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B ETHEL JOURNAL

Your Community Press newspaper serving Bethel, Chilo, Felicity, Franklin Township, Moscow, Neville, Tate Township, Washington Township

THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 2014

75¢ BECAUSE COMMUNITY MATTERS

Business jeopardized because of electric rates By Keith BieryGolick kbierygolick@communitypress.com

BETHEL — The Bethel IGA grocery store could be in danger of closing after Village Council passed legislation eliminating discounts on electric rates. Charlie Collins, the owner of IGA, told council that himself at a recent meetAusman ing. “I want to run a business in town here, but quite frankly this really makes it extremely (tough),” Collins said. “There’s nothing else I can really cut in terms of expenses. I can only charge the customer Hembree so much before they go somewhere else.” Collins calculated he will pay $29,841 more next year because of the rate changes. The system used to calculate electric rates is difficult to understand, but council member Lucy Sheperd summed it up in a way everyone could comprehend. “The more you used the cheaper it got,” she said. And IGA uses a lot of electricity. “Obviously I’m the biggest

consumer of electric in town,” Collins said. The store uses about 100,000 kilowatt-hours a month, split between single-phase service and three-phase service. Collins essentially paid a discount rate for nearly all of his electric services, as only the first 1,000 kwh were charged at the base rate. The base rate didn’t change in legislation counDotson cil passed, but the discounts went away and Collins will pay more for electricity next year. “It has the potential to put the store out of business. It’s certainly not right,” Collins said. “I got the feeling that there wasn’t much concern as to how it impacted my business.” Norm Bishop, a Bethel resident and owner of Bishop’s Hardware, echoed Collin’s statements about the grocery business. “That’s about the most cutthroat, competitive industry there is,” Bishop said. “I would hate for us not to have a grocery store in the village.” Council member Jeremiah Hembree said the discount rate was something the village couldn’t afford to continue. “The reality is we’ve been passing on a step rate to our businesses that we have not received from Duke (Energy)

Customers simultaneously enter and leave the Bethel IGA grocery store. At a recent village council meeting, the owner of Bethel IGA, Charlie Collins, told officials the proposed electric rates for next year would make it tough to stay open. Council passed the rates, which eliminate discounts for high usage, but later reconvened at a special meeting to lower them. The rates still eliminate previously offered discounts, which means Collins, based on his own calculations, will pay more than $17,000 next year in additional electric fees. KEITH BIERYGOLICK/THE COMMUNITY PRESS

ever,” Hembree said. “We have been passing on a discount that we don’t get.” Hembree also said Duke rates will increase substantially in 2015. “That is something we’ve been told very clearly,” he said. Mayor Alan Ausman said electric is “going to do nothing

but get more expensive.” Electric rates in the village have not increased since 2008, Ausman said. “In 2015, we’re all facing some pretty steep raises in our electric rates ... and that’s something we all have to get prepared for,” he said. “This will take away some of

the shock in 2015, going into 2016.” An audience member laughed at that justification. “As funny as it seems ... that’s the way its going to be. It’s going to be a steep increase come those years,” Ausman said. See ELECTRIC, Page A2

Grant to help students after graduation By Jeanne Houck jhouck@communitypress.com

BETHEL — The Bethel-Tate Local School District has received a state grant to better prepare students for life after graduation. The grant is designed to help students in Appalachian school districts succeed in technical schools, twoyear colleges Kircher and four-year colleges. Bethel-Tate won the award with the help of the Ohio Appalachian Collaborative Personalized Learning Network. Money for the grant will come from the Ohio Department of Education, which has appropriated a total of $15 million from its Straight A Fund to award 24 of the grants. Melissa Kircher, superintendent of the Bethel-Tate Local Schools, said the state soon

FOOD Rita’s red beans and rice is her take on the traditional New Year’s Hoppin’ John. Full story, B3

Bethel-Tate High School recently received a grant is designed to help students in Appalachian school districts succeed in technical schools, two-year colleges and four-year colleges.

will announce exactly how much money each of the grant winners will receive. She expects Bethel-Tate to be awarded between $500,000 and $700,000.

CAMPUS HEROES Catch up with local athletes now in college See Sports, A5

Grant winners plan to meet their goals by an unprecedented collaboration between school districts, higher-education institutions, educational service centers, communities

and regional economic groups, Kircher said. One benefit is that highschool students would be able to earn college credits by taking college-level classes in

See page A2 for additional information

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high school. That, in turn, would benefit local wallets, Kircher said. “I think it is a great grant for students to help themselves succeed in college and to give them an opportunity to earn college credits so when they go to college they’ve already earned college credits and their bill will be less,” Kircher said. Ways that the Bethel-Tate Local Schools would like to spend grant money, Kircher said, include: » Funding advanced college degrees for teachers so they can teach college-level courses. » Training teachers to better teach technology. » Setting up a learning lab in the high school where teachers can use the Internet to teach students who can sign on wherever they are.

The Bethel Journal 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170 Loveland, Ohio 45140

Published weekly every Thursday Periodicals postage paid at Bethel, OH 45106 ISSN 1066-7458 • USPS 053-040 Postmaster: Send address change to The Bethel Journal, 394 Wards Corner Road, Suite 170, Loveland, Ohio 45140 Annual subscription: Weekly Journal In-County $18.00; All other in-state and out-of-state $20.00

Vol. 114 No. 39 © 2014 The Community Press ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


NEWS

A2 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

Community Savings Bank appoints chairman BETHEL — James Smith has been named chairman of the board of the Community Savings Bank, succeeding Charles Frost. Smith has served on the bank board since 2006. Smith Along with his wife, Brenda, he is a longtime resident of the Bethel area. Smith was formerly superintendent of the Bethel-Tate Local School District from 1998 to

Index Calendar .................B2 Classifieds ................C Food ......................B3 Life ........................B1 Police .................... B6 Schools ..................A5 Sports ....................A6 Viewpoints .............A8

2011 when he retired. He has since served as interim superintendent of the Winton Woods City School District and has been recently named interim superintendent of the Hillsboro City School District. “I look forward to Community Savings Bank continuing to provide top-notch, cutting edge financial services to our community,” Smith said. “We have a real treasure in the Community Savings Bank. The point of our existence is to serve the financial needs of our community.” Smith begins his duties immediately.

Clermont Co. plans for wild animal escapes By Leah Fightmaster lfightmaster@communitypress.com

After the escape of more than 50 exotic animals from a farm in Zanesville, Broughton the state and all Ohio counties are creating a response plan in the case of a similar event. Clermont County commissioners created a committee to craft an emer-

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JOURNAL Find news and information from your community on the Web Bethel • cincinnati.com/bethel Felicity • cincinnati.com/felicity Franklin Township • cincinnati.com/franklintownship Moscow • cincinnati.com/moscow Neville • cincinnati.com/neville Tate Township • cincinnati.com/tatetownship

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2014

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gency response plan in case any dangerous wild animals escape or are intentionally released, said Pam Broughton, director of the Clermont County Emergency Management Agency. The state is requiring all counties to create a team, as part of the Ohio Revised Code, according to the resolution. The committee will draft the response plan, as well as take applications to be part of the Clermont County Dangerous Wild Animal Emergency Response Team. Broughton said the plan is mainly for first responders who would be on the scene to guide them in dealing with the situation. Creating the plan is part of the state’s response to the Zanesville escape in 2011, when Terry Thompson released more than 50 lions, tigers, bears, wolves and monkeys from his Zanesville

COMMITTEE MEMBERS Here’s who is on the planning committee for the Clermont County Dangerous Wild Animal Emergency Response Team: » Tony Adams — Vice President, The Clermont Sun Publishing Co. » Pam Broughton — Director, Clermont County Emergency Management Agency » Edwin Humphrey — President, Clermont County commissioners » Dan Mack — Assistant chief, Miami Township Fire and EMS » Jason Oyer — Disaster Operations Coordinator, American Red Cross » Rob Perry — Director, Environmental Health, Clermont County General Health District » Karl Schultz — Miami Township trustee, Clermont County Township Association » Tom Tenhunfeld — Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Gardens » James Young — Sergeant, Miami Township Police Department

farm. The Clermont County committee is made up of nine people from various organizations, including fire departments, the American Red Cross and the Cincinnati Zoo and Bo-

BRIEFLY Authorities bust pot distribution ring

mont County Sheriff A. J. “Tim” Rodenberg.

Seven people were arrested after Cincinnati police and the Clermont County Narcotic Unit say they broke up a major pot distribution ring Dec. 23. Authorities seized 316 pounds of marijuana, $25,000 in cash, 55 guns, 10 cars, a boat and computers when several homes were searched on Ohio Pike, Fulton Grove, Marilyn Drive and Elm Drive in Clermont County and on Beechmont Avenue in Cincinnati. The operation is the result of a six month joint investigation, said Cler-

Bethel Lions Club to meet Jan. 6

Electric

Zip Printing, voted against the legislation. “I own a business in town and I understand how hard it is to run a business,” Johnson said. “It’s hard, businesses are closing left and right.” The new legislation also affects residents, who were previously given discounts after their first 800 kwh of electricity. The average Bethel household uses 904 kwh, according to information

Continued from Page A1

Collins didn’t agree with the mayor’s premise. “I’d rather have the (money) in my bank account to fight or prepare for what’s coming then have it taken out of my bank account,” he said. Council voted 4 to 2 to eliminate the discount. Council member Priscilla Johnson, who owns

The Bethel Lions Club will meet at 6:30 on Monday Jan. 6 at the Grant Memorial Building at the corner of Main and Plane Streets in Bethel with a catered meal. Anyone interested in joining the Lions are welcome to visit.

Monroe Grange card party Jan. 4

The Monroe Grange will have their monthly card party at 7 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 4, at the Grange Hall at 2644 Ohio 222

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tanical Gardens. Broughton said the committee has to create a plan by Feb. 28, and then will need to be approved by the county commissioners.

