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REACH FOR IT.


10 1,000+ COMMUNITY SERVICE HOURS ANNUALLY

AVERAGE CLASS SIZE

5:1

STUDENT TO FACULTY RATIO

180 STUDENTS IN GRADES 9-12

$ 5M+

85%

IN FINANCIAL AID ALLOCATED ANNUALLY

OF STUDENTS RECEIVE GENEROUS NEED-BASED AID

F O U N D E D BY A N E P I S C O PA L P R I E S T I N

1918

LOCATED ON 150 ACRES 30 MILES FROM PHILADELPHIA, PA

NAMED THE 2018 “MOST BEAUTIFUL PRIVATE HIGH SCHOOL IN PENNSYLVANIA” BY ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST

20% INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

200

$3-5M IN SCHOLARSHIPS AND GRANTS TO LEADING UNIVERSITIES AWARDED ANNUALLY

ALUMNI IN COLLEGE SERVED ANNUALLY THROUGH ALUMNI SUCCESS PROGRAM

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DIFFERENT SPORTS WITH TEAMS FOR EVERY SKILL LEVEL

+ 60 COURSE OFFERINGS

INTEGRITYRESPONSIBILITYRESPECTBROTHERHOOD

70% OF FACULTY WITH ADVANCED DEGREES


Dear Friend, Chances are that you have reached for this introduction to Church Farm School to find out a little more about us—our people, programs, campus and community. As you do, please know that we are reaching out for you, too. We would like to get to know you and learn a little more about what drives you and the person you aspire to become, the immediate and long-term goals you are interested in reaching and how that effort can contribute to the dynamic quality of our 24/7 learning environment that has been helping young men reach their goals for more than 100 years.

to a wide range of students who want to be and do their very best. So, reach for it! We look forward to seeing you on campus for an interview someday soon. With best wishes,

The Reverend Edmund K. “Ned” Sherrill II Head of School

“Reach for it” intends to capture the dynamic, aspirational quality of our common life and the educational experience that is a daily reality here. Striving to be our best, pushing ahead through reasoned inquiry to find greater and more enduring solutions to questions we choose to pursue, persevering through obstacles when we have not yet succeeded and encouraging others as well as being encouraged by them in a rich and rewardingly diverse brotherhood … this is our way of life. Staying still is not an option, so we continue to reach for those things that edify, ennoble and endure. By reaching out to you and placing this introduction to Church Farm School in your hands, please know that we see in you the kind of young man who wants to make a difference in his own life and the lives of others by sharpening his intellectual and physical skills and clarifying his purpose. We are committed to supporting that by making our program uncommonly affordable, thus presenting such an educational option

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WHY CHURCH FARM Our Mission:

CHURCH FARM SCHOOL PREPARES A DIVERSE GROUP OF BOYS WITH ACADEMIC ABILITY AND GOOD CHARACTER TO LEAD PRODUCTIVE AND FULFILLING LIVES BY MAKING A COLLEGE PREPARATORY EDUCATION FINANCIALLY ACCESSIBLE. “IT HAD EVER BEEN MY DREAM TO ESTABLISH A SCHOOL THAT WOULD TAKE CARE OF BOYS OF ABILITY AND PROMISE WHO OTHERWISE MIGHT HAVE NO OPPORTUNITY TO GAIN SUCH AN EDUCATION.”

— THE REV. DR. CHARLES W. SHREINER, FOUNDER

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SCHOOL? Exceptional Men “Schools for boys focus with intention on learning that addresses not only how to excel in academics but also how to grow into a young man of integrity and empathy. In engaging and supportive single-sex environments, students explore their values and establish a foundation for making

responsible decisions; they explore their own definitions of self, who they are and who they want to become; they learn to forge healthy relationships; they step out of their comfort zone to explore their full potential.” — from International Boys’ School Coalition “Why a Boys’ School”

Exceptional Opportunities Financing an independent school education is an investment in your child’s future, and we are committed to making Church Farm School affordable for every family.

Thanks to a strong endowment and a loyal group of generous donors, we provide a first-rate education at an uncommonly affordable price.

