETC & lots of other household items Independence/KY - Barn Clean Out Sale 6/16-6/17 9:00 am-3:00 pm 4977 Old Madison Pike (Rt. 3035), Rain or Shine. Indoor sale. Antique farm items, household, old books, tools, old bottles, jars, chicken feeders lots of misc. See Craigslist ad for pictures and additional details. Taylor Mill-653 Cardinal Dr Sat. 6/17: 9A - 4P, Sun. 6/18: 9A - 4P, Huge Multi Family Yard Sale. Lots of new items, tools, toys, home decor, bath sets, video games, phone cases, air compressors, girls bicycle, various glassware, antique iron bed frame & box spring, clothes, purses etc.

Union/KY - Yard Sale, Sat 6/17, 9-2, 693 Oakridge Dr, Lots of household items, baby, kids & adult clothing, baby toys, linens, purses, etc., Something for Everyone!!! Walton 2 Family Sale 463 Mustang Dr. Fri 6/16 & Sat 6/17, 8a-12p Household, decor & a whole lot more Walton/Richwood Moving Sale. 11035 Stirrup Ln. Fri 6/16 & Sat 6/17, 8AM-1PM:

THE NEWS IS ALWAYS CHANGING. SO ARE WE.

VISIT US ONLINE TODAY

Service Directory CALL: 513-421-6300 TO PLACE YOUR AD

HOLMES

BLACKTOP & CONCRETE Driveways • Patios • Steps Drainage Solutions Residential & Commercial

FULLY INSURED - FREE ESTIMATES

513-451-3100

CONCRETE LLC

Caregiver needed - to help care for my husband Part time, $12/hr., 10-15hrs weekly., must have caregiving exp, w/refs available. 859-360-8498

Hauling

Specializing in new and old replacement of driveways, patios, sidewalks, steps, retaining walls, decorative concrete work, basement and foundation leaks & driveway additions.We also offer Bobcat, Backhoe, Loader, and Dumptruck work, regrading yards & lot cleaning. • Free Estimates • Fully Insured • Over 20 Years Experience Currently Offering A+ Rating with Better 10% DISCOUNT Business Bureau OFFICE CHRIS

859-485-6535 859-393-1138 cohornconcrete@aol.com www.cohornconcrete.com

ALL DONE

FREE ESTIMATES • INSURED Ready for Winter? Concrete Work & Repair Tuckpointing Stone and Brick

COMPUTER REPAIR

859-384-1500 www.wbscomputers.com

CE-0000678648

Home $75 Per Hr and Business $95 Per Hr On-Site Service Only! We come to you! Call today to schedule an appointment. Virus / Spyware Removal / Reloads Data Backup / Recovery Network Design and Installation Tune-ups / Upgrades Server Design and Installation WBS Computers

Roofs and Roof Repairs Additional Exterior Services Provided

5-Year guarantee on all workmanship

Gutters and Mulching

Residential Roofing

• Free Estimates

Pressure Washing

• Fully Insured

Call Today for your Quote

859-814-1778

• 5� & 6� Seamless Gutters

NKyHomeRepair.com Kitchen, Bath & Basement Remodeling, Decks, Tile, Custom Showers, Walk-in Tubs

Rodney Goins 859-743-9806

     VISIT CLASSIFIEDS online at cincinnati.com

25 years exp. Insured.

CE-0000679112

2 Witches and A Broom Cleaning Services. Housework driving you crazy? Let us HELP!!! Weekly, Bi-Weekly deep cleans. Call 859-488-1298 for a FREE quote.

R & R ROOFING

859-331-0527

LOVE WORK LIKE IT’S YOUR JOB. Satisfaction comes in all shapes in sizes. Fortunately, we’ve got jobs for everyone. Fine one that’s right for you on CareerBuilder.com.


4C µ KC-KENTUCKY - COMMUNITY µ JUNE 15, 2017

ONLY CARS.COM HELPS YOU GET THE RIGHT CAR, WITHOUT ALL THE DRAMA.


