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C AMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER

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Your Community Recorder newspaper serving Bellevue, Cold Spring, Highland Heights, Newport, Southgate

THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013

BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Campbell’s libraries seek resolution on tax issue Board votes to keep property tax rate the same By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

COLD SPRING — Keeping all three Campbell County Public Library branches operating normally was the objective of a library board of trustees vote to collect the same amount of property tax revenue, about $4.3 million, as last year. The board voted unanimously at the Aug. 20 meeting to keep the rate of 7.7 cents per $100 of assessed value of real property. The owner of a $100,000 home paid $77 in library tax. The vote also kept the rate for tangible personal property including machinery and furniture and fixtures at 9.4 cents per $100, and the tax rate for motor vehicles and boats remained at 2.6 cents per $100 of assessed value. The Kentucky Supreme Court declined to hear the library district’s appeal of a Campbell Circuit Court Judge Julie Reinhardt Ward ruling in April the library has used the wrong law to raise the tax rate since 1979. The library has appealed the ruling to the Kentucky Court of Appeals. Attorney Brandon Voelker had filed the suit against the library in January 2012, acting for residents Charlie Coleman, John P. Roth Jr. and Erik Hermes. Coleman is now campaigning as a candidate for Campbell County Commissioner. “We are trying to honor Judge Ward’s decision, but we are also trying to preserve the service that we know a large number of people in this county enjoy,” said JC Morgan, library director. Almost 94 percent of the library’s revenue is derived from property taxes to pay for a $4.6 million operating budget, Morgan said. The tax rate approved will bring in about $4.3 million, he said. The operating budget pays staff salaries and everything needed to keep the branches in Cold Spring, Fort Thomas and New-

port open, he said. Property tax revenue will decrease by 56.7 percent down to $1.8 million annually if the library is required to reduce the rate back to the 1978 level when the system was formed by petition, Morgan said. Ward’s ruling did not require rolling back the property tax rate to the 1978 level, so the library asked the Kentucky Supreme Court to hear an appeal and was denied, he said. “We’re asking for relief for an order that was never given,” Morgansaid.“We’reaskingthem to let us stay at the current rate that nobody has told us that we couldn’t stay at.” Morgan said the library will continue to operate normally unless told otherwise. “This is totally uncharted territory,” he said. Morgan said he presented two different budgets to the board in May. The board approved a budget based on maintaining existing revenues. Another budget was based on immediately trying to operate off of 1978 revenues and cut annual costs immediately by 60 percent. The costcutting budget was not approved, and has not been discussed since May. The cost cutting budget does exist just in case, he said. “Library services will be greatly diminished if that becomes a reality,” said Morgan in a news release distributed at the end of the Aug. 20 meeting. Board of Trustees President Rebecca Kelm released a statement on behalf of the board in the news release: “The Board of Trustees fully understands the decision by the Campbell County Circuit Court on which statutes apply in setting annual tax rates. However, the court’s ruling did not specify any procedure for moving forward. We’ve sought a ruling from the Kentucky Court of Appeals to clarify that situation. In the meantime, we are keeping the tax rates exactly the same.” During the Aug. 20 meeting, Louis Kelly, the library’s legal See TAX, Page A2

Dr. Angelo Colosimo, son Michael Colosimo and Beechwood head football coach Noel Rash shown at Michael’s college signing day. FILE PHOTO

New law aims to slow head trauma By James Weber jweber@nky.com

For most sports injuries, it’s easy to tell what’s wrong with the athlete: Just look and see where the cast or the bandage is applied. With head injuries, the problems haven’t always been obvious, but the effects can be much worse than a sprained knee or a busted hand. Treating head injuries, concussions in particular, has been a higher priority at all levels of athletics in recent years, as awareness of longterm effects has increased. A concussion is defined as a traumatic brain injury caused by a blow to the head. “You can’t be too careful,” said Josh Stratton, head coach of New Richmond (Ohio) and former Lloyd Memorial football coach. “If a player is dehydrated and gets a headache from that and tells a coach or a trainer, we have to have them checked. We’ve lost some player days to that kind of scenario, but keeping kids safe is a lot more important than sending them out there if they’re injured or potentially injured.” Proper identification and treatment of concussions can

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help prevent lifelong difficulties, according to Dr. Matthew DesJardins, non-surgical sports medicine specialist at Commonwealth Orthopaedic Centers in Edgewood. He said middle and high school athletes with concussions should be withdrawn from sports completely, and maybe even withdrawn from school, to allow recovering brains sufficient time to rest. “We want to reduce the risk of repeat injury while they’re still recovering, and we also want to give rest to the brain,” said DesJardins. “We withdraw the athletes from sport, but also in school situations, we’re even sometimes withdrawing them from school. They can be very light-sensitive to fluorescent lights, computer screens; a lot of audio and visual input can exacerbate their headaches. They’ll routinely have a difficult time concentrating, and so the rest from cognitive brain function from the types of things going on in school every day can be really important in concussions that are more serious.” Another important factor in recovery is getting a good neurological evaluation. DesJar-

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dins said subtle symptoms, such as headaches or balance issues, can go unnoticed in general examinations. He said athletes returning to play while any concussion symptoms remain puts them at risk of “catastrophic brain swelling and death after a second impact.” The less severe, but still potentially devastating, risks of secondary impact include chronic headaches, chronic sleep disturbance, depression, poor function in school, attention disorders, and other permanent issues requiring ongoing medical care. A concussion-related bill, KRS 160.445, was passed and enacted by the Kentucky State Legislature in 2012. The Kentucky High School Athletic Association, which governs all high school sports in the state, previously had a concussion policy in place but only at the high school level. What they were able to do with the approved bill, however, was “hard code it in the statute,” said KHSAA Commissioner Julian Tackett. Tackett said the legislation See TRAUMA, Page A2 Vol. 17 No. 28 © 2013 The Community Recorder ALL RIGHTS RESERVED

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NEWS

A2 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER Find news and information from your community on the Web Bellevue • nky.com/bellevue Cold Spring • nky.com/coldspring Highland Heights • nky.com/highlandheights Newport • nky.com/newport Southgate • nky.com/southgate Campbell County • nky.com/campbellcounty

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Marc Emral Editor ..............................578-1053, memral@communitypress.com Chris Mayhew Reporter .......................578-1051,cmayhew@nky.com Amy Scalf Reporter ............................578-1055, ascalf@nky.com Melissa Stewart Reporter ....................578-1058, mstewart@nky.com Melanie Laughman Sports Editor ............513-248-7573, mlaughman@nky.com James Weber Sports Reporter ................578-1054, jweber@nky.com

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Trauma Continued from Page A1

also includes a provision that anytime during a game if the signs and symptoms of a concussion are present coaches or officials are to send the child out of the game for medical evaluation. If a medical professional is not present, Tackett said it will be assumed a player exhibiting signs and symptoms of a concussion has a concussion. The KHSAA, in conjunction with the Kentucky Medical Association, has promoted a web site www.KyConcus sions.com, to help with the issue. It has an online training program about head injuries that all the coaches in Kentucky have to take. “So we’re trying to really increase awareness among coaching staff (and) by school administrators that a concussion is serious business,” DesJardins said.

Such precautions are a far cry from the playing days of University of Cincinnati orthopedist Dr. Angelo Colosimo – a former Bengals team doctor who was a high school and college player in his own right. Colosimo has had two sons play football for Beechwood High School. “When I played, you got drilled, you didn’t even know where you were and you went back to the huddle and carried the ball again,” Colosimo said. “It’s amazing where the science has gone when you look at the long-term damage of traumatic brain injuries. It affects you long term. The idea is to limit that. “You can’t play (football) without contact. If you play this game, you’re going to get your head dinged. It’s going to happen. What we’re trying to do is to limit the damage that’s done.”

Reporters Amy Scalf, Stephanie Salmons and Mark D. Motz contributed to this story.

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Sanders wants to be appeals court judge Justin A. Sanders, a partner at the Sanders Law Firm in Covington, has announced his candidacy for Kentucky Court of Appeals Judge in the 2014 election. Sanders Sanders will seek the Sixth Appellate District seat held by Justice Michelle Keller before her recent appointment to the Kentucky Supreme Court. Sanders filed his letter of intent to run for the judgeship with the Kentucky Registry of Election Financ Aug. 7. “As an experienced attorney who has tried cases both as a criminal

prosecutor and a civil litigator, represented common people in the courtroom in their fight for justice, and taken cases before the Court of Appeals and Kentucky Supreme Court, I think I am uniquely qualified for this position,” Sanders said. He was one of three attorneys nominated by the Kentucky Judicial Nominating Commission to fill the vacancy created by Keller’s appointment. The Sixth Appellate District includes Kenton, Boone, Campbell, Bath, Bracken, Carroll, Fleming, Gallatin, Grant, Harrison, Henry, Lewis, Mason, Nicholas, Oldham, Owen, Pendleton, Robertson, Shelby, Spencer and Trimble Counties.

Tax

der is on appeal I do think that this group shouldn’t just disregard it,” he said. “That we think the best option is to keep the tax rate what it is.” Erik Hermes, one of the people who filed the lawsuit against the library, was one of four people asking the board to abide by Ward’s ruling about setting tax rates. “Has there been the proper amount of petitions signed to change the tax rate?” said Hermes to board. The library board has a policy of not answering comments or questions posed at meetings. “I’ll take that as a no,” said Hermes after he didn’t receive any answer from the board.

Continued from Page A1

counsel, said his advice to the board in response to Ward’s ruling was to keep the property tax rate the same. The ruling invalidated the library’s use of HB 44 to raise taxes without a petition since 1978. Kelly said the wording of Ward’srulingwasthatthelibrary, a special taxing district, cannot raise or lower the tax rate without submitting a petition with 51 percent of the number of the registered voters from the last election. While the lawsuit is active, Kelly said his advicewastonotraisetaxes at all. “Even though that or-

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NEWS

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A3

Lower-body injuries top list among youth sports tskeen@communitypress.com

HAMILTON COUNTY —

While concussions may get the most attention when it comes to injuries, they account for just 14 percent of all youth sports injuries (age 19 and under) according to a study done by USA Today. The study analyzed youth sports injuries in 2011 and 2012 and determined the three most common sports injuries are sprains/strains, fractures and contusions. When being more specific, Oxford Physical Therapy’s Liz Reis said injuries to the ankle, anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and the shoulder’s are the most common injuries she sees as a physical therapist among high school athletes. In today’s world of expensive shoes, the argument has come about whether or not a shoe can cause an injury. The perception is you see more ACL tears today than you did 10-20 years ago when shoes weren’t as advanced, but Reis believes there are a variety of factors that play into any injury. “There is a push for a more natural shoe,” she said. “From a physical therapist’s perspective, if your foot mechanics are off, then it’s going to work up the chain and cause problems. … There is no rhyme or reason as to when these people are developing these injuries, but in theory, most people need a good, supportive shoe.” Reis has seen an increase in Iliotibial Band Syndrome, or more commonly known as the ITSB, in high school athletes. Also known as “Runner’s Knee,” according to runnersworld.com it occurs when the IT band, a liga-

ment that runs down the outside of the thigh from the hip to the shin, is tight or inflamed. The problem with the injury is it can be hidden with the use of anti-inflammatories and many athletes get back to their respective sport before the injury is fully healed. “The injury is not so much worrisome, but it can be difficult to rehab,” Reis said. “The (IT band) crosses the knee, so every time we bend our knee the band actually slips under the bone and it’s just a repetitive injury. People just need to give it time to heal, rest and strengthen the other muscles.” One trend Reis has seen lately is an increase in hamstring strains in younger athletes. The reason is factually unknown, but Reis has her opinion. “I think it goes along with people gaining an un-

Physical therapist Liz Reis of Oxford Physical Therapy, left, examines a patient. THANKS TO OXFORD PHYSICAL THERAPY

derstanding of stretching and warming up,” she said. “Some kids as they are going through growth

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start to get some strain in the muscle. I think that is where a lot of these hamstring strains are coming in as they go through these growth spurts.” ACL tears, ITSB and hamstring problems are just three of hundreds of injuries that occur each high school sports season, but the prevention is all the same: Rest, adding prevention and strengthening exercises and proper technique top the list of way to prevent injuries. “These statistics don’t have to be part of the game if we take some simple precautions,” Kate Carr of Safe Kids Worldwide said as part of the USA Today study. Oxford Physical Therapy has offices in Crestview Hills, Dry Ridge, Florence and Independence. For more information go to www.oxford physicaltherapy.com.

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SCHOOLS

A4 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

Editor: Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Back-to-school event helps families

A steady morning rain couldn’t dampen the spirits of more than 2,600 children and 1,500 parents and guardians who turned out at Turfway Park Aug. 3, for the second Cincinnati DreamWorks Give Back ... to School event. The event, which drew support and volunteers from 16 sponsors, provided back-toschool supplies, hygiene items, and clothing to children from low-income families in Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. Within two-and-a-half hours, 1,600 backpacks had been given away to children enrolled from kindergarten through eighthgrade. The rain lasted about as long as the distribution. After the skies cleared, every child and adult had the opportunity to enjoy free donuts, pizza, hot dogs, hamburgers, and treats, and volunteers, parents, and children played games together on the Turfway lawn. Face painting and two bounce houses proved popular, as did a special appearance by Tychus, a service dog in training.

The line for school supplies at Give Back ... to School stretched across the front of the Turfway Park grandstand and doubled down the side.THANKS TO CINCINNATI DREAMWORKS

“From last year’s event to this year’s, the number of children who attended jumped from 350 to 2,600, an increase of 642 percent,” said Cincinnati DreamWorks president Tim Hall. “We anticipated we would see an increase to 750 children, or maybe 1,000. As it became clear the need would be even greater than

we expected, our sponsors and volunteers stepped up again and we were able to provide supplies to 1,600 children and food and fun for everybody. We also provided bagged groceries to many of the families. “We are celebrating that we were able to serve so many children, but we are not content to

EKU honors Alexandria students Community Recorder

The following students made the dean’s list at Eastern Kentucky University for the spring semester. To achieve dean’s list honors at EKU, students attempting 14 or more credit hours must

earn a 3.5 grade-point average; students attempting 13 credit hours must earn a 3.65 GPA; and students attempting 12 credit hours must earn a 3.75 GPA. Additionally, students who earn a perfect 4.0 GPA are named to the president’s list.

Alexandria: Patricia Renae Bode (pres. list), Megan Nichole Borth (pres. list), Andrew W. Hogg (pres. list), Tyler Joseph Hubbard, Krista Marie Kennedy, Tori Marie Lyle, Brittany Ann Wagner and Jessica Bailey White (pres. list)

COLLEGE CORNER McGraw graduates with honors

Kathryn McGraw, recently graduated with honors from Savannah College of Art and Design with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in animation and a minor in storyboarding. A 2008 graduate from Newport Central Catholic High School, she is the daughter of Randy and Barbara McGraw of Dayton.

Morehead announces dean’s list

The following local students made the dean’s list at Morehead State University for the spring semester: Alexandria: Alexxander Livingstone Bernard, Katarina Eliza Chalk, Alyssa Michelle Franklin, Samantha Lynn Haas, Kenton Ray Sandfoss, Kaitlyn Walburg To be named to the dean’s list a student must be enrolled on a full-time basis and achieve at least a 3.5 grade-point average on a 4.0 scale for the semester.

Peters graduates with honors

Alexandria resident Brianna L. Peters recently graduated with summa cum laude honors from Wilmington College with a Bachelor of Science degree in agricul-

ture.

Locals graduate from Transylvania

The following local students recently received Bachelor of Arts degrees from Transylvania University. Lindsay Renee Studer graduated with honors in music technology and a minor in business administration. She is a graduate of Bishop Brossart High School and the daughter of Paul and Melissa Studer of Cold Spring. Kyle Dean Newman graduated with a major in business administration and a minor in exercise science. He is a graduate of Campbell County High School and the son of Dean and Jamie Newman of Alexandria. Karley Renee Raisor graduated with a double major in business administration and Spanish language and literature. She is a graduate of Highlands High School and the daughter of Michele Raisor of Alexandria.

Alexandria students make dean’s list

The following local residents were named to the Bellarmine University dean’s

list for the spring semester: Alexandria: Kathleen Neiser, Bishop Brossart High School graduate, a senior majoring in middle grades education; Ashley Fields, Campbell County High School graduate, a freshman majoring in biology; Keshia-Luz Bakunawa, Notre Dame Academy graduate, a junior majoring in nursing. The dean’s list recognizes students who receive a grade-point average of 3.5 or higher on a 4.0 scale.

Klocke earns prestigious honor

Bishop Brossart High School senior Kristin Klocke was selected a winner of the National Merit Fifth Third Scholarship sponsored by the Fifth Third Foundation. The 8,300 National Merit Scholarship winners were chosen from the group of approximately 15,000 distinguished finalists, who themselves were chosen from original pool of nearly 1.5 million student entries. Klocke plans to attend Thomas More College and major in pre-med with a minor in Spanish. She is the daughter of Dennis and Vicki Klocke of Alexandria.

stop there,” Hall said. “There were too many other children we were not able to reach. There is plenty of room for improvement if we want to reach an even larger population, and we mean to do so. We will plan even earlier for next year’s event and continue working with key organizers to reach more of Northern Ken-

tucky’s struggling families.” Turfway Park’s participation in Give Back ... to School was organized through the racetrack’s HERO initiative, an employeebased volunteer program in place at all Caesars Entertainment properties. Turfway adopted the HERO program in July 2012.

Naberhaus wins geographic bee Community Recorder

Hannah Naberhaus, an eighth-grade student at St. Thomas, won the school-level competition of the National Geographic Bee for a chance at a $25,000 college scholarship. Other participants who competed in the geography bee include John Taul who came in second, Sam Reynolds who came in third, William Martin, Austin Neff, Alex Christman, Kevin Eberhart, Warren Naberhaus, Nathan DeBurger and Mackenzie Eberhart. The school-level bee, at which students answered oral questions on geography, was the first round in the 25th annual National Geographic Bee. This year’s bee is sponsored by Google. The entire U.S. and five U.S. territories are participating.

The school winners, including Hannah Naberhaus, will now take a written test; up to 100 of the top scorers on that test in each state will then be eligible to compete in their state bee April 5. The National Geographic Society will provide an all-expenses-paid trip to Washington, D.C., for state champions and teacher-escorts to participate in the bee national championship rounds May 20-22. The first-place national winner will receive a $25,000 college scholarship a lifetime membership in the society, and a trip to the Galapagos Islands, courtesy of Lindblad Expeditions and National Geographic. “Jeopardy!” host Alex Trebek will moderate the national finals on May 22. The program will air on television. Check local listings for dates and times.

Gentry new NKU VP for university advancement Community Recorder

Eric C. Gentry has been named vice president for university advancement. He will begin on Oct. 1. Gentry has served as associate vice president for development at the University of Texas at San Antonio since 2008. As vice president, Gentry will lead an NKU advancement division that includes fundraising, alumni programs, marketing and communications, media relations, the NKU Foundation,

special events and WNKU public radio. He will advise on all aspects of advancement and resource development and serve Gentry on the NKU executive team and on the executive committee of the NKU Foundation. He replaces Gerard St. Amand.