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south of Ohio 125 in Nicholsville. The main game is Euchre but those who don’t play can play other games. The cost is $1.50. Between the fourth and fifth games refreshments are available. This is one way the Grange makes extra money to support their community service projects. The Monroe Grange donated staple food to the needy at Thanksgiving and made a donation to the Heifer Project International for a pen of chickens for the needy to hatch new chickens to eat and sell the eggs to help their income.

provided by Administrator Travis Dotson. That means an average bill will increase $1.57 a month and $18.84 a year. The rates take effect Feb. 1 because council did not pass the ordinance as an emergency measure. Following the meeting, Dotson and Fiscal Officer Bill Gilpin analyzed the rates of “big” electric users, Dotson said in an email. “Based on that, we are recommending an adjustment,” he said. The new legislation decreases the base rate for single and three-phase commercial services. The single-phase rate goes from 10.5 cents per kwh to 10 cents per kwh. The three-phase rate goes from 11 cents per kwh to 10 cents per kwh. Discounts for large consumption are still eliminated and residential base rates stayed the same at 10 cents per kwh. On average, Collins calculated he paid about 8.3 cents per kwh for single-phase service and 8.7 cents per kwh for threephase service this year. Based on the proposed rates, Collins will still pay more than $17,000 in additional electric fees in 2014. Council conducted a special meeting Dec. 18 to vote on the revised rates and they passed, Dotson said in an email.


NEWS

JANUARY 2, 2014 • BETHEL JOURNAL • A3

Second book details gluten-free recipes

Seasons Greetings from Adams County Cancer Center

Delhi Township author cooks for Cincinnati archbishop

Prakash B. Patel, MD THE LEADER IN CANCER CARE Introducing the Elektra Hexapod Evo RT System

By Kamellia Soenjoto Smith kynews@nky.com

Do you eat gluten-free meals? “It turns out it’s a really healthy way of living,” says Delhi Township Giovanna Delli Carpini Trimpe, author of the recipe book “Holy Chow Gluten Free.” What’s the key? “Fresh products,” she explains, not processed. “And there are a lot of products that say gluten-free already.” Trimpe’s new book showcases a collection of her gluten-free recipes, as well as a few from family and friends. “This is regular, everyday food,” she points out. The chef for the St. Peter in Chains Cathedral downtown Cincinnati began working on the recipes nearly five years ago when she was asked to cook for Cincinnati Archbishop Dennis M. Schnurr. “They gave me this folder, like four or five pages, of what he could have and couldn’t have,” she recalls. “And I was stressed out.” She started reading and learned about the allergy the archbishop suffers from, called celiac disease. She revamped

Giovanna Delli Carpini Trimpe holds her new book, a collection of her gluten-free recipes. KAMELLIA SMITH/FOR THE COMMUNITY RECORDER

her back to Italy so she would know her ancestors. They lived with her grandmother for three years in a small town, Gallo Matese. “It was so rustic,” she says, describing her grandmother’s home. And there was something missing. “I asked, ‘Where’s the stove?’ She said, ‘We don’t have one.’ “They had a woodburning oven,” she explains, made of brick and built into the wall. Cooking was an all-day chore. “By the time you finished breakfast, it was time for lunch, and then dinner.” But she had no complaints. “Oh, I loved it!” “You can take just about any recipe,” Trimpe writes, “and turn it into a gluten-free recipe without your family and friends ever knowing the difference.”

her recipes, then surprised him. “One night I made spaghetti and meatballs,” she says. “He looked at me and said, ‘I can’t have that.’ I said, ‘Yes you can.’” How did she do it? “There’s really good gluten-free pasta out there,” she explains. “I got gluten-free bread and turned it into breadcrumbs, and then used it in the meatballs. “He couldn’t believe that he was eating the entire plate.” Schnurr repaid her with a testimonial in her book. “Giovanna has served our guests with delicious meals while at the same time being ‘safe’ for me,” he wrote. Trimpe was born in Venezuela to Italian parents. When she was 8 years old her mother took

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SCHOOLS

A4 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

Editor: Eric Spangler, espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251

ACHIEVEMENTS | NEWS | ACTIVITIES | HONORS

BETHEL

JOURNAL CommunityPress.com

Drivers prepare for the start of the Ohio Valley Voices 500.CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

The green flag waves as karts race at the start of the Ohio Valley Voices 500 Friday, Oct. 4. CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

Laurence Jones, Ashley Schmitz, Kevin Weckesser and Steve Petrosky made up one of the race teams.CHUCK

Karts line up for the third annual OVV 500 race to benefit the Ohio Valley Voices.CHUCK

GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

B.J. Zacharias in the drivers seat with wife, Stephanie, with teammates Fred Zacharias and Dennis Okin pose before the race.CHUCK GIBSON/FOR THE COMMUNITY PRESS

October motor race raised $10K for OVV By Chuck Gibson

clermont@communitypress.com

T

he roar of racing engines was heard during the third annual Ohio Valley Voices OVV-500 in October at Motorsports Country Club of Cincinnati. Eight teams of four drivers competed in European style karts on the professionally designed track in Batavia, Ohio. The Kart Enduro invitational race is a benefit event for Ohio Valley Voices. Maria Sentelik is the executive director of the Miami Township program that provides early intervention to teach profoundly hearing impaired infants and children to listen and talk. “The OVV 500 is such a unique event,” Sentelik said. “It’s an opportunity for a bunch of people to get in cars and race

“It’s fun to watch them. As the day goes on, they start getting the hang of what this means." MARIA SENTELIK

Ohio Valley Voices executive director

around. It’s an exciting opportunity for people who are connected in some way to Ohio Valley Voices to really let some steam out.” Even people who know nothing about racing get in the cars. Sentelik sat it out this year, but has put on the helmet and gloves, slid behind the wheel, and took the turns around the track in previous years. She admitted it

was a little scary for her. It is an all-day event. A professional driver is on hand to help, and the participants all took some “warm-up” laps. “It’s fun to watch them,” Sentelik said. “As the day goes on, they start getting the hang of what this means. Eventually you see them getting better and really competitive. By the end of the day, they’re stoked. ‘I’m a race car driver.’ It’s a fun event.” More than just a fun event, the OVV 500 netted over $10,000 for the program this year. The daylong event included an auction which raised about $500 of that sum. “Team Trista,” named after OVV student Trista DeBruler, was the winning team. Her father, Scott DeBruler, and the father of another student, both took the wheel as part of the winning team of four drivers. Ashley Schmitz was also a

driver for one of the teams in the race. Her two-year old son attends OVV. Tate Schmitz was born with moderate to severe hearing loss in both ears “He’s been there since he was 18-months-old,” Schmitz said. “When he started, he wasn’t talking at all. Now he’d talking up a storm. He’s really feisty; he’s saying all kinds of stuff they teach him. He’s doing really, really well.” Ohio Valley Voices has been instrumental in supporting legislation for hospitals to test the hearing of newborn babies at birth. Schmitz says they knew there was a problem the day Tate was born because of this testing. As a result, they had his full diagnosis by the time he was three weeks old. He had his first set of hearing aids by the time he was 10-weeks-old. They call him “Tater Bear” and drive 45 minutes

from their home in Springboro, Ohio to bring him to OVV and back. “It’s quite a drive,” Schmitz said. “When we did the tour, we were really amazed with what the kids were doing. We wondered how it would affect Tate. Looking at where he was versus where he is now, we always tell people the program is amazing.” Fred Zacharias is already connected as a member of the OVV board of directors, chairman for the race event, and a driver on one of the teams. He hoped the event would help raise money for the school, but he has even higher hopes beyond that. “One of the other things is to get new people to come out and bring them along to get involved with OVV,” he said. “That’s how we got involved. Somebody brought us to an event and we sort of jumped into it.”


SPORTS

JANUARY 2, 2014 • BETHEL JOURNAL • A5

Editor: Melanie Laughman, mlaughman@communitypress.com, 513-248-7573

HIGH SCHOOL | YOUTH | RECREATIONAL

BETHEL

JOURNAL CommunityPress.com

CATCHING UP WITH COLLEGE ATHLETES The Bethel Journal asked college athletes’ family and friends to submit information so our readers can get caught up on their activities. Here are the Clermont County offerings:

Kayla Byrnside

» Kayla Byrnside is No. 3 on Marshall University’s women’s soccer team and is the daughter of Allen and Susan Byrnside. She attended Milford High School. Kayla played significant minutes in 18 games as a freshman for the Thundering Herd this fall helping her team to a historic 10-7-3 record overall and firstever win in the Conference USA Tournament, played in Houston. Kayla scored her first collegiate goal in her first game in a 3-0 victory against Campbell University and her first assist in her second game against Kent State. She plays midfield for Marshall and finished the season with eight shots total and five on goal. She is majoring in elementary education. Capital freshman Taylor Atkins of Bethel-Tate made the women’s soccer team as a walk-on and competed in the Division III semifinals in San Antonio recently. THANKS TO TINA ATKINS

Capital gains a soccer player in Taylor Atkins By Scott Springer

sspringer@communitypress.com

BETHEL — Taylor Atkins left Bethel-Tate High School with the intention of running and jumping on Capital University’s track team in Columbus. However, before she put her track shoes on, and right in the heart of the season for mosquitoes and bees, the soccer “bug” bit. A four-year player at BethelTate, Atkins had chatted some with the Capital coach Chris Kouns. She was offered nothing more than a tryout. That experience eventually turned into a long bus ride and more travels. “I went to two of their practices and he let me on the team,” Atkins said. “I tried out on a Wednesday and a Thursday. On Friday, we went to Pennsylvania.” Playing striker for the Crusaders, she didn’t score, but did have several assists. Though she was a highlydecorated high school athlete, the return to shin guards and cleats in college was not expected. “Definitely not,” Atkins said. “There were like 34 girls on our team. I didn’t expect that to happen at all. Especially as a freshman.” The story doesn’t end there. The Capital Crusaders finished the season at 19-5-2 and made the school’s first ever trip to the Division III “final four” in San Antonio. To get there, they defeated three teams ranked in the top 16 in the nation, including No. 1 Washington (Missouri) and nearby Thomas More. “It was great,” she said of the

experience. “We went to the Alamo, but we really were just practicing at the field.” The ride ended with a 1-0 loss to eventual national champion William Smith (New York). Capital finished the season ranked in the top 10 in the nation by the National Soccer Coaches Association of American and D3soccer.com. “There were polls all season long that said we would never make it that far,” Atkins said. “We were the only unranked team in the nation that made it that far. We had never been past the second round before.” Atkins will play the next three years of soccer, but has little down time as she has already started indoor track. Indoors and outdoors, she will high jump, long jump, triple jump and run some sprints. “Our indoor facility is really nice,” Atkins said. “I love it up there. It’s great.” As this is published, Atkins will be preparing to return to the Columbus suburb of Bexley where she triple jumps and triple majors in criminology, psychology and sociology. As if she wasn’t busy enough, she misses being on the basketball court this time of year. At Bethel-Tate, she was a key player for girls coach Dave Fallis. She is still represented on the court by her freshman cousin, Haylee Foster, who took over her No. 24. Atkins has already competed in Capital’s Purple and White Invite indoor track meet at the Capital Center. Her next appearance is Jan. 11 in the Capital Challenge.