SHARED VALUES CHALLENGING CURRICULUM SMALL CLASSES INDIVIDUAL ATTENTION UNIQUELY AFFORDABLE INCLUSIVE COMMUNITY SPIRITUAL GROWTH SERVICE LEARNING EXPERIENCES LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITIES LIFELONG BONDS

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BROTHERHOOD IS ONE OF OUR FOUR CORE VALUES. AS ANY OF OUR STUDENTS WILL TELL YOU, BROTHERHOOD MEANS “WE’VE GOT YOUR BACK.” BROTHERHOOD MEANS VIGILANCE AND CARING. THERE IS NO SLIPPING THROUGH THE CRACKS. WE ARE ALL CARETAKERS FOR EACH OTHER.


ROTHERHOOD DION MATHEWS ’20 AND EMMETT ECKERT ’20 Emmett and Dion went to middle school together at The Ron Clark Academy in Atlanta, Georgia. Both play lacrosse. Dion is thinking about becoming a pilot (in spite of a fear of heights!). Emmett is thinking about psychology, politics and journalism. EMMETT: “We are brothers from another mother. To us, brotherhood means there’s always someone you can talk to. But it also means not having to talk if you don’t want to!” DION: “We know how to give each other personal space. It also means tossing ideas back and forth, building on each other’s ideas.” EMMETT: “We are learning how to be boys and men—avoiding toxic masculinity.” DION: “You don’t have to be stoic and strong all the time. Being emotional is important. Too many men are forced to live in a box.” EMMETT: “Last year I worked hard on academic success. This year, I’m doing a lot of emotional learning, and learning to live responsibly.” DION: “There’s a lot of pressure in high school. Brotherhood helps you grow through it, helps you to set priorities. You have to make your own team, build connections and long-lasting relationships.”

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WE ENCOURAGE STUDENTS TO ADVOCATE FOR THEMSELVES.

EXCEPTIONAL FACULTY “Our faculty are extremely adaptive and flexible. We encourage our students to advocate for themselves. Often, boys have a hard time asking for help. We teach them what to do when no one is around. We give authentic feedback—not sugar-coated. We have regular SEL (Social Emotional Learning) sessions. Every boy learns differently. “It’s all about relationships and trust. We get to know them—their interests and their stories. You have to be willing to be vulnerable, to show them what failing and trying again looks like. I’m always asking, ‘what’s a mistake you made this week?’ “There’s a great deal of collaboration among the faculty. We give each other feedback and share best practices. We meet regularly to talk about students we are concerned about. We never say, ‘does this boy belong here?’ but rather, ‘what can we bring out of this boy?’

“It fills you with pride to see them grow. We are making great men. Our College Guidance office does a terrific job preparing them for visits and applications. “They have to believe in themselves. I tell them they are ready.” — Eric Fulmer, Dean of Faculty

“WE GIVE OUR STUDENTS A SENSE OF POWER OVER THEIR EXPERIENCE, WHAT I CALL AGENCY, OWNERSHIP. HOW DO WE DO THIS? BY CARING … A GENUINE CONCERN FOR EACH OTHER … A SENSE OF RESPONSIBILITY FOR OURSELVES AND FOR THOSE AROUND US.” — CHRIS SEELEY, ASSISTANT HEAD OF SCHOOL

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DAY IN THE LIFE OF A CFS STUDENT 7:30 a.m. 7:45 a.m. 9:00 a.m. 10:10 a.m. 10:25 a.m. 11:35 a.m. 12:15 p.m. 12:45 p.m. 1:55 p.m. 3:30 p.m. 6:00 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. 11:00 p.m.

Breakfast and Morning Check-In Geometry Class Spanish II Advisory English Club: DECA Lunch Digital Photo World History Lacrosse Practice Dinner Chores/Study Hall Video Games/ Fun with Friends Lights Out

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EXCEPTIONAL RELATIONSHIPS Tom Johnstone ’09: Teacher, Cottage Parent, Coach and Alumnus When Tom Johnstone graduated from Church Farm School in 2009, his classmates voted him “most likely to return.” “I wanted to give back for all the opportunities CFS opened up for me. For many of our students, this is their first time away from home. They are young men of ability and promise, but they are wide-eyed and overwhelmed. “As a cottage parent, I make sure they feel at home (which includes teaching them how to do laundry!). I wake them up, teach them in class and make sure they are in bed at night. We are going through our days together. As a history teacher, I make sure they are communicating well, I push them beyond

BY THE TIME THEY GRADUATE, THE TRANSFORMATION IS ENORMOUS. their comfort zones and make sure they are prepared to face the challenges I give them. As the Assistant Director of Athletics and a coach [soccer, wrestling and baseball], I make sure they are prepared for competition. We build successful teams with guys who have never played before. It’s similar to what we do in the classroom. By the time they graduate, the transformation is enormous. “It is important that they know I am the same person in all these different contexts. Consistency is important. It is also important to be as real as possible, to be myself. They want to know the real people teaching and caring for them. They trust that I am there for them. “One of the most powerful things about the CFS experience is the quality of the friendships formed here. And it’s not just about fun. These boys call each other out. They keep each other in check. They hold each other accountable. That’s real friendship.”