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NEWS

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A5

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NEWS

A6 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

Daily schedule for the Alexandria Fair ALEXANDRIA — The 157th Alexandria Fair & Horse Show, Campbell County’s fair, will be Aug. 28-Sept. 2. » Wednesday: The festivities begin with the annual parade from Campbell County Middle School’s parking lot off Washington Street at 6:45 p.m. Wednesday. The parade route continues south along Washington Street and then south on East Main Street to the fairgrounds. The carnival midway will open once the parade is over. Main show ring: After the parade there will be a back-seat driver contest where the driver of a vehicle is blindfolded and a passenger tells them when to turn, stop and start. There will also be a wheelbarrow race contest. » Thursday: Fair gates and the exhibit hall open at 3:30 p.m. Midway rides will operate from 6-11 p.m. Main show ring: All Terrain Vehicle (ATV) and motorcycle drag racing will be at 7 p.m. Entertainment stage: The Miss Teen Alexandria Fair Pageant will be at 7 p.m. The Miss Alexandria Fair pageant will be at 8:30 p.m. » Friday: Fair gates open at 3:30 p.m. Midway rides will operate from 611 p.m. Livestock barn: Market steers will be weighed from 4-5 p.m. The 4-H/ FFA beef cattle show will be at 6 p.m. The open beef cattle show will be at 7 p.m. Entertainment stage: Open karaoke starts at 7

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p.m. Main show ring: A stick horse race for children ages 3-8 will begin at 7 p.m. Raising of the U.S. flag will be at 7:25 p.m. The horse show will begin at 7:30 p.m. » Saturday: Fair gates open at 7 a.m. Midway rides will operate from noon to 11 p.m. Rides will be closed from 5-6 p.m. Livestock barn: The 4H/FFA hog show will be at 9 a.m. The open and 4-H/ FFA goat show will be at 11 a.m. The 4-H/FFA sheep and market lamb show will be at noon. An open sheep show will be at 1 p.m. The 4-H/FFA steer, lamb, goat and hog sale will begin at 6 p.m. Entertainment stage: The Alexandria Fair Baby Contest will begin at noon. The Alexandria Fair Cutie Pie Pageant begins at 1:30 p.m. Hula hoop contest will be at 4 p.m. The Tian Academy of Asian Martial Arts will perform at 5 p.m. The karaoke competition will begin at 8 p.m. Main show ring: A horse show starting at 1 p.m. will feature miniature horse, halter and South Central Hackney Association Futurity classes. Presentation of the U.S. flag will be at 7:25 p.m. The horse show will begin at 7:30 p.m. » Sunday: Fair gates open at 10 a.m. Midway rides operate from noon to 11 p.m. Rides will be closed from 5-6 p.m. Livestock barn: Presentations of 4-H awards and exhibit hall grand champion awards will be at 5:30 p.m. Entertainment stage: The Princess Alexandria

Fair Pageant will begin at 1:30 p.m. The Miss PreTeen Alexandria Fair Pageant will being at 2:30 p.m. The Little Miss and Mister Pageant will begin at 3:30 p.m. The hat contest will be at 5:30 p.m. The Spirit of American Cloggers will perform at 6 p.m. Main show ring: A horse show will begin at noon. Presentation of U.S. flag will be at 7:25 p.m. A horse show will begin at 7:30 p.m. » Monday: Fair gates open at 7 a.m. Midway rides will operate from 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Rides will be closed from 5-6 p.m. The fair ends immediately after the championship horse show around 10 p.m. Livestock barn: The open dairy and meat goat show will be at 11 a.m. The Cornhole tournament will be at 1 p.m. at the end of the barn near the parking lot. Entertainment stage: A pedal tractor pull contest will be at 1 p.m. A dog and puppy show will be at 2:30 p.m. Main show ring: Chicken rodeo and greased pig contests will be at 10 a.m. The Campbell County 4-H Horse Show will begin immediately after the the chicken rodeo and greased pig contests around noon. Presentation of the U.S. flag will be at 5:55 p.m. The championship horse show will be at 6 p.m. Admission to the fair, for ages three and older, is $8 Thursday through Monday. Source: Schedule of events in the fair guidebook.

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NEWS

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A7

A.J. Jolly Park hosts dragon boat races Sept. 7 Home meet for breast cancer survivor team

By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

ALEXANDRIA — More

Members of the Northern Kentucky Thorough-Breasts’ Chinese dragon boat racing team row across A.J. Jolly Park’s 200-acre lake. In the rear of the boat is breast cancer Tamina White of Westwood. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

they try to go back to “normal,” but the experience is life altering. Being on the team is about moving on, but not forgetting about breast cancer, White said. “We’re not complainers, it’s not a pity party,” she said. “We fought the battle and won.” Part of the team’s mission is to give back to people fighting breast cancer now. Money raised at the dragon boat festival will go to St. Elizabeth to help pay for everything from transporting breast cancer patients to the doctor’s office and hospital for appointments to mammograms, she said. The Thorough-Breasts have participated in other dragon boat racing competitions this year in Montgomery, Ala., Chicago and Akron, Ohio,

White said. Last year the team traveled to Canada, and many team members spent a week in Florida this year learning how to improve their paddling speed. Pendleton County resident Jim Thaxton, founder and manager the Thorough-Breasts and their support team “Saddles and Paddles,” said more than 40 different teams will be at A.J. Jolly. The first race of the day will be a race between breast cancer survivor teams, including one from Canada. And for the first time the Thorough-Breasts will compete in the festival they organize, he said. Participating in the races is no small feat because the team members also recruit teams, including local groups, to row in the festival, Thaxton said.

A Thorough-Breasts team member recruited a dragon boat racing team this year from the Brighton Recovery Center for Women, he said. The Recovery Center has a 100bed facility in Boone

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than 40 Chinese dragon racing boats, each powered by at least 18 people rowing, will glide across the water of A.J Jolly Park’s lake Saturday, Sept. 7. For the Kentucky Thorough-Breasts, a team of breast cancer survivors, the fourth annual Kentucky Dragon Boat Festival “Paddling for the Pink” is their home meet. The Thorough-Breasts are sponsored by St. Elizabeth Healthcare, and practice weekly at the county park south of Alexandria off Race Track Road. Tamina White of Westwood said she needed the Thorough-Breasts when the team was first formed in the winter of 2008. “I was just out of treatment, and I was kind of depressed,” White said. People are extra nice when someone is fighting breast cancer, she said. The spotlight brought by a struggle for life goes away or dims after a person gets better. A common story for survivors is how

County to help women break addictions to drugs and alcohol, according to the Brighton Center, which is based in Newport. A new feature this year will be a Twilight Paddle from 6-:30-9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 6, according to a news release from St. Elizabeth. The paddle will offer people an opportunity to experience dragon boat racing from inside the boat for $5. Advance registration is required for the Twilight Paddle. So far more than $14,000 has been raised for this year’s dragon boat festival. For information about other teams, registration and the festival events the Paddling for

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NEWS

A8 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

BRIEFLY Cold Spring features free movie

Cold Spring — The city will present the PG-13-rated movie, “Jack the Giant Slayer,” at dusk on Saturday, Sept. 14. Admission to the movie is free, and popcorn and drinks will be available for purchase. Moviegoers can bring

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chairs, blankets and coolers or picnic baskets to enjoy the screening in Municipal Park, 5694 E. Alexandria Pike. For more information, call 859-441-9604.

Library offers amnesty and ‘technical support’

The time is now to settle fines and fees owed to the Campbell County Public Library. The library will offer fine amnesty Sept. 3-15 to celebrate National Library Card Sign-up Month, according to a news release from the library. Overdue fines, and also fees charged to patrons whose accounts have been sent to collections will be waived if the library materials are returned. Lost and damaged fees will still apply. “The last time we offered amnesty was in 2008 when we updated our library catalog system,”

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Breds dashing

Newport Central Catholic will have its second annual Breds Dash For Cash. This split-the-pot raffle is an all-school fundraiser to benefit the educational needs of our students and for upgrades to the science labs. The prizes will be determined based on the number of $20 tickets sold. There will be four prize winners: grand prize of 30 percent, second prize of 10 percent, third prize of 7 seven percent, and fourth prize of 3 percent. Newport Central Catholic receives 50 percent. The Breds Dash For Cash drawing will be Saturday, Nov. 2, at the school’s Winners’ Circle event. You need not be present to win. Last year the total pot was $43,360: winners received: grand prize, $13,008; second prize, $4,336; third prize, $3,035.20; fourth prize, $1,300.80; and NCC received $21,680. Mail to: NCC - Breds Dash for Cash, 13 Caroth-

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said Chantelle Phillips, assistant director, in the news release. “Nearly 800 people have charges of between $10-$50, and they haven’t used their library cards in the past two years. We want them to take advantage of the amnesty period, clear their accounts and be able to use all the Library’s services again.” The library will also show people how to use ereaders and other mobile devices to access magazines, take online classes and download materials using a library card during visits to area Kroger stores in September. The “tech petting zoos” led by library staff will give people a hands-on experience using library materials with electronic devices and answer questions. Tech petting zoo schedule: » From 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7 and Sept. 28 at Kroger, 275 Crossroads Blvd., Cold Spring. » From 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Sept.14 and Sept. 21at Kroger, 130 Pavilion Pkwy. Newport.

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Fort Thomas church offers finance classes

FORT THOMAS — Highland United Methodist Church is offering a class to find “Financial Peace.” The nine week “Financial Peace University” will meet Mondays at 6:30 p.m. at the church, 314 N. Fort Thomas Ave. Classes begin Sept. 9. The church’s program is part of author and syndicated radio host Dave Ramsey’s national program to help people get control of their finances and become debt free, according to a news release from Jennifer Hall, director of spiritual growth for the church. For info, registration visit www.highlandmeth modist.com.

Fall Festival planned

BELLEVUE — Grandview Elementary will host the annual Fall Festival 5-8 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4, at the school, 500 Grandview Ave., Bellevue. The event includes games and inflatables for the children along with a cakewalk, bake sale and theme basket raffle.

Outing helps with service dog

Dunkers Sports Bar & Grill will be hosting a golf outing to benefit Keegan Knecht on Saturday, Sept. 7. Keegan is a 5-year oldboy suffering from ataxic cerebral palsy since birth. This benefit will serve to raise money in the efforts of obtaining a service dog

that will assist Keegan with everyday activities along with providing companionship to the young child. The Knechts’ search for a service dog came to an end when they met Jake, who is a 6-month-old golden retriever currently being trained at Kentucky Working K-9 Academy. Due to the extensive training and conditioning that Jake must receive to help Keegan, the cost of Jake is quite expensive, but the opportunity and joy Jake will bring to Keegan’s life is priceless. Any donation and/or sponsorship to this benefit would be greatly appreciated by Dunkers Sports Bar & Grill and the Knechts.

Footlighters gala

The Footlighters Inc. is celebrating its 50th anniversary and are looking for former members who would like to join a gala on Friday, Sept. 6th, at The Syndicate, 18 E. Fifth St, Newport. In 1988 they found a home at the former Salem United Methodist Church in Newport which had been hit by a tornado. Footlighters opened the Stained Glass Theatre at Eighth and York streets in Newport where they having been performing since then. If you, yourself, are an ex-Footlighter or know someone who was, even if they are now out of town, email Footlighters.ky@gmail.com or call 513 661-4359. However, the party is open to . Go to www.footlighters.org.


SPORTS

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • A9

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

CommunityPress.com

Camels, Breds have hopes for state meet By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Cross country season is right around the corner. Here is a look at some local teams:

Campbell County boys/girls

Mike Bankemper returns for his 14th season as head coach of the Camels. The boys team was third in the region last year, qualifying for the 3A state meet. The Camels return five starters in Mark Chaplin, Kevin Lackey, Thomas Comer, Peter Glenn and Parker Younce. Joe McGrath is the top newer runner to watch. Chaplin was the top Camel at state, finishing 60th. Chaplin was 15th at regionals last year and Lackey 11th. On the girls team, Jennah Flairty represented the Camel at state, finishing 33rd overall after placing fourth in the region. She returns for her junior year, and is joined in the list of returning starters by Kara Pangburn and Annah Johnson. The Camels start things off in the Ryle Invitational Aug. 31.

Campbell County RB Josh Carroll (6) runs the ball and got up-ended by Newport DB Brian Burton (21) in the second quarter. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Newport Central Catholic senior Caitlyn Drohan qualified for state last year.FILE PHOTO

Camels open new stadium with win

Campbell County beat Newport 27-7Aug. 23 in the first game at the Camels’ new on-campus stadium. Campbell plays at Highlands Aug. 30. Newport plays at WaltonVerona Friday.

Newport Central Catholic boys

Longtime veteran David Ueding returns for his 35th season coaching cross country at NewCath. His team finished third in the conference last season, fifth in the regional and eighth in the Class 1A state meet a year ago. He returns five starters with postseason experience in senior Griffin Jordan; juniors Collin Walker, Alex Jones and Bannon Seiter; and sophomore Samuel Kaelin. Walker was the team’s top finisher in the state meet, finishing 85th a year ago. Seiter finished 28th in regionals. Jordan was 32nd in the region and 98th at state. Junior Kenny Ballard, sophomore Josh Reaves and sophomore Dominic Ciafardini have strong junior varsity experience and are running close together on the course in the offseason. Ueding expects them to build a competitive front seven for the Thoroughbreds. Depth will be important in the highly competitive local region in November. Ueding feels the region has five of the top teams in the state so getting to the state meet is always a challenge. NCC will run in the Ryle meet Aug. 31 and the Grant County meet Sept. 7.

NewCath girls

The Thoroughbreds had their best team in the past 10 years in 2012 and have a goal of taking the Best Team Ever title in 2013. Led by Caitlyn Drohan, who finished 44th in the Class 1A state meet to represent NewCath’s first girls state

Campbell County DB David Gaskins (26) intercepts the ball against Newport WR Brian Burton (21) in the first quarter. JOSEPH

Campbell County junior Mark Chaplin qualified for state last year.FILE PHOTO

qualifier in five years, the Thoroughbreds have six returning starters for head coach Dave Meyers. Others include Stephanie Lewis, Mariah Drohan, Casey Kohls, Hannah Bielski and Alyssa Blanchet. Other runners to watch are Olivia Schadler, Jenna Hansman, Mallory Sykes and Hannah Cox. Drohan was 18th in the regional along the way to earn her berth at state. A deep NCC team is ready to try to make big strides. “If they can stay healthy, our front three runners should be able to compete for top 15 in the region,” Meyers said. “This puts a little pressure on the rest of the team to work harder to round out our scoring five and give us a chance of placing well as a team. The girls realize that this could be our best season ever, so that excitement is going to keep them focused and working hard.”

FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By James Weber jweber@nky.com

Girls soccer

» Brossart beat Clark County 6-2 Aug. 19. Abby Stadtmiller had two goals and two assists. Cori Ziegler had a goal and two assists. Brossart started the week 4-1. » Campbell County beat Conner 3-0 Aug. 19. Lauren Macke, Taylor Jolly and Abby Vandergriff had the goals. Campbell went 4-1-1 to start the season in the first week.

Volleyball

» NCC beat Bellevue 25-6, 25-9, 25-17 Aug. 20.

Boys golf

» Newport Central Catholic beat Holy Cross 156-176 Aug. 19.

Drew McDonald shot even-par 35 to medal. NCC beat Campbell County 155-171 Aug. 20, with Matt Striegel shooting 37 to take medalist honors.

Boys soccer

» Bishop Brossart beat Holy Cross 6-0 Aug. 24. The Mustangs were led by senior Jake Jennings, who scored two goals and was named the tournament Most Valuable Player. Senior goalkeeper Andrew Erickson recorded the shutout. Adding goals for the Mustangs were juniors Nick Dierig and Jon Henn, and seniors Drew Berkemeyer and John Geiman. » Campbell County beat Montgomery County 3-2 Aug. 24. Andrew Szovati had two goals. The Camels are 3-0 after not winning a game in 2012.

Football

» Campbell County played its first regular game in its new stadium and beat Newport 27-7. » Dayton beat Bishop Brossart 20-14. » Highlands beat University Christian from Jacksonville, Fla. 47-17. Drew Houliston threw for 373 yards and four touchdowns, and Zach Harris rushed for 115 yards and three scores.

TMC Notes

» The Thomas More College women’s soccer team was picked to capture the 2013 Presidents’ Athletic Conference (PAC) championship. The Saints led by eighth-year head coach Jeff Cummings and winSee PREPS, Page A10


SPORTS & RECREATION

A10 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

High standards pace TMC football in 2013 By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

Only a select few Division III football programs have reached a point where a 7-3 record and rout of their biggest rival is considered a disappointing season. Thomas More College finished 6-2 in the Presidents’ Athletic Conference, but those two early season losses prevented the Saints from earning a fifth straight playoff berth. A six-game winning streak to close out the season was encouraging, but 2012 was still a disappointment for a program that has established itself as a perennial top 25 team. “When I think about it, it is good that we have such high expectations,” said head coach Jim Hilvert. “When you set a standard like that, when you expect at least nine wins and a PAC championship, less than that is not good enough.” The silver lining to last year was that the seniors were the first class in years to end the season with a win. Consistently qualifying for the playoffs means that, unless the Saints win the 32team tournament and Stagg Bowl championship, they end the season with a loss. Last year, the Saints got to finish the season by setting all kinds of records in a 75-6 Bridge Bowl victory over rival College of Mount St.

Thomas More College senior and Highlands High School graduate Tyler Combs is a 6’, 225-pound defensive lineman for the Saints. THANKS TO THOMAS MORE COLLEGE

Joseph. “Everybody was hungry to finish off the season on a high note,” said sophomore free safety Kyle Fuller (Holy Cross). Fuller is one of several young starters on both sides of the ball this year. He has learned from the upperclassmen who were once in his position and expects to step into a leadership role in just his second season at Thomas More. “The coaches do a good job of preparing you for a leadership role,” said Fuller, who led Holy Cross to a state championship two years ago. “Last year’s seniors left a legacy that made the program what it is and they really pushed us underclassmen to make us better.” The veteran leaders of the defense will help the new starters adjust. De-

fensive backs Jake Fishburn (Elder) and Alex Taylor (Elder) and lineman Tyler Combs (Highlands) provide senior leadership on the otherwise young defense. “We are young on defense, but very fast,” said Hilvert. “This is one of the most athletic defenses I’ve had.” The offense is led by the return of junior running back Dominique Hayden from injury and another year of experience for sophomore quarterback Jensen Gebhardt, who went 6-1 after taking over as the starter last year. Thomas More has always benefited from a pipeline of local talent from both sides of the river, but the recent rise of Northern Kentucky programs like Cooper and Campbell County has provided the Saints with even more talented players who are accustomed to winning. “With the talent we have around here, it’s a huge addition,” said Hilvert. The Saints open the season on Sept. 7 at Capital University. The home opener is Sept. 28 against Waynesburg University. The team is eager to get back to the playoffs and hopes to avoid last year’s slow start. “We have some really good leaders,” said Hilvert. “We’re excited to get back on the field and compete.”

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Highlands WR Ryan Greene (80) caught and dove for a touchdown against University Christian FS Jordan Gray (34) in the second quarter. JOSEPH FUQUA II/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

BLUEBIRDS SHINE ON ESPNU Highlands beat University Christian from Jacksonville, Fla., 47-17 Aug. 24 in a

game broadcast from Highlands by ESPNU. Zach Harris rushed for 115 yards on 12 carries with three touchdowns. Drew Houliston was 21-of-29 for 373 yards and four TDs, two of them to Ryan Greene. Brandon Hergott had four catches for 96 yards.

MSJ football ready to put 2012 in rear view By Adam Turer presspreps@gmail.com

The College of Mount St. Joseph is eager to start the 2013 football season. When the Lions begin play on Sept. 7, the disappointing 2012 season will be completely behind them. Last season, the program finished with a losing record in conference play for the first time since 2008 and just the second time since 2001. Five teams finished ahead of Mount St. Joe in the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference standings. The Lions’ 4-6 overall record marked the program’s first losing season since the winless 2001 campaign. The season ended with a 75-6 drubbing at the hands of rival Thomas More College in the Bridge Bowl. “Coach Huber and the seniors don’t like talking about last year,” said senior punter Greg Tabar (Colerain). “We are excited to move forward. We’re playing with a chip on our shoulder this year.” This year’s squad is poised to bring Mount St. Joe back to its winning ways. It will be a challenge, as the Lions need to replace All-American running back James Clay and a host of other starters. “A lot of spots are wide open,” said head coach

Senior Greg Tabar, a graduate of Colerain High School, will return as the kicker/punter for the College of Mount St. Joseph. THANKS TO THE COLLEGE OF MOUNT ST. JOSEPH

Rod Huber as his team prepared for training camp. “We’ve got a lot of holes to fill.” Sophomore Cody Meade will try to replace Clay, who led the nation in rushing with 212.4 yards per game in 2012. Junior Jason Stinebaugh is the most experienced quarterback on the roster and will compete with freshmen and transfers for the starting nod. He completed 21 of 64 passes with four interceptions and zero touchdowns as a backup in 2012. Whoever wins the starting quarterback job will have some big targets in the passing game. 6’8” junior John Peters and 6’5” senior Tyler Feine (Amelia) should win most jump balls

thrown their way. “We should be able to get those guys the ball in the red zone,” said Huber. The offensive line is led by senior Brandon Chapman and junior Brandon Keller. Senior safety Tyler Elrod leads the secondary, where he will be joined by new starters at both cornerback spots. Defensive end/linebacker Adam Bigelow (Anderson) missed all of last season with a knee injury, but returns as a fifth-year senior. Nosetackle Russell Turner anchors the defensive line. The linebackers are the most experienced and deepest group on defense, with Konnor Blevins and Garrett Breiner returning. Several freshmen will be expected to contribute right away. They will bring athleticism and a positive attitude to a team that is eager to start fresh in 2013. Tabar’s leadership on and off the field earned him national recognition in 2012, when he was named to the Allstate AFCA Good Works Team and the Capital One Academic All-District Team. This will be the fourth straight season he has started at punter for the Lions. The Lions open the season on Sept. 7 at Augustana College. Following a bye week, the Lions host conference foe Hanover College on Sept. 21.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS Continued from Page A9

ners of the last two PAC Championship Tournament titles, captured six of the possible 10 firstplace votes. » Thomas More College President David A. Armstrong, J.D. and Athletic Director Terry Connor announced Aug. 26 that the college will add women’s lacrosse as a varsity sport during the 201415 academic year.