Amanda Darling

» Amanda Darling, a Milford High School graduate, just completed her freshmen season with the Union College Bulldogs women’s soccer team where she appeared in 14 games, starting five. She only scored one goal on the season, but it was a memorable one. With the scored tied at one, Darling found the back of the net in the 82nd minute to lift her team to a 2-1victory over Appalachian Athletic Conference foe Point (Ga.) University. Her team is hoping to train in Brazil this summer with head coach Camila Mendes. The nursing major graduated Milford with a 4.022 grade point average earning her both athletic and academic scholarships to Union. Darling is the daughter of Judy and Jerry Darling, and the sister of Rachel Darling.

Kayla Ernst

» Kayla Ernst, a graduate of Batavia High School, is currently in her first year at the Ohio State University law school after playing basketball for Kenyon College. In addition to her Kenyon College NCAC all-decade selection, she was named a Capital One Academic All-American, NCAC Player of the Year and second team All-Great Lakes region. She holds the Kenyon single season record for points scored (550) and ranks third in school history for points scored (1,520).

Alex Fultz

» Glen Este’s Alex Fultz is a sophomore on Wittenberg’s varsity basketball team. The business major has a 3.0 GPA and is the son of Tami Fultz and the late Steve Fultz. In 2012-12 he played in all 27 games and started 19, leading the Alex Fultz team in threepoint shooting with a .413 percentage. He averaged 5.3 points and 3.3 rebounds, fourth on the team. He hit five three-pointers against Allegheny last Feb. 2. This season, Alex has been starting and had 14

With the scored tied at one, Darling found the back of the net in the 82nd minute to lift her team to a 2-1 victory over Appalachian Athletic Conference foe Point (Ga.) University. THANKS TO JUDY DARLING

points in the first half of the Wittenberg/Capital rivalry game.

Kristina Fultz

» Glen Este’s Kristina Fultz is a sophomore at Wittenberg University on the women’s varsity volleyball team, which recently won the 2013 NCAC Championship. She is an outside hitter and defensive specialist. The communications major carries a 3.6 GPA. She is the daughter of Tami Fultz and the late Steve Fultz.

Danielle Lang

» Danielle Lang of Amelia is a freshman goalkeeper for the Georgetown College women’s soccer team. Danielle started 16 out of 17 games this year. She was injured in the first tournament game and unable to play the last tournament game. Her record was 7-6-1 with 19 goals against, a goals Lang against average of 1.34, 73 saves, a save percentage of .793, and 6.5 shutouts. During the season, she was honored as Defensive Player of the Week in the Mid-South Conference. Danielle is a 2013 graduate of Amelia High School and is the daughter of Jack and Lori Lang of Amelia.

Heidi McManus

» Heidi McManus, a graduate of Williamsburg High School, is a sophomore for the College of Mount Saint Joseph women’s basketball team. She was the MVP for her team at the MSJ Tip Off Tournament last year and MVP for the Marietta College Turkey Shoot this season. She played in all 25 games last season for the Lions, starting 24 times. She finished fifth in the conference for steals, and was the second leading scorer for her team. Heidi is the daughter of Beth and Jon McManus.

Michelle Thomas

» Glen Este graduate Michelle Thomas is a junior at Ohio State majoring in education. She is the daughter of Michael and Sharon Thomas and runs cross country and track for the Buckeyes. In cross country, she took fourth place at the Big Ten Conference Championship, was a 2013 First Team All-Big Ten se-

lection (First Buckeye to make first team since 1986), and won the 2013 Big Ten Sportsmanship Award. In addition, she was a 2013 NCAA All-Great Lakes regional selection and a member of school outdoor record-holding DMR squad (11.34.28). In track, she took first in the 3000 meter at the Armory Collegiate Invitational (PR of 9:40.0). She also was a 2013 USTFCCCA All-Academic selection, Big Ten Distinguished Scholar, Academic All-Big Ten selection and a 2013 Ohio State Scholar Athlete.

Jennifer Trame

» Jennifer Trame, a Milford High School graduate, finished in a tie for fifth place in the Heartland Collegiate Athletic Conference golf tournament, earning her all conference honors as a senior. Trame broke three school records for the College of Mount St. Joseph at the tournament in Seymour, Ind. Her opening day 82 was the lowest round for a Mount player in HCAC tournament history. Her fifth-place finish was also a record for HCAC Championship play. The former Eagle owns the second lowest scoring average in Mount history (90.05) and holds three of the four lowest single-season scoring averages in school history. Her 86.36 average this past season ranks second all time. She is the daughter of Gary and Billie Trame of Milford.

Amy Van Syoc

» Amy Van Syoc, a 2008 Milford High School graduate, is in the midst of her senior season with the University of Louisville rowing team. Van Syoc has captained the Cards rowers for three seasons now and is coming off a junior season where she was named Collegiate Rowing Coaches Association National Scholar-Athlete and chosen as the team’s Cardinal Pride Award winner by her teammates. She earned first-place finishes against Duke, Dayton, Alabama, Kansas and Georgetown in the varsity eight boat, to go with a third-place finish at the BIG EAST Championships. In the only meet during the fall season, her varsity eight boat finished second in the Rivanna Romp hosted by the University of Virginia. She is the daughter of Gary and Cindy Van Syoc.

Becca Walton

» The 2010 Mother of Mercy graduate recently wrapped up her volleyball career at the UC Clermont. The Cougars were awarded a bid to the U.S. Collegiate Athletic Association national tournament all four years of her career. The Cougars went 23-8 this past season, winning the Ohio ColWalton legiate Athletic Conference regular season title and conference tournament title. Walton was selected as a USCAA First Team All-American for the 2013 season. Becca is the daughter of Steve and Cheryl Walton of Cleves.

PRESS PREPS HIGHLIGHTS By Scott Springer and Mark Motz sspringer@communitypress.com mmotz@communitypress.com

Girls basketball

» Felicity-Franklin beat Williamsburg 56-30 on Dec. 19. Sophomore Brittany Drake led

the Lady Cardinals with 12 points. » McNicholas beat Purcell Marian 48-30 Dec. 21 behind Hannah Taylor’s 21points and12 rebounds. The Rockets improved to 6-3 with the win. They played Mason Dec. 28.

Boys basketball

» Bethel-Tate lost to Amelia 73-29 on Dec. 20. Junior Adam Shinkle topped the Tigers with 11 points. » Felicity-Franklin lost to Williamsburg 75-47 on Dec. 20. Junior Jordan Utter had 17 points in the loss. » McNicholas High School dropped to 3-1 on the season

with a 50-49 loss on the road at Purcell Marian Dec. 20. Danny Byrne had 15 points to lead the Rockets, who competed in the Ripley Invitational Dec. 27 and 28.

Wrestling

» Bethel-Tate junior Aric Peters made it to the semifinals at

120 pounds at the Glenn Sample Holiday Classic Dec. 21-22.

Boys bowling

» McNicholas lost 2,3532,154 against Middletown Fenwick Dec. 18 to even its record at 2-2. The Rockets roll again Dec. 7 against Kettering Alter.


VIEWPOINTS

A6 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

BETHEL

JOURNAL

Editor: Eric Spangler, espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251

EDITORIALS | LETTERS | COLUMNS | CH@TROOM

CommunityPress.com

William Howard sympathized with the South January 30, 1861: U.S. Rep. William Howard of Batavia rose to address his colleagues about the impending crisis. Howard was a 43-year-old conservative Democrat who served two terms as Clermont County’s prosecuting attorney and one term in the Ohio Senate before being elected to Congress. The situation was dire. South Carolina, claimed “the increasing hostility on the part of the non-slave holding states to the institution of slavery” especially their failure to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act was responsible for the Constitutional crisis. The secessionists, believing that the North wouldn’t stop until it abolished slavery throughout the country, said it was left with no other choice.

South Carolina left the Union on Dec. 24, 1860. Within a month five other states Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Gary and Louisiana Knepp COMMUNITY PRESS followed South Carolina out of GUEST COLUMNIST the Union. Howard sympathized with the South. He agreed that the North failed to enforce the Fugitive Slave Act. The North agitated the South by sending “forth their emissaries to stir up the unsuspecting slave to insurrection to murder, rape, arson.” In short, he blamed the North for the situation: “the Northern states were the ag-