MIKE CASTRUCCI

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY

S1

Go Further

OPEN M-THU 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5

$750 MILITARY APPRECIATION BONUS CASH AVAILABLE

FOR ACTIVE & RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL AND VETERANS - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

2017 FORD F-150 REGULAR CAB STOCK #HKD35171

BUY FOR

19,995

MSRP ................................. $29,805 FACTORY REBATE ................-$3,750 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT .........-$4,810 BUY FOR............................. $21,245 FORD CREDIT REBATE..........-$1,250

$

2017 F150 SUPERCAB 4X4

LEASE FOR

STOCK #HKC89661

199

$

MSRP $38,545 $1995 CASH OR TRADE EQUITY DUE AT SIGNING NO SECURITY DEPOSIT 10,500 MILES PER YEAR PLUS TAX AND FEES

2017 FORD F-150 SUPERCREW 4X4 STOCK #HKC52320

MSRP ................................. $39,540 FACTORY REBATE ................-$4,450 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT .........-$5,245 BUY FOR............................. $30,245 FORD CREDIT REBATE..........-$1,250

PER MO. FOR 36 MONTHS

BUY FOR

28,995

$

2017 F350 CREW CAB 4X4

DUALLY LARIAT STOCK #HEB13453

MSRP ................................. $65,955 FACTORY REBATE ............... -$1,000 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT .........-$7,210 BUY FOR............................. $57,745 FORD CREDIT REBATE.............-$750

BUY FOR

56,995

$

OVER 175 F SERIES IN STOCK

30% OFF ALL 2016 F-150 XL LAST E AND XLT MODELS! CHANC ONLY 11 REMAINING FOR THIS OFFER

CALL TOLL FREE

877.934.4699 www.mikecastruccifordalexandria.com

Not all buyers will qualify. Ford Credit limited-term APR financing. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 6/30/2017. Not all Fusion models may qualify. See dealer for residency restrictions qualifications and complete details.

MSRP


Go Further

S2

MIKE CASTRUCCI

$750 MILITARY APPRECIATION BONUS CASH AVAILABLE

FOR ACTIVE & RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL AND VETERANS - SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS

2017 FORD

2017 FORD

ESCAPE

EXPLORER

MSRP .................................$24,495 FACTORY REBATE ................-$3,900 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.........-$4,100 #HUC08957

LEASE FOR

139/MO.

$

BUY FOR *

16,495

$

MSRP .................................$32,605 FACTORY REBATE ................-$3,500 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.........-$4,110 #HGC83690

LEASE FOR

24,995

$

*

*24 month lease plus tax & fees. $2500 cash or trade equity down. No security deposit. 10,500 miles per year.

*24 month lease plus tax & fees. $2500 cash or trade equity down. No security deposit. 10,500 miles per year.

2017 FORD

199/MO.

$

BUY FOR

EDGE

2017 FORD

EXPEDITION

4X4 EL

#HBB35496

MSRP ........................................ $31,535 FACTORY REBATE .......................-$3,850 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT................-$3,690

#HEA34586

BUY FOR

23,995

$

2017 FORD

FIESTA #HM103654

2017 FORD

FOCUS

2017 FORD

FUSION S

#HR333923

2017 FORD

MUSTANG

#H5290400

2017 FORD

FLEX

MSRP ........................................................ $14,535 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ...........................-$2,840 FACTORY REBATE .......................................-$700

LEASE FOR

79

$

PER MONTH

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

LEASE FOR

129

$

PER MONTH

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

LEASE FOR

BUY FOR

MSRP ......................................... $65,766 FACTORY REBATE ........................-$5,650 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT.................-$7,371 BUY FOR..................................... $52,745 FORD CREDIT REBATE.....................-$750

189

$

PER MONTH

$2500 Cash or Trade Equity due at signing, 24mo. lease, no security deposit, 10,500 miles per year, plus tax & fees

MSRP ...........................................................$30,920 FACTORY REBATE ...................................... -$2,850 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ............................. -$4,075