The team will play in the Presidents’ Athletic Conference, which will officially sponsor a championship in women’s lacrosse during the 2014-15 academic year. Currently, Saint Vincent College, Thiel College, Washington & Jefferson College and Waynesburg University sponsor women’s lacrosse as a varsity sport. The Saints will play their home matches at the college’s on-campus Bank

of Kentucky Field. A national search for a head coach will be begin immediately, and the coach will spend the 201314 year recruiting.

Freedom Trail

» Florence has three home games left Sept. 3-5. On press time Aug. 27, the Freedom were in a fiveteam battle for three playoff spots as teams entered the final nine games of the 2013 season.


VIEWPOINTS

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CAMPBELL COMMUNITY RECORDER • A11

COMMUNITY

RECORDER

Marc Emral, memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

Teacher fellows working to strengthen education

The commonwealth of Kentucky is known for unparalleled success on the basketball court, boasting two national NCAA basketball championships in as many years. Educators and administrators have been working hard to elevate academic success in the commonwealth to the same level, making strides to ensure that our students are effectively prepared for college and career readiness. While most of the nation has embarked upon education reform, Kentucky is at the forefront. This was evidenced Jan. 10 as Gov. Steve Beshear announced from the Capitol that the 2012 Education Week Quality Counts Report indicated that Kentucky had climbed to 10th in the nation in its annual survey of states and their education of America’s students. This was further evidenced as our district/state implemented the new Common Core Standards two

years ago, while many states are still preparing for the implementation of these national standards. A part of conKim Delaney COMMUNITY PRESS tinued reform, Kentucky is in GUEST COLUMNIST the process of implementing a new evaluation system referred to as the Professional Growth and Effectiveness System (PGES). Kentucky, along with 36 other states, requested a waiver exempting them from the No Child Left Behind legislation. In exchange, states will be required to include student growth as a part of their educators’ evaluations. The Professional Growth and Effectiveness System is based on the work of Charlotte Danielson and the results of the Measures of Effective Teaching Study, conducted by the

The third time is the charm Recently, God placed a verse in my path three times in one day. Now that may not seem significant for some, but for me, the verse’s relevance to my current requests to God for direction gave me pause. To top that, it wasn’t a verse I was familiar with, and I came across it in three very different ways. “The eyes of the Lord search the whole earth in order to strengthen those whose hearts are fully committed to Him.” 2 Chronicles 16:9. During a time when I was questioning God’s direction for my life and a path He was calling me to take, He said to me in this verse, “If you don’t do it, I will find someone who will.” At that point, I submitted. I submitted because I long to be obedient, just as a child longs to be obedient to his parents. And I submitted because I wanted what the verse promised; to be strengthened. And I was! That step of faith and step of obedience provided me a rest in my heart, and rejuvenation for my soul that I had been searching for, for some time. “The third time’s the charm.” Well it may not be the “charm,” but I’ve been around long enough to know that when God speaks something to my heart for the third time, I’d better listen. I’ve also finally reached a point when I really feel like I know when God is speaking. Isn’t it so frustrating when we pray and pray and pray about something, only to wonder if we’re receiving an answer? Trust me, I know, I’ve been there too. For me, I found the answer

in restlessness; yes restlessness. When I am experiencing unrest, I know God is working. Why Julie House do we get COMMUNITY PRESS restless? We GUEST COLUMNIST become restless because we’re ready for something new; a new job, a new haircut, etc. God allows restlessness to show us that He is ready for us to move to something new as well. Restlessness for me also usually means that God has already provided the direction; He is just waiting for me to take the next step. However, each time I experienced the unrest, the direction God was calling me into, was not where I wanted or intended to go. Yet, each time, the destination was more beautiful and fulfilling than I could have ever imagined. If you struggle today with unrest, know this; God has a plan; it is a good plan; it leads to success, and not harm; and when you get there, God will be there. Take a step toward obedience today through prayer and praise to God and remember this; “Do not despise these small beginning, for the Lord rejoices to see the work begin.” Zechariah 4:10. Julie House is a former resident of Campbell County and graduate of Newport Central Catholic and NKU. She is also the founder of Equipped Ministries, a Christ-centered health and wellness program with a focus on weight loss. She can be reached at 859-802-8965 or on Facebook.com/EquippedMinistries.

CAMPBELL

COMMUNITY RECORDER

A publication of

Gates Foundation. Danielson’s Framework of Teaching focuses on four areas: planning and preparation, classroom environment, instruction, and professional responsibilities. Teacher evaluations in Kentucky will also include a fifth area, student growth. The exact percentage, each of these areas will receive in an evaluation, is yet to be determined as Kentucky continues to pilot the new PGES with limited numbers of teachers during the 2013/14 school year. This will be determined prior to statewide implementation the following year. Todd Baldwin, with the Kentucky Department of Education, states they are “going slow” to ensure they “get it right.” A shift in teacher evaluations will include numerous snapshot observations in the classroom and specific suggestions for professional growth. It may be reasonable to

expect a certain level of apprehension surrounding an entirely new evaluation system. However, teachers should be relieved to discover that the areas in which they will be evaluated are areas in which they are already highly engaged in and commit considerable time and thought to in Boone County. Parents should be relieved to know that our district is well ahead in key areas of the implementation of the PGES including but not limited to administrator walk-throughs, peer reviews, teacher selfevaluation, and frequent monitoring of student progress. The Hope Street Group, a non-profit organization, whose goal is to provide a better America, is involving its 21 Kentucky teacher fellows to elicit the opinions, concerns and ideas of Kentucky teachers regarding this new system. Hope Street, recognizing that great poten-

tial exists here, is working to facilitate dialogue throughout the commonwealth, bringing the Kentucky Department of Education, the Kentucky Education Association, legislators, and educators together to further strengthen Kentucky students’ learning. The Hope Street Group recognizes the importance of collaboration and communication between the groups. The new PGES provides an opportunity to empower teachers to further improve their students’ learning, as they continue to enhance their craft. Working cooperatively, Kentucky’s students and teachers will continue to elevate their “educational game,” ensuring that students are college and career ready. Kim Delaney is a Hope Street Group Kentucky Teacher Fellow, a firstgrade Teacher at Longbranch Elementary in Union and lives in Florence.

Cincinnatians were at March on Washington

“I am happy to join with you today in what will go down as the greatest demonstration for freedom in the history of our nation.” That’s how Martin Luther King opened his “I Have a Dream” speech on Aug. 28, 1963. National civil rights leaders had called for 100,000 to march on Washington for freedom and jobs soon after President Kennedy sent his civil rights bill to Capitol Hill. Cincinnati activists helped King’s prediction come true. Abysmal race relations defined the South and much of the North. Cincinnati, just north of state-mandated segregation, had made some notable gains. African-American leaders had pressured downtown restaurants and Coney Island to integrate, and were now focused on ending discriminatory housing. Local leaders like Clyde “Jimmy” Vinegar of CORE, William Bowen of the NAACP, and future Cincinnati Mayor Ted Berry led a contingent of about 500 to the nation’s capital. “The march will give witness that the Negro is united in America,” Berry told the Enquirer in 1963. The Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth had moved here, but continued the intense fight in his native Birmingham. A mix of African-American citizens, white clergy and others boarded a specially arranged train at Union Terminal. They packed two box lunches and prepared for possible violence. They sang freedom songs along the way, and picked up additional demonstrators near Ports-

mouth and Ashland, Kentucky. “The train ride gave us such a warm, friendly feeling,” David recalls PatriWolfford cia Hogue COMMUNITY PRESS (widow of GUEST COLUMNIST University of Cincinnati Bearcat basketball player Paul Hogue) and a senior at Central State University at the time. Donations to the local NAACP enabled her to attend. “It was the most wonderful experience.” It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. Would this crew face danger? Would the march have any real impact? Could the civil rights bill become law? The Cincinnati Post and Times Star editorialized, “We favor the public accommodations section of the civil rights bill but think reform will come almost as fast without a law as with it.” Both of Ohio’s senators, Frank Lausche and Stephen Young, declined an invitation to attend. The uncertainty is what made it a dream. “We were the first train to arrive at Union Station,” recalls Hogue, “and we were some of the first to make it to the Washington Monument.” They got a close view of Peter, Paul, and Mary, Harry Belafonte, and Joan Baez. Later in the day, at the other end of the reflecting pool, spoke A. Phillip Randolph, Shuttlesworth, and of course the headliner, Dr. King. Press reports and recollections by local participants paint the

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ABOUT LETTERS AND COLUMNS We welcome your comments on editorials, columns, stories or other topics important to you in the Community Recorder. Include your name, address and phone number(s) so we may verify your letter. Letters of 200 or fewer words and columns of 500 or fewer words have the best chance of being published. All submissions may be edited for length, accuracy and clarity. Deadline: Noon Friday E-mail: mshaw@community press.com Fax: 283-7285. U.S. mail: See box below Letters, columns and articles submitted to the Community Recorder may be published or distributed in print, electronic or other forms.

day as “glorious,” “wonderful,” “peaceful,” and “promising.” The march ended as an apparent success. In total, 200,000 attended. Most Cincinnati marchers returned home that evening. An intense debate on the bill, the assassination of its chief sponsor, and increased press coverage followed. A year later, Kennedy’s successor signed the bill with King and other leaders standing behind him to help fulfill the dream. “Free at last! Free at last! Thank God almighty, we are free at last.” David Wolfford teaches Government and Politics at Mariemont High School.

Campbell Community Editor Marc Emral memral@communitypress.com, 578-1053 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.


NEWS

A12 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

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THURSDAY, AUGUST 29, 2013

LIFE

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PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

BOBBY MACKEY’S

35

AT IS STILL Bobby Mackey plays and sings country music inside his club in Wilder, which will celebrate 35 years Sept. 6-7.THANKS TO BOBBY MACKEY

COUNTRY By Chris Mayhew cmayhew@nky.com

W

ILDER — Call Bobby Mackey’s hon-

A January 2009 view of the exterior of Bobby Mackey’s in Wilder, opened in 1978 inside the same building as the former Latin Quarter. FILE

The silhouette of a couple dancing frames Bobby Mackey, center, on stage at his club in Wilder in April 2005. FILE

ky tonk or a favorite haunt, the music inside remains traditional country the way the club’s namesake owner and singer likes. “I’m proud to call it a honky tonk,” Mackey said. Other country music performers play at Bobby Mackey’s, but at 10 p.m. each Friday and Saturday Mackey and his Big Mac Band play on stage. A 35th anniversary celebration will be Friday and Saturday, Sept. 6-7, featuring Mackey and his band. Mackey said he played at multiple clubs in the Cincinnati area prior to opening his club in 1978 inside the former Latin Quarter – which was a gambling casino up until the early 1960s. The Highland Heights resident said he bought the club in Wilder so he could play traditional country all the time. “I just wanted to be in control,” he said People who come to hear the music know what to expect – covers of George Jones, Hank Williams Sr., and Buck Owens among other country icons, Mackey said. That’s in addition to his original songs. His 1982 single “Pepsi Man” made the Billboard country chart list at No. 57. Mackey said his song “Hero Daddy” became a hit locally on Cincinnati radio stations. He released a new album Aug. 20, “Country Music Lives On” featuring the song “That Jones Boy Is Gone” – a tribute to George Jones. Mackey said he originally wrote the song as “When That Jones Boy Is Gone” a couple of years before the singer’s death in April 2013. The song is an ode to Jones with the repeating lyric “who’s going to fill his shoes.” He said this is the first album he wrote the lyrics for every song. Bass player Ernie Vaughn of Forest Park has played with Mackey since 1968. Vaughn said it is a pleasure to play with, and sometimes just listen to, each other play and sing. Vaughn and other band members typically only miss playing with Mackey three or four times a year. “It’s not a job, it’s just something that we all like to do or we wouldn’t do it,” Vaughn said. “I’m a traditional country singer, and that’s

all I’ve ever wanted to do,” he said. “And I know it works.” Mackey said he still has his mother’s Zenith radio where he heard country legends’ songs while his mother worked inside his father’s grocery store in Lewis County, Ky. “As soon as we would get there in the morning I would jump on a box and turn on that radio,” Mackey said. “I’d listen all morning to Hank Williams, Ernest Tubb and Red Foley. “When I heard Hank Williams sing at 4years-old my life was set to country music forever on,” he said. Mackey said his strategy of delivering traditional country music has worked so far, and his audiences range in ages including a younger crowd that comes for the midnight set and the mechanical bull “Turbo.” The bull has been part of Mackey’s for 34 years. His midnight set has a lot of rockabilly, but it’s still all country, he said. “That’s the young element, and the bull doesn’t sit still too much and it’s rockin’ all night long,” Mackey said. The club also has become known as a place to hunt for ghosts, something Mackey said he was initially against. He said he feared ghost stories would scare people away, and managed to keep attention away from that for 10 years. Now some people seek out the club to see if they can spot ghosts, and that’s all right too, he said. Bobby Mackey’s has been featured on multiple television shows including The Travel Channel’s “Ghost Adventures.” The club continues to be an established country music destination despite the ghost attention, he said. “It’s a throwback,” Mackey said of the club. “And if anybody used to come in there years ago and comes back in today, it would be like they basically stepped back in time. It has basically stayed the same.” And playing almost every weekend never gets old to him, and he has no plans of stopping. “We went through the urban cowboy craze and every other craze there was,” he said. “But the way it was is still the way it is, and the beat goes on.” As other country singers opened up their own theaters in Branson, Mo., he said. “I call my night club my Branson,” he said. “I don’t have to go running across the country. I play here in Wilder and people come to me.”


B2 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD FRIDAY, AUG. 30 Attractions Summer Family Discount Hours, 4-7 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Free admission for up to two children ages 2-12 with each full-paying adult, available online only. Admission: $23, $15 ages 12 and under. 859-2617444; www.newportaquarium.com. Newport.

Cruises Pirates of the Ohio Cruise, 3-4:30 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Afternoon cruise with games for entire family. Children receive free pirate hat, eye patch and treasure map. $16. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Dining Events Newport Elks Fish Fry, 4:307:30 p.m., Newport Elks Lodge, 3704 Alexandria Pike, Dinner includes fish, slaw and choice of fries, onion rings or macaroni and cheese. Beer, wine and soda for dining room. Carryout available. Benefits Newport Elks Lodge 273. $8.50 dinner, $6 sandwich. 859-441-1273. Cold Spring. Christian Moerlein Beer and BBQ Cruise, 7:30-10 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Tasting of Christian Moerlein beer samples and buffet featuring brisket, chicken and pulled pork. Music by local band. Member of Christian Moerlein team directing tasting and talking about history of brewery. Ages 21 and up. $55. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-261-8500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Drink Tastings Friday Night in the Aisles Wine Tasting, 4-8 p.m., Party Source, 95 Riviera Drive, Flight of four wines, free of charge. Ages 21 and up. 859-291-4007; www.thepartysource.com. Bellevue.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, 519 Enterprise Drive, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, 1600 Montague Road, Highlights performers, bands, DJs, composers, lyricists and other musical artists from Northern Kentucky who have spent 20-plus years sharing love of music with the public. Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Verbum Domini Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Verbum Domini, “The Word of the Lord,” is made up of a couple dozen Bible-related items in an exhibit that celebrates God’s word throughout the ages. Also called the Green Collection, it’s funded by Hobby Lobby chain of arts and crafts stores. $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Portico. Come face-to-face with tales of dragons from all over the world. View artwork and other adornments strolling beneath Chinese dragons. Learn about encounters with these beasts from China to Africa, Europe to the Americas and Australia to the Middle East. Discover what ancient historians have written about these creatures, and examine armaments that may have been used by valiant dragon slayers. $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dr. Crawley’s Insectorium, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, 2800 Bullittsburg Church Road, Near Palm Plaza and downstairs from Dinosaur Den. Learn interesting facts, such as, not all insects are bugs, but all bugs are insects. Collection represents a lifetime of collecting by Dr. Crawley. With an animatronic

Karaoke, 9 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., With DJ Will Corson. $10 buckets and $4 grape and cherry bombs. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-491-6659. Covington. DJ-led Karaoke, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Miller’s Fill Inn, 52 Donnermeyer Drive, Free. 859-431-3455; www.facebook.com/millers.fillin. Bellevue.

person, named Dr. Arthur Pod, who answers many questions about insects. Included with admission: $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Karaoke and Open Mic Friday Night Karaoke, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., Florence Elks Lodge 314, 7704 Dixie Highway, Karaoke and dance. Ages 21 and up. Free. 859-746-3557. Florence.

Music - Acoustic Kevin Fox, 10 p.m., Strasse Haus, 630 Main St., Free. 859-261-1199. Covington.

Music - Jazz

Music - Big Band

The John Von Ohlen Trio, 7:30 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., 859-261-2365; www.deefelicecafe.com. Covington.

Jammin’ at Jane’s, 3-6 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Free. 859-384-6617; www.janessaddlebag.com. Union.

Music - Pop Jon Aiken, 7:30 p.m., Blinkers Tavern, 318 Greenup St., Patio. Saxophone player. 859-3600840; www.blinkerstavern.com. Covington.

On Stage - Comedy Dan Davidson, 7:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Music - Rock

MONDAY, SEPT. 2

Danny Frazier Band, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500; www.jerzeespub.com. Newport. Sinful Crow, 8 p.m. With Kentucky Ugly, This is a Knife, Breakneck Pace, Rhythm and Booze and Knucklehead. Doors open 7 p.m., Madison Theater, 730 Madison Ave., All ages. $7. 859-491-2444; www.madisontheateronline.com. Covington.

Riverfest 2013 returns, noon to 10 p.m. Sept. 1, in Newport.FILE PHOTO

On Stage - Comedy

Farmers Market

Dan Davidson, 8 and 10:30 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, Newport on the Levee, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Newport Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Historic Newport Business District, Monmouth Street, Held at 709 Monmouth St. in city parking lot adjacent to Pepper Pod Restaurant. Homegrown fruits, vegetables and annual and perennial flowers. Presented by City of Newport. 859-292-3666. Newport.

Recreation Friday Night Cruise In with DJ Ray, 5-8 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Door prizes, $1 hot dogs and free color photo. Bring car for discounted meals. Free. Through Sept. 27. 859-3846617. Union.

Senior Citizens Euchre Tournament, noon-2 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton.

SATURDAY, AUG. 31 Cooking Classes Sushi Rolling and Dining, 7 p.m., Sushi Cincinnati, 130 W. Pike St., Includes training, choice of at least three sushi rolls, BYOB and recipe/product information. $25. Reservations required. 513-335-0297; www.sushicinti.com. Covington.

Cruises Princess Cruise, noon-2 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Enchanting afternoon with favorite fairy tale princesses. Music by DJ and dancing. Children must be accompanied by adult. $20, $16 children. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-261-8500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Dining Events All Fired Up, 2 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Chef grilling season’s best and pairing them with wine. Ages 21 and up. $25. Registration required. 859-426-1042. Crestview Hills.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m. and 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Behringer-Crawford Museum, Included with admission. 859491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Verbum Domini Exhibit, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dr. Crawley’s Insectorium, 9 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, Included with admission: $29.95

Civic

ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

ABOUT CALENDAR To submit calendar items, go to www.cincinnati.com and click on “Share!” Send digital photos to life@communitypress.com along with event information. Items are printed on a spaceavailable basis with local events taking precedence. Deadline is two weeks before publication date. To find more calendar events, go to www.cincinnati.com and choose from a menu of items in the Entertainment section on the main page.

Music - Jazz

The Alexandria Fair and Horse Show runs through Sept. 2 at the Alexandria Fairgrounds, 100 Fairground Lane.FILE PHOTO

On Stage - Comedy Dan Davidson, 7:30 and 10 p.m., Funny Bone Comedy Club, $10-$15. 859-957-2000; www.funnyboneonthelevee.com. Newport.

Pets Bark for Life, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Diocesan Catholic Children’s Home, 75 Orphanage Road, Fairgrounds. Families and dogs come together to honor caregiving qualities of canine friends and cancer survivors. Games for dogs, dress-up contest, team and community fundraising, music and food. Benefits American Cancer Society of Northern Kentucky. $15 per dog, $5 each additional. Presented by American Cancer Society Northern Kentucky. 859-372-7873; www.relayforlife.org/barknorthernky. Fort Mitchell.