The tree crisis: Reviving a battlefield

The drive along Interstate 275 is the scene of a battlefield. Thousands of giant soldiers are in a battle to save their lives. Unfortunately, the enemies are winning. With too many forces working against them, the soldiers don’t stand a chance. They need replacements. The drive, that once provided an awesome view of expansive greenery, is now a scene of barren and broken limbs and masses of dead or dying trees. Throughout the Tristate region, thousands of trees are caught in a battle against disease, insect infestations and invasive species. The emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle which bores into trees and disrupts the flow of nutrients, is now attacking the nine species of native ash throughout the region. In total, more than 20 million trees will inevitably be lost to the emerald ash borer in the Tristate region within the next 10 years. Other insects are also threatening the tree canopy. In Clermont County, the Asian longhorned beetle is responsible for the loss of 9,000 trees. Although this beetle is expected to be contained and eradicated, it has caused significant damage, and its potential to return requires continued vigilance. Another new threat is the walnut twig beetle, which carries a fungus fatal to black walnut trees. Insect infestations are not the only threats to the region’s trees. Disease and other invasive species also endanger local forests. With the increase of invasive plants like honeysuckle and the flowering pear, forests can’t regenerate and open areas can’t re-forest as they have in the past. The tree seedlings that do survive often fall victim to deer, whose growing population consume young plants before they have a chance to mature. With all these factors working against them, trees and forests are struggling What can be done to keep the trees we have and replace the ones that are lost? The Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, the Green Partnership for Greater Cincinnati and the Green Umbrella have joined

forces to create Taking Root, a broadbased campaign to address the current and historic loss of Tia Garcia the region’s COMMUNITY PRESS tree canopy. GUEST COLUMNIST Through education and improved management, the campaign hopes to better maintain existing trees and also to plant 2 million trees by 2020 (one for everyone in the region). This is not the first time the region’s trees have been victims of a battle. In the late 1800s, much of the region had been de-forested. It was during this time when Cincinnati became a prominent leader in the movement to conserve the nation’s forestry. In 1875, Cincinnati natives formed the American Forestry Association. Seven years later, the First Annual Forestry Congress was held in Cincinnati. It called for “the discussion of subjects relating to tree planting: the conservation, management, and renewal of forests.” Two days later, the superintendent of Cincinnati schools, John B. Peaslee, closed all schools and every Cincinnati child went to an abandoned vineyard and planted trees. That vineyard is now Eden Park. In order to overcome the loss of the region’s tree canopy, the community must once again come together. Trees cannot fight this battle on their own, and their loss would result in devastating environmental and economic consequences. Taking Root is leading the battle to save the region’s trees through a collaborative effort in which communities will be provided opportunities to join the fight and help ensure that trees come out the winner. For more information on the battle and how you can help, go to www.takingroot.info. Tia Garcia is the communication intern for the Ohio-Kentucky-Indiana Regional Council of Governments. She is in her fourth year at the University of Cincinnati studying both journalism and communication and will be graduating in the spring of 2014.

BETHEL

JOURNAL

A publication of

gressors; and if they really…desire the preservation of the Union, let them first correct the errors at home.” Though provoked, the South couldn’t leave the Union because “This Union, under our Constitution, was intended to be perpetual.” Representative Howard praised the efforts of President James Buchanan to save the Union. “What American citizen,” Howard asked, “does not feel a glow of pride thrill his very soul to see the present Executive…enforcing the national laws, elevating our flag, and showing a determination at all hazards to preserve and perpetuate our national honor?” What of the future? Would it be war or peace? That, he said, was entirely “within the hands

of the Republican Party.” If the president-elect insisted on restraining slavery’s expansion, then it was likely that the nation would hear the “tramp and tread of hostile armies.” Howard urged compromise by supporting the so called Crittenden proposals which would have preserved both slavery and the Union. Howard’s Southern sympathies may sound strange to modern ears, but they were well within the mainstream of Democrat party thoughts about slavery. The party’s platform reaffirmed its support for slavery. The Democrats upheld the rights of the states to regulate slavery, urged support for the Fugitive Slave Act, and blamed the abolitionists for agitating against slavery, predicting

those efforts will “endanger the stability and permancy of the Union.” They pledged to do what they could to preserve the institution. Events overtook the compromisers. Howard, like many Democrats, went to war to preserve the Union, not to free the slaves. Howard joined up with the 59th Ohio Volunteer Infantry at Camp Ammen in Ripley. The 59th was a hard-fighting unit, seeing heavy action at Shiloh, Perryville and Stone River. Howard left the service with a medical discharge with a rank of Lieutenant Colonel. He returned to Batavia to continue his law practice. Gary Knepp is a resident of Milford.

Feeling blessed to be a health care worker

I feel compelled to tell this story, as I believe it defines why I feel so blessed to work in a skilled nursing facility, caring for our residents. We assist patients during their recovery, and I often get caught up in the day-to-day activities and do not think about the profound impact we have on those with whom we work. Less than one year ago, I had an opportunity to do something for Scott Hartman, a resident at Eastgatespring, who was suffering from end stage renal disease. Scott’s last wish before signing up for Hospice was to attend the Reds Opening Day game. I contacted the Cincinnati Reds, telling them about Scott, and I was able to buy two tickets in handicap accessible seating, even though tickets for Opening Day are very difficult to secure. A transportation company donated their services to and from the game, so we held a care conference with Scott’s mother and told her that we were going to make Scott’s dream come true. I have never been an extremely emotional individual, but it was very difficult to not shed a tear as we presented the Reds tickets, a ball cap and jersey to Scott. He was in tears as he thanked our team over and over again, leaving few dry eyes in the room. Now, all

that we needed to do was make plans for the day and the game. About a week before the game, Mark Zielinski Scott became COMMUNITY PRESS ill and was hospitalized. GUEST COLUMNIST We wondered if he would return in time for the game and if he would he be well enough to go to the game. A few prayers were sent and Scott was discharged from the hospital the day before the game. When Scott returned, as anticipated, he stated that he would not be missing this game. Opening Day went off without a hitch. Scott and I were there to watch the Opening Day parade. It was a little difficult to find a viewing place, but thanks to the great people in Cincinnati, a group moved their seats along the street so that Scott could have a good view in his wheelchair. We headed to the game and had some standard ballpark food, on a chilly, but sunny day. As the lineups were announced and the national anthem was sung, the tears began to well up in Scott’s eyes. Again, I found myself becoming quite emotional as well. Scott made it through the ending of an

extra inning game, and the day was perfect! I reminisced about Scott’s story when I learned he passed away at the hospital in November. Scott knew he would never witness another Opening Day and we were able to do something incredibly special for him. That cold April day will always be a part of me, and I am fortunate that I was given the opportunity to spend it with Scott. We are able to impact the lives of those with whom we encounter on a daily basis. Sometimes it is as small as a pat on the shoulder to a patient who is not feeling well. Other times it is a simple conversation about our lives, but each and every interaction we have is special. We are blessed to be health care workers and have answered a call over and over to help those in need. There are many changes and challenges that we will face, but the constant will always be our care and desire to help others. Mark Zielinski is a resident of Milford. Eastgatespring is a transitional care center located at 4400 Glen Este-Withamsville Road. (near the corner of Glen Este-Withamsville Road and Route 32, just one mile east of Jungle Jim’s.) For more information, contact Mark Zielinski at 513-752-3710.

CHATROOM Last week’s question Should the U.S. adopt an advisory panel’s recommendations to end the government’s systematic collection of logs of all Americans’ cellular phone calls and require those to be kept in private hands “for queries and data mining” only by court order? Why or why not?

“The recent U.S. District Court opinion was on the money. Eroding our private lives is unacceptable. This started when 9/ 11caught most of us by surprise. Many documents have shown that the present wholesale spying on citizens would not have prevented that tragedy.

NEXT QUESTION Should Ohio allow online voter registration, which would allow for an immediate cross check of license records and help prevent illegal voting? Why or why not? Every week we ask readers a question they can reply to via e-mail. Send your answers to espangler@communitypress.com with Chatroom in the subject line.

“Secret courts whiteout public information is a danger to the Constitution. One should read that document to understand the many ways that government agencies are twisting it.”

394 Wards Corner Road Loveland, Ohio 45140 phone: 248-8600 email: clermont@communitypress.com web site: www.communitypress.com

W.B.

“Yes, the U.S. should probably adopt the recommendation, but the president has said there will be a decision made about much of this in January. In the post-911 world many parts of our freedom of speech have been curtailed. The real question is how much freedom are we willing to sacrifice in order to feel safer from terrorism occurring on our soil? And if you have a problem with that sacrifice of freedom, don't use a cell phone.”

Bethel Journal Editor Eric Spangler espangler@communitypress.com, 576-8251 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday See page A2 for additional contact information.

TRog


BETHEL

JOURNAL THURSDAY, JANUARY 2, 2014

LIFE

PEOPLE | IDEAS | RECIPES

Retro Fittings draws record crowd

Cincy Style Edit's Brock Maitland and Marsha Ashley of Hyde Park hang out at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

St. Vincent de Paul District Council President Andrew Curran and Liz Curran of Anderson get ready for the festivities at RetroFittings THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Jen Dalton and Artrell Hawkins emcee at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

David Hammerstrom of Fort Thomas, Advisory Board Member and RetroFittings Committee Member Tamie Sullivan of Loveland and Charitable Pharmacy Board Member Bob Saelinger of Mariemont enjoy the evening at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

RetroFittings emcee Artrell Hawkins models during the fashion show. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Aaron Kinebrew of Avondale, Committee Member Meg Tarvin and Paul Tarvin of Anderson mingle at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

The RetroFittings Committee for this year's event are, in back, from left, Kathleen Stenger of Newport, Carmen Sanders of Springdale, Hengameh Nassef of Indian Hill, Meg Tarvin of Anderson, Peggy Mossbarger of Hyde Park and Jeanne Howe of Hyde Park; in second row, Lori Stenger of Cleves, Dianne Brown of Hyde Park, Tina Hawking of Mt. Lookout, Jayne Watkins of Fairfield, Tammy Snyder of Franklin Township; and in front, Taren Kinebrew of Avondale, the committee chairwoman. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

S

Creative Director Joe Rigotti of Over the Rhine and St. Vincent de Paul Director of Development Karen Williams of Springdale chat at RetroFittings. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

t. Vincent de Paul’s recent 11th annual RetroFittings event was attended by a record-breaking 800 guests. The event was moved to Music Hall this year because of repeat sell-out crowds. The new Creative Director, Joe Rigotti, used the new venue, Music Hall, as inspiration for this year’s theme, “A Night at the Opera.” The event showcased the fashion designs of more than 55 students from the University of Cincinnati's College of Design, Architecture, Art and Planning.

RetroFittings committee members Mary Casella and Peggy Mossbarger attend the event. THANKS TO ELYSA HAMLIN

Each student was given a $10 voucher to shop at one of St. Vincent de Paul’s seven Thrift Stores to redesign and create an ensemble inspired by one of eight famous operas. Each design was modeled in a New York style fashion show by UC students and other special guests including event emcee Artrell Hawkins, Cincinnati Bengal Adam Jones and owners of Cincy Style Edit, Marsha Ashley and Brock Maitland. The event also featured a boutique filled with vintage and

trendy items donated to St. Vincent de Paul’s thrift stores, cocktails and h'ors d'oeuvres, raffle prizes, and a live auction with items such as a one-of-akind jewelry piece designed by Krombholz jewelers. Proceeds from the event will benefit St. Vincent de Paul's efforts to bring hope to the front line of poverty, with more than 900 parish volunteers visiting the homes of neighbors in need to provide innovative, practical emergency assistance throughout Greater Cincinnati.


