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Fall 2018


www.envirtualseniorlife.com


EnVirtual Magazine

Design copyright Š 2018 by Chujun/Jun Zhao. All right reserved. Chujun/Jun Zhao Chujunpo@gmail.com Publish by Chujun Zhao for the course GR 850: Thesis 3, instructed by Hamlett Phillip in Fall 2018 at Academy of Art University, San Francisco, CA. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without the express written permission of the publisher. EnVirtual

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Table of Contents

Table of Contents VR in the News

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The most important and recent stories of the moment in the VR industry.

The Newest Products Read about the newest VR product information updates here.

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Senior VR Life

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The most useful articles which relate to seniors and the VR field. How Virtual Reality Improves Senior Living

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Teenager’s Charity Brings VR To Sick Kids And The Elderly

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For Senior Citizens, the Future of VR Lies in the Past

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Tips and Tricks for the Best VR Experience While Wearing Glasses

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The EnVirtual Event

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Information about our EnVirtual Event and valuable coupons.

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VR in the News

VR in the News The most important and recent stories of the moment in the VR industry.


VR in the News

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Virtual Reality Helps Seniors With Dementia Get Back on Track Virtual reality (VR) is helping seniors with cognitive and physical impairments express themselves and experience the outside world. But its use in therapy is far outpacing research, which has yet to determine how VR affects the brain in the long term.


VR in the News

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Wisconsin Seniors Introduced to Virtual Reality Technology A Wisconsin woman says that two years ago she made it her mission to infuse new energy and experiences into the lives of elderly individuals like her mother, connecting them with the excitement and technology of the modern world. It’s moments like this that led Helgerson, Strauss’ daughter and founder of Simple Steps to Technology to say she has the best job in the world. Helgerson is motivated to reach as many individuals as she can through Simple Steps to Technology, and hopes to get the community on board.


VR in the News

become accustomed to using basic technology like mobile devices, the avenue is opened for them to adapt to even more innovations, like VR hardware. Beyond being something that is just for fun and entertainment, VR is starting to show promise as a technology that can improve the quality of life for seniors.

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The New Frontier of Senior Care is Virtual Reality Seniors are probably not the first group that comes to mind when people think about virtual reality. VR is thought of as high-tech and fun, and is often associated with younger audiences. While young people may be among the first to adopt virtual reality, researchers and startups see it as a technology that can benefit people of all ages. With advances in mobile application design, the online world is easier than ever for seniors to access. As they


The Newest Products

The Newest Products Read about the newest VR product information updates here.


The Newest Products

Google Cardboard Get it, fold it and look inside to enter the world of Cardboard. It’s a VR experience starting with a simple viewer anyone can build or buy. Once you have it, you can explore a variety of apps that unfold all around you. And with plenty of viewer types available, you’re sure to find one that fits you just right. Google Cardboard brings immersive experiences to everyone in a simple and affordable way. Whether you fold your own or buy a Works with Google Cardboard certified viewer, you’re just one step away from experiencing virtual reality on your smartphone.

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The Newest Products

Viewer 3.0 EcoViewer The EcoViewer 3.0 is the most environmentally conscious, custom brandable, fully featured virtual reality headset on the market. Made from 80% recyclable materials, these lightweight and durable VR goggles weigh less than 7 ounces, have a fool-proof interactive button and no fragile plastic hinges. Fits all iOS and Android smartphones with a body width up to 3.25�. The optically superior lenses can easily be adjusted for pupil alignment (IPD) and focal length, and the soft rubber trim provides a comfortable, cleanable surface.

HTC Vive VIVE is a first-of-its-kind virtual reality system. Let yourself be visually, physically and emotionally amazed by new virtual worlds. With a limited time offer of 6-month VIVEPORT subscription, VIVE Pro HMD does not include controllers, base stations or VIVE wireless adapter.

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The Newest Products

Smithsonian Journeys: Venice Smithsonian Journeys: Venice invites you to take a tour of this magical city with a brilliant professor of Italian history as your personal guide. Enjoy over 30 minutes of 3D 360° video shot on location as you learn all about the history and culture of the city. You’ll discover fascinating facts along the way that will make your journey so much more memorable and rewarding.