New Sleepcat Band, 7 p.m., Dee Felice Cafe, 529 Main St., Directed by Bill Gemmer and features John Von Ohlen. 859261-2365; www.deefelice.com. Covington. Karl Dappen on Sax, 7-10 p.m., Argentine Bistro, 2875 Town Center Blvd., Variety of music from jazz to soft rock. Free. 859-426-1042; argentinebistro.com. Crestview Hills.

Recreation

Music - R&B

Tours

Basic Truth, 9:30 p.m.-1:30 a.m., KJ’s Pub, 2379 Buttermilk Crossing, 859-344-1413; basictruth.webs.com. Crescent Springs.

Music - Rock Face Full of Chicken, 9 p.m.-1 a.m., JerZee’s Pub and Grub, 708 Monmouth St., Free. 859-4913500. Newport.

Music Education Musikgarten Open House, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Florence Music Academy, 240 Main St., Crafts, instruments, games, songs, snacks and more. Parents can explore materials, ask questions, play with children, enter raffle and more. Free. Presented by Little Songbird Music Studio. 859-547-8765; www.littlesongbirdmusic.com. Florence.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8-9 a.m. and 9:30-10:30 a.m. and 4:30-5:30 p.m. and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Exhibits

Music - Concerts Kentucky Symphony Orchestra, 7:30 p.m. Cirque Devou Deux. Circus Mojo brings trapeze artists, acrobats, daring feats of skill and clowns., Devou Park, 1344 Audubon Road, Amphitheater. Concessions and restroom available. Bring seating, picnics welcome. TANK Shuttle will transport from Covington Catholic High School, 1600 Dixie Highway, Park Hills, 6-7:30 p.m., $1 each way. Free limited parking. Free, $5 suggested donation. Presented by Kentucky Symphony Orchestra. 859-431-6216; www.kyso.org. Covington. Fort Thomas Summer Series, 7 p.m., Tower Park, 950 S. Fort Thomas Ave., Amphitheater. Bring seating. Rain moves concert to community center. Free. Presented by Fort Thomas Recreation Department. 859781-1700; www.ftthomas.org. Fort Thomas. Grand Funk Railroad, 7 p.m. With The Whammies., University of Cincinnati Medical Center Stadium, 7950 Freedom Way, Blues rock band popular during the 1970s. $29-$55. Presented by Florence Freedom Professional Baseball. 859-594-4487; www.ticketreturn.com. Florence.

Tea Party Meeting, 6-8 p.m., Sub Station II, 7905 Dream St., Meet and discuss limited government, free markets and fiscal responsibility. Free. Presented by Grassroots Tea Party of Boone County. Through Dec. 29. 859586-9207; www.teapartyboonecounty.org. Florence.

St. Timothy Knights of Columbus Golf Outing, 11:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m., Kenton County Golf Course, 3908 Richardson Road, Includes golf, steak dinner and more. $80. Reservations required. Presented by St. Timothy Council of the Knights of Columbus. 859-384-1100; www.sttimothygolfouting.com. Independence. Ultimate Gangster Tour, 2 p.m., Gangsters Dueling Piano Bar, 18 E. Fifth St., More in-depth tour expands on Newport’s history. Includes visiting three additional locations not on regular tour. $30. Presented by American Legacy Tours. 859-491-8000; www.americanlegacytours.com. Newport.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 1 Benefits RiverBlast Fireworks Gala, 5 p.m., Newport Aquarium, Newport on the Levee, Includes appetizers, penguin encounter, full bar, multi-course sit-down dinner and private terrace for fireworks viewing with security, individual seats for every guest and more. Ages 21 and up.

Benefits Gateway Community and Technical College Foundation. $125, tables available. Reservations required. Presented by Gateway Community and Technical College Foundation. 859-442-1176. Newport.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.

Verbum Domini Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dr. Crawley’s Insectorium, 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Creation Museum, Included with admission: $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Health / Wellness Breastfeeding 101, 6:30 p.m., Babies ‘R Us Florence, 4999 Houston Road, With Sandi Brown, registered nurse. Free. Registration required. Presented by St. Elizabeth Healthcare. 859-282-8929. Florence.

Exhibits

Karaoke and Open Mic

Northern Kentucky Music Legends, 1-5 p.m., BehringerCrawford Museum, Included with admission. 859-491-4003; www.bcmuseum.org. Covington. Verbum Domini Exhibit, noon-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dragon Invasion Exhibit, noon-6 p.m., Creation Museum, $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg. Dr. Crawley’s Insectorium, noon-6 p.m., Creation Museum, Included with admission: $29.95 ages 13-59, $23.95 ages 60 and up, $15.95 ages 5-12, free ages 4 and under. 800-778-3390; www.creationmuseum.org. Petersburg.

Open Mic, 9 p.m.-2 a.m., The Southgate House Revival, 111 E. Sixth St., The Lounge. Awardwinning open mic features singer-songwriters, comedians, marimba players, storytellers and more. Ages 21 and up. 859-431-2201; www.southgatehouse.com. Newport.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 3

Holiday - Labor Day

Community Dance

Labor Day Kids Festival, 11 a.m.-7 p.m., Jane’s Saddlebag, 13989 Ryle Road, Inflatable obstacle course, games and activities for children. Free. 859-384-6617; www.janessaddlebag.com. Union. Riverfest Fireworks Cruise, 5-10 p.m., BB Riverboats Newport Landing, 101 Riverboat Row, Hors d’oeuvres, gourmet dinner buffet and dessert. $115. Reservations required. Presented by BB Riverboats. 859-2618500; www.bbriverboats.com. Newport.

Line Dancing, 7-9 p.m., Lookout Heights Civic Club, 1661 Park Road, Holly and Bernie Ruschman, instructors. Beginners welcome. Smoke-free. $6, $3 for first-timers. Presented by H & B Dance Co.. 859-727-0904. Fort Wright.

Karaoke and Open Mic

Music - Bluegrass Bluegrass Jam Session, 8 p.m., Molly Malone’s Irish Pub and Restaurant, 112 E. Fourth St., All bluegrass pickers invited to participate. Free. 859-491-6659; mollymalonesirishpub.com. Covington.

Senior Citizens Yoga Fitness for Seniors, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Walton Multipurpose Senior and Community Center, 44 N. Main St., Presented by Walton Senior Activity Center. 859-485-7611. Walton.

Exercise Classes Jazzercise Classes, 8:30-9:30 a.m. and 9:30-10:30 a.m. and 4:30-5:30 p.m. and 6-7 p.m., Jazzercise Crescent Springs Center, $34 for unlimited monthly classes. 859-331-7778; jazzercise.com. Crescent Springs.


LIFE

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B3

Cobbler, dips make great Labor Day recipes Cleaning out the freezer is never an easy task. I don’t know how I accumulate so much food in there! I ran across a container of sour pie cherries the Rita other day Heikenfeld from last year and RITA’S KITCHEN knew I had to do something with them, and fast. So I made this cherry cobbler. This is really delicious eaten warm with a dollop of whipped cream or ice cream and perfect for that Labor Day gathering.

Cherry or berry cobbler

I have made this with blueberries, blackberries and raspberries. Just about any fruit is good. After baking the batter rises up, surrounding the berries.

6 tablespoons butter 1 scant cup flour 2 teaspoons baking powder 3 ⁄4 cup sugar 2 ⁄3 cup milk 2 generous cups cherries or berries (I used sour pie cherries)

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. In an 8-inch square or 2-quart baking dish, melt butter in oven. Carefully remove and set aside. Whisk flour, baking powder and sugar together. Add milk and stir until just combined. Pour batter into melted butter but don’t stir. Add cherries. Bake 30-40 minutes or until cake portion is golden and berries exude juices.

Layered Greek dip

From Anderson Township reader Linda

Smith via Regan Smith Knaus. “One of my favorites,” Smith told me. 8 oz. cream cheese, softened 1 tablespoon lemon juice 1 teaspoon dried Italian seasoning 2-3 cloves garlic, minced 11⁄2 cups prepared hummus 1 cup unpeeled, chopped cucumber 1 cup chopped tomato 1 ⁄2 cup pitted chopped Kalamata olives 1 ⁄2 cup crumbled feta 1 ⁄3 cup sliced green onions Pita or multigrain tortilla chips

Beat cream cheese, juice, seasoning and garlic until smooth. Spread into deep 9-inch pie plate or shallow serving dish. Evenly spread hummus over cream cheese layer, then top, in order, with cucumbers, tomatoes, olives, cheese and onions.

Beer cheese

With Oktoberfest coming soon, I knew the requests for this would start coming in. Depending upon the kind of processed cheese and beer you use, this could be a mild or spicy cheese dip. This is good with pretzel bread sticks. Blend together until smooth: 8 oz. each: cream cheese, softened, and favorite processed cheese Garlic powder to taste 1 ⁄2 cup room temperature beer

Readers want to know

7-Up Cake: For clarification on Diane Byrne’s recipe that I published, the pudding is one 1 oz. box. It is a package contain four servings. Check out my blog for more recipes.

Cherry bounce: How much bourbon? Enough to cover the cherries by an inch or so. Some readers use vodka, rum or grain alcohol. The container should be glass, since it’s not airpermeable, with a tight lid. Canning jars work well. A reader wants to use a sugar substitute. I suggested Splenda, but have not tried it.

Tips from readers’ kitchen

Greyhound Restaurant’s pasta Gabrielle: Thanks to the readers who reminded me about this previously published recipe that MaryAnn B. wanted. It’s on my blog.

Rita used sour cherries for this cobbler, but has also used blueberries, blackberries and raspberries.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

got this from Amy Tobin when I was a guest on her radio show. For nice sauté oil that you can freeze, pour olive oil into ice cube trays and

add a thin layer of your favorite herb(s). Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator and author. Find her blog online at

Cincinnati.Com/blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Can you help?

Poor man’s lobster: I didn’t catch the reader’s name, but she is craving this dish. “It’s made with codfish that you cook in water seasoned with perhaps butter, salt and other ingredients. After it’s cooked, you serve with drawn butter. I would love to have a recipe similar to the one I lost.” Twin Trolley’s BBQ: For Carol E., who loved the sandwich of this now-closed and, I might add, much-loved restaurant. If you have a similar recipe, please share. Manyet’s Bakery cheesecake: Another request from this popular bakery, which was in Newport and now closed. For Pat B. “They had a cheesecake like no other I have ever had that was really great. If in any way you can find that recipe, I would surely appreciate it!”

Tip from Rita’s kitchen

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LIFE

B4 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

Protect yourself against someone stealing check Do you know the best way to protect yourself when receiving a large check? One woman says she wishes she knew because her check was stolen and cashed months ago – and she’s been unable to recover the money. Earlier this year, Heather Weismann of Delhi Township got a cash advance for more than $500. But before she could cash it, the check was stolen from her parked car. “When I got back to my car it was missing. So I called the place that wrote the check to see if it was

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cashed. The next day it was cashed and it wasn’t even signed by me,” Weismann said. Howard WeisAin mann got a HEY HOWARD! copy of the check and found although she had not signed the back of it, someone else forged her signature before getting it cashed. “They forged my name and then the bank allowed them to cash the check without me being present,” Weismann said. After doing a lot of investigating on her own, Weismann determined the person who cashed the check had an account at that bank – and that person’s bank account number was written on the back of the check. Weismann contacted the bank, which notified the check casher. “The bank manager had called them and said, ‘You’re supposed to bring the money back.’ She said, ‘Well, Heather Weismann signed the check over to me and I have witnesses,’” Weismann said. But Weismann had already filed a police report alleging the person who cashed the check is a thief. Despite all this, Weismann still didn’t have her money back,

Shingles vaccine offered Community Recorder

Shingles is a common infection in older adults, with one in three Americans getting the virus at some point in their lifetime. A vaccine is available, but its high-out-ofpocket cost can make it difficult for many seniors to get.

which caused major problems. “I haven’t been able to pay certain of my bills so I have late fees coming – and my personal account basically is horrible. I can’t use it right now because of this,” she said. Based on the information she’s uncovered, Weismann said she believes police should able to find the thief and take action. “They forged a check and stole a check. They cashed a check. Altogether that’s three things against this person. They need to pay for what’s happened,” Weismann said. I contacted the bank and, following an investigation, the bank returned the more than $500 to Weismann plus money to reimburse her for the overdraft charges she incurred. A spokesman for the bank agrees this appears to be theft. The bank has turned over its findings to the Cincinnati Police Department. So protect yourself whenever you get a check by immediately writing on the back, “For Deposit Only.” There’s no need to sign it, just put it in your bank as soon as possible.

The Northern Kentucky Health Department has a grant to provide a limited number of shingles vaccines at its four county health centers for adults age 60 and older who are uninsured or underinsured. . Those interested in vaccination can be screened further by

Watermelon a healthy, late-summer treat Fresh watermelon is a wonderful treat. Think of the crisp texture and those wonderful sweet juices running down your arm as you bite into the tasty treat. Watermelon is a healthy addition to any diet. A two-thirds cup serving has about 92 calories. It is a great source of vitamin C, vitamin A and potassium. Potassium is important for many functions in our bodies, but it is crucial for heart and other muscle function. Watermelon is also a very good source of lycopene, a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants help keep the cells of our bodies healthy. Lycopene has been shown to help reduce the risk of some types of cancers. Locally grown watermelons are available through September.

Howard Ain answers consumer complaints weekdays on WKRC-TV Local 12. Write to him at 12 WKRC-TV, 1906 Highland Ave., Cincinnati 45219.

Choose melons with a wellrounded shape and smooth surface. The melon Diane should Mason have a EXTENSION yellow NOTES spot on it where it laid on the ground. Watermelons with or without seeds are available. There are yellow-flesh and redflesh melon varieties. All melons should be washed well with water and a brush prior to cutting. Cut melons should be covered and stored in the refrigerator. Uncut melons will keep in a cool place for up to two weeks. Try the following Plate It Up Kentucky Proud recipe featuring watermelon and toma-

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health center staff when scheduling an appointment. Appointments will be taken on a first-come, first served basis as vaccine supply allows. Locations include: » Campbell County Health Center,1098 Monmouth St., Newport, 859431-1704

toes. It is a nice side dish for picnics and the final days of summer. Plate It Up Kentucky Proud is a partnership project between the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and the University of Kentucky School of Human Environmental Sciences. This project provides healthy, greattasting recipes using Kentucky Proud products. Visit www.kyproud.com/recipes for more Kentucky Proud information and recipes.

Watermelon Tomato Salad (Serves six)

5 cups seeded watermelon cubes 3 cups cubed tomatoes 1/4 teaspoon salt 1 small red onion, quartered and thinly sliced 1/4 cup red wine vinegar 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon black pepper; 6 lettuce leaves

Combine watermelon and tomatoes in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt; toss to coat. Let stand 15 minutes. Stir in onion, vinegar, and oil. Cover and chill 2 hours. Serve chilled on lettuce leaves, if desired. Sprinkle with cracked black pepper to taste. Nutritional analysis: 100 calories, 5 grams fat, 2 grams protein, 18 grams carbohydrate, 0 milligrams cholesterol, 105 milligrams sodium. Diane Mason is county extension agent for family and consumer sciences at the Boone County Cooperative Extension Service.


LIFE

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B5

St. Elizabeth Physicians buy care enters St. Elizabeth Physicians have reached an agreement to acquire three Hometown Urgent Care centers in Northern Kentucky. The agreement is expected to go into effect on Oct. 1, when the three locations join St. Elizabeth Physicians’ current Express Care location in Highland Heights as part of its network of walk-in convenient care services. At a St. Elizabeth Physicians Urgent Care center, patients will be able to receive medical attention for common illnesses and minor injuries without an appointment. The three Hometown locations are: » 8460 U.S. Highway 42 Florence, » 2091 North Bend Road Hebron, and » 4387 Winston Avenue Covington. Each clinic will be renovated slightly to have the same look and feel as the Highland Heights location. All locations will have access to the same electronic medical records as every other St. Elizabeth facility, meaning patients’ medications, allergies and medical history will already be known to the urgent care staff. For patients with a St. Elizabeth primary care physician, visits to the urgent care or express care clinics will also be visible to their primary care physician. “We are excited to expand our convenient care

GRILL MASTERS

Justin Bramel, from left, Andy Bertsch and Denny Wagner, all of Southgate, grill the food for the St. Therese Church Picnic, Aug. 18, at the Southgate Community Center.

services network to better meet the needs of our patients and community,” says Dr. Glenn Loomis, president and CEO of St. Elizabeth Physicians. St. Elizabeth Physicians Urgent Care Centers are staffed by physicians with services that include Xrays, stitches, and care for other minor injuries that are not life threatening, but require medical attention on the same day. Conditions treated include cold or flu symptoms, ear ache, fever, foreign objects in the eye or nose, migraines, minor burns or bruises, minor fractures, poison ivy and other rashes, scrapes or minor cuts, sore throat, strains and sprains, and conditions that require radiology and lab testing services. In contrast, St. Elizabeth Express Care centers, staffed by nurse practitioners, are appropriate for more minor medical issues, such as ear aches and cold and flu symptoms, similar to the services provided by walk-in clinics within retail pharmacies. St. Elizabeth Physicians Urgent Care and Express Care locations all accept the major commercial insurance plans, Medicare and Medicaid, and offer affordable self-pay rates. St. Elizabeth Physicians has plans to open a second Express Care location in Independence this winter and a fourth Urgent Care location in Ft. Thomas in early 2014.

THANKS TO BILL THEIS

Bike or Car?

You make small choices every day.

Run for Hope 5K takes off Sept. 7 The Jaymie Jamison Foundation for Hope presents the second annual Jaymie’s Rockin’ Run for Hope, 5:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 7, at Devou Park in Covington. The 5K race awards prizes to the top runners. Walkers are welcome as well. New this year will be a kids fun run. September is Gynecological Cancer Awareness Month – an important month to the Jaymie Jamison Foundation for Hope. Jamison was a 34-yearold mother of four when she lost her 10-month battle with cervical cancer. Friends and family created a foundation in her honor to help make all women aware of gynecological cancers, so no one has to experience the loss like they did with Jamison.

The Jaymie Jamison Foundation for Hope’s mission is to raise awareness for gynecological cancers. Awareness is the center of everything they do. They are supporting families as they battle gynecological cancer, providing support to research and to Hospice of Hope. The foundation encourages women and men to get teams together to walk or run the Rockin’ Run for Hope to honor a loved one. People may also honor a loved one with an inspirational or “in memory of” sign that will be placed on the course for $50. For more information, email shelton@jaymie jamisonfoundation.org, or visit www.jaymiejam isonfoundation.org.

With something as big as cancer care, why wouldn’t you make your own choice? OHC treats every form of adult cancer or blood disorder. We offer access to more leading-edge clinical research trials than any other community practice in the tri-state area. With more than 60 physicians and advanced practice providers, OHC delivers innovative, compassionate care close to home at 17 convenient neighborhood locations.

Train rides benefit children’s advocacy center The Northern Kentucky Children’s Advocacy Center will be host a family-friendly community awareness event at the Richwood Tahoe Railroad on Saturday, Sept.7. Train rides will be available from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. on the grounds of the Columbia Sussex Corporation, at 740 Centre View Boulevard, Crestview Hills. Tickets for the 30-minute train ride are $10 for adults, $5 for children and

$25 for families (two adults, two children), and can be purchased in advance by calling the NKYCAC at 859-442-3200 or at the event. Carnival games, a petting zoo, inflatables, face painting will also be featured and free ice cream will be provided by the Forcht Bank Ice Cream Machine. To purchase tickets in advance, contact 859-4423200 or its website at www.nkycac.org

Make the best choice for your cancer or blood disorder care. Choose OHC.

To learn more about the OHC choice, visit ohcare.com or call (513) 751-CARE.

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LIFE

B6 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

Breast cancer survivor and Falmouth resident Amy McKinney, front left, paddles into a dock with teammates as part of a demonstration of the Northern Kentucky Thorough-Breasts’ dragon boat racing team. In the rear of the boat, standing and steering, is Tamina White of Westwood.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Bronson, Arabella and Bentley Bertsch, 21-month-old triplets, are pulled across the grass at A.J. Jolly Park.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Partying at A.J. Jolly Park The more than 1,000acres of Campbell County’s A.J. Jolly Park were put center stage for a festival celebrating the 50th anniversary of the park’s creation Aug. 17. People were invited to try 20 different activities ranging from hot air balloon rides, horse and pony rides, nature hikes and kayaking or paddle board-

ing throughout the day. A fishing derby, archery demonstrations and wine festival were other attractions provided to showcase what is possible at the park. People set up chairs in the morning to take in 11 different live music performances on a temporary stage set up in front of the park’s 200-acre lake.

The organizers of the festival, the all-volunteer and nonprofit Jolly Park Development Council, are continuing to seek donations to build a permanent outdoor stage at the website www.jollyparkcdc.com. The council is working with the county Fiscal Court to recommend possible changes and improvements to the park.