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CFS TRADITIONS What would a private school be without traditions? Here are just a few of our favorites. SENIOR AND FRESHMEN RETREATS At the beginning of each school year, our seniors and our freshmen embark on day or weekend-long retreats as a class with faculty leadership where they engage in team-building and goal-setting activities. HALLOWEEN DECORATING CHALLENGE AND PROGRESSIVE DINNER Each cottage works together to create the best decorated space, and students are able to tour their peers’ efforts during a catered progressive dinner, replete with candy, of course.   CFS CHRISTMAS PAGEANT “WHY THE CHIMES RANG” Started in 1924 and based on a short story, the school’s annual Pageant, held each December on a Friday evening and Sunday afternoon, features students dressed in beautiful period costumes acting in pantomime with accompaniment from the CFS Choir, audience singalongs and our organist. This story of a child’s selflessness for the Christ child is a wonderful start to the Christmas season. Typically, Pageant weekend also features a cottage decorating contest and a progressive dinner.  

LESSONS AND CAROLS Also held each December, this Chapel service features readings, hymns, psalms and music by the CFS Choir in celebration of the Christmas season. MULTICULTURAL DINNER Church Farm students hail from nearly a dozen different countries, and each year we gather to celebrate this diversity at a multicultural dinner, featuring culinary dishes from around the world prepared by our caterer, Sodexo, our faculty and staff, our students and their families.   COLLEGE DRAFT DAY A tradition that began in spring 2015 and the precursor to Field Day, College Draft Day is an opportunity for our seniors to announce their college decisions to the entire community in a festive morning ceremony.   MAROON VS. GREY FIELD DAY The second to last week of school, our community spends the entire day outdoors (weather permitting) participating in organized and relaxed activities and competitions. The highlight of the day is our pre-lunch maroon vs. grey tug-of-wars by class. The day usually concludes with distribution of the Yearbook and a video encapsulating the year.

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NAM DO ’19 “I was born in Hanoi and moved to Texas in eighth grade. I taught myself English before I came to the U.S. My school in Texas had a more homogenous community than this, but I was always interested in other cultures. I really matured after coming to CFS—became less arrogant and started expanding my horizons. It has been a process of self-discovery. “I also became more motivated, and started my own non-profit, Sing for Joy, with an organization in Vietnam. Students audition, we put them in a choir, stage a performance and the proceeds go to various causes. We raised $30,000 to build a playground at the National Childrens’ Hospital. “When I first came to the U.S., I had a kind of identity crisis. Thinking in English was hard. Last winter, I published a book in Vietnamese to inspire Vietnamese youth to be more confident and independent. I’m also the Editor in Chief of a magazine in Vietnam. “My parents brought me to Buddhist temples, encouraged me to communicate and to contribute. Integrity means doing the right thing, period. In Buddhist terms, it means clean living. Clean living means putting attention and care into what you do and realizing that every action has a consequence. “I attended a Yale summer program my junior year on International Affairs and Security, and want to pursue a double major in Literature and Political Science in college. I also attended the school of the New York Times to study investigative journalism. This year I’m balancing AP courses. “I’m motivated, sure, but everyone here is a leader. And leadership means being there for everyone.”

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GAINING INTEGRITY OFTEN INVOLVES STRUGGLE. AT CHURCH FARM SCHOOL, OUR STUDENTS ASK THEMSELVES, “HOW CAN WE BE BETTER MEN?” THIS MEANS EVERYTHING FROM LEARNING HOW TO MANAGE TIME TO SETTING PRIORITIES AND DEALING WITH CONFLICT FAIRLY.

CH INTEGRITY


COLLEGE

WE ARE KNOWN AS A PLACE THAT CULTIVATES MEN OF WISDOM AND CHARACTER.


