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001 PREMIERE ISSUE

FIRST OCEAN CONSERVANCY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE FOR WATERMEN WORLDWIDE WWW.OCEANFORCE.ORG

SPECIAL EDITION ES 100 + PAG

FREE

INTERVIEWS

JESSE HEILMAN + JIM MORIARTY + MERCEDES MAIDANA PHOTO GALLERY SPECIAL PLACES OF THE SEA AFTER RAIN SURF FOR A CAUSE COMMUNITY TALK > PLASTICS

ISSUE

number

one


001 PREMIERE ISSUE

FIRST OCEAN CONSERVANCY AND ENVIRONMENTAL MAGAZINE FOR WATERMEN WORLDWIDE WWW.OCEANFORCE.ORG

SPECIAL EDITION ES 100 + PAG

FREE

INTERVIEWS

JESSE HEILMAN + JIM MORIARTY + MERCEDES MAIDANA PHOTO GALLERY SPECIAL PLACES OF THE SEA AFTER RAIN SURF FOR A CAUSE COMMUNITY TALK > PLASTICS

ISSUE

number

one


An unidentified charger drops into a clean one as fishing boats leave Santa Barbara for a day of work during a solid swell that hit Southern California in mid April last year. Later that same week oil giant BP would trigger the worst oil spill in the history of the United States with over 210,000 gallons of crude a day pouring from the sea floor. Proof that there is always room to keep

raising the bar on environmental disasters worldwide. Welcome to the new heights.

A year after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill disaster, some

astonishing numbers come to light.

On April 2011 the Center for Biological Diversity released a report tallying the full impacts of the disaster on the region’s birds, sea turtles, dolphins and other wildlife. The Center estimated that approximately 6,000 sea turtles, 26,000 dolphins and whales, 82,000 birds, and countless fish and invertebrates may have been harmed by the disaster. This oil spill pollution will continue to affect Gulf wildlife for decades. The cost to clear up the huge mess on the water has been calculated to reach $40 billion. Source: Ocean Sentry

PHOTO Š Alfonso Lopez


2011 This is your chance to make a sound and positive investment in the global community - you, your

business and organization can make a socially and environmentally responsible investment by supporting a real bottom-up grassroots project.

ADVERTISE

WITH US


1

INVEST IN A MODEL THAT MAKES SENSE IN THE DIGITAL AGE.

Advertising in Oceanforce Magazine is highly efficient from both a cost and environmental perspective - we offset the carbon footprint generated by our various web servers and networks year round.

YES, I WOULD LIKE TO ADVERTISE ! Please email

support@oceanforce.org


While we too agree that there is always time for another walk down the beach at sunset, we also think that it all depends on how you look at it. Our rapid climate change is proof that things are certainty accelerating for the worse and immediate COLLECTIVE action is needed. That includes every one of us. It is time we ALL take action to safeguard our most precious resource, the ocean.

Show your support and help us spread the word about this new movement. Together we can make a difference!


Editor In Chief Alfonso Lopez Editorial Director Areli Perez Copy Editor Thomas Lockie Translation Editor Thomas Lockie Creative Director Alfonso Lopez Business Director Stephen Perestam Web Development Inextricable Design Creative Design Rafaela Laureti Staff Writers Areli Perez, Thomas Lockie, Alfonso Lopez, Staff Photographers Alfonso Lopez, Steve Sawitz, Colin Brown, Ricardo Giaccagglia, Francisco Herrera, Francisco Lacaze Contributing Writers Mercedes Maidana, Facundo Albarracin, Guillermo Piñon, Meagan Wylie Contributing Photographers Rob Snow, Gregg Miller, Terence Reis, BIDU, surfshooterhawaii.com, João Vianna, Jeff Munson, LightHawk.org, Kyle Lishok, Brooke Spencer, Alexander Carrion, Daniela Bombina, Rafaela Laureti, Facundo Albarracin, Nicolas Felicevich, Adrian Ortiz

PHOTO © Alfonso Lopez

Oceanforce Magazine is a community-based project published quarterly by Oceanforce Foundation. Editorial contributions are welcome via e-mail at submissions@oceanforce.org - Oceanforce Foundation is not responsible for unsolicited materials. Oceanforce Magazine © is a copyrighted publication of Oceanforce Foundation. DO NOT print, re-publish or distribute this magazine without the authorized consent of the Editors. For advertising enquiries, and any other questions please email info@oceanforce.org. Made on a . PHOTO: Alfonso Lopez


www.eeday.org


www.eeday.org


Magazine

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001 PREMIERE ISSUE

> MERCEDES MAIDANA INTERVIEW

Our friend “Meti” talks about her beginnings as a surfer, protecting her playground and her love for mother earth. Find out why she is making a big splash both in and out of the water.