People gather by the temporary music stage overlooking people kayaking and paddle boarding on the lake.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

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LIFE

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B7

People fish along the shores of the lake at A.J. Jolly Park in southern Campbell County as a man climbs into the saddle atop a horse.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Alexandria residents Riley Decker, 9, and his mother Melissa, take a ride in the Touchstone Energy hot air balloon piloted by Dave Champion. CHRIS MAYHEW/THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

Tweed Donohoe of Grants Lick plays banjo as Marty Dunn of Falmouth plays lead guitar and Sandy Geiman of Foster sings “Drivin’ Nails in My Coffin” as she joins members of the local Bluegrass band Crossroads.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE

Marley Berkley, 5, of Cold Spring, tastes a candy ring aboard her mother Allison’s shoulders near the music stage.CHRIS MAYHEW/THE

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LIFE

B8 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013 NORTHERN KENTUCKY INDEPENDENT DISTRICT HEALTH DEPARTMENT SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 2013 CREATED PURSUANT TO KRS 212.780-794 Published in accordance with KRS 424.220 and 65.070 The following info and supporting data may be inspected by the public at 610 Medical Village Drive Edgewood, KY. The District’s service area includes all of Boone, Campbell, Grant and Kenton Counties. BOARD MEMBERS DEAN R. ADAMS, MD CHARLES BREEN, MD JORDAN HSU, MD CHARLES KENNER, DMD ROBERTA LEHMKUHL, RN JULIE METZGER AUBUCHON, OD JAY MIDDENDORF, DVM GARY W. MOORE BRIAN RICKERT, RPh LAWRENCE BRENNAN, MD ANGELA ERVIN, MD TARA KNIPPER, MD JERRY PELUSO STEVE PENDERY KEVIN PFEIFFER, DMD RICHARD SCHUCK, OD DANIEL SHERIDAN, DMD DARRELL LINK JONATHAN RICH, MD WM. FORD THRELKELD, II, MD AMY ARLINGHAUS, RN STEVE ARLINGHAUS ROSANA AYDT, RPh SHERRY CARRAN BRETT COLDIRON, MD DEBBIE DAVIS, BSN GARRY W. NELTNER, DPM JAMES NOLL, DVM KURT POHLGEERS LYNN SHEWMAKER, OD SUZANNE WENDT MICHELLE WIEST, PharmD

ADRESSS 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017

Reserves balance carried forward from previous year REVENUE State Funds Federal Funds Local Tax/Donations Service Fees - All Sources Reserve Use/Changes in Liabilities Total Revenue

TERM EXPIRES 6/30/2013 6/30/2014 6/30/2014 WHEN LOCAL BOARD CHAIR TERM ENDS 6/30/2013 6/30/2013 6/30/2014 WITH TERM OF OFFICE 6/30/2013 WHEN LOCAL BOARD CHAIR TERM ENDS 6/30/2013 6/30/2014 WITH TERM OF OFFICE WITH TERM OF OFFICE 6/30/2014 6/30/2014 6/30/2014 WITH TERM OF OFFICE 6/30/2014 WHEN LOCAL BOARD CHAIR TERM ENDS 6/30/2013 WITH TERM OF OFFICE 6/30/2014 WITH TERM OF OFFICE 6/30/2013 6/30/2014 6/30/2013 6/30/2014 6/30/2013 WHEN LOCAL BOARD CHAIR TERM ENDS 6/30/2014 6/30/2013

RECEIPTS

$4,313,815 $1,973,788 $3,989,085 $6,340,374 $2,497,147 $4,957

DISBURSEMENTS

Salary $6,424,627 Fringe $3,027,488 Contracts $2,614,530 $147,681 Travel $301,412 Space Office Administration $355,019 Medical Supplies $187,024 Auto $14,276 Program Supplies $1,091,669 Capital $42,629 Total Expenses RESERVES BALANCE AT JUNE 30, 2012 BALANCE PER BANK STATEMENT $5,692,207 Local Petty Cash $1,650 ($19,151) Liabilities Outstanding Accounts Payable Checks/in-transit adj ($761,895) TOTAL AMOUNT This is to certify that at the close of business on June 30, 2013, a total of was credited to the account of the Northern Independent Kentucky District Health Department. Tiffany Smith Tiffany Smith, Banking Branch Manager (Officer or Cashier of Bank) Witness our hands this the 23rd day of August, 2013 Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Department Commonwealth of Kentucky County of Kenton Subscribed and sworn by Kirk Kavanaugh, Chair before me on the 23rd day of August, 2013 My Commission expires: January 12th, 2017 VENDOR LIST Amount Paid YTD 3L SELF STORAGE Total $18,031.00 4IMPRINT INC FKA NELSON MARKETING Total $25,240.31 A&S ELECTRIC SUPPLY INC Total $2,259.92 AAF CINCINNATI Total $2,765.00 AAHPERD Total $109.00 AARP MEDICARERX SAVER PLUS Total $60.00 ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS Total $210.24 ACB RECOVERY Total $732.46 ACCELERANDO INC Total $4,565.00 ADAMS STEPNER WOLTERMANN & DUSING Total $28,741.31 ADP BENEFIT SERVICES Total $1,809.34 ADP INC Total $21,668.09 ADP SCREENING & SELECTION SERVICES Total $1,026.50 ADVANCED MUSIC & GAMES INC Total $1,630.00 ADVANCED PAIN TREATMENT CENTER Total $560.00 AFFORDABLE LANGUAGE SERVICES LTD Total $225.00 AHC MEDIA LLC Total $1,000.00 AIMBRIDGE HOSPITALITY Total $1,887.60 AIR CHEK INC Total $390.00 ALL GONE TERMITE AND PEST CONTROL INC Total $6,075.00 ALLEGRO MEDICAL Total $2,527.55 ALLEN, EUGENIA Total $129.56 ALTEVERS, DONALD Total $900.00 AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF IABETES EDUCATORS Total $1,713.00 AMERICAN MEDICAL COLLECTION AGENCY Total $51.00 AMERICAN PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOCIATION Total $1,100.00 AMERICANA SCHOOL HEALTH ASSOCIATION Total $150.00 ANDERSON, NEIL Total $150.00 ANDROIT BROTHERS INC Total $35.00 ANTHEM BC/BS KY GROUP Total $3,789.63 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS & BLUE SHIELD Total $23,822.18 ANTHEM BLUE CROSS AND BLUE SHIELD Total $4,338.75 APB PROPERTIES LLC Total $400.00 APEX BILLING SOLUTIONS Total $198.25 ARC ELECTRIC A/C & HEATING INC Total $10,513.88 ARCHWAYS BLUEGRASS Total $160.00 ARISTOTLE CORPORATION Total $1,160.81 ART’S RENTAL EQUIPMENT & SUPPLY Total $58.00 ASEPTICO Total $6,025.50 AT&T Total $1,887.37 AT&T COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS SOUTHEAST Total $2,250.00 AT&T MOBILITY II LLC Total $355.32 AVALON SALON & SPA LTD Total $4,482.00 AVENUE PHARMACY Total $172.76 AWARENESS AND DISCOVERY GROUP Total $90.00 B.S.D. INC Total $102.01 BACH, MARSHA Total $2,851.47 BAKER, ALICIA Total $43.71 BAKER, BRENT A Total $1,605.00 BALLOONS ACROSS THE RIVER Total $190.00 BANK OF AMERICA Total $2,171.91 BARNES & NOBLE BOOKSELLERS USA INC Total $867.54 BEACON PRINTING INC Total $10,433.25 BECK DMD, MICHELE Total $1.00 BECK, R J Total $3,286.17

$14,805,351

$14,206,355 $4,912,811

$4,912,811 $5,692,207.06

Forcht Bank Kurt Pohlgeers Kurt Pohlgeers, Chair Lynne Saddler, MD Lynne Saddler, MD District Director of Health Northern Kentucky Independent District Health Dept Kim Herald Kim Herald, Notary Public BECK-MYERS, AMANDA Total $1,836.24 BEGLEY, STACIE Total $102.76 BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ASSOCIATES INC Total $11,024.70 BEIL, SHIRLEY M Total $400.00 BELLIZZI-DADE, MARIA Total $69.12 BENEFIT CONCEPTS Total $4,440.58 BENJAMIN ENTERPRISES LLC Total $818.00 BERGMAN, LAURA KAYE Total $421.50 BERTRAM, NANCY Total $188.02 BHS INC Total $1,133.42 BLACK, SOPHIA Total $173.11 BLACKBURN, CYNTHIA Total $24.24 BLANKENSHIP, DANIEL Total $5.00 BLANKS PHARMACY INC Total $1,263.33 BLU PHARMACEUTICALS LLC Total $15,000.00 BLUE DIAMOND PROPERTIES INC Total $2,050.00 BLUE MEDICARERX Total $129.20 BOLDEN INSTRUMENT Total $444.00 BONDED LOCK SERVICE LLC Total $24.75 BOONE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY Total $50.00 BOONE COUNTY FISCAL COURT Total $575.00 BOONE COUNTY WATER DISTRICT Total $95.99 BOSWELL, FRANKI Total $4.42 BREHM, JOE Total $800.00 BRG APARTMENTS Total $2,585.00 BRIAN D HOCK Total $52.50 BRIOVARX Total $42.00 BROTHERS, JENNIFER Total $25.00 BROWE, TRACY Total $92.09 BRUEGGERMANN, RICK A Total $800.00 BUILD A SIGN Total $546.92 BUNCH, GREG Total $105.18 BURLEW, COLLEEN Total $123.36 BURLEW, DEBBIE Total $147.37 BURRIS, JANET Total $90.45 BURRISS, ARTHUR Total $1,139.66 BUSINESS JOURNALS OF OHIO INC Total $160.00 BUSKEN BAKERY Total $25.00 BUTLER PLUMBING HEATING & A/C INC Total $3,774.39 CALDWELL, MEGAN Total $22.56 CAMPBELL CO PUBLIC HLTH TAXING DIST Total $163.37 CAMPBELL COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION Total $4,000.00 CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT Total $21,599.64 CAMPBELL COUNTY HEALTH SERVICES Total $237,345.63 CARDINAL LABORATORIES INC Total $350.00 CARPIO, CLAUDIA Total $60.70 CARROLL SR, JOHN Total $1,800.00 CAUDILL, JEAN Total $1,643.17 CBCS Total $62.19 CEI PHYSICIANS PSC INC Total $74.23 CENTER FOR CHEMICAL ADDICTIONS TREATMENT Total $3,230.00 CENTRAL KY ADULT & PED UROLOGY Total $1,500.00 CERIDIAN CORPORATION Total $3,979.32 CHARD SNYDER & ASSOCIATES INC Total $12,749.95 CHASE BANK Total $696.00 CHASE RECEIVABLES Total $27.61 CHL KENTUCKY MEDICAID RECOVERY Total $100.63

CINCINNATI BELL TELEPHONE Total $47,698.55 CINCINNATI BELL TELEPHONE CO INC Total $53,861.30 CINCINNATI CHILDRENS HOSPITAL Total $86.10 CINCINNATI COUNSELING SERVICES Total $128.21 CINCINNATI DENTAL SERVICES Total $965.00 CINCINNATI ENQUIRER Total $179.20 CINCINNATI ZOO AND BOTANICAL GARDEN Total $270.00 CINTAS CORPORATION Total $3,436.37 CINTAS FIRE PROTECTION Total $15,269.23 CITIBANK (SOUTH DAKOTA) N A Total $12,057.94 $1,311.00 CITY OF CINCINNATI Total $360.00 CITY OF COVINGTON Total $2,266.50 CITY OF FLORENCE Total $11,848.14 CITY OF WILLIAMSTOWN Total $53.82 CLEMONS, LUCIE W Total CLIA LABORATORY PROGRAM Total $350.00 CLIFFORD, DONALD Total $800.00 CMI EDUCATION INSTITUTE INC Total $179.98 CNKY SCENE Total $400.00 COLLECTION ASSOCIATES INC Total $286.60 COLLETT, JOSEPH L Total $2,495.00 COLONIAL LIFE & ACCIDENT INSURANCE CO Total $21,233.69 COLUMNS APARTMENTS LLC Total $945.92 COMBINED LOCK SERVICE Total $6.59 COMBS, DAVINA Total $61.57 COMDOC INC Total $17,350.65 COMMERCIAL PARTS & SERVICE Total $783.34 COMMONWEALTH ORTHOPAEDIC CENTERS Total $110.00 COMMUNITY MANAGEMENT CORPORATION Total $2,625.00 COMMUNITY PRESS/COMMUNITY RECORDER Total $165.00 COMPUCADDY Total $2,523.93 CONLEY, MARY Total $32.64 CONNER & ASSOCIATES PLLC Total $125.00 CONTROLLED CREDIT CORPORATION INC Total $124.16 CONWAY CASUAL CONCEPTS Total $3,992.57 $832.00 COOK, SONJA Total CORNERSTONE MANAGEMENT GROUP LTD LLC Total $2,652.00 COVINGTON PAPER Total $6,687.89 COVINGTON, SONYA Total $9.40 COVITA Total $992.09 CREDIT SOLUTIONS LLC Total $272.86 CRESTVIEW LANDS LLC Total $330.00 CROLEY, ROSE Total $406.37 CUSTOM DATA PROCESSING Total $4,896.00 $1,947.15 CUSTOM DESIGN BENEFITS INC Total CUSTOM DESIGNS BY ALICE LLC Total $2,977.00 $53.42 DAFFRON, JANICE Total DALHOVER, MELISSA Total $1,438.81 DAMRON DMD, STAFFORD RUSSELL Total $1.00 DAROB INC Total $1,520.50 DATA VAULT SOLUTIONS LLC Total $13,107.27 DAVITA RX Total $87.38 DEDDEN, SHEILA Total $1,422.41 $150.00 DELOZIER, JACK Total $47,775.93 DELTA DENTAL OF KENTUCKY INC Total $772.00 DENTAL CENTER OF FLORENCE KY PSC Total $1,858.22 DEPARTMENT OF VETERAN AFFAIRS Total DERMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF NO KY PSC Total $135.94 DEVERS, JONELL Total $84.48 DIABETES SELF MANAGEMENT MAGAZINE Total $49.85 DICKSON UNIGAGE INC Total $445.00 DISCOVERY BENEFITS INC Total $4,330.55 DISPLAYS2GO Total $988.06 DIVINE, STEVEN Total $123.00 DIXIE HEIGHTS HIGH SCHOOL Total $213.84 DIXIE STAR LLC Total $75.00 DOCTORS URGENT CARE OFFICE Total $127.69 $1,134.94 DOMASCHKO, KAREN Total DONNELLON-MCCARTHY INC Total $780.00 DOYLE, MARK Total $1,160.00 DREES-DIBELLO, CATHERINE Total $130.19 DRIVERS LICENSE GUIDE COMPANY Total $839.50 DRY RIDGE AUTO PARTS LLC Total $3,215.00 $1,134.00 DRY RIDGE PROPERTIES LLC Total DUKE ENERGY KENTUCKY INC Total $84,145.68 $408.00 EDGEWOOD DENTAL CARE Total EDGEWOOD ELECTRIC INC Total $1,180.78 $220.00 ELMORE, JOHN Total EMERGE IT SOLUTIONS LLC Total $1,370.00 EMERGENCY CARE PHYSICIANS OF NO KY Total $86.60 EMPI INC - RETAIL Total $51.20 ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS SERVICES LLC Total $1,256.00 ESRI Total $1,700.00 ESTEP, DARINA Total $270.70 ETR ASSOCIATES Total $3,651.24 EVENT PROMOTIONS NOW Total $138.75 EVERSOLE, MICHELLE Total $1,875.43 EVERY CHILD SUCCEEDS Total $2,019,337.00 EXPRESS SCRIPTS Total $105.00 FAMILY CARE PHYSICIANS PSC Total $1,064.01 FASTSIGNS Total $8,070.95 FEBCO INC Total $97,514.73 FEDEX FREIGHT Total $815.86 FELDMAN, ALANN Total $309.00 FFLAG Total $3,540.00 FIFTH THIRD BANK OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY Total $62,344.46 FIRST FEDERAL CREDIT CONTROL Total $59.07 FIRST HEALTH Total $237.30 FISHER SCIENTIFIC COMPANY LLC Total $1,865.73 FLEET TIRE & AUTO SERVICE INC Total $3,068.44 FLORENCE CARRIAGE HOUSE LLC Total $1,033.58 FLORENCE FIRE AND EMS Total $76.77 FLORENCE FREEDOM BASEBALL CLUB Total $1,500.00 FOLKERTH, MEGAN Total $951.76 FORD, ROBERT A Total $1,256.23 FORESTRY SUPPLIERS INC Total $4,456.10 FOSSITT, RONALD Total $150.00 FOUNTAIN SQUARE COSMETIC DENTAL GROUP Total $598.00 FOXWORTHY, TAMMY Total $203.90 FRANKLIN COUNTY HEALTH DEPT Total $60.76 FREEDOM FINANCIAL LLC Total $667.28 FRISCHS RESTAURANTS INC Total $4,726.32 FRYMANS ROOFING COMPANY INC Total $236.00 FULMER, KELLY F Total $900.00 FUNKYS CATERING Total $2,396.50 GALLAGHER & GALLAGHER LLC Total $1,000.00 GANNETT SATELLITE INFORMATION NETWORK INC Total $20,974.70 GASTRIGHT, CAROL Total $1,983.00 GATEWAY COMMUNITY & TECHNICAL COLLEGE Total $105.00 GEOHEGAN, JOAN Total $988.59 GHC SPECIALTY BRANDS LLC Total $6,094.94 GIESBRECHT, KELLY Total $340.83 GILLIECE, AUBREY JAMES Total $200.00 GLOBAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY Total $21,133.96 GLOBAL PROTECTION CORP Total $7,964.99 GLOCKNER, MARK J Total $1.00 GLOVE WORLD Total $65.00 GOEKE, THOMAS F Total $1.00 GONZALEZ, AIDA Total $12.60 GOTTSCHALK, JULIA Total $23.07 GRAINGER Total $4,432.21 GRANDVIEW PROFESSIONAL CENTRE Total $10,296.00 GRANT COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION Total $80,500.00 GRANT COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Total $800.00 GRANT COUNTY NEWS Total $3,061.96 GRAVIC INC Total $200.00 GREAT KIDS INC Total $346.50 GREEN DRAGON REALTY Total $420.00 GREEN UMBRELLA Total $130.00 GREENFIELD REALTY Total $1,195.00