GUIDANCE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY HARVARD UNIVERSITY YALE UNIVERSITY COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA WILLIAMS COLLEGE DUKE UNIVERSITY DARTMOUTH COLLEGE JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY BROWN UNIVERSITY CORNELL UNIVERSITY RICE UNIVERSITY EMORY UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA TUFTS UNIVERSITY VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY SWARTHMORE COLLEGE LEHIGH UNIVERSITY PURDUE UNIVERSITY BOSTON COLLEGE POMONA COLLEGE

TIFFANY SCOTT “In their first two years, our students build an academic foundation. They take advantage of all our resources and they find something they enjoy. Then we ask them to push themselves and align their activities with their interests. By junior year, they should be asking ‘what do I want/need? What is my learning style? What are some of my biggest challenges? “We hold college planning seminars with juniors to help them begin thinking about the application process, and each fall we have over 70 colleges visit our campus. College Admission Counselors want to meet our exceptional students. We are known as a place that cultivates men of wisdom and character. We have a 100 percent college acceptance rate to fouryear colleges. “This work is so rewarding—the opportunities we expose our students to are changing the trajectory for generations to come.” “We’ve created a class called the College Transition Course, to help our students refine their expectations and understand how college will be different from their high school experience, culturally, academically and even financially. We teach them how to advocate for themselves. “We are very proud of our Alumni Success Program, designed to help students stay in college. An alumnus will visit you, email you, engage your parents. Our best measure of success is the students who go through all four years of college. Each student does a ‘senior checkout,’ in which they gather all their information and identify a teacher who will stay in touch with them. “Our kids are incredibly mature when they graduate. They motivate each other.”


INSPIRING BOYS • FULFILLING DREAMS Athletics

Clubs

Community Service

Extracurriculars

Leadership Opportunities

Our outstanding coaching staff, consisting primarily of academic and residential faculty, serve as teachers and mentors for our boys, working closely with our studentathletes to pursue excellence while developing leadership, sportsmanship, teamwork and an appreciation for lifelong fitness. CFS fields multiple levels of competitive teams in soccer, golf, cross country, wrestling, basketball, bowling, winter track, baseball, tennis, lacrosse

We offer numerous lunchtime and afterschool clubs for every interest. Students are also welcome and encouraged to suggest their own clubs. Sample options include robotics, chess, screen printing, DECA, band, computer science, yearbook, Interact, Relay for Life and film enthusiasts.

Church Farm School’s community service program is an important component of school life, and all students are expected to participate in at least five hours annually. Opportunities to participate are held every weekend, as well as some evenings, at venues including the SPCA, area churches, other mission schools, homeless shelters and more.

While there is much to do on our 150-acre campus—Frisbee golf, basketball, volleyball, bike riding, swimming in season—we strive to offer fun and educational activities off site, too. The famous King of Prussia mall is just 15 minutes from the school, plus movies, theater, arboretums, museums, sports games and more are all nearby and scheduled through our student activities office with the help of student leaders.

We want our students to become leaders, and there are many ways to hone these skills: Student Congress representatives, Honor Council members, Student Ambassadors and Admission Tour Guides are just a few examples of leadership opportunities available. These students are often asked to participate in offsite events, including community festivals, regional conferences and more.

and track and field, as well as non-competitive options such as intramural sports and strength and conditioning.

Alumni Success Program Increases College Persistence Church Farm School is very successful in guiding its graduates to top colleges and universities. 100% of Church Farm School graduates are accepted at four-year colleges and universities, many attending highly competitive institutions with significant grants and scholarships. Most notably among these include a Gates Millennium Scholarship and more than a dozen QuestBridge scholarships.   The transition to college life for students can be difficult, and nationally, the percentage of male students who graduate in six years is 56%. With this statistic in mind, and the reality that many of our students are the first in their families to attend college, Church Farm School developed the Alumni Success Program which supports recent graduates as they

navigate their college careers. The team maintains connections with 200 graduates quarterly, and provides support, mentorship and guidance to help keep them on track. We support students in their course selections, give advice managing student-professor relationships, help students create schedules and structure to support their study needs and offer a listening ear when they are homesick.  With seed funding from the Hamilton Family Foundation, the Church of the Redeemer and the Charter Foundation, the program is already making a verifiable difference. College persistence and graduation rates have significantly increased at Church Farm School, and are on track to get better each year. In all areas of academic success, Church Farm students continue to excel.