B2 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

THINGS TO DO IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD THURSDAY, JAN. 2

Childcare provided with registration. Ages 18 and up. 8313770. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road, Variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activity for daily living skills. Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers Flex, 12:30-1:15 p.m., Summerside Woods, 5484 Summerside Road, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Summerside. SilverSneakers, 1:30-2:15 p.m., O’Bannon Terrace, 6716 Ohio 132, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Goshen. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, 2010 Wolfangel Road, Burn calories, sculpt your body and have a blast. $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Health / Wellness Mercy Health Mobile Mammography Unit, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Kroger Mulberry, 1093 Ohio 28, Fifteen-minute screenings. Cost varies per insurance plan. Financial assistance available for qualified applicants. Appointment required. 6863300; www.e-mercy.com. Mulberry.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Share cup of coffee or tea while counting birds. Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 3 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, 1596 Ohio 131, Fish sandwiches, chicken fingers or six-piece shrimp dinner. Includes coleslaw and French fries. Carryout available. $6-$6.50. Presented by Ladies Auxiliary Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers Yoga Stretch, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, 4350 Aicholtz Road, Complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Restorative breathing exercises and final relaxation promote stress reduction and mental clarity. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Union Township. Chair/Mat Yoga, 9-10:10 a.m., Yoga with Sharon Studio 1, 267 Mount Holly Road, Gentle yoga begins in chair and ends on mat. Focus on strength, flexibility, pain management and relaxation. $6 drop-in or $50 for 10 classes. Presented by Sharon Strickland. 237-4574. Amelia. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 4 Drink Tastings A Tasting With Chip Emmerich of Burnet Ridge Winery, 1-3 p.m., Jungle Jim’s International Market Eastgate, 4450 Eastgate South Drive, Cooking School. Chip show new releases, plus lots of surprises from his barrel samples. Ages 21 and up. $20. Registration required. Presented by Jungle Jim’s International Market. 674-6000. Union Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Make and Take Bird Houses, 9:30-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Outdoor Learning Center. Wood stove keeps

Build and decorate your own bird house in the Outdoor Learning Center at Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, from 9:30-11 a.m. Saturday, Jan. 4. The cost is $14, $9 for children, or $6 for Cincinnati Nature Center members. Registration is required. Call 831-1711.FILE PHOTO you warm as you make and decorate your own bird house. $14, $9 children; $6 all members. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

Pets Puppy Social, Noon-1 p.m., All Creatures Animal Hospital, 1894 Ohio Pike, Puppies socialize with other pups under supervision of professional trainers at indoor facility. Free. 797-7397; www.allcreatures.com. Amelia. Clermont Pets Alive Pet Adoptions, 1-5 p.m., Petco, 1087 Ohio 28, Cats and dogs available for adoption. Presented by Clermont Pets Alive. 279-2276; www.clermontpetsalive.org. Milford.

SUNDAY, JAN. 5 Exercise Classes

7 p.m. $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Music - Cabaret Sinatra Night, 5:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., Tong’s Thai Restaurant, 1117 Main St., With Matt Snow, “The Cincinnati Sinatra.” Doors open 4:30 p.m. Free. 248-2999. Milford.

TUESDAY, JAN. 7 Dance Classes Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, 450 Victor Stier Drive, No prior dance experience necessary. Wear casual dress and smooth-soled shoes. Class registration closes after third week. $5, first class is free. 929-2427; frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, 4240 Mount Carmel Tabasco Road, Non-contact workout including cardio and strength training in energizing environment, using kicks, jabs, hooks and uppercuts to improve overall agility and power. $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

SilverSneakers, 11-11:45 a.m., O’Bannon Terrace, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Goshen.

Nature

Farmers Market

Winter Walk, 3 p.m., Woodland Mound, 8250 Old Kellogg Road, Seasongood Nature Center. Walk along the trail to enjoy the sights and sounds of winter. Free, vehicle permit required. 5217275; www.greatparks.org. Anderson Township. Hot Cocoa Social, 1-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Free hot cocoa, conversation and play. Bring your own mug. For ages 12 and under with adult. Members free; nonmembers pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township. Thru-Hiking the Buckeye Trail, 2-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Learn about globe-trotting experiences of fellow nature lovers. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 932 O’Bannonville Road, Presented by Loveland Farmers’ Market. 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

MONDAY, JAN. 6 Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, 135 N. Union St., Zumba fitness and Zumba Gold classes. $5. Presented by Kimberley “KC” Coniglio. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. SilverSneakers, 9:15 a.m.-10 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers, 10:30 a.m.-11:15 a.m., Crossings of Amelia, 58 Amelia Olive Branch Road, Move to music through variety of exercises designed to increase muscular strength, range of movement and activities for daily living. For seniors. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-6783. Amelia. SilverSneakers Flex, 2:15-3 p.m., Bethel Woods Elderly Complex, 610 Easter Road, Move your whole body through complete series of seated and standing yoga poses. Chair support offered to safely perform variety of seated and standing postures designed to increase flexibility, balance and range of movement. Call for pricing. Presented by SilverSneakers Flex. 478-783. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, 4183 Mount Carmel Tobasco Road, Choose from Beginners Power Yoga Class at 6 p.m. or Candlelight Relaxation and restorative slow flow class at

Exercise Classes

Nature Herpetology Program, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, PowerPoint programs on reptiles and amphibians. Ages 18 and up. Free. Presented by Greater Cincinnati Herpetological Society. 831-1711. Union Township.

Dance Classes

Astronomy Club, 7-9 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, With naturalist Sheila Riley. For ages 12 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township. Camera Club, 7-8:30 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Amateur and professional photographers learn and share knowledge. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.

Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, $5, first class is free. 929-2427; http:// frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

THURSDAY, JAN. 9 Exercise Classes SilverSneakers, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 947-7344. Union Township. SilverSneakers Flex, 12:30-1:15 p.m., Summerside Woods, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Summerside. SilverSneakers, 1:30-2:15 p.m., O’Bannon Terrace, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Goshen. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 10 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes SilverSneakers Yoga Stretch, 9-9:45 a.m., Union Township Civic Center, Call for pricing. 478-6783. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 11 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature

Caregiver Support Group, 7-8:30 p.m., St. Andrew Church, 552 Main St., Undercroft. To support caregivers of elderly or disabled parents (relatives). Ages 18 and up. Free. Registration required. 929-4483. Milford.

Ohio Young Birder’s Club, 9 a.m.-noon, Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Youth-led group interested in hiking and watching birds. Hosted by CNC volunteer Brian Herriott. $10 online pre-registration required to join club. 831-1711, ext. 125; www.cincynature.org. Union Township. Bird Walk, 8 a.m.-10 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Spend morning looking for birds. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 8 Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, 1646 Ohio 28, Basic handwork techniques and fresh ideas in knitting, crochet and other handicrafts along with short devotional time. Free. 575-1874. Milford.

SUNDAY, JAN. 12

Dining Events

Exercise Classes

WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, 541 Main St., Part of Wednesdays Are Very Extraordinary event. No church service attached, no reservations needed. All welcome. Familyfriendly meals. Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Mom’s Clubs Mothers of Preschoolers, 9:30-11:30 a.m., Faith Church, 5910 Price Road, Share homemade food while listening to speaker or learning new craft.

TUESDAY, JAN. 14

Nature

Support Groups

Art & Craft Classes

Township.

Nature Arches, Canyons and Ruins of Utah and Northern Arizona, 2-3 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Learn about globe-trotting experiences of fellow nature lovers such as yourself. Ages 18 and up. Members free; non-members pay daily admission. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 13 Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson

Farmers Market Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 15 Art & Craft Classes Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, Free. 575-1874. Milford.

a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

SUNDAY, JAN. 19

Cardio Kick Boxing, 7-8 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township.

MONDAY, JAN. 20

Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Beginner Yoga Classes, 6-8 p.m., Mount Carmel Christian Church, $7 or $12 for both classes. 675-0954. Mount Carmel. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

TUESDAY, JAN. 21

Dining Events

Dance Classes

WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Frontier Squares Square Dance Classes, 7:30-9:30 p.m., American Legion Post 450, $5, first class is free. 929-2427; frontiersquares.tripod.com/. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Health / Wellness Pre-Diabetes Class, 4-6 p.m., Mercy HealthPlex Anderson, 7495 State Road, Information on making healthy food choices, exercise and blood sugar control and monitoring blood sugar levels. $20. 956-3729; www.emercy.com. Anderson Township.

Nature Full Moon Walk, 7:30-9 p.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, 4949 Tealtown Road, Meet at Kiosk. Hit trails at night and enjoy full moon and natural history readings. For ages 8 and up. $8, free for members. Registration required. 831-1711. Union Township. A Jungle Jim’s Tasty Expedition, 10-11 a.m., Jungle Jim’s International Market Eastgate, 4450 Eastgate South Drive, Food Safari tour market to experience delectable bounty of nature. Explore miles of aisles with one of Jungle Jim’s knowledgeable tour guides and sample food from around the world. Free. Registration required. Presented by Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods. 831-1711; www.cincynature.org. Union Township.

THURSDAY, JAN. 16 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

Farmers Market Loveland Farmers Market, 4-6 p.m., Grailville Retreat and Program Center, 683-0491; www.lovelandfm.com. Loveland.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 22 Art & Craft Classes Knitting, Crochet and Needlecraft Class, 7-8 p.m., Milford Heights Church of Christ, Free. 575-1874. Milford.

Dining Events WAVE Free Community Dinner, 6 p.m., Milford First United Methodist Church, Free; donations accepted. 831-5500; www.milfordfirstumc.org. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba with KC, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Bethel Community Center, $5. 240-5180; www.zumbawithkc.com. Bethel. Cardio Kick Boxing, 6:30-7:30 p.m., ATA Taekwondo of Cincinnati, $5. 652-0286. Union Township. Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

THURSDAY, JAN. 23 Art & Craft Classes Teen Craft, 4 p.m., Loveland Branch Library, 649 LovelandMadeira Road, Make a fleece pillow. Ages 12-18. Free. 3694476. Loveland.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 6-7 p.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 24 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Support Groups

Exercise Classes

Caregiver Support Group, 4-5:30 p.m., Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, 7820 Beechmont Ave., Guadelupe Room. To support caregivers of elderly or disabled parents (relatives). Ages 18 and up. Free. Reservations required. 929-4483; www.ccswoh.org/caregivers. Anderson Township.

Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

FRIDAY, JAN. 17 Dining Events Fish Fry, 6-7:30 p.m., Dennis Johnson VFW Post 6562, $6$6.50. 575-2102. Milford.

Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9:30-10:30 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 18 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10

Nature Project Feeder Watch, 9-11 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Free. 831-1711. Union Township.

SATURDAY, JAN. 25 Exercise Classes Zumba Fitness with Sue, 9-10 a.m., Clough United Methodist Church, $5. 379-4900; www.zumbasue.net. Anderson Township.

Nature Bird Walk, 8 a.m.-10 a.m., Cincinnati Nature Center at Rowe Woods, Members free; nonmembers pay daily admission. 831-1711. Union Township.


LIFE

JANUARY 2, 2014 • BETHEL JOURNAL • B3

Rita predicts food trends for 2014 At the start of each new year with you, I like to talk about food trends. Locally sourced continues to be a big factor, along with homemade biscuits instead of buns and bread for sandwiches. Another trend is Rita healthier Heikenfeld kids meals: RITA’S KITCHEN yogurt, applesauce and baked fries for fried. Gluten-free (no surprise) items will be abundant in restaurants and at the grocery. Chefs will use nuts as coating for poultry and fish instead of flour. Veggies galore, especially cauliflower, will be cooked simply or with flavorful herbs and spices as mains and sides. Heirloom beans and peanuts are “in” and are easily grown. Peanuts hide under the ground and kids love to harvest these. Rice is big this year. You’ll see a dizzying variety, from instant to brown to the new darling of the food world: Carolina Gold. This is the grandfather of longgrain rice here and, depending upon the way it’s cooked, can be made into fluffy rice or creamy risotto. Tea is here to stay. Get out mom’s tea set and enjoy a relaxing and healthy cup of tea. Tea contains polyphenols, antioxidants that are good for our heart, teeth, eyes and general good health. As far as wild edibles, I’m right on top of it. I’ve made pine needle tea (high in vitamins A and C) for years and now it’s hit the big time. It has a minty, piney flavor. Look for ground pine needle tea at health food stores. Ditto for sumac lemonade. We have sumac trees (not the poison sumac!) growing along our old country road and in late August they bear a beautiful, coneshaped red fruit perfect for tart, healthy lemonade. A caution here: Always make a positive identification when picking wild edibles. There are many nonedible look-a-likes out there.

Rita’s vegetarian red beans and rice

My twist on Hoppin’ John, the traditional New Year’s dish. Rice and beans together make a protein-filled dish. Add sautéed shrimp or chicken for a non-vegetarian meal. Use your favorite beans.

1 very generous cup chopped onion 2-3 teaspoons garlic, minced 2 teaspoons cumin or to taste 2 bay leaves 1 teaspoon chili powder blend or to taste 2 cups rice 2 cans red beans, drained

4 cups vegetable or chicken broth, or bit more if needed Salt and pepper to taste

To stir in after cooking: Favorite greens (If using kale, add when you put rice in as it takes longer to cook). Garnish: Thinly sliced green onions, chopped tomatoes Film pan with olive oil. Add onion, garlic, cumin, bay and chili powder. Sauté until onion looks almost clear. Add rice, beans and broth. Bring to boil. Cover and lower to a simmer and cook until rice is tender. Remove bay leaves. Health aspects Beans: Lower cholesterol, stabilize blood sugar and reduce risk of cancer and heart disease. Onions and garlic: Great for your heart. Tomatoes: Contains antioxidants and is good for the prostate. Brown rice vs. white: Nutritionally superior, your body absorbs nutrients from brown rice more slowly. Bay: Helps blood sugar levels.

Rita’s red beans and rice is her take on the traditional New Year’s Hoppin’ John.THANKS TO RITA HEIKENFELD

Well wishes from our family to yours.

Easy Southern “light” biscuits

Try a Southern flour like White Lily, which has a lower gluten/protein content than Northern flours and produces a lighter textured biscuit.

2 cups self-rising flour ⁄4 cup shortening 2 ⁄3 to 3⁄4 cup buttermilk Melted butter

1

Preheat oven to 475 degrees. Spray baking sheet. Spoon flour into measuring cup and level off. Cut in shortening until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. With a fork, blend in enough milk until dough leaves sides of bowl. Knead a couple times on lightly floured surface and roll 1 ⁄2 inch thick, cutting with biscuit cutter or glass. Place on baking sheet, one inch apart. Bake 8-10 minutes or until golden. Brush with melted butter.

On the blog

Homemade self-rising flour, more Hoppin’ John recipes and quick cheddar bay biscuits.

Mercy Health—Anderson Hospital

Mercy Health—Fairfield HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Clermont Hospital

Mercy Health—Western Hills HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Fairfield Hospital

Mercy Health—St. Raphael Social Service Agency

The Jewish Hospital—Mercy Health Mercy Health—West Hospital

Rita’s current herb book

Mercy Health—Eastgate Medical Center

Mercy Health—St. John Social Service Agency Mercy Health—West Park Senior Living & Rehabilitation

“Culinary Herbs that Heal Body and Soul” is available at Sacred Heart Radio (www.sacredheartradio.com or 513-731-7748).

Mercy Health—Harrison Medical Center

Rita Nader Heikenfeld is an herbalist, educator, Jungle Jim’s culinary professional and author. Find her blog online at Cincinnati.Com/ blogs. Email her at columns@communitypress.com with “Rita’s kitchen” in the subject line. Call 513-248-7130, ext. 356.

Mercy Health—Rookwood Medical Center

Mercy Health Physicians—360+ Primary Care Physicians & Specialists

Mercy Health—Western Hills Medical Center

Mercy Health—Eastgate Occupational Health & Urgent Care

Mercy Health—Anderson HealthPlex

Mercy Health—Springdale Occupational Health & Urgent Care

Mercy Health—Liberty Falls Medical Center Mercy Health—Mt. Orab Medical Center

Mercy Health—Downtown HealthPlex

Mercy Health—StoneBridge at Winton Woods Mercy Community at Winton Woods

Mercy Health—Mobile Mammography

CE-0000579784


LIFE

B4 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

Watch out for online lending scams Thieves have figured out a new way to steal your money and it doesn’t involve sending you bad checks. Once again they prey on people who can least afford to lose money: those seeking a loan. Krystal, I’ll just use her first name, wrote about her mother’s need for a loan while out of work following surgery. She turned to the Internet and found lots of websites offering loans. After applying at one of them, she received a call saying she was approved for the $2,000 she was requesting. But first, she was told, she had to prove she could cover her first loan payment. She told the lender she wouldn’t send him money before getting the funds. “He answered, ‘No, of course not. We just need to verify you’ll be able to make the payment,’”

Krystal wrote. Krystal says she was instructed to go a local drug store, get a VanilHoward la Card Ain and load it HEY HOWARD! with $150 so they could verify the funds. “He then had my mother give him the information off the card so he could verify the funds. He told her everything was great and that he needed to place her on hold so he could go ahead and finalize the transaction. He came back on the line and said that, due to her credit, would she be able to verify a second month’s payment for another $150 on the Vanilla Card? She told him, ‘No,’” Krystal wrote. At this point Krystal says she and her mother

were suspicious, began researching the card and discovered the so-called lender was buying time so he could pull the funds off the Vanilla Reload Card. By the time they began trying to download the funds from the card themselves, the “lender” had already taken all the money. They called the local police who had them contact the Vanilla Network to see if they could learn where the money from the card was released. She was told it had been placed into the account of a pre-paid debit card so the money could now be taken and used anywhere without a trace. “All said and done this scam has me out of pocket over $170,” Krystal wrote. She’s not alone, I received a letter from a Harrison area man who also applied for an online

loan and was sent to the store to buy a Green Dot Money Pack. He loaded $375 on the card and didn’t realize it was a scam until they got another $282 from him. The Federal Trade Commission says legitimate lenders never “guarantee” or say you’re likely to get a loan or a credit card even before you apply – especially if you have bad credit, no credit or a bankruptcy. Bottom line, beware of these new methods used to steal your money. Remember, online lending offers are often just scams and a quick way to lose your money. Howard Ain’s column appears bi-weekly in the Community Press newspapers. He appears regularly as the Troubleshooter on WKRC-TV Local 12 News. Email him at heyhoward@local12.com.

ASSEMBLIES OF GOD

Services: Sunday Worship 10:30 AM - Children’s Church Wednesday Worship 7:00 PM - Rangers and Girl’s Ministry Friday 24 hour prayer 6:00 PM

RIVER OF LIFE Assembly of God 1793 U.S. 52, Moscow, Ohio 45153 Pastor: Ralph Ollendick Sun. Contemporary Service SS -9:45am, Worship 11:00am Wed.- Informal Biblestudy 7-8pm

UNITED METHODIST

GLEN ESTE CHURCH OF CHRIST

All Saints Lutheran Church 445 Craig Road Mt. Carmel, Ohio 45244 513-528-0412

GOSHEN UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 6710 Goshen Rd, Goshen Across from Goshen High School 513-722-2541 www.goshenmethodist.org Sunday School 9:30am Worship 10:30am Blended Worship Traditional and Contemporary Youth Fellowship 6:00pm Nursery Available

Sunday School Sunday Worship Sunday Eve. Childrens Mission Sunday Eve. Adult Discipleship Sunday Eve. Worship Wed. Eve. Adult Bible Study

9:45am 10:45am 6:00pm 6:00pm 7:00pm 7:00pm

3052 ST. RT. 132 AMELIA, OH 45102 797-4189

Sunday School..............................9:30am Sunday Morning Worship............10:30am Sunday Evening Worship...............6:30pm Wednesday Prayer Service ...........7:00pm

www.lindalebaptist.com

BATAVIA BAPTIST TEMPLE

770 South Riverside, Batavia OH 45103 Raymond D. Jones, Pastor 732-2739

Sunday School 10am; Morning Worship 11am; Sunday Evening Service 6pm; Wednesday Eve. Prayer Service & Bible Study, 7:00pm

Reaching the Heart of Clermont County

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 10:30am Bible Study: 9:30am & 6:00pm Youth Groups: 6:00pm (except summer)

Saint Peter Church

1192 Bethel-New Richmond Rd New Richmond, Ohio 45157 Phone 553-3267 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor

Saturday Mass - 5:00 PM Sunday Masses – 8:30 & 11:00 www.stpeternewrichmond.org

CHRISTIAN AND MISSIONARY CALVARY ALLIANCE CHURCH

Senior Pastor, Rev. Dave Robinette 986 Nordyke Road - 45255 (Cherry Grove turn off Beechmont at Beechmont Toyota) Worship Service, Sunday 10:45 am Classes For All Ages, Sunday 9:15 am Prayer Service Wednesday, 6:45 pm

Pastor James Dinkel 513-528-9142

CHURCH OF GOD GOSHEN CHURCH OF GOD

Real People...In a Real Church... Worshipping a Real God! 1675 Hillstation Road, Goshen, Ohio 45122 722-1699 www.goshenchurchofgod.org Pastor Tim McGlone Service Schedule Sunday School 10:00am Sunday Worship 10:45am Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm Wednesday Youth Service 7:00pm Saturday Service 7:00pm

Contemporary and Traditional live Worship Music and Multimedia

Phone 734-4041 Rev. Michael Leshney, Pastor Saturday Mass – 5:00 PM Sunday Mass – 10:30 AM www.stmaryparishfamily.org

Services Saturday at 5 p.m. Sunday at 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.