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Our Newest Products


The Newest Products

The Official Cardboard App The official Cardboard app is your first stop for virtual reality on your Android or iPhone. The Cardboard app lets you use any Works with Google Cardboard viewer with any Cardboard app, and includes a variety of immersive demos.

Paul McCartney Experience musical legend and visionary Sir Paul McCartney performing “Live and Let Die” in 360 degrees, with stereo 3D and immersive audio in Jaunt’s first publicly released cinematic VR experience.

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Tilt Brush Tilt Brush lets you paint in 3D space with virtual reality. Your room is your canvas. Your palette is your imagination. The possibilities are endless. Paint life-size three-dimensional brush strokes, stars, light, and even fire. Experience painting as you never have before.


The Newest Products


Senior VR Life

Senior VR Life The most useful articles which relate to seniors and the VR field.


How Virtual Reality Improves Senior Living Author

Photography

Ginna Baik

Wavebreak Media Ltd


Senior VR Life

Immersive technology helps to combat isolation, loneliness and pain management for seniors. Senior living communities present residents with a variety of options geared toward staying active and building new relationships. But isolation and loneliness remain significant issues. Unfortunately, many residents don’t get to see family as often as they’d like or travel as much as they used to, if they ever had the opportunity to do so. Advances in virtual reality technology represent a potential solution, one steadily making headway in the senior care industry. Such innovation also helps seniors and others manage pain, reducing opioid dependence, a growing epidemic on its way to being declared a national emergency by the White House. Going forward, I believe there is a tremendous opportunity for VR to change senior experiences for the better. 32

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Providing an Immersive VR Experience for Seniors Consider the success achieved by VR companies like Rendever Health and AppliedVR, both of which have partnered with CDW to roll out the technology in various settings. At a Brookdale Senior Living community in Boston, Rendever enabled residents to virtually visit locations all around the world using Samsung Gear VR headsets. The test deployment elicited so much positive feedback that Brookdale is considering rolling out a larger pilot. Meanwhile, AppliedVR, which also deploys Samsung Gear headsets, is creating a library of VR content with a focus on pain management. The technology already has proven effective in pilot programs conducted at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. In one study, patient pain dropped 24 percent during VR sessions showing therapy content such as helicopter rides over scenic landscapes. As hospitalization rates related to opioid abuse continue to rise among older adults, such pain management alternatives will only grow in importance.


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Making Memories with Virtual Reality Other organizations, like Morning Pointe of Columbia in Columbia, Tenn., have rolled out VR with an emphasis on memory care. To truly enhance engagement and immersion, Morning Pointe plans activities around VR content. For example, if there is a scheduled “trip” to Italy, the community will also prepare Italian cuisine to bring the experience to life, Executive Director Tyler Sneed said in a recent interview. In addition to virtual vacations and pain management, VR holds the potential to allow seniors to view special events for which

participation might otherwise be difficult. Rendever creates virtual experiences for individuals using recordings of special family events like a wedding in a remote location or a graduation. Such application of VR technology not only stimulates the minds of older adults, it helps to stem loneliness. Residents in senior living communities don’t have to feel like they’re missing out on life. VR technology represents a promising tool to ensure that doesn’t happen.

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Teenager’s Charity Brings VR To Sick Kids And The Elderly Author

Photography

Chloe Spencer

simbiothy


Senior VR Life

Dillon Hill, an 18-year-old who just finished his first year at University of California Davis, started the nonprofit while he was still in high school. He says that when he was younger, he used to volunteer in food kitchens or at hospitals, but often, these tasks were unrewarding as he didn’t get to interact with the community he was trying to serve.