GRIMME, KATHY Total $69.96 GRIPSHOVER, STACEY Total $50.00 GROSS INSURANCE AGENCY LLC Total $4,709.26 GUTHIER, SUSAN Total $1,901.66 HANCOCK, JUSTIN Total $5,131.34 HARLAND TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Total $222.00 HAROLD P FREEMAN PATIENT NAVIGATION INSTITUTE Total $595.00 HATHAWAY STAMP & IDENTIFICATION Total $137.55 HAY CHIROPRACTIC CENTER Total $91.81 $2,285.23 HAYASHI TELEMPU NORTH AMERICA Total $785.88 HAZ MAT DQE INC Total $131.75 HEALTH EDUCATION ASSOCIATES INC Total HEALTH FOUNDATION OF GREATER CINCINNATI Total $35.00 $820.00 HEALTHPOINT FAMILY CARE Total HEALTHPOINT FAMILY CARE INC Total $42,589.78 HEALTHY CHILD CARE Total $24.95 HECK, LISA Total $850.49 HEIDENREICH, RACHEL Total $2,258.02 HEINZ & ASSOCIATES INC Total $2,490.00 HEMOCUE INC Total $8,221.00 HENRY SCHEIN Total $323.06 HENSLEY PLUMBING Total $100.00 HERALD, KIM Total $83.16 HERSCHEND FAMILY ENTERTAINMENT CORPORATION Total $1,175.00 HILDEBRAND, CARLA Total $39.36 HIV/AIDS CONFERENCE Total $85.00 HOHM PRESS Total $298.50 $1,500.00 HOLIDAY INN FLORENCE Total HOPKINS MEDICAL PRODUCTS Total $139.85 HOPPER, DAVID Total $220.00 HOSKINDS, LARRY Total $225.00 HOSPITALISTS OF MT AUBURN Total $9.75 HOWARD, ROXANNA Total $54.33 $1,043.00 HSC WORKSHOPS Total HULL, PENNY Total $254.44 $4,920.00 HUMAN IMPACT PARTNERS Total $1,061.44 HUNTER, JENNIFER Total $4,563.76 IATSE NATIONAL BENEFIT FUNDS Total IBELE, CLINT Total $871.82 ICB DBA PARAGARD DIRECT Total $24,600.00 IDENTISYS INCORPORATED Total $177.40 IMAGE LAWN CARE & SNOW REMOVAL LLC Total $23,544.11 IMMUNIZATION ACTION COALITION Total $241.50 INDEPENDENT ANESTHESIOLOGISTS Total $7,488.00 $2,000.00 INDIANA WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY Total INFECTIOUS DISEASE CONSULTANTS $14,778.09 OF NO KY Total $1,138.00 INNOVATIVE MEDICAL SYSTEMS INC Total INTERNATIONAL LACTATION CONSULTANT ASSOCIATION Total $366.00 ISON DMD PSC, DAVID E Total $1,040.00 JACKSON FLORIST & GARDEN CENTER Total $1,513.93 JAMES WALTZ INVESTMENTS CO LLC Total $694.58 $21.02 JAMIESON, DR WILLIAM Total JENKINS, DANELLE Total $797.60 $1,530.00 JOHNSON MOVING & STORAGE Total JOHNSON, GAYLE Total $476.06 JOHNSON, GERALD Total $5,676.87 JOHNSON, LAURA Total $2,732.65 JOHNSON, RHONDA Total $1,110.68 JOURNEYWORKS PUBLISHING Total $213.94 JPMORGAN CHASE Total $977.52 KACO ALL LINES FUND Total $72,719.46 $30,057.49 KACO UNEMPLOYMENT INS FUND Total KACO WORKERS COMP FUND Total $71,084.97 $170.93 KAEFF, DANA Total $3,224.33 KAISER, JOSHUA Total $200.00 KAISER, LINDA L Total KALAPASEV, NED Total $263.13 KALBOH Total $500.00 KALOS, ALAN Total $972.50 KAMFES 2013 CONFERENCE Total $600.00 KANET POL BRIDGES INC Total $1,883.00 KATALAC BOOKS LLC Total $123.75 KCNPNM Total $1,475.00 $350.00 KEENE, RICK Total KELLNER, KEVIN Total $4,990.85 $1,144.39 KELLY, KAREN Total KENNER, DR CHARLES Total $2,540.41 KENT, LOUISE Total $701.06 KENTON COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION Total $3,000.00 KENTON COUNTY SHERIFF Total $85.00 KENTUCKY ACADEMY OF NUTRITION AND DIETETICS Total $375.00 KENTUCKY CHAMBER Total $300.45 KENTUCKY CVS PHARMACY LLC Total $13,128.54 KENTUCKY DIABETES SYMPOSIUM Total $385.00 KENTUCKY MEDICAL SERVICES FOUNDATION INC Total $232.23 KENTUCKY PEST CONTROL ED FUND Total $100.00 KENTUCKY RETIREMENT SYSTEMS Total $7,969.50 KENTUCKY STATE TREASURER Total $1,380,264.14 KENTUCKY VOICES FOR HEALTH Total $100.00 KERLIN, ROBERT Total $250.00 KHDA Total $1,350.00 KHDA ANNUAL CONFERENCE RETREAT Total $100.00 KIDWELL, SHEILA Total $166.79 KINCAID, KIMBERLY Total $5.00 KINSELLA, KENNY Total $4,082.81 KISER, MARGARET Total $678.98 KLIC Total $85.00 KLINE JR, JOSEPH Total $158.00 KOHLS DEPARTMENT STORES Total $950.00 KORDISH, MARY Total $55.22 KPHA 2013 CONFERENCE Total $3,050.00 KPHA ADVERTISEMENT COMMITTEE Total $100.00 KPHRA TREASURER Total $350.00 KREIMER, TIMOTHY Total $651.99 KROGER LIMITED PARTNERSHIP I Total $38,851.23 L Q AIRPORT LLC Total $300.00 LABORATORY SUPPLY COMPANY INC Total $33,351.47 LAFFALOT DAY CAMP Total $40.00 LANDERS, DEVIN Total $25.85 LANDRUM, TERRI A Total $1,500.00 LEGACY Total $30.00 LENIHAN, JACK F Total $1.00 LEWIS, REBECCA L Total $1,750.00 LINCARE INC Total $85.75 LOMBART INSTRUMENT Total $576.93 LOPEZ, CARLOS Total $39.14 LUCAS, SACHA Total $226.87 MACIUBA, SANDRA Total $500.00 MARKET LAB INC Total $2,474.33 MASCHINOT, MARY Total $407.15 MASIMO AMERICAS INC Total $32,000.00 MAYFIELD CLINIC Total $155.59 MAYO NICOTINE DEPENDENCE CENTER Total $305.00 MCCANDLESS, ASHLEY Total $109.24 MCCANDLESS, ROBERT Total $312.72 MCDONALDS RESTUARANT Total $135.00 MCDONOUGH, DENNY Total $55.00 MCHALES CATERING LLC Total $2,163.00 MCMILLEN, ANGIE Total $78.96 MCPC INC Total $2,016.03 MDM INVESTMENTS Total $1,355.00 MEDCO HEALTH SOLUTIONS INC Total $477.22 MEDIA LIBRARY INC Total $1,525.00 MEDIA PARTNERS CORPORATION Total $1,001.70 MEDICAL PRODUCTS LABORATORIES INC Total $871.74 MEIJER Total $1,000.00 MENTAL HEALTH ASSOCIATION OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY Total $135.00 &(+)'')""$!!$+')*#,%


LIFE

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B9

DEATHS Robert Davis Robert Gilbert Davis, 51, of Erlanger, died Aug. 17, 2013. Survivors include his sons, Robert G. Davis III of Newport, and Jeremy Rafus of Burlington; brothers, Glenn R. Davis, Judd Allison and Ronald G. Davis; sisters, Janie Parsons, Theresa Lipscomb and Bonnie Nuckels; and two grandchildren.

ABOUT OBITUARIES Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge by The Community Press. Please call us at 283-0404 for more information. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 513-2424000 for pricing details. For the most up-to-date Northern Kentucky obituaries, click on the “Obituaries” link at NKY.com.

Mike Fisher Mike Fisher, 65, of Falmouth, died Aug. 19, 2013. He was a Marine Corps veteran of the Vietnam War, worked at his family’s car dealership, Fisher Chevrolet, more recently was manager at the Circle K Store in Alexandria, was active in the Jaycees on the local, state and national level, serving as state president in 1980 and national vice president in 1981, served on the Falmouth City Council in the late 1970s and early ’80s, and was a member of the American Legion Hardin Browning Post 109, Masonic Lodge and the Falmouth Christian Church. His parents, C.W. and Mary Lou Brann Fisher, died previously. Survivors include his daughter, Emily Fisher Greene of Taylor Mill; son, Nick Fisher of Bellevue; brother, John Fisher of Florence; sister, Elizabeth Fisher Chapman of Alexandria; and three grandchildren. Burial was at the Kentucky Veterans Cemetery, North in Williamstown.

Michael Groeschen Michael J. Groeschen, 69, of Newport, died Aug. 16, 2013, at his home.

He worked for GM for 35 years, was an Army veteran of the Vietnam War, member of the Kersten O’Day Sportsman Club, and an avid fisherman and hunter. Survivors include his wife, Gayle Groeschen; mother, Virginia Groeschen; brother, Mark Groeschen; sister, Suzy Lange; children, Melissa Janson, Kimberly Zilliox, Traci Cafferky and Nicholas Groeschen; seven grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren. Memorials: American Cancer Society, 297 Buttermilk Pike, Fort Mitchell, KY 41017.

Edna Knapp Edna T. Knapp, 91, of Cold Spring, died Aug. 20, 2013, at her home. She was a lifetime member of St. Joseph Church and member of St. Mary’s Ladies Society. Her husband, Clifford Knapp, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Ray, Bill and Charley Knapp; daughters, Mary Jane Moore and Beverly Hartig; 12 grandchildren, 24 great-grandchildren and two great-great grandchildren.

Martha Morrell

Martha A. Morrell, 78, of Cold Spring, died Aug. 20, 2013, at Highlandspring of Fort Thomas. She was a teacher of physical education for many years in Long Island, N.Y., attended St. Joseph Church in Cold Spring, coached swimming, diving and synchronized swimming, and enjoyed quilting, bowling and swimming. Her brother, Albert Morrell, and sister, Mary Reber, died previously. Survivors include her sisters, Peggy Knipper and Clarellen Morrell. Burial was at Calvary Cemetery in Cincinnati. Memorials: charity of donor’s choice.

Garnet Myers Garnet Myers, 91, of Alexandria, died Aug. 17, 2013, at Highlandsprings of Fort Thomas. She was a homemaker and former beautician. Her husband, Charles H. Myers, died previously. Survivors include her daughter, Genevieve Hill; son, Lynn Charles Myers; other family members, Karen Myers, Neal Myers, Andrea Rumschlag,

See DEATHS, Page B10

CAMPBELL COUNTY PUBLIC HEALTH TAXING DISTRICT SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENT For the Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2013 CREATED PURSUANT TO KRS 212.720-760 Published in accordance with KRS 424.220 and 65.070 The following info and supporting data may be inspected by the public at 610 Medical Village Drive, Edgewood, KY. The District’s service area includes all of Campbell County. BOARD MEMBERS Lawrence Brennan, MD-CHAIR Carla Austin, RN Beth Healy, Pharm. D. Kevin Hanson, PE Jerry Peluso, Mayor Richard E. Schuck, OD Daniel Sheridan, DMD Steve Pendery, Judge Ex.

ADDRESS 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017 610 Medical Village Dr., Edgewood, KY 41017

TERM EXPIRES 12/31/2013 12/31/2014 12/31/2009 12/31/2014 WITH TERM OF OFFICE 12/31/2014 12/31/2009 WITH TERM OF OFFICE $457,694.08

BALANCE CARRIED FROM PREVIOUS YEAR REVENUE TAXES REAL PROPERTY PERSONAL PROPERTY MOTOR VEHICLE DELINQUENT INTEREST

TOTAL FUNDS AVAILABLE

$1,015,809.39 $115,612.57 $126,680.65 $15,274.25 $4,164.10

$1,735,235.04

DISBURSEMENT DISTRICT REFUND (SHERIFF/CLERK) VON LEHMAN & CO

$1,352,943.63 $472.95 $1,375.00 TOTAL DISBURSEMENT

BALANCE

As of June 30, 2013

$1,354,791.58 $380,443.46

This is to certify that at the close of business on June 30, 2013, a total of $380,443.46 was credited to the account of the Campbell County Public Health Taxing District

Tiffany Smith

Forcht Bank

Tiffany Smith, Banking Branch Manager (Officer or Cashier of Bank) Witness my hand this the 24th day of August, 2013 Campbell County Public Health Taxing District Commonwealth of Kentucky County of Campbell My Commission expires: January 12th, 2017

George Moore

George A. Moore II, Treasurer

Kim Herald

Kim Herald, Notary Public CE-1001776746-01

NORTHERN KENTUCKY INDEPENDENT DISTRICT HEALTH DEPARTMENT SUMMARY FINANCIAL STATEMENT (continued) Amount Paid YTD PARSONS, KELLY Total VENDOR LIST $64.97 MERCY HEALTH PARTNERS Total $68.47 PATIENT AIDS INC Total $332.91 $600.00 PATTERSON DENTAL SUPPLY INC Total METZGER, JULIE Total $10,760.65 MIDLAND RADIO CORPORATION Total $5,000.00 PAUL, TAFFINY Total $43.88 $1,065.18 PBH HEALTHY RESOURCES Total MILES, HOWARD Total $402.00 MILLER, ANN Total $303.32 PELUSO, JOHN Total $800.00 MILLER, JASON Total $2,295.00 PEPPLE, SHARON Total $23.92 MILLI WIRING CONSULTANTS INC Total $400.00 PETER PAUL OFFICE EQUIPMENT Total $953.95 $4,259.38 PETTY CASH HLDR-BETSY TOBIS Total MINNESOTA LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY Total $70.84 MOBILE COMMONS INC Total $500.00 PETTY CASH HLDR-CAROL RHODES Total $109.75 $491.15 PETTY CASH HLDR-DEBBIE BURLEW Total MODERN OFFICE METHODS INC Total $666.90 MOORE II, GEORGE Total $840.43 PETTY CASH HLDR-EDDA HARDEN Total $80.89 $5,364.60 PETTY CASH HLDR-KIM HERALD Total MOORE MEDICAL LLC Total $373.07 MOORE, DR THOMAS J Total $321.00 PETTY CASH HLDR-LAURA JOHNSON Total $91.78 $67.93 PETTY CASH HLDR-ROSE CROLEY Total MORRIS, CONNIE Total $218.62 MOSELEY, SONYA Total $1,682.72 PETTY CASH HLDR-SALLY MERK Total $589.49 $695.98 PETTY CASH HLDR-TAFFINY PAUL Total $500.00 MOSIER, MARY JO Total $4,850.00 PETTY CASH HLDR-TAMMI BUTLER Total MPC INVESTMENTS LLC Total $215.22 $294.99 PHILLIPS SUPPLY Total $690.84 MT AUBURN NEPHROLOGY INC Total $501.51 PICKARD ENTERPRISES Total MUENCH, DEBORAH Total $90.00 $1,575.00 PITNEY BOWES Total MULCAHY DENTAL PLLC Total $13,107.61 $511.48 PODIATRY OF HAMILTON INC Total MULLEN, DONNA Total $2,001.04 $1,139.37 POE, DEBRA Total MULTI SERVICE CORPORATION Total $1,198.19 $74.00 POMEROY IT SOLUTIONS SALES CO INC Total $46,729.90 MUNSO INC Total $12.00 POSITIVE PROMOTIONS INC Total MURRAY, DIANE Total $1,872.18 $1,956.00 POWELL, TONY Total NACCHO Total $1,839.34 $115.00 POWERBAX LLC Total NAEYC Total $125.00 $39,530.00 POYNTER, LINDA Total NATIONAL FINANCE CENTER Total $845.06 $75.00 PRECISION DENTAL CARE Total NATL PUBLIC HLTH INFO COALITION Total $1.00 $854.00 PRECISION MEDICAL EQUIPMENT REPAIR LLC Total $670.00 NC STATE UNIVERSITY Total $13,704.40 PREMIER REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT LLC Total $4,405.00 NEELY DMD INC, STEVEN M Total $1.00 PRINCE, CHRISTINA Total NEELY, STEVEN Total $880.70 $270.78 PRO ONCALL TECHNOLOGIES LLC Total NEUROSCIENCE ASSOC OF NO KY PSC Total $20,289.87 $275.00 PROFESSIONAL RADIOLOGY Total NEW HORIZONS CLC OF CINCINNATI Total $248.00 $4,256.86 PROPIO LANGUAGE SERVICES LLC Total NEW, STACY Total $13,076.02 $114.00 PUBLIC HEALTH ACCREDITATION BOARD Total $6,015.00 NEWMAN, JAMES Total $25.00 PURCHASE POWER Total NEWPORT RECREATION COMMISSION Total $35,320.00 $93.26 QUAST INC Total NICHTER, ZACHARY Total $5,300.00 $80.00 QUENCH USA Total NIES PHARMACY Total $2,938.68 $262.50 QUEST DIAGNOSTICS Total NIMCO INC Total $28.00 $17,402.51 R&S NORTHEAST LLC Total NK MANAGEMENT Total $392.02 $4,159.40 $95.00 RACO INDUSTRIES LLC Total NKADDSENIOR EXPO Total $45,233.95 $1,272.00 RADIOLOGY ASSOCIATES OF NKY Total NKEMS Total $500.00 $300.00 RAVE CINEMAS Total NKWCC Total $3,734.32 $709.42 RAY, KELLY Total NO KY MHMR REGIONAL BOARD INC Total $11,963.66 $44.99 RECEPTIONS INC Total NOAHS ARK ANIMAL CLINICS OF FT WRIGHT Total $25,888.00 NOAKES, LUCINDA Total $5,293.88 RED HAWK TECHNOLOGIES LLC Total $150.00 NORLAB INC Total $213.00 RED HERRING STUDIO Total $47.13 NORMANDY GREEN APARTMENTS Total $400.00 REEVES, SARAH Total $754.67 NORRIS, KATHLEEN Total $400.00 RELYCO SALES INC Total $75.00 NORTHERN KENTUCKY MEDICAL SOCIETY Total $25.00 REMKE BIGGS Total $1,788.00 $500.09 RENAISSANCE COVINGTON Total NORTHERN KENTUCKY OMS ASSOC PSC Total $2,849.70 $1,040.00 REPUBLIC SERVICES OF KENTUCKY LLC Total NORTHERN KENTUCKY PRIDE Total $600.00 $7,895.00 RESCOMM SECURITY SYSTEMS INC Total NORTHERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY Total $757.25 $3,989.11 RHODES, CAROL Total NORTHERN KENTUCKY WATER DISTRICT Total $996.32 $442.00 RICE, JOYCE Total NORTHERN KY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE Total $1.00 $125.00 RICH, JONATHAN W Total NORTHERN KY FOOT SPECIALISTS PSC Total $906.24 $2,030.00 RICHIE PHARMACAL CO INC Total NORTHERN KY PSYCHIATRY ASSOC Total $1,567.04 $1,159.50 RICOH USA INC Total NORTHERN TOOL & EQUIPMENT Total $4,140.00 RIGHTSOURCE RX Total $90.08 NORTHERY KY WATER DISTRICT Total $20.00 RIVERA, MELITZA Total NUTRITION ACTION Total $27.14 OAKBROOK WOODS LLC Total $1,400.00 RIVERCHASE PROPERTIES LLC Total $525.00 OB/GYN SPECIALISTS OF NORTHERN KY Total $335.00 RIVERTOWN COMMUNICATIONS LLC Total $5,581.00 OFFICE DEPOT Total $36,185.51 ROBERT DECK Total $787.00 ONCOLOGY HEMATOLOGY CARE Total $60.00 ROCK-SHELTON, KIMBERLY Total $1,178.76 ONLINE ENGRAVING & AWARDS Total $609.00 ROMBACH, DAVID Total $150.00 OSBORNE, DENISE Total $2,675.32 ROSS HOME DELIVERY Total $272.45 OTIS ELEVATOR COMPANY Total $250.00 ROSS, TRACEY BUTLER, DMD Total $13,001.75 OTOOLE, PATRICK B Total $2,715.00 ROSS-TEAGUE, EMILY Total $146.26 OUTDOOR POWER STORE Total $351.77 ROYAL DOCUMENT DESTRUCTION Total $1,200.00 OVERHEAD DOOR CO OF NO KY Total $400.00 RUBINSTEIN MD, JEFFREY B Total $50.00 OWEN ELECTRIC COOPERATIVE INC Total $1,209.32 RUEHL, WILLIAM J Total $700.00 PAGE, FLORENCE Total $97.38 RUMPKE CONSOLIDATED CO Total $3,795.16 PANERA BREAD Total $1,042.70 RUNNING TIME LLC Total $634.50 PARK UNIVERSITY ENTERPRISES INC Total $298.00 RUWE FAMILY PHARMACY Total $1,154.57 PARKVIEW MANOR INC Total $203.00 RYANS ALL-GLASS INC Total $1,285.00