51,995

$

BUY FOR

10,995

$

MSRP ........................................................................ $17,650 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ...........................................-$2,405 FACTORY REBATE ....................................................-$2,500 BUY FOR................................................................... $12,745 FORD CREDIT REBATE................................................-$250

BUY FOR

12,495

$

MSRP .................................................................... $22,995 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT .......................................-$3,350 FACTORY REBATE ................................................-$2,150

16,995

$

BUY FOR

MSRP .......................................................................$26,085 CASTRUCCI DISCOUNT ......................................... -$2,690 FACTORY REBATE .................................................. -$1,900 BUY FOR..................................................................$21,495 FORD CREDIT REBATE.............................................. -$500

BUY FOR

20,995

$

BUY FOR

23,995

$

All prices refl reflect ect all applicable Ford Factory rebates deducted. Some offers require Ford Credit fifinancing. nancing. Customers that choose not to fifinance nance may lose these rebates. Lease payment is a closed end 24 mo. lease through Ford Credit with approved credit. All leases based on 10,500 miles per year with 20¢ per mile overage. Tax, title, license and acquisition fees not included. Trade-in assistance rebate requires a 1995 or newer Ford or competitive make registered to household to be used as trade toward purchase of new vehicle. Not all buyers will qualify for all offers. Ford Credit Special APR financing is available in lieu of rebates. Some offers may have residency restrictions qualifications. Residency restrictions apply. 30 percent off msrp offer includes manufacturer rebate and ford credit financing rebate and excludes all ST and RS modelss. See dealer for complete details of any advertised offer. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 6/30/2017.

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY • OPEN M-THU 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5 OPEN EVERY SUNDAY 11AM - 5PM

CALL TOLL FREE

877.934.4699

www.mikecastruccialexandria.com


Mike Castrucci Lincoln

T1

OPEN EVERY SUNDAY 11AM - 5PM!

2017 LINCOLN MKC

#5LHUL55960

269

$

per month

36 month lease

MSRP $33,805

$2995 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3264 due at signing

BUY FOR

31,295

$

after $1000 Premium Customer Cash & 0% APR for 60 months

2017 LINCOLN MKX

2017 LINCOLN MKZ

#2LHBL34218

$

339 per month

36 month lease

BUY FOR

$

MSRP $39,380 $2995 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3334 due at signing

36,495

after $1000 Premium Customer Cash & 0% APR for 60 months

#3LHR650002

329

$

36 month lease

BUY FOR

$

43,995 Only 1 remaining at this price

$

33,895

after $500 Premium Customer Cash & 0% APR for 60 months

2016 LINCOLN NAVIGATOR

#1LH5620241

BUY FOR

$2995 down payment 10,500 miles per year no security deposit $3324 due at signing

per month

2017 LINCOLN CONTINENTAL MSRP $46,100

MSRP $36,095

#5LGEL09783

BUY FOR

55,995

$

All leases & 0% offers through Lincoln Automotive Financial Services with approved credit. All leases based on 10500 miles per year with over milage charge of 20 cents per mile.Tax, title and license fees not included. 1st payment due at delivery. See dealer for complete details of any offer. $16.66 per every $1000 financed at 0% for 60 months. $13.88 per every $1000 financed at 0% for 72 months. Offer ends 6/30/17.

Mike Castrucci Lincoln 7 4 0 0 A l e x a n d r i a P i ke | A l e x a n d r i a , KY | 8 7 7 - 9 3 4 - 4 7 0 2 Open M-Thur 9-8 | Fri-Sat 9-6 | Sun 11-5

www.mikecastruccilincoln.com


Mike Castrucci Ford Lincoln of Alexandria

T2

OVER 50 PRE-OWNED TRUCKS IN STOCK!