If you’re reading this article on this site, you’re probably interested in video games, which means you’re probably a gamer. And you’re probably into video games because gaming brings you joy. Well, one Sacramento-based nonprofit organization, Gamer’s Gift, is working to bring the joy of VR games to people who might not have access to it, such as elderly people in nursing homes or sick children in hospitals. “I was very frustrated by the lack of handson volunteering for young people,” Dillon explained to Kotaku. “It was very monitored, and you don’t really get to directly interact with the community that you’re trying to help.” Dillon, a gamer himself, was also frustrated by how his peers and family members viewed video games as a “waste of time” or a “lazy thing to do.” But the defining experiences that led him to start the nonprofit were with his friend, Chris, who was diagnosed with leukemia when they were in the fifth grade. “For the first couple of weeks as he was going through that, I would try to make as many visits as possible, but it was always really hard,” Dillon said. “It was miserable. It was tough to make those visits.” One day, when he was on his way to the hospital with Chris’ dad, they decided to bring a Playstation 2 as a means of cheering Chris up and help him regain a sense of normalcy.

Dillon and Chris began to spend long hours at the hospital, playing video games. “We didn’t have to worry about when his next shot was coming or the nausea that he was feeling, or any of the typical things you have to deal with,” Dillon said. “We were completely immersed in that world, and we could very much distract ourselves from what was happening.” Video games would continue to be helpful to Dillon and his friend in the future, as they both went through darker times. In their sophomore year of high school, Chris’ sister took her own life. Once again, video games provided a welcome way to cope. Dillon and Chris would spend time playing games together as a way of coping with the tragic event. “We always got to distract ourselves and give a distraction when we try to talk, but basically those video games, we were so focused on working together and it brought us closer,” Dillon said, “which enabled us to really communicate and kind of talk about how we were feeling as we were going through that.” In October 2015 of their senior year, Dillon and Chris were chatting about their ideas for a gaming-based charity.They decided to go for it, spending hours on Google learning how to start and manage a nonprofit. In February 2016, the organization they called Gamer’s Gift officially launched, though they had no EnVirtual

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money. Dillon said they would take cake pops and sell them door to door to raise money. They ended up buying Beatles Rock Band and tried to head to a children’s hospital. Because they were all underage at the time, they could not go into children’s hospitals. Instead, they decided to visit nursing homes. Dillon admits that their first nursing home visit was a somewhat rough experience. “We learned a lot and we did build relationships, and we learned that it’s very hard to introduce technology like that to the elderly,” Dillon said, “and we learned some strategies on how to do that better.” Despite the challenges they encountered at their first event, ultimately they felt like it was successful, and they knew it was something they wanted to keep doing. Rock Band was for starters, but Dillon’s charity now focuses on virtual reality experiences. The idea is to let people undertake experiences that able-bodied, healthy people generally take for granted. Dillon said the elderly people he serves frequently want to go back to what they used to be able to do, such as scuba diving or skiing, whereas sick children want to experience everyday life outside of hospital walls. “A lot of the times in children’s hospitals they just want to be store clerks in Job Simulator, and they just want to be normal,” he said, referring to the comedic workplace VR game. “So different specific applications depending on where we’re going, but the general idea is escape and opportunity.” VR also has the benefit of not having complicated controls, or a large learner’s gap.

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“We couldn’t bring a keyboard and mouse to an elderly home because that’s a very hard concept to understand, but with something like the HTC Vive, it’s much easier,” Dillon explained. “It’s simple grabbing mechanics.” As soon as the player puts on the headset, they can experience something new, and escape reality. Still, patients and caregivers at hospitals and nursing homes were skeptical when they first learned about Gamer’s Gift and what it attempts to do with VR. VR hasn’t sold well enough to be widely popular and familiar. For those who aren’t well versed in tech, Dillon says that understanding VR and what it does can be confusing. “Explaining it to them is really difficult, and they don’t understand it until they try it,” he said, “but once they try it, they’re excited to be able to have these opportunities and these experiences.” Dominic Papa is someone who has benefitted from Gamer’s Gift and using VR. He uses a wheelchair, and communicates through gestures and body language, since he can’t talk. His aunt, Theresa Thorpe, and one of his caregivers, Abri Proctor-Carpenter, helped facilitate my interview with him. Papa lives independently, with the guidance of professional caregivers. Four days a week, he volunteers at the Citrus Heights Police Department, visiting malls and watching for shoplifters and suspicious passerby. His aunt read an article in the Sacramento Bee about Gamer’s Gift and was interested in having her nephew try out one of the systems. She reached out to them to figure out what to buy. But Gamer’s Gift insisted on helping her and Papa, and first visited him this past spring. The volunteers helped Papa


— Chris Milk

“It connects humans to other humans in a profound way that I’ve never seen before in any other form of media. It can change people’s perception of each other. And that’s how I think virtual reality has the potential to actually change the world.”