$1,653.98 SADDLER, LYNNE M Total SADRI, RONNY J Total $360.00 $5,178.53 SANITATION DISTRICT #1 Total $229.30 SANOFI PASTEUR Total SAVING GRACE PRODUCTIONS LLC Total $1,100.00 $1,541.50 SCHOLASTIC BOOK CLUBS Total SCHOOL HEALTH CORPORATION Total $23.58 SCHOOL SPECIALTY INC Total $670.27 SCHREIBER, THOMAS Total $995.00 SCHULKERS, AMANDA Total $2,505.43 SCHULTZ, JESSICA Total $454.21 SCHWEGMAN, JAY Total $2,278.18 $954.94 SCHWEGMAN, KELLY Total $1,360.00 SD2007-1 LLC Total $684.50 SEARS COMMERCIAL ONE Total $12.48 SEBEZ, MARIJANA Total $1,200.00 SELLS, DAMIAN B Total $1.00 SEXTON, SUZANNE VOSS Total $2,330.57 SHAPERO, JULIE Total $415.00 SHAPIRO MD, ARNOLD Total $28,500.00 SHERILL MORGAN & ASSOCIATES INC Total $175.00 SIMPLEX GRINELL LP Total $1,125.00 SIMPLI-NET Total $3,118.99 SIMPSON, DEBORAH Total $158.71 SINGER, MICHELLE Total $1,171.14 SINGLER, MARY Total $2,646.55 SJS PARTNERSHIP Total SMARTSTOP CRESCENT SPRINGS ERLANGER Total $2,670.00 $2,600.00 SMELLER, AMANDA Total $1,981.07 SMILEMAKERS INC Total $99,389.11 SMITH MEDICAL PARTNERS LLC Total $1,408.52 SMITH, MONICA Total $2,977.54 SMITHKLINE BEECHAM CORPORATION Total $60.00 SNIDER MD PSC, BRUCE A Total $180.00 SOCIETY FOR HUMAN RESOURCE MGMT Total $927.00 SOPHE Total $438.80 SPECIALIZED PLUMBING PARTS SUPPLY Total $158,930.47 ST ELIZABETH HEALTHCARE Total $23,489.33 ST ELIZABETH MEDICAL CENTER Total $1,464.09 STANBIO LABORATORY LP Total $910.59 STATE FARM BANK Total $430.00 STAY LODGE OF FLORENCE Total $2,650.00 STEFFEN, SHERRY Total $575.00 STEGMAN LANDSCAPE & TREE Total $465.00 STERLING CUT GLASS Total $120.00 STERLING, SANDY Total $225.00 STINSON, JACK Total STREVELS, LAURA Total $1,326.75 STRUCKHOFF DDS, MS, PSC, JANICE A Total $1.00 SUMMIT MEDICAL GROUP Total $26,389.00 SUMMIT SUPERIOR FLOOR CARE LLC Total $7,236.90 SUNTRUST MORTGAGE INC Total $1,113.22 $1,950.29 SWAN, GREGORY Total $7,161.92 TAB PRODUCTS COMPANY LLC Total $2,066.58 TALLEY, TED Total $366.84 TAYLOR TECHNOLOGIES INC Total $655.47 TECH DEPOT Total $270.00 TECHNICAL ELEVATOR SERVICE CO INC Total TEMPLETON, CATHERINE Total $100.80 TERRY, AMANDA Total $150.00 THE CASE-CENTER Total $3,001.00 THE CHRIST HOSPITAL Total $200.00 THE CHRIST HOSPITAL PHYSICIANS Total $244.64 THE DERMATOLOGY CENTER PSC Total $247.52 THE DETERS COMPANY Total $120.00 $314.54 THE ENQUIRER Total $1,400.00 THE PLACE FOR KIDS Total $150.00 THOLEMEIER, JO ANN Total $617.55 THOMAS, DOUG Total $1,485.06 THOMAS, JENNIFER Total $157.53 THOMAS, ROBIN Total $2,377.46 THOMPSON, JEFFREY C Total $1,233.00 THOS INC Total $2,000.00 TIMBERLAKE FAMILY LLC Total TIME WARNER CABLE Total $1,992.15 $108.66 TOBIS, BETSY Total TODD ENGRAVING INC Total $720.00 TOM GILL CHEVROLET Total $9,813.18 TOTAL ACCESS GROUP INC Total $1,247.00

TPSG RED BANK OFFICE Total $40.96 TRAINER’S WAREHOUSE Total $238.14 TRANCY LOGISTICS AMERICA CORP Total $16,200.00 TRANSIT AUTHORITH OF NORTHERN KY Total $1,396.25 TRANSIT AUTHORITY OF NORTHERN KENTUCKY Total $810.00 $60.00 TRANSITIONS Total $720.00 TRANSITIONS INC Total $63.95 TRAYLOR, JONDA Total $2,078.48 TRICKEL, PAUL Total TRICOR DIRECT INC Total $960.10 TRION GROUP INC Total $1,195.12 $3.00 TRI-STATE DIGESTIVE DISORDER CENTER Total $4.00 TRI-STATE GASTROENTEROLOGY ASSOC INC Total $7,197.32 TRISTATE MATERNAL FETAL MEDICINE Total $75.00 TRISTATE URGENT CARE LLC Total $450.45 TROPHY AWARDS MFG INC Total $3,864.84 TROPHY HOUSE INC Total $171.04 TROXEL, KIM Total $28.00 TUFTS UNIVERSITY Total $1,200.00 TULIP LLC Total $10,085.55 UC HEALTH Total $150.00 UDF Total $3,386.18 ULINE Total $260.85 UNION SAVINGS BANK Total $192.00 UNITED WAY - NORTHERN KENTUCKY Total $3,195.92 UNITED WAY OF GREATER CINCINNATI Total $115.00 UNIVERSAL CLASS INC Total UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI PHYSICIANS INC Total $5,299.17 $500.00 UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE Total $746.12 UPS Total $400.67 USA MOBILITY WIRELESS INC Total $6,487.93 USBANCORP EQUIPMENT FINANCE INC Total $225.00 USLCA WEBINAR Total $320.00 VACCINE EDUCATION CENTER Total ($326.00) VAXCARE CORPORATION Total $329.00 VERAX, DR WILLIAM Total $13,569.47 VERIZON WIRELESS LLC Total $2,101.58 VERSA PHARM INC Total $199.00 VERSARE SOLUTIONS INC Total $2,250.00 VICTORIA SQUARE APTS LLC Total $1,450.00 VIEWPOINT PSYCHOLOGICAL SERVICES Total $604.40 VKR ENTERPRISES INC Total $1,685.07 VOGEL, STEPHANIE Total $13,000.00 VONLEHMAN & COMPANY INC Total $270.95 VOSS SIGNS Total $864.79 WALGREEN PHARMACY #2991 Total WALL DDS, KEVIN S Total $1.00 WAL-MART STORES INC Total $3,440.00 WALMART VISION CENTER Total $110.00 WALTON-VERONA BOARD OF EDUCATION Total $3,000.00 WARD, GENIENE Total $126.74 $4,000.00 WARNER, JARED Total $1,764.02 WATERHOUSE PUBLICATIONS Total $148.68 WEBB, SHELLY Total $1,862.75 WEINGART DESIGN Total $8,234.80 WEISS, JONATHAN S Total $2,622.82 WELLS FARGO HOME MORTGAGE Total WESTERN KENTUCKY BREASTFEEDING COALITION Total $70.00 WETHERELL, JAMIE Total $1,600.00 WHERLE, EMILY Total $640.47 WHITE CASTLE Total $75.00 WHITES TOWER ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Total $1,000.00 WI STATE LABORATORY OF HYGIENE Total $101.00 $422.69 WILLEN, MELISSA Total $25,000.00 WILLIAMSTOWN BOARD OF EDUCATION Total $100.00 WINALL, JUDI A Total $1,657.78 WINSTON, CATHY Total $66.20 WISEWAY SUPPLY Total $115.00 WOMENS CRISIS CENTER HT PROGRAM Total $1,130.10 WOOD, JOY Total $1,629.00 WRIGHT STATE UNIVERSITY Total $1,448.65 WRIGHT, DEBBIE Total WRIGHT, LA TANISHA C Total $6,630.00 $25,509.97 XPEDX Total ZIOLKOWSKI, LILA Total $750.00


LIFE

B10 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

DEATHS Continued from Page B9

LEGAL NOTICE CAMPBELL COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT #1 CAMPBELL COUNTY FIRE DISTRICT #1 HAS DECLARED THE FOLLOWING VEHICLES SURPLUS PROPERTY. ANYONE WISHING TO SUBMIT A SEALED BID FOR THE PURCHASE OF ANY OR ALL OF THE VEHICLES MAY DO SO BY SENDING A SEALED BID TO 6844 FOUR MILE ROAD, MELBOURNE, KENTUCKY, 41059, ATTENTION CHIEF BUCKLER/BID. SEALED BIDS WILL BE OPENED ON SEPTEMBER 12, 2013, AT 4:00 P.M., THE BIDS WILL BE OPEN AT THE FIRE DISTRICTS MAIN FIRE HOUSE LOCATED AT 6844 FOUR MILE ROAD, MELBOURNE, KENTUCKY. THE SUCCESSFUL BIDDERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT THE FIRE BOARD MEETING TO BE HELD AT 7:30 P.M., ON SEPTEMBER 19, 2013. THAT MEETING WILL BE HELD AT THE SILVER GROVE FIRE STATION, AT THE INTERSECTION OF MARY INGLES PIKE AND FOUR MILE ROAD IN SILVERGROVE, KENTUCKY. ANYONE HAVING ANY QUESTIONS CONCERNING THE VEHICLES MAY CONTACT DEPUTY CHIEF, MYRON BORN AT (859) 635-9255 OR FAX THE QUESTIONS TO (859) 635-0260. ALL MILEAGE LISTED BELOW WAS AS OF AUGUST 13, 2013, AND ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE BASED ON USAGE UNTIL SOLD. 1997 Ford F350, 4x4, dual rear wheels, 2 door, 7.3L diesel engine, automatic transmission, two fuel tanks. Mileage - 16,000 Marco Fire/Rescue aluminum body with Marco skid unit and foam system Roll up doors, 2 cross lays, reel, emergency strobe lighting, Code 3 siren with 100 watt speaker Minimum bid - $16,000 2003 Ford Taurus 4 door sedan, 3.0L engine, automatic transmission, AlC, Cruise, Power locks, windows, and driver seat, ABS brakes Mileage - 38,000 Minimum bid - $4,000 2005 Chevrolet K1500 4X4 Suburban LS, 5.3L engine, Automatic transmission, 4 door, AlC, Cruise, Power locks, windows, and driver seat Mileage - 66,000

Deanna, Nathan, Matthew and Benjamin Myers, and Hannah Myers. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: Trinity Episcopal Church, 326 Madison Ave., Covington, KY 41011; or Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

June Prince June G. Prince, 80, of Cold

Spring, died Aug. 19, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a secretary with Fort Thomas Public Schools. Survivors include her husband, Richard J. Prince of Cold Spring; son, Kyle R. Prince of Falmouth; sister, Edith Bentley; two grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Interment was at Evergreen Cemetery. Memorials: Hospice of the Bluegrass, 7388 Turfway Road, Florence, KY 41042.

Minimum bid - $6,000 The Fire District is accepting bids for the purchase of a 6-wheel drive, off road vehicle. This vehicle will be powered by at least an 800 CC engine and gasoline fueled. It will have a 95 gallon water tank with tower fill, a 1.5” intake for the tank, a 5 gallon integrated Class-A foam cell The vehicle will be equipped with a 5.5 manual start Honda gas engine coupled to a 95 gallon per minute pump. The pump will discharge 95 gallons per minute at 40 psi and 55 gallons per minute at 75 psi. The vehicle will also include a system to mount a medical stretcher with hold down clamps to keep a Junkin JSA 200 stokes basket stable during transport. The bidder shall provide the Junkin JSA 200 with the unit. The vehicle color is red. It will have heavy duty springs, equipped with a front-mounted wench of at least a 3500 pound capacity. A Hannay manual rewind hose reel, which will include 70 feet of %” 800 psi Goodyear red booster hose and one task force tip 10 gallon per minute to 24 gallon per minute nozzle. The entire complete booster tank/pump system with pump and motor shall be removable from the vehicle and be a fully contained system. There shall be a minimum of a life time warranty on the water tank, a 2 year warranty on the pump, a 3 year warranty on the motor attached to the pump and a 3 year warranty on the hose reel. All bids must be received by the Fire District no later than 3:30 p.m., September 12, 2013. Bids will be open at 4:00 p.m., September 12,2013 at the Fire Station located at 6844 Four Mile Road, Melbourne, Kentucky, with delivery of the vehicle, the successful bidder shall provide all warranty books, documentation books, parts books for both the vehicle and the pump system located on the system. The vehicle shall be of the latest construction, and no older than 2014 model year vehicle. LF 2003 Revised August, 2013 District Board Membership Campbell County: Fire District One ___________________________________________________ Designated Meeting Date, Time & Place First and Third Thursday each month, 7:30 p.m. 6844 Four Mile Road, Camp Springs, KY President/Chair: Gary W. McCormick P. O. Box/Street 9822 Washington Trace Road City: California Zip Code: 41007 E-mail: Telephone: Vice President: Allen Lee Spangler P. O. Box/Street 11821 Mary Ingles City: Mentor Zip Code: 41007 E-mail: Telephone: Secretary: Anna Zinkhon P. O. Box/Street 5210 Owl Creek Road City: Camp Springs Zip Code: 41059 E-mail: Telephone: Treasurer: Simon W. Jewell P. O. Box/Street 5604 Cutters Trace City: Melbourne Zip Code: 41059 E-mail: Telephone Member: Matthew Frank P. O. Box/Street 11500 Maple Street City: Mentor Zip Code: 41007 E-mail: Telephone: Member: Lawrence Ballinger P. O. Box/Street 3841 Smith Road City: Mentor Zip Code: 41007 E-mail: Telephone: Member: Chris Fuchs P. O. Box/Street 5973 Four Mile Road City: Melbourne Zip Code: 41059 E-mail: Telephone:

Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr): 06/15 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term Judge Appointment Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr): 6/15 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term

X

X

Firefighter Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr.): 6/30/16 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term

X

Property Owner Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr.): 06/30/14 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term

X

Property Owner Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr.): 6/30/14 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term

X

Judge Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr.): 06/30/17 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term Firefighter Term Expires (Mo/Day/Yr): 06/30/16 First Full Term Second Full Term Third or more Full Term Filling Unexpired Term

X

X

Winfred Singleton, 91, formerly of Southgate, died Aug. 16, 2013, at Baptist Convalescent Center in Newport. He was a World War II Marine Corps veteran, retired police officer with the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Airport, worked as a welder and in security for General Electric for more than 20 years, and was a member of Henry Barnes Masonic Lodge No. 607 F&AM, Southgate Volunteer Fire De-

AUDIT OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT Ray, Foley, Hensley & Company, PLLC, Certified Public Accountants and Consultants completed the audit of Campbell County Fiscal Court for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012. A complete audit report, including financial statements and supplemental information is on file at the County Clerk’s office and is available for public inspection during normal business hours. Any citizen may obtain from the County Clerk, a copy of the complete audit report, including financial statements and supplemental information for personal use. Any citizen requesting a personal copy of the audit report will be charged for duplication cost at a rate that shall not exceed twenty-five ($0.25) per page. Copies of the financial statement (Treasurer’s Report) prepared in accordance with KRS 424.220, for audited fiscal year 2012 and unaudited fiscal year 2013 are available in the County Treasurer’s office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, KY.

rfh

Ray, Foley, Hensley & Company, PLLC

Certified Public Accountants and Consultants

Stephen D. Allen, CPA/PFS Dennis H. England, CPA Michael D. Foley, CPA Lyman Hager, Jr., CPA Jerry W. Hensley, CPA J. Catrall Loby, CPA

Minimum bid - $ 14,000 2006 Chevrolet Trailblazer, 5.3L engine, Automatic transmission, 4 door, AlC, Cruise, Power locks, windows, and driver seat Mileage - 106,000

Winfred Singleton

To the People of Kentucky Honorable Steven L. Beshear, Governor Lori H. Flanery, Secretary Finance and Administration Cabinet Honorable Steve Pendery, Campbell County Judge/Executive Members of the Campbell County Fiscal Court

Independent Auditor’s Report We have audited the accompanying financial statements of the governmental activities, the business type activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund information of Campbell County, Kentucky, as of and for the year ended June 30, 2012, which collectively comprise the County’s basic financial statements, as listed in the table of contents. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Campbell County Fiscal Court. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements based on our audit. We did not audit the financial statements of some entities that collectively comprise Campbell County Fiscal Court. Those financial statements were audited by other auditors whose reports have been furnished to us and our opinion, insofar as it relates to the amounts included for those component units and funds is based upon the reports of other auditors. Those entities were: Certain portions of the Governmental Funds including: • Major Special Revenue Fund-Campbell County, Kentucky Fiscal Court Housing Department Housing Choice Voucher Program. • Major Debt Service Fund-Campbell County Public Properties Corporation. Certain portions of the Proprietary Funds including: • Major Proprietary Fund-Lakeside Terrace Apartments HUD Project No. 083-44012-236 • Major Proprietary Fund-A.J. Jolly Park Those financial statements reflect total assets and revenues of the government-wide financial statements and total assets and revenues or additions of the fund financial statements as follows: Government-Wide Financial Statements Primary Government-Governmental Activities Primary Government-Business-Type Activities Fund Financial Statements Governmental Funds-Major Funds Proprietary Funds-Major Foods

Percent of Assets

Percent of Revenues

1.89% 93.90%

12.95% 81.34%

7.24% 93.90%

12.95% 81.34%

We conducted our audit in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards issued by the Comptroller General of the United States, and the Audit Guide for Fiscal Court Audits issued by the Auditor of Public Accounts, Commonwealth of Kentucky. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinions. In our opinion, based on our audit and the report of other auditors, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the respective financial position of the governmental activities, the business-type activities, each major fund, and the aggregate remaining fund information of Campbell County, Kentucky, as of June 30, 2012, and the respective changes in financial position and cash flows, where applicable, thereof for the year then ended in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America require that the management’s discussion and analysis and budgetary comparison information on pages 5 through 14 and 64 through 71 be presented to supplement the basic financial statements. Such information, although not a part of the basic financial statements, is required by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, who considers it to be an essential part of financial reporting for placing the basic financial statements in an appropriate operational, economic, or historical context. We have applied certain limited procedures to the required supplementary information in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America, which consisted of inquiries of management about the methods of preparing the information and comparing the information for consistency with management’s responses to our inquiries, the basic financial statements, and other knowledge we obtained during our audit of the basic financial statements. We do not express an opinion or provide any assurance on the information because the limited procedures do not provide us with sufficient evidence to express an opinion or provide any assurance. Our audit was conducted for the purpose of forming opinions on the financial statements that collectively comprise Campbell County, Kentucky’s financial statements as a whole. The combining fund financial statements and schedule of expenditures of federal awards, as required by U.S. Office of Management and Budget Circular A-133, Audits of State and Local Governments and Non-Profit Organizations, are presented for purposes of additional analysis and are not a required part of the financial statements. The combining fund financial statements and schedule of expenditures of federal awards are the responsibility of management and were derived from and relate directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the financial statements. The information has been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in the audit of the financial statements and certain additional procedures, including comparing and reconciling such information directly to the underlying accounting and other records used to prepare the financial statements or to the financial statements themselves, and other additional procedures in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. In our opinion, the information is fairly stated in all material respects in relation to the financial statements as a whole. In accordance with Government Auditing Standards, we have also issued our report dated February 4, 2013, on our consideration of Campbell County, Kentucky’s internal control over financial reporting and on our tests of its compliance with certain provisions of laws, regulations, contracts, and grant agreements and other matters. The purpose of that report is to describe the scope of our testing of internal control over financial reporting and compliance and the results of that testing, and not to provide an opinion on the internal control over financial reporting or on compliance. That report is an integral part of an audit performed in accordance with Government Auditing Standards and should be considered in assessing the results of our audit.

Ray, Foley, Hensley & Company

Judge CE-1001776889-01

Ray, Foley, Hensley & Company, PLLC February 4, 2013

CE-1001776843-01

partment and John R. Little VFW Post in Southgate. Survivors include his wife, Frankie Singleton; son, Michael W. Singleton; daughters, Cathy Butler and Gale Singleton; six grandchildren and four greatgrandchildren. Burial was at Evergreen Cemetery in Southgate. Memorials: the DAV, 3725 Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, KY 41076; or the Humane Society of Northern Kentucky, P.O. Box 369, Union, KY 41091.

Peter Steffen Peter Alois Steffen, 81, of Alexandria, died at his home. Survivors include his sons, David A Steffen and Donald Steffen; daughters, Marilyn Sue Woeste, Rose Ann Steffen, Judy Griffith, Mary Lauer and Margaret Griffith; sisters, Mary “Sis” Allender and Dorothy Kool; 11 grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren.

Ralph Tankersley Ralph Lee Tankersley, 77, of Highland Heights, died Aug. 20, 2013, at his residence. He was an Army veteran, member of the Coast Guard Auxiliary, retired instrumentation mechanic at GE after more than 30 years of work, enjoyed the men’s Bible study at Christ Baptist Church in Cold Spring, and attended the Immanuel Church of the Nazarene in Highland Heights. Survivors include his wife, Villa “Mae” Tankersley; son, Brian Payne of Vero Beach, Fla,; and one granddaughter. Interment was at Forest Lawn Memorial Park in Erlanger. Memorials: Jewish Voice Ministries International, P.O. Box 31998, Phoenix, AZ 85046-1958 or online at jewishvoice.org.

William Thompson William Anthony Thompson, 87, of Alexandria, died Aug. 16, 2013, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. He worked as a programming engineer for AT&T, and was member of the NRA, the GWRRA and Ham Radio Operators. Survivors include his sons, Jay Thompson and Tony Thompson; sister, Susan Derryberry; and three grandchildren. Burial was at Persimmon Grove Baptist Cemetery.