THE STEAM TEAM Steve Harris, STEAM Chair and Dina Schmidt, Arts Chair “Our STEAM (Science, Technology, Engineering, Art and Math) program is in its fourth year, and students are loving it. In the past, math, science, art, physics and chemistry were strictly separated. Today, students are bringing the skills they learn to design projects and problem-solve across disciplines. This involves imagination, constant revision, resilience, creativity and hands-on, experiential learning. Our STEAM Club meets every day after school and is an alternative to sports in winter—students use our Maker Space with 3D printers, woodworking shop and other tools and technologies to create videos, architectural models and many other projects. We are developing more options in music, 2D and 3D art and Digital Design. We offer a Technology and Engineering Design (TED) class to ninth graders, where they are introduced to coding. In their sophomore, junior and senior years they can take Introduction to Engineering, which is more project-oriented. ‘Don’t limit yourself!’ we tell them.

WE ARE SENDING THEM INTO THE FUTURE, A WORLD OF POSSIBILITIES. “We use mastery-based grading in our STEAM classes, which allows students to go back and try again when they don’t succeed. They are learning how to learn. Seventy-minute classes facilitate project-based learning. When they work on projects, we want them to document their process. They build digital portfolios, and begin to think about creating their own careers. We are sending them into the future, a world of possibilities.”


MUSICAL ARTS

Choir

The CFS Choir provides our students with opportunities to experience the joy of making music through preparation and performance. Under the direction of Gary Gress for nearly 30 years, the choir performs concerts throughout the school year for the CFS community of students, faculty, parents, friends and alumni; at the school’s two annual fundraisers, the Golf Classic and Gala; at private donor events; and at public venues and festivals. They have sung at Carnegie Hall in New York City, music festivals in Boston, New York, Williamsburg and Toronto, the U.S. Naval Academy Chapel in Annapolis, the Philadelphia Cathedral, the Russell Senate Building; the National Cathedral in Washington D.C., and at several Philadelphia Phillies’ baseball games. Individual members regularly participate in the PMEA District, Regional, All State and MENC All Eastern Chorus festivals. In 2006, the CFS Singers, a small vocal ensemble focused on jazz and a cappella singing, were invited to perform at the PMEA State Convention. The choir has also been on tour overseas to Germany and South Africa.

Band

The CFS Band allows students to become proficient with a variety of instruments and music styles, including blues, Latin music, classic rock, hip hop and pop.

Because some experience and proficiency is required for band, the first semester for a student is focused on learning how to play and blend with other musicians. In the second semester, theory and application of that theory come more into play. The Band performs at concerts for the CFS community, as well as at sporting events and other lively venues.

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SAAIF AHMED ’18 “I’m headed to Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) next year, and from day one, I will be looking for opportunities. I’ve been a prefect here for two years, and if I can become a Resident Assistant (R.A.) in my sophomore year, that will take care of my room and board. I play varsity tennis and golf, and I take a lot of Advanced Placement classes! Mr. Fulmer has been my favorite teacher here. He taught me how to write, synthesize, analyze and build an argument. “My mom is from Guyana and my dad is Bengali. Both are very focused on opportunity. Their story has influenced me so much. My father is a businessman and my mother is an educator. They’ve worked so hard and they never forget their families or where they came from. “I came to CFS knowing I’d have to hustle. My mentor was a senior who became my role model. His brotherhood kept me motivated. He showed me that leadership means caring. He showed me that when you succeed you give back. (That’s what my parents did, too.) And he showed me that there’s a positive kind of competitiveness that is not cutthroat but that inspires us to push ourselves and each other. We played video games together, studied the games and played competitively. I did an AllStarCode intensive, went to the Cooper Union summer STEM program and built my own computer. The video tournaments we attend bring everyone together. I want to be part of a team working for a better future. I come from a line of resilient people who worked hard and I’ve found that I love working hard, too.”

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I COME FROM A LINE OF RESILIENT PEOPLE WHO WORKED HARD AND I’VE FOUND THAT I LOVE WORKING HARD, TOO.

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REACH F “Teaching pottery is similar to coaching a sport. I deal a lot with students’ mental states. Many people are afraid to make things because they are afraid of failure. Until they are more comfortable with themselves, and until they feel secure and safe from judgment, it’s hard to get them to express themselves, in clay or any other medium. “So there is a process of early growth, even before students learn the skills they need to make pots. This is where the grit comes in. They have to be willing to keep trying, even if they fail. “I try to help them find a way through—to see it as an adventure. “I feel a deep personal commitment to these kids. CFS is my extended family. I go to the students’ games—often their parents are unable to come. I try to help them keep growing. When they graduate, they leave this support system. But they begin the transition to adulthood here.”