Senior VR Life


Senior VR Life

“I want it to be big, but I want it to be big in a try on different headgear sets to see which way where we can still maintain the commuone would fit best, and selected VR experinity,” he said. “The important thing to me is ences that didn’t require controllers, which growing community, because with commuPapa can’t use. Proctor-Carpenter was surnity we can easily fundraise more effectively prised at how organized the volunteers were. “I just felt like for just for it to be some commu- and we can easily spread our reach way more effectively and bring this technology to way nity service they were pretty well presented more people.” in what they were doing,” she said. “For some college kids who came together and said this While Dillon juggles attending school and is what we want to do, they were actually running Gamer’s Gift now, he says that the pretty professional.” balancing act hasn’t been incredibly challenging. He appreciates the experiences he Papa expressed that he was nervous at first gets from both attending school and running to try VR. But once he got into it, he loved it. Gamer’s Gift, although he does say that he is He tried several different experiences in outer more likely to prioritize the nonprofit over his space, underwater, and even walking with studies. And he does this because the work dinosaurs. The one where he drove a racecar he does is so rewarding. was a favorite. Gamer’s Gift later donated the VR equipment so that Papa could use it “Just seeing a disabled man who can’t whenever he wanted. speak, suddenly emote all of this emotion just with smiles and head movement as he Thorpe said that the experience opened her experiences a race car in virtual reality or eyes to how technology could be used posisomething like that,” Dillon said. “It’s really tively. “I’m of a generation where technology doesn’t come easy,” she said. “From my obser- incredible to see the idea that video games can do so much good. To see the idea come vations, I’ve noticed that [for] many people to fruition, and make an actual physical impact who get involved with technology it becomes on people is just... it’s been a really, really an addiction. In other words I see that they incredible experience.” lose some balance in their life. And Dillon and the volunteers, they just have such If you’re interested in helping Gamer’s Gift, perfect balance in their lives between the check out their Facebook page or visit their technology, the people, the helping, and website for more information. the school. They’re wonderful people.” Gamer’s Gift raises money for itself by hosting fundraising activities on Twitch, Discord, and Twitter. The organization is limited to serving California, but Dillon hopes it will grow in the future.

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For Senior Citizens, the Future of VR Lies in the Past Author

Photography

Mary Pilon

Elizaveta Galitckaia


Senior VR Life

Craig Palmer hasn’t left his Manhattan apartment in four years, but on a recent afternoon, the 78-year-old made a transatlantic voyage— while seated upright in his bed. He visited Stonehenge, a favorite vacation site of his; the streets of London’s Russell Square, near his old apartment; the stretch of Broadway where he lived and worked for so many years. A singer and actor for most of his career, Palmer was eager to poke his head backstage at the Triad, an Upper West Side nightclub he used to frequent. Back and forth the man moved his head, his eyes obscured by the Gear VR headset he wore. Sitting at the foot of the bed, Jake Kahana kept a close eye on Palmer, guiding the trip via tablet. Show tunes played quietly in the distance, and car horns blared from a window outside. “This is awesome,” Palmer said, tilting his head under the weight of the headset. “I get homesick for everything.” The experience was among Palmer’s first with VR, but that made it no less important. The bedridden man represents a population that Kahana fears has been forgotten by the VR industry: seniors. “Everyone talks about VR as a Millennial thing,” says Kahana, a New York-based designer and film director. “But the elderly are the fastest-growing segment of the population, and there really weren’t that many people looking at how this could work for them.” Kahana wanted to be one of those people, so he created BettVR With Age, a series of films designed to benefit seniors. The films, which he officially unveils today, are the result of more than 18 months of production, testing and focus groups. “They want entertainment,” Kahana says. “I know this sounds silly, but seniors are just like us.” 48