2003 FORD F-150 CREW CAB XLT 4X4......................................... $6,875 STOCK#59097

2010 TOYOTA TUNDRA DOUBLE CAB 4X4 ................................$22,586 STOCK#5965

2008 FORD EXPEDITION XLT 4X4 ....................................................$7,456 STOCK#59151

2011 GMC SIERRA 1500 CREW CAB SLE 4X4..........................$24,243 STOCK#59767

2002 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 DIESEL ............................. $7,900 STOCK#59234

2001 FORD F-150 CREW CAB LARIAT 4X4................................$24,442 STOCK#59508

2007 FORD F-150 REG. CAB XL.......................................................$11,423 STOCK#59786

2009 FORD F-150 CREW CAB KING RANCH 4X4 .................. $24,864 STOCK#59156

2010 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB STX 4X4 ......................................$18,456 STOCK#59250

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW LARIAT 4X4...........................$25,258 STOCK#58980

2010 FORD F-150 CREW CAB XLT 4X4 .......................................$18,652 STOCK#59743

2014 FORD F150 SUPERCAB STX 4X4....................................... $25,922 STOCK#5830

2010 FORD F-150 CREW CAB XLT 4X4 ......................................$20,828 STOCK#5966

2014 FORD F150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4 ....................................$27,865 STOCK#5926

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4 ....................................$21,519 STOCK#5684

2012 TOYOTA TUNDRA CREW CAB 4X4.....................................$27,986 STOCK#59751

2012 FORD F150 SUPERCAB XLT 4X4.........................................$22,307 STOCK#5690

2014 FORD F-150 REG CAB TREMOR 4X4 ................................$29,458 STOCK#59069

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW FX4, 4X4, 6.5 FT. BED..........$22,318 STOCK#5790

2014 FORD F-150 SUPERCAB LARIAT 4X4................................$31,423 STOCK#59042

2012 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4................................... $22,541 STOCK#5669

2013 FORD F250 CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL 4X4 ................$33,265 STOCK#5920

2011 FORD F-150 SUPER CREW XLT 4X4 ...................................$23,785 STOCK#5684

2010 FORD F-350 CREW CAB LARIAT 4X4 DUALLY................$34,161 STOCK#59378

2006 FORD F-350 CREW CAB LARIAT DIESEL 4X4 .............. $22,449 STOCK#59668

2015 FORD F150 SUPER CREW LARIAT 4X4............................. $37,186 STOCK#5658

7400 ALEXANDRIA PIKE | ALEXANDRIA, KY • OPEN M-THUR 9-8 | FRI-SAT 9-6 | SUN 11-5

859.448.2404

www.mikecastruccialexandria.com

Stop In For Savings! We Can Service Most Makes & Models Regardless of Where You Purchased Your Vehicle! Why Pay More? Motorcraft Oil & Filter Change

24

$

95

Up to 5 qts. Some makes & models excluded. See advisor for details. Includes the multi-point inspection, brake inspection, inspected belts & hoses & top off all fluid levels. Only valid at Mike Castrucci Ford-Lincoln Alexandria. Expires 6.30.17

THE WORKS

FUEL SAVER PACKAGE

Oil & Filter Change, Tire Rotation, Adjust Tire Pressure, Top-Off All Fluid Levels, Includes MultiPoint Inspection, Battery Test, Filter Check & Belts & Hoses Checked

39

$

95

Most vehicles. Up to 5 qts. synthetic blend. Excludes diesels. Expires 6.30.17

Alignment Check

Dare To Compare!

In 2 Minutes or Less!

Front End Alignment Special

Only valid at Mike Castrucci Ford-Lincoln Alexandria. With Coupon only. Expires 6.30.17

Certain makes & models excluded. Only valid at Mike Castrucci For-Lincoln Alexandria. Must present coupon at time of write-up. Expires 6.30.17

FREE 59 $

95

Includes camber, caster & toe adjustment

Call to Schedule Today!

(859) 838-4794 | www.mikecastruccialexandria.com 7400 Alexandria Pike, Alexandria KY 41001

MON-THURS. 7:30AM-7PM • FRI 7:30AM-6PM • SAT 7:30AM-3PM • CLOSED SUNDAY

Profile for Enquirer Media

Community recorder 061517  

Community recorder 061517