UNITED METHODIST

3398 Ohio SR 125

MONUMENTS BAPTIST CHURCH

BAPTIST

937 Old State Route 74 (Behind Meijer) 513-753-8223 www.gecc.net

LINDALE BAPTIST CHURCH

Saint Mary Church,Bethel

2831 State Route 222 Mark Pence, Pastor 513-313-2401 SS 9:30AM, Sun Worship 10:45AM Wed. Prayer Service 7:00PM Childcare Provided for All Services www.monumentsbaptist.org Growing in Faith Early Learning Center NOW ENROLLING 513-427-4271 www.monumentsbaptist.org/ growinginfaith

Anderson Hills United Methodist Church

LUTHERAN

CLOUGH PIKE BAPTIST CHURCH

752-3521

Lue Caudill, 90, Georgetown, died Dec. 14. Survived by daughters Beverly (Mark) Good, Barbara Bornhoffer; grandchildren Michelle, Michael, Matthew Horton, Stefanie Diana, Steven, Scott Bornhoffer; great-grandchildren Michael III, Madelene, Maxwell, Logan; stepdaughter Patsy Hance. Preceded in death by first wife Evelyn Caudill, second wife Jeannette Caudill. Arrangements by CraverRiggs Funeral Home. Memorials to: Alzheimer’s Association, 644 Linn St., Cincinnati, OH 45203.

CHURCH OF CHRIST

ROMAN CATHOLIC

www.cloughpike.com

Deborah Bolling Deboard

BAPTIST

SOUTHERN BAPTIST Sunday School 9:30am Morning Worship 10:45am AWANA Ministry Wednesday 6:45 - 8:15pm Bible Study 7:00 - 8:00pm Youth grades 6-12 7:00 - 8:00pm Nursery provided for all services

Lue Caudill

Nominations are due Jan. 10, 2014. Nomination forms are on the Clermont Chamber of Commerce website, www.clermontchamber.com/salute-toleaders. The nomination form can be completed online or downloaded to complete and mail. Or call the Clermont Chamber of Commerce at 576-5000 for more information.

Come Experience The Presence of the Lord In Our Services

1025 CLOUGH PIKE

Basic obituary information and a color photograph of your loved one is published without charge. Call 248-8600 for a submission form. To publish a larger memorial tribute, call 242-4000 for pricing details.

ville Road. Categories are Civic, Community Project, Military, Education, Environmental/Parks and Recreation, Health/Health Care, Human Services, Rural Interests, Safety/Justice, The Up ‘n Over Youth Leadership Award, Humanitarian Award in Memory of Dr. Richard Zinsmeister and the William H. Over Leadership Award.

212 Prather Rd. Felicity, OH Pastor: Chad Blevins 876-2565

ABOUT OBITUARIES

Clorinda Beckler, 96, Moscow, died Dec. 17. Survived by son James Beckler; grandchildren Kathy England, Jim Jr., Joseph, Neysa, Brett, Bruce, Lori, Jason, Aaron Beckler; siblings Bill Miller, Aileen Whitt; 14 great-grandchildren. Preceded in death by husband Louis Beckler, son Louis Beckler, siblings Herman, Elmer, Richard Miller, Ann Bracken. Services were Dec. 21 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home.

a better place to live, work and play. Every year, unsung heroes - your friends and neighbors - are honored at the Salute to Leaders dinner. The 2014 event is set for 5:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 11, at the Oasis in Miami Township. Salute to Leaders sold out last year and is moving to the larger Oasis Golf and Convention Center, 902 Loveland-Miami-

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF FELICITY

509 Roney Lane Cincinnati Ohio 45244 T: 513.528.3200 E: admin@clconline.us

Clorinda Beckler

Deborah Bolling Deboard, 54, Bethel, died Dec. 21. Survived by husband Jim Deboard; children Dana Bolling Jackson, RJ Stanfield; grandchildren Dewey, Brianna, Zack Jackson; father Dewey Bolling; sister Tresa Gossett; nieces and nephew Brandy (Mike) Williams Sowards, Beau (Sam Renn) Williams, Dominique Gossett; great-niece Autumn Sowards; many aunts, uncles and cousins. Preceded in death by mother Barbara Bolling Moore. Services were Dec. 23 at E.C. Nurre Funeral Home.

RELIGION

Salute to Leaders nominations sought Do you know a person, group or organization who regularly helps others in your neighborhood, church or school - and asks nothing in return? That is just who the Salute to Leaders planning committee members are looking for. Since 1994, this event has honored those who quietly volunteer their time, resources and talent to make Clermont County

DEATHS

TRADITIONAL WORSHIP Sunday 8:30 & 11 am CONTEMPORARY WORSHIP Sunday 9:30 & 11 am & 1st Saturday of the Month 6 pm

The church has two contemporary services on Sundays at 9:30 a.m. and 11 a.m., and two traditional services at 8:30 a.m. and 11 a.m. A contemporary service is also offered at 6 p.m. on the first Saturday of each month in the fellowship hall. The church is at 7515

Locust Corner Community United Methodist Church 917 Locust Corner Rd. (at Wagner) 513-752-8459 Traditional Worship : Sunday,10 am Bible Study : Sunday, 9 am Thursday, 7 pm Pastor: Allen R. Mitchell Join us in worshipping our risen Lord and sharing Christ’s love with our community.

Children’s programs and nursery & toddler care available at 9:30 and 11:00 services. Plenty of Parking behind church.

Forest Road, Anderson Township; 231-4172; andersonhillsumc.org.

Mount Washington United Methodist Church

The community is invited to a free dinner from 5:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. the second Saturday of every month. The church is at 6365 Corbly Road; 231-3946; mtwashumc.org.

NON-DENOMINATIONAL

Sunday Morning 10:00AM Contemporary Worship Practical Message Classes for Children & Teens Nursery Care Sunday Night Live 6:00PM Exciting classes for all ages! We have many other groups that meet on a regular basis 4050 Tollgate Rd, Williamsburg, OH 513-724-3341 www.cmcchurch.com Mark Otten, Pastor

Sunday Morning Service Times are: 8:45am, 10:15am & 11:45am Sunday Night Service Time at 6pm Youth Service at 6pm (in Youth Center) Watch LIVE online Sunday's at 10:15am, 11:45am & 6pm www.LCchurch.tv Life Change TV Program Every Sunday Cincinnati Fox19 @ 11am

EPISCOPAL THE CHURCH OF THE GOOD SAMARITAN 25 Amelia Olive Branch Rd.

7515 Forest Road Cincinnati, OH 45255 513-231-4172 • www.andersonhillsumc.org

BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 402 W. Plane St. Bethel, Ohio 513-734-7201 www.bumcinfo.org

Sunday 10:30am ... Holy Eucharist 10:30am...Sunday School (Lil’ Samaritans)

Blended Worship 8:00 & 10:45 am Contemporary Worship 9:30 am Sunday School 9:30 & 10:45 am

Handicap Accessible 513-753-4115 www.GoodSamaritanEpiscopal.org

Nursery Care for Age 3 & under Full Program for Children, Youth, Music, Small Groups & more Handicapped Accessible Bill Bowdle -Sr. Pastor Steve Fultz - Assoc. Pastor; J. D. Young - Youth Director Janet Bowdle - Children’s Director

EVANGELICAL FREE 5910 Price Road, Milford 831-3770 www.faithchurch.net

Services 9:15 am & 10:45 am Nursery provided at all services

Take I-275 to exit 57 toward Milford, Right on McClelland, Right on Price, church soon on Right

Troy P. Ervin, Pastor 4359 E. Bauman Lane | Batavia, OH 45103 513-735-2555 www.LCchurch.tv

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m. Sunday School: 9:45 a.m. Active Youth • Outreach • Fellowship Music Ministries • Bible Studies

Ark of Learning Preschool and Child Care Ages 3 through 12

681 Mt. Moriah Drive • 513.752.1333

mtmoriahumc.org

Childrens Church & Nursery PASTOR MARIE SMITH

www.cloughchurch.org

A Loving, Praying, Caring Church Join us for Sunday Services Sunday School .........9:15 - 10:00am Fellowship ...............10:00 - 10:30am Worship Service .....10:30 - 11:30am 360 Robin Av (off Oak St) Loveland OH

683-2525

Trinity United Methodist “Encircling People with God’s Love”

Sunday Worship: 9:00 & 10:15 AM with

LOVELAND PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

www.LPCUSA.org • LPCUSA@fuse.net

Traditional Worship 8:15am & 11:00am

2010 Wolfangel Rd., Anderson Twp. 513-231-4301

PRESBYTERIAN (USA)

Contemporary Worship.........9:30am Sunday School......................9:30am

Nursery Available 5767 Pleasant Hill Rd (next to Milford Jr. High)

513-831-0262 www.trinitymilford.org

PRESBYTERIAN FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 199 Gay Street Williamsburg, Ohio 45176 Phone: 513-724-7985 Sunday School: 9:30A.M.