KEVIN KORB: ART, CERAMICS, WOODWORKING


OR

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“We must strengthen students’ foundation in order to truly educate them. Education requires getting our boys to a place of trust. We teach them self-care. We are giving them the tools to thrive. We could change the world using this approach. This place has opened my eyes to this. “I believe in taking care of the needs of other people. This is our Episcopal identity. We believe that this enhances our own well-being and is the key to peace and harmony. Once you define identity, you have to live up to and into it. We have people from all over the world here. You can’t expect them all to live into this identity. First, you have to know them. We have to share this Episcopal identity with students from many different backgrounds. Our students are engaged in many service programs. Many come from backgrounds that embrace service. They are familiar with the idea that giving to others enhances both lives. “What advice do I give students? I say, ‘I love you.’ “They have to believe that.”

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WE ARE GIVING THEM THE TOOLS TO THRIVE.

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CYRUS GUO ’18 “I looked at many schools but just didn’t feel like everyone connected. At many, there was too much of a prep school feel. In high school, everyone wants stuff. Here, it felt different. It felt as though everyone was sharing an experience. It’s a feeling—not a statistic. “I also believe that education should prepare you for the real world, so the level of diversity here made sense to me. I am half Chinese, and I identify more with the Asian part. Why? Something as basic as eating dinner! I’m well-versed in both cultures, but I just feel more comfortable in a Chinese setting. My three closest friends are from the Philippines, Korea and India. I might never have met them at another school with less diversity. When I enter the workforce, I have to know how to interact with people from around the world. You can’t teach diversity. You have to experience it. “It’s about respect. Respect and love are intertwined. In hard times, we know what to do. Sometimes, you need space. Sometimes you need to talk. We respect each other’s boundaries. We help each other through tough times. “We also respect the way our fellow students learn. Everyone learns differently. CFS does a good job providing different levels, pacing for different learning styles. I’m a fast learner, but it can be hard to get motivated. I’ve come to understand the way I learn. This school has really prepared me for self-study.”

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REACH FOR RESPECT

SUCCESS IN THE GLOBAL KNOWLEDGE ECONOMY DEMANDS COLLABORATION. COLLABORATION MEANS WORKING WITH PEOPLE WITH VERY DIFFERENT POINTS OF VIEW, FROM VERY DIFFERENT BACKGROUNDS AND DISCIPLINES. THIS REQUIRES CURIOSITY, RESPECT AND EMPATHY.

CFS STUDENTS ARE NOT COMPETING IN THE TRADITIONAL SENSE OF THE WORD—SOCIALLY, ACADEMICALLY AND ATHLETICALLY. INSTEAD, THEY ARE LEARNING HOW TO RESPECT AND HELP EACH OTHER. THIS IS THE BEST PREPARATION WE CAN GIVE THEM FOR THE REAL WORLD.


We welcome you not just as a student, but as a whole person embarking on a journey beyond classes and homework. Because we are small, you will find that you know everyone by name and they know you. Ten small, bright, “cottage’ dormitories that hold a maximum of 18 students provide a positive atmosphere that encourages intellectual, emotional and social growth. These cottages are a home away from home, offering a sense of belonging you will feel in classes, on teams, and

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throughout your daily life here. Cottage life offers a unique opportunity for a young man to learn valuable life skills: independence; how to live with and understand people from social, cultural and ethnic groups different from his own; and how to prepare for college. It is an experience that will remain with our students forever, as friends made in boarding school will be friends for life. The skills and qualities that students develop in the residence halls help them grow into adults who impact their communities in positive ways.

Design: Harp and Company Graphic Design

RESIDENTIAL LIFE

Writing: Susan Salter Reynolds

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GROWTH HILARY HAYES, COTTAGE FACULTY, TEACHER, COACH “I treat the cottage as our home—it’s not just a building. When they get into college, I know they know how to be independent. “There are challenges: getting used to a roommate, getting along with others, finding common ground. Each year, we pair big brothers—juniors and seniors, with freshmen and sophomores for mentoring. “The most important thing to me is that the boys demonstrate growth. And that they are willing to reach for the opportunities we offer. I ask them ‘How hard are you willing to work ‘for what you want?’

HOW HARD ARE YOU WILLING TO WORK FOR WHAT YOU WANT? 25


Church Farm School 1001 E. Lincoln Highway Exton, PA 19341 610.363.5347 admissions@gocfs.net

www.gocfs.net/apply

CFS Viewbook 2018  
CFS Viewbook 2018