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Kahana’s idea for the project came about through his own struggles in communicating with his own grandmother. First they spoke on the phone, but transitioned to writing letters. When that became too difficult for her, he told her that he wished she could be in his living room in New York—a realization that inspired him, who worked as the creative director for the Clinton Foundation’s Emmy­-nominated VR film Inside Impact: East Africa, to try and find a solution.

simulations had a direct impact on how people behaved in the real world, even after they took off their headsets—in fact, as neuroscientists at UCLA discovered, the part of one’s brain that responds to their VR surroundings is different than the part that responds to the real world, raising questions about the new ways in VR it could affect memory.

Given the dearth of literature, Kahana opted for field work. He spent close to six months visiting community centers like DOROT, a senior facility in Manhattan’s Upper West Side, Despite precipitous growth in VR research talking to seniors about what they might want over recent years, less exists around applifrom a VR experience. (Headsets and phones cations for the elderly. However, findings in were donated by Samsung and software by other fields may hold a clue to VR’s benefits. Rendever, an MIT startup focused on bringing Researchers have learned that listening to music from the 1930s or 1940s can jog memo- VR to the elderly.) His work with the Clinton Foundation had involved grandeur—sweeping ries for Alzheimer’s and dementia patients. At Stanford, researchers found that virtual reality vistas, the streets of Nairobi—and he expected 50

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that his new audience would also thrill to the possibility. Yet, the seniors he spoke with simply missed the everyday experiences they could no longer physically access: museums, concerts, tours. Despite being anxious about using a new technology, Kahana says, the seniors were above all excited. “They love to learn,” he says. “They had these limitations, physical or otherwise, but they still wanted new experiences.” Kahana then set out to direct the 10 films that make up his series. In one, a pair of violinists play a cozy apartment concert for friends. In another, viewers experience a concert at an LA bar today where patrons and performers are still clad in World War II-era clothing. There’s a tour and concert at a Lower East Side museum; a peek into a dance rehearsal; a guided mediation and chorus. Hoping to avoid

the motion sickness that can affect VR users, Kahana’s shots are mostly from a stationary standpoint, surrounded by movement that isn’t too jarring or sudden. They’re simple, yet powerful in concept and execution, highlighting elements of an experience many take for granted while creating a sense of intimacy. The technology and films will be donated to DOROT to use for senior programming—and Kahana is already training nursing home staff how to use the headsets on their own.


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“VR is going to be defined by the content that is designed explicitly for virtual reality.” — Palmer Luckey


New York to Amsterdam and Back Back in Craig Palmer’s apartment, a violin concert unfolded before his eyes. The sedentary lifestyle has been frustrating for Palmer—a sharp contrast to a decades-long career as a singer and performer on Broadway. Much of his days now are spent watching Chelsea FC soccer games and the news, or listening to a rotation of show tunes. Being in a wheelchair and unable to see the latest theatrical productions “is terrible,” he said. “But you have to accept what you have.” After watching Kahana’s films, Palmer asked if there was anything else he could see. Kahana launched Google Maps’ VR app, and sent Kahana to Amsterdam. “I was on that canal,” Palmer said, watching the boats and bicycles. “It doesn’t smell!” Next stop: London, a city where Palmer had lived off and on for years. “That place had the most horrible bacon you’ve ever had,” Palmer said.

“I’m a vegetarian, Craig,” Kahana said. “Good! Then you won’t have to taste it.” Kahana moved him across town to the Tate Modern. “Oh, is that the Thames?” Palmer asked. “I fell into that once. Accidentally, after a party.” After about 15 minutes, the experience ended; Kahana gently lifted the headset off of Palmer’s head and asked the man how he felt. “It was awesome,” Palmer said. “But it would be better if I had a scotch and a cigarette.” “Is there anything you want me to pass on to people who will be there?” Kahana asked of the launch party, tucking the headset back into his bag. “Don’t ever say ‘pass on’ to a senior,” Palmer said.