Worship:10:30A.M.(SupervisedNursery) PRESCHOOL: Tues, Weds, Thurs


LIFE

JANUARY 2, 2014 • BETHEL JOURNAL • B5

Watching the new kitten play is entertaining Howdy Folks, Wednesday Ruth Ann and I went down to my brothers for the noon meal. His wife, Inez cooked a great meal. Ruth Ann fried frozen crappie. Herb sure likes fish especially, bluegills and crappie. Their son and daughter-in-law were there to eat with us, also Randy our foster brother. Herb is doing pretty good. He has trouble walking. He has a good appetite and that is good, he is my only brother living. The Bethel Lions club held a pancake breakfast last Saturday morning with a good crowd. The school had a wrestling tournament and that always help with the kids eating pancakes after weigh in. Ruth Ann and I delivered the calendars to folks that ordered them. We took a couple to Bethel Marine/Tire Service. The folks that have the facility are doing a super job. They did have the auto mechanics and tire shop in Bethel. Now they have that along with the Bethel marine shop. So they can work on boats or vehicles and put on new tires. If you are down that way stop and say hello to the folks and see how they are ready to take care of your boat or vehicle. They are very qualified and their telephone number is 7342628. They also have storage for boats or vehicles and they are doing a lot of remodeling to

make their business better for service. I was told a feller saw a coyote and her pup George and they Rooks were both OLE FISHERMAN white. I would like to see them. The coyotes are getting to be a bigger number in their pack. They have taken a number of the groundhogs down. The new kitten we have, Chester sure likes to play. A friend of ours gave us a plastic thing with several hole in it. It has several small mice made of fabric that he can reach in and try to get out. He sure does play with this and when he gets them out he bats them around then runs and gets each one and rolls around. He can do a somersault real quick. Ruth Ann had a big plastic bag the one that has loops for hand holes. Chester was playing with it the other morning. He got his head in the handle part and was running with the bag. Ruth Ann caught the bag and pulled it off of him. It was so funny how he was running and was scared of the noise it was making. He as a kitten does a lot of playing. Then stops and has a snack then jumps on the couch and sleeps. We sure enjoy Chester. If he is playing and Ruth Ann gets up from her chair and goes

REAL ESTATE Clermont County real estate transfer information is provided as a public service by the office of Clermont County Auditor Linda L. Fraley.

BETHEL VILLAGE

422 Grace Way, Frances Sipple to Roy & Cheryl Childers, 0.4750 acre, $137,000. 145 N. West St., Victoria Mathew, trustee to Bethel Feed & Supply Inc., 0.9360 acre, $65,000. 2705 Spring St., Bank of New York Mellon to GORF LLC, 0.2370 acre, $30,000.

TATE TOWNSHIP

Oak Corner Road, Larry Wayne Richardson, et al. to Charles & Jessie Lynch, 2.5400 acre, $6,360. 2876 Sugartree Road, Timothy & Vicky Rohling to Kyle Egbert, 2.6000 acre, $114,000. 2682 Swings Corner Point Isabel Road, Timothy & Tanya Fischer to Joseph Stegman, 17.4220 acre, $239,000. 2701 Williamsburg Bantam Road, Karen & Ronald Massman Jr. to Debra & Harold McIntosh, Jr., 23.5850 acre, $415,000.

to the kitchen he will run after her. He sometimes sleeps with us at night. Then in the morning before we get up he likes to play and jumps if we move the covers any. We went down to Milford to the Garden Center to help Santa last Saturday evening. It was special. We had the pleasure of having two sets of twins on my lap. One set were 4 1/2 months old both were girls, their young brother was about 2 1/2 years old. The other twins were older. This was so special. I talked to Mike at the Boars Head Bait Shop in Afton. He said there were a few fisherman out and they were catching fish and the duck hunters were getting their limit of ducks. We have received some seed catalogs and now I want to start planting. I know it is too early but that doesn’t stop me from dreaming and planning for spring. We hope everyone had a good Christmas and a Happy New Year. Keep check on your neighbor and the shut-ins to see if they have food and heat. Start your week by going to the House of Worship of your choice and praise the Good Lord. God Bless All. More Later.

Safe Ranges Friendly Service Large Selection WWW.SHOOTPOINTBLANK.COM

CINCY WEST: 7266 HARRISON AVE. 513-322-4050 BLUE ASH: 10930 DEERFIELD RD. 513-322-5070 HOURS: M-F 10AM-9PM, SAT 8AM-8PM, SUN 10AM-8PM

George Rooks is a retired park ranger. Rooks served for 28 years with the last five as manager of East Fork State Park. CE-0000576409

BUILDING PERMITS RESIDENTIAL

Schumacher Homes, Canton, new, 652 Lily Way, Bethel Village, $290,000. Dennis Weber, Bethel, alter, 1227 Caldwell Road, Franklin Township. Donald Childress, Moscow, alter, 2634 Laurel Pt. Isabel, Washington Township.

MARRIAGE LICENSES Gary Resibois, 34, 30 High Meadow Lane, Williamsburg, self employed and Tiffany Richey, 23, 113 Concord Sq., Williamsburg, DCA-MRDD. Gregory Constable, 48, Box 94, Bethel, painter and Lena Sears, 48, Box 94, Bethel. James Borgerding, 18, 8035 Griffith Road, Felicity, U.S. Army and Amber Snodgrass, 18, 4312 East Fork Valley Drive, Batavia.

177 W. Main Street Amelia, OH 45102

513-753-6130

200 Western Avenue New Richmond, OH 45157

513-553-4132

315 W. Plane Street Bethel OH 45106

513-734-2228

www.ecnurre.com CE-0000572954

Happy New Year


LIFE

B6 • BETHEL JOURNAL • JANUARY 2, 2014

POLICE REPORTS BETHEL

Reports not available

ABOUT POLICE REPORTS

CLERMONT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

The Bethel Journal publishes the names of all adults charged with offenses. The information is a matter of public record and does not imply guilt or innocence. To contact your local police department, call: » Bethel, Chief Mark Planck, 722-6491 » Clermont County Sheriff’s Office, Sheriff A.J. “Tim” Rodenberg, 732-7500

Arrests/citations Rodney Dale Bryant, 28, 2293 Chesterfield Lane, Batavia, illegal use or possession of drug paraphernalia, possessing drug abuse instruments, possession of drugs - heroin, Dec. 17. John Wayne Blair, 35, 2591 Gaylord Ave, Bethel, receiving stolen property, Nov. 8. Ashley Dawn Messer, 24, 2061 Ohio 125 Lot No. 183, Amelia, receiving stolen property, Dec. 20. Billy Ray Goforth, 31, 2787 Lindale Mount Holly, Amelia, receiving stolen property, Dec. 20. Randy Nmn Reynolds, 53, receiving stolen property, Dec. 23. Billy Ray Goforth, 31, 235 Mulberry St., Felicity, receiving stolen property, Dec. 20. Ashley Dawn Messer, 24, 235 Mulberry St., Felicity, receiving stolen property, Dec. 20. Jonathan James Foster, 22, 4246 Summit Road, Batavia, unlawful sexual conduct with a minor, Dec. 19. Mary Elizabeth Angel, 26, 2002 Still Water Lane Apt. No. 6, Milford, driving under OVI suspension, falsification - public official, mislead, obstructing official business, Dec. 17. William Kody Rust, 19, 2907 Fair Oak Road, Amelia, falsification - public official, mislead, obstructing official business, Dec.

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17. Jack Nmn Childress, 35, (lka) 9649 Miamiview Road, North Bend, fugitive from justice, Dec. 16. Brandon David Cook, 38, 811 Commons Drive, Milford, illegal use or possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of drugs - marijuana, resisting arrest, Dec. 16. Stefanie N. Link, 27, 563 S. Charity St., Bethel, possessing drug abuse instruments, Dec. 17. Ashley Link, 19, 3424 Cole Road, Amelia, drug paraphernalia, Dec. 18. Juvenile, 15, possession of drugs, Dec. 17. Terri Rae Barger, 49, 2369 Donald Road, Bethel, assault, Dec. 17. Richard Otis Sheets, 59, 2369 Donald Road, Bethel, domestic violence, Dec. 17. Georgia Kaye Flaugher, 27, 367 Felicity Cedron Road, Georgetown, theft, Dec. 18. Mar Elroy Mccollum, 55, 1756 Lindale Nicholsville Road, New Richmond, domestic violence knowingly cause physical harm,

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Animal Rescue Fund Bingo &'"!))!%#!(%$")!

1300 West Ohio Pike, Amelia, Ohio

(2) $1000 JACKPOT GAMES

Call 513-843-4835 for more information INSTANT BOOTH OPEN MON-SAT 11-5PM

Dec. 19. Shauna Renae Schrichten, 46, 1756 Lindale Nicholsville Road, New Richmond, domestic violence - knowingly cause physical harm, Dec. 19. Juvenile, 13, juvenile cigarette or other tobacco products violations, Dec. 18. Michele Marie Wilson, 49, 62 Brandywine Drive, Amelia, breaking and entering - purpose commit theft offense/ felony unoccupied structure -use of force stealth deception, possessing drug abuse instruments, Dec. 18. Michele Marie Wilson, 49, 62 Brandywine Drive, Amelia, Dec. 18. Casey Scott Mell, 28, 62 Brandy Wine, Amelia, breaking and entering - purpose commit theft offense/felony unoccupied structure -- use of force stealth deception, possessing criminal tools, Dec. 18. Charles Edward Parlier, 45, 3683 Ohio 132, Batavia, complicity aid/abet another, Dec. 20. Earl Lee Hensley, 48, 1930 Rapp Lane, Batavia, domestic violence - cause belief of imminent physical harm by threat or force, Dec. 17. Miranda Suzanne Bryan, 33, 5811 Deerfield Road, Milford, possessing drug abuse instruments, Dec. 19. Jake Daniel Taulbee, 33, 844 Wright Street, Newtonsville, domestic violence, Dec. 19. Matthew Scott Shouse, 24, 3115 Leeds Road, Amelia, falsification, Dec. 19. Aaron Eugene Gay, 36, 616 Mercury Drive, Cincinnati, possessing drug abuse instruments, Dec. 20.

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Bethel journal 010114