Lucille Turner Lucille Turner, 84, of California, Ky., died Aug. 18, at St. Elizabeth Fort Thomas. She was a member of Fellow Friendship. Her siblings, Mitchell, Ruby and Virgil; and sons, Ron Turner and Randy Turner, died previously. Survivors include her husband, John Turner; son, Rick Turner; daughter, Thea Turner True; eight grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. Burial was at Oakland Cemetery.

Sondra Wolfe Sondra “Sue” Wolfe, 72, of Alexandria, died Aug. 16, 2013, at River Valley Nursing Home. Her husband, Junior William Wolfe, and son, Terry Wayne Wolfe, died previously. Survivors include her sons, Jerry Lee and John William Wolfe; daughter, Rene Theresa Wolfe; brother, Michael Smith; 10 grandchildren and six greatgrandchildren. Memorials: River Valley Nursing Home.

Group added to Bluegrass at Turfway Park National recording group Russell Moore and IIIrd Tyme Out will bring their contemporary bluegrass sound to Turfway Park on Saturday, Nov. 9, adding a fifth concert to the American Roots: Bluegrass at Turfway Park series. The bluegrass extravaganza series at Turfway is hosted by Cincinnati radio station WOBO (FM 88.7) and sponsored by Miller Lite.


LIFE

AUGUST 29, 2013 • CCF RECORDER • B11

Mildew attacking garden phlox Question: I have some phlox flowers that bloom every year, but the leaves get covered with some kind of white, powdery substance. The plants seem to be getting weaker and smaller each year, with fewer flowers. Is this a disease? How can I stop it? Answer: The white powder is caused by powdery mildew fungus. You apparently have one of the more susceptible varieties of phlox. Fungicides need to be applied early in the season to prevent this disease. Phlox is a favorite perennial for Kentucky gardens, but is often disappointing to grow because of devastation caused by powdery mildew disease, which covers the leaves with white fungal growth late in the season and weakens affected plants. Here are some tips on

how to control or prevent the disease next year: » Avoid crowding plants. Grow susMike ceptible Klahr plants in a HORTICULTURE sunny CONCERNS location; prune out nearby shading vegetation. » Avoid wetting foliage, especially in the evening. » Sprays of garden fungicides containing “Active Ingredients” (listed in small print on the label) such as dodemorph, fenarimol, thiophanate-methyl, triadimefon, wettable sulfur, ziram, or mancozeb + thiophanate-methyl are effective for powdery mildew control, if applied early in the season. Read the pesticide label

Golf outing takes a swing at poverty Community Recorder

Golfers will have a chance to take a swing at poverty at the 12th annual Master Pro Golf Outing Saturday, Sept. 7, at Lassing Pointe in Union. The event begins with lunch at 12:30 p.m. at nearby Union Baptist Church prior to the 2 p.m. shotgun start. Proceeds from the day will benefit the work of Master Provisions and Lifeline Ministries, Northern Kentucky nonprofit organizations that work as partners in hunger relief in the Tristate. The event can accommodate 112 golfers and foursomes can still sign up. There are also opportunities for “hope” sponsors to help fund event expenses. Golfers are asked to make a love offering as they register for the outing, keeping in mind that the actual cost of the day is $60 per person. To register a foursome or become a sponsor, contact Vince Meiman, 859-803-5939, or Roger Babik, 859-8166087. Master Provisions’ food program manages

Beckfield adds online nursing program Beckfield College recently launched a fully online RN to BSN program. This degree-completion program enables registered nurses with associate degrees in nursing to obtain their bachelor of science in nursing degree online. The first online RN to BSN classes begin Sept. 26 during the traditional Beckfield College Fall start. This online program complements the on-campus nursing program offerings. Beckfield is accepting applications. For more information, visit www.beckfield.edu.

and distributes 150,000 pounds of donated food each week to assist over 150 area nonprofits involved in hunger relief. Over 10,000 people in Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana receive fresh fruits and vegetables, baked goods and beverages through these partner agencies. Master Provisions also cares for orphans, distributes clothing and helps create jobs, helping meet the physical and spiritual needs of 500,000 annually.. To learn more, visit masterprovisions.org.

Request for Qualifications Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III (NMHCIII) is ReQualificaquesting qualified for tions non-profit partners for of development home NMHCIII’s ownership properties located in the City of Newport and to purchase excess properties from NMHCIII. RFQ’s are due no later than 4:00 p.m., local time, September 13, 2013, at the offices of the NMHCIII, located at 30 East 8th. St. Newport, KY 41071. Submission requirements may be obtained by contacting Randy Schweinz 581ger at (859) 2533, ext. 217, or by e-mail at rs c h w e i n z ger@neighborhoodfo undations.com The and/or hearing speech-impaired may call our TDD line at 581-3181. (859) Newport Millennium Housing Corporation III reserves the right to waive any informality, irregularity, or defect in any proposreject to and al, any/or all proposals should it be deemed in the best interest of NMHCIII to do so. It is the intent of NMHCIII to award a contract to the responsible and reproposer. sponsive NMHCIII is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 1777185

COMING UP N. Ky. Master Gardener Program: register for the next Master Gardener class, only held once every three years in Boone County. Call 859586-6101 for details and the registration packet. No phone-in or online registration.

for lists of specific plants allowed or not allowed for each fungicide, in order to make sure it is safe for use on phlox. Under our warm, humid growing conditions in Kentucky, powdery mildew can be quite severe on susceptible Phlox. Kentucky gardeners will want to plant powdery mildew-resistant cultivars. Phlox disease evalua-

tions were recently completed. The following cultivars were evaluated for powdery mildew resistance. Even highly resistant cultivars (listed below) are still not immune to powdery mildew, so expect to see a little disease should those be chosen for the garden. Susceptible cultivars would need to be sprayed regularly with fungicides to keep them looking good. Highly resistant phlox varieties include: ‘Blue Boy,’ ‘Darwin’s Joyce,’ ‘David,’ ‘Delta Snow,’ ‘Eden’s Crush,’ ‘Natascha,’ Phlox caroliniana, ‘Red Magic,’ ‘Robert Poore,’ and ‘Speed Limit 45.’ Moderately resistantmoderately susceptible: ‘Bright Eyes,’ ‘Eva Cullum,’ ‘Fairest One,’ ‘Fla-

INVITATION TO BID Date: August 29, 2012 PROJECT: Dudley Pump Station Roofing Improvements SEALED BIDS WILL BE RECEIVED AT: Northern Kentucky Water District (Owner) 2835 Crescent Springs Road Erlanger, KY 41018 UNTIL:

Date: September 10, 2012 Time:10:00 a.m., local time

At said place and time, and promptly thereafter, all Bids that have been duly received will be publicly opened and read aloud. The proposed Work is generally described as follows: Replacing two building roofs at the Owner’s Dudley Pump Station. Work shall include removing existing roof materials and installing approximately 2,080 SF of new, modified bitumen roofing systems. All Bids must be in accordance with the Instructions to Bidders and Contract Documents on file, and available for examination at: Northern Kentucky Water District, 2835 Crescent Springs Road, Erlanger, Kentucky. Copies of the Bidding Documents may be obtained from the Owner at the address indicated herein or by contacting Denise Manning at (859) 426-2718. There is no charge for these documents. All questions concerning the Work should be directed to Dave Enzweiler at (859) 547-3265. A non-mandatory pre-bid conference will be held for prospective Bidders on September 5, 2013 at 10:00 a.m. at the Owner’s Dudley Pump Station located at 796 Dudley Pike (at the end of Rodgers Road), Edgewood, KY 41017. Additional access to the site can be made with 72 hours advanced notice by contacting Dave Enzweiler at (859) 547-3265. Bids will be received and awarded on a Lump Sum Basis as described in the Contract Documents. Bid security, in the form of a certified check or a Bid Bond (insuring /bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) in the amount of ten percent (10%) of the maximum total bid price, must accompany each Bid. The Successful Bidder will be required to furnish a Construction Payment Bond and a Construction Performance Bond (insuring /bonding company shall be rated "A" by AM Best) as security for the faithful performance of the contract and the payment of all bills and obligations arising from the performance of the Contract. Contractor and all Subcontractors will be required to conform to the labor standards set forth in the Contract Documents. This project does not fall under the provisions of KRS 337.505 to 337.550 for prevailing wage rates. Evaluation of Bids and the awarding of a final contract are subject to the reciprocal preference for Kentucky resident bidders pursuant to KRS 45A490 to 45A.494 and (KAR 200 5:400). Owner reserves the right to reject any or all Bids, including without limitation the right to reject any or all nonconforming, non-responsive, incomplete, unbalanced, or conditional Bids, to waive informalities, and to reject the Bid of any Bidder if Owner believes that it would not be in the best interest of Owner to make an award to that Bidder. Owner also reserves the right to negotiate with the apparent qualified Bidder to such an extent as may be determined by Owner. Minority Bidders are encouraged to bid. Bids shall remain subject to acceptance for 60 days after the day of bid opening or for such longer period of time to which a Bidder may agree in writing upon request of the Owner. If a Contract is to be awarded, the Owner will give the successful Bidder a Notice of Award during the period of time during which the successful Bidder’s bid remains subject to acceptance. Richard Harrison, Vice President of Engineering, Water Quality, & Production Northern Kentucky Water District 7310

gie,’ ‘Miss Mary,’ ‘Miss Pepper,’ ‘Miss Universe,’ ‘Mt. Fujiyama,’ ‘Nikki,’ ‘Russian Violet,’ ‘Sir John Falstaff,’ ‘Starfire,’ ‘Tenor,’ ‘The King,’ and ‘White Admiral,’ because these varieties are prone to having mildew problems every year.

mingo,’ ‘Laura,’ ‘Magnificence,’ ‘Miss Ellie,’ ‘Miss Jo-Ellen,’ ‘Miss Katherine,’ ‘Miss Kelly,’ ‘Nicky,’ ‘Nora Leigh,’ ‘Orange Perfection,’ ‘Pink Gown,’ ‘Prime Minister,’ ‘Red Super,’ ‘Rosalinde,’ ‘Snow White,’ and ‘Starlight,’ Try to avoid susceptible cultivars such as ‘Andre,’ ‘Franz Schubert,’ ‘Little Boy,’ ‘Little Princess,’ ‘Miss Jill,’ ‘Miss Karen,’ ‘Miss Mar-

Mike Klahr is the Boone County extension agent for horticulture.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to KRS 132.027, the City of Bellevue will hold its public hearing on the 11th day of September 2013 at 6:45 p.m. The meeting will be held at 322 Van Voast Ave., (the Callahan Community Center.) for the purpose of hearing comments from the public regarding the institution of proposed tax rates for the 2013-2014 Fiscal Year. As required by law,

Tax Rate (Per $100.00 of Assessed Value)

Revenue

Preceding Year’s Rate & Revenue Generated

.273 (Real) .287 (Personal)

$ 969,758. $ 86,113.

Tax Rate Proposed & Revenue Expected

.290 (Real) .354 (Personal)

$1,023,844. $ 91,103.

Compensating Rate & Revenue Expected

.263 (Real) .276 (Personal)

$ 934,236. $ 82,679.

Expected Revenue Generated from New Property

none

Expected Revenue Generated from Personal Property

.354

none $

91,103.

The City of Bellevue proposes to exceed the compensating tax rate by levying a real property tax rate of .290 (per $100.00 of assessed value) and a personal property tax rate of .354 (per $100.00 of assessed value). The excess revenue generated will be utilized for the following purposes: General Fund for governmental purposes THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY HAS REQUIRED PUBLICATION OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN. Edward Riehl, Mayor City of Bellevue Publication dates:

August 22, 2013 August 29, 2013

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to KRS 132.027, the City of Highland Heights will hold its public hearing on the 17th day of September 2013 at 7 p.m. The meeting will be held at 176 Johns Hill Road, (the Highland Heights City Bldg.) for the purpose of hearing comments from the public regarding the institution of proposed tax rates for the 20132014 Fiscal Year. As required by law, Tax Rate

(Per $100.00 of Assessed Value)

Revenue

Preceding Year’s Rate & Revenue Generated

.164 (real) .164 (personal)

$464,640 $47,094

Tax Rate Proposed & Revenue Expected

.171

$481,838

Compensating Rate & Revenue Expected

.165 (real) .164(personal)

$464,932 $47,141

Expected Revenue Generated from New Property

none

zero

Expected Revenue Generated from Personal Property

.170

$49,027

The City of Highland Heights proposes to exceed the compensating tax rate by levying a real property tax rate of .171 (per $100.00 of assessed value) and a personal property tax rate of .170 (per $100.00 of assessed value). The excess revenue generated will be utilized for the following purposes: General Fund for governmental purposes. ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY HAS REQUIRED PUBLICATION OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN.

Publication dates: August 29, 2013 September 5, 2013

Gregory V Meyers, Mayor City of Highland Heights 1777046

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Pursuant to KRS 132.027, the City of Southgate will hold a Public Hearing on Wednesday, September 11, 2013 at 6:00 pm at the Southgate City Building, 122 Electric Ave, Southgate KY regarding the proposed 2013 Tax Rates on Real Property. Please alert the City Clerk @ 859-331-0075 by no later than Wednesday 9/11, at 3:30 p.m. if access assistance is required. As required by state law, this Notice includes the following information: Rate Revenue Rate for 2012-2013 .0487 $827,091.00 Proposed Rate for 2013-2014 .0510 $858,533.00 CompensatingRate for 2013-2014 .0501 $843,382.00 Revenue expected $36,331.00

from

new

and

personal

property:

Revenue in excess of previous year’s revenue will be allocated to the General Fund of the City of Southgate for services including, but not limited to, administration, public safety, and public works. THE KENTUCKY GENERAL ASSEMBLY HAS REQUIRED PUBLICATION OF THIS ADVERTISEMENT AND THE INFORMATION CONTAINED HEREIN. 1777447


LIFE

B12 • CCF RECORDER • AUGUST 29, 2013

LEGAL NOTICE The City of Cold Spring Planning & Zoning Commission will hold a public hearing on September 11, 2013, 7:00 P.M. at the City of Cold Spring City Building, 5694 E. Alexandria Pike, Cold Spring, Ky. for the purpose of hearing testimony for the following: FILE NUMBER: 124-13-TXA-01 APPLICANT: City of Cold Spring REQUEST: Proposed text amendment to the Cold Spring Zoning Ordinance, Section 10.0(D) R-RE Residential Rural Estate, Conditional Use: adding a thirteenth conditional use to conditionally permit small farm winery’s in the R-RE zone. Persons interested in this case are invited to be present. Information concerning this case is available for public inspection at the Campbell County & Municipal Planning & Zoning Office, 1098 Monmouth Street, Suite 343, Newport, KY Monday-Friday during normal business hours. Ryan Hutchinson /s/ Ryan Hutchinson Principle Planner Date: August 22, 2013 Published:August 29, 2013 Campbell County Recorder LEGAL NOTICE The Campbell County Fiscal Court, at a regular meeting of the court on Wednes day, August 21, 2013 at 5:30 p.m., at the Campbell County Administration Building, 1098 Monmouth Street, Newport, Kentucky, adopted the following ordinance upon the second reading, said ordinance having been read by title and summary given for the first time at the August 7, 2013 regular meeting of the Court. CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY ORDINANCE O-09-13 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CAMPBELL COUNTY FISCAL COURT AMENDING CHAPTER 90: ANIMALS OF THE CAMP BELL COUNTY CODE OF ORDINANCES The full text of Ordinance O-09-13 will be on file in the Office of the County Clerk, Newport, Kentucky and is on file in the Office of the Fiscal Court Clerk, Newport, Kentucky, and same is available for inspection and use by the public during regular business hours. I, Paula K. Spicer, Clerk of the Campbell County Fiscal Court, hereby certify that this summary was prepared by me at the direction of the Campbell County Fiscal Court and that said summary is a true and accurate summary of the contents of Ordinance O-09-13. Paula K. Spicer Fiscal Court Clerk

1777206

Law clinic accepting cases The Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law Small Business & Nonprofit Law Clinic is accepting applications for new clients. The clinic provides free legal services to qualifying new or emerging small businesses and nonprofit organizations in Kentucky and Ohio. For more information about the clinic, go to http://cha-

selaw.nku.edu/clinical/ sbnlc.html. The clinic is staffed by third-year law students who work under the supervision of a licensed attorney on matters which are generally completed over the course of a semester. Clients are chosen based on a number of criteria including the nature and scope of the requested representation and the appli-

NOTICE Please take notice that Duke Energy Kentucky, Inc. has applied to the Kentucky Public Service Commission for approval to revise its Demand Side Management (DSM) rate for electric service and gas service for residential and commercial customers and add new products for its DSM program available to customers. Duke Energy Kentucky’s current monthly DSM rate for residential gas customers is ($0.039396) per hundred cubic feet (ccf) and for non-residential gas customers is $0.000000 per hundred cubic feet. Duke Energy Kentucky’s current monthly DSM rate for residential electric customers is $0.001988 per kilowatt-hour (kWh) and for nonresidential customers is $0.001104 per kilowatt-hour for distribution service and $0.001070 per kilowatt-hour for transmission service. Duke Energy Kentucky seeks approval to revise these rates as follows: Duke Energy Kentucky’s monthly DSM rate for residential gas customers would increase to ($0.038919) per hundred cubic feet and for non-residential gas customers would remain at $0.000000 per hundred cubic feet. Duke Energy Kentucky’s monthly DSM rate for residential electric customers would increase to $0.002003 per kilowatt-hour and for non-residential customers would increase to $0.001131 per kilowatt-hour for distribution service and would remain at $0.001070 per kilowatthour for transmission service. The rate contained in this notice is the rate proposed by Duke Energy Kentucky. However, the Public Service Commission may order a rate to be charged that differs from this proposed rate. Such action may result in a rate for consumers other than the rate in this notice. The foregoing rates reflect a proposed increase in electric revenues of approximately $91 thousand or 0.03% over current total electric revenues and an increase of $31 thousand or 0.03% over current gas revenues. A typical residential gas customer using 70 ccf in a month will see an increase of $0.03 or 0.04%. A typical residential electric customer using 1000 kWh in a month will see an increase of $0.02 or 0.02%. A typical non-residential electric customer using 40 kilowatts and 14,000 kWh will see an increase of $0.39 or 0.03%. Non-residential gas customers and non-residential electric customers served at transmission voltage will see no change in their bills from this application. Any corporation, association, body politic or person may by motion within thirty (30) days after publication or mailing of notice of the proposed rate changes, submit a written request to intervene to the Public Service Commission, 211 Sower Boulevard, P.O. Box 615, Frankfort, Kentucky 40602, and shall set forth the grounds for the request including the status and interest of the party. The intervention may be granted beyond the thirty (30) day period for good cause shown. Written comments regarding the proposed rate may be submitted to the Public Service Commission by mail or through the Public Service Commission’s website. A copy of this application filed with the Public Service Commission is available for public inspection at Duke Energy Kentucky’s office at 4580 Olympic Boulevard, Erlanger, Kentucky 41018 and on its website at http://www.duke-energy.com. This filing and any other related documents can be found on the Public Service Commission’s website at http://psc.ky.gov. CE-0000565760

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cants' financial resources to afford legal counsel. The clinic does not handle disputes or litigation or assist with qualifying for nonprofit status with the IRS. Clients with urgent legal matters should not seek clinic assistance. Clinic director Barbara Wagner has over 30 years of experience as a lawyer, most recently working inhouse at Chiquita Brands International. “I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to supervise these students and teach them the skills that will help them in their fu-

Campbell County Schools - Notice

The purpose of this notice is to inform the public that the Annual Financial Report for 2012-13, as submitted to the Kentucky Department of Education, has been posted to County School School website website for for the the Campbell Cam bell County public viewing. If you wish to review this report, go to the following address: http://www.campbellcountyschools.org. Click on the "BOARD OF EDUCATION" tab on the left side. On the next screen, click on "CCBOE Financial Report" in the middle of the right side. Please contact Tracey Jolly at the Central Office at 859-635-2173, Extension 524, if you are unable to access this report. 1001777453

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ture practice,” she said. Examples of matters handled by the clinic include entity selection and formation, contract drafting, compliance with legal requirements, and advising nonprofit organizations. The clinic runs from late August to late November and from late January to late April. For application instructions, go to http:// chaselaw.nku.edu/clinical/sbnlc/clientinfo.html. For more information, contact clinic administrator Kathy Molique at moliquek1@nku.edu.

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The Northern Kentucky University Chase College of Law Small Business & Nonprofit Law Clinic student clinicians this year include, standing, from left, Cole Lanigan, Marvin Knorr, Kyle Johnson and Victoria Russell; seated from left, Joshua Schneider, Melissa Moser, professor Barbara Wagner; backs to camera or not pictured: Dominic Rossi, Matthew Bengel and Brian Whitney.PROVIDED

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Campbell community recorder 082913