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Tips and Tricks for The Best VR Experience While Wearing Glasses


Author

Photography

Kennedy Weston

Simon Menges


Senior VR Life

“Even if you are wearing glasses, you can still have a wonderful VR experience.” If you’re as blind as a bat or maybe just have less-than-average vision, here are our tips on how to play VR with glasses. Nobody wants to spend the time and money involved in picking up and setting up a new VR headset just to find that it doesn’t seem to fit right because they wear glasses. Whether you’re nearsighted, or they help you read, being able to wear your glasses in VR is a big deal. As a fellow poor-sighted gamer, I know that it may seem like there are things you have to do to truly enjoy the VR experience.


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Don’t Remove Your Glasses If at all possible do not remove your glasses to play VR. Most headsets are built with enough space that the visually impaired can easily wear their glasses in VR, with the exception to a few of the less expensive cardboard kits out there. If you try to go glasses-less, you won’t clearly see the picture of the game, and it could possibly alter how you see the game you play. Since you adjust your headset using how blurry the picture is, not using your glasses while playing will make this adjustment even harder.

The one caveat to this is if your vision isn’t truly terrible. If you wear glasses for slight astigmatism, or you haven’t been told you need to wear them all the time you may be able to get away with just adjusting the focal length and IPD on your headset. Then again, not every VR headset will offer these options. For the best experience seeing clearly, you’ll want to try to keep your glasses on while playing in VR.

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Make sure your glasses are clean and fitted Folks who wear glasses are actually looking through two pairs of lenses when they play in VR. While making sure that your headset is properly fitted, and that you can see what’s going on inside the headset, if your spectacles are constantly sliding down your nose, you’re going to have a bad time. That’s why we suggest ensuring that your glasses are properly fitted. What we mean is that when you put them on, they stay put. In VR you’re going to be constantly looking around and may end up thrashing a bit, and

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you’ll need to see in order to react to what is going on around you. This also means that the lenses of your glasses will need to be nice and clean. The easiest way to ensure this is to give them a quick wipe down before you jump into VR. Then you won’t go through the process of getting started only to notice the massive smudge that makes reading impossible.


03

Adjust Your Headset With Your Glasses On When first putting the headset on, make sure you have your glasses on so there’s plenty of space between them and the lens. This ensures that your experience is comfortable, and you can adjust it easily when you make your space visible. Depending on the headset, you may be able to adjust the focal length and IPD in order to get a good fit, but what’s going on inside the headset isn’t the only important thing. Unlike other users, those of us who wear glasses have two different accessories pressed right up against our faces.

This means you’ll want to be especially careful in adjusting how the headset fits, as well as making sure your glasses are stable on your face. If they slip down your nose, you won’t be able to adjust them with a VR headset on. Likewise, if your headset is adjusted too tightly around your head, you may give yourself a headache from pressing your glasses against the bridge of your nose.


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Play Your Heart Out Now that you have your headset adjusted with your glasses on, and you’ve completed all the setup you need to, go ahead and get crazy! You’re ready to play VR like no other, whether it’s pretending to work a job in Job Simulator, or fighting aliens in games like Farpoint or Alien Isolation. Have you had any problems with wearing your glasses while playing VR? Let us know in our EnVirtual website!

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Sources

Sources

Ginna Baik, “How Virtual Reality Improves Senior Living “, Aug 18 2017 https://healthtechmagazine.net/article/2017/08/ how-virtual-reality-improves-senior-living

Chloe Spencer, “Teenager’s Charity Brings VR To Sick Kids And The Elderly“, Sep 04 2016 https://kotaku.com/teenager-s-charity-brings-vr-to-sickkids-and-the-elder-1797757250

Mary Pilon, “For Senior Citizens, the Future of VR Lies in the Past“, Jun 25 2017 https://www.wired.com/2017/04/vr-for-seniors/

Kennedy Weston, “Tips and Tricks for the Best VR Experience While Wearing Glasses“, Jan 01 2018 https://www.vrheads.com/ tips-wearing-glasses-your-vr-headset

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