> SURF FOR A CAUSE

Project Save Our Surf rocks Huntington Beach with 24 hours of ocean advocacy. The event brings together film and TV celebrities as well as pro surfers in a one of a kind event raising money for ocean conservancy groups.

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> AFTER RAIN

While searching for big waves in Mexico, Mercedes Maidana leads by example and brings us a story to remember. Because being an ocean “ambassador” means so much more than just having good water skills.

> BIRD OF WATER

We take you “hurricane hunting” on the East Coast with aerial expert and ocean conservancy advocate Jesse Heilman. Photographer Robert Snow helps us see things from a different perspective...

PRESERVING THE ENVIRONMENT ONE BOTTLE CAP AT THE TIME -

WANT MORE? PLEASE VISIT THE MAGAZINE’S WEB SITE TO EXPLORE NEW ARTICLES, PHOTOGRAPH


> SPECIAL PLACES OF THE SEA

Come dive with us and learn first hand about our national system of Marine Protected Areas. Understanding their role and importance within our coastal communities, and the marine ecosystems at risk is a must for all watermen.

> JIM MORIARTY INTERVIEW

We sat down with Surfrider Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer Jim Moriarty. He shares his thoughts about the past, present and future of grassroots organizing.

> PHOTO GALLERY

Follow us to remote destinations where our precious water is the main nature element giving life to some amazing photographs. Lots of swimming, hiking and diving went into creating this editorial piece now at your fingertips!

> COMMUNITY TALK > PLASTIC BAGS We walked around town in San Diego, CA. and asked community members a couple of questions about their relationship with plastic bags and their feelings about there being a law that could ban their use.

- DOLPHIN ALERT IN FERNANDO DE NORONHA - INNER VISIONS

HS, VIDEOS, BLOGS AND MANY OTHER INTERACTIVE FEATURES @ WWW.OCEANFORCE.ORG


Welcomes

YOU


Welcome to Oceanforce Magazine’s PREMIERE issue, this is a very special

Please take a minute to browse through these pages and let us know your comments. moment for all of us and we want you to be a part of it.

Thanks for stopping by - ENJOY! PHOTO Š Alfonso Lopez


Mercedes Maida HAILING FROM COLD SOUTH AMERICA SHE SETTLED IN THE WARM WEATHER OF THE HAWAIIAN ISLANDS TO PURSUE HER DREAM. THE 29 YEAR OLD ARGENTINA NATIVE HAS POSITIONED HERSELF AS THE NEW FRESH FACE IN THE BIG WAVE SURFING SCENE AND IS MAKING A BIG SPLASH BOTH IN, AND OUT OF THE WATER. THIS TIME, MERCEDES SHARES WITH US MEMORIES ABOUT HER BEGINNING AS A SURFER, HER INTEREST FOR PROTECTING HER PLAYGROUND-THE OCEAN, HER GOALS AND ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND MORE IMPORTANTLY HER LOVE FOR OUR MOTHER EARTH.

PHOTO © www.greggmillerphoto.com


ana


Please tell us about yourself. How old are you, where are you from, where do you live? I am 29 years old, originally from Buenos Aires, Argentina. I’ve been living in the North Shore of Oahu for the last six years.

How did you pick up surfing? I was in Brazil for a short holiday and a friend of a friend was a surfer. I asked him if I could try his board for a few hours. I went out to the lineup by myself, having no idea of how to even duck dive! I got tossed around all morning, just falling and getting worked. Suddenly I realized that I wanted to surf every day of my life! Even without having gotten a single wave, I got hooked. I think it was written in my destiny.

Did your love for nature evolve from being around the ocean? I’ve always loved nature and have always felt most at calm there, where I could find my self. Having lived in a huge city like Buenos Aires for most of my life, I always looked for ways to make trips to the beach or the lakes. My love for nature just got more intense and alive since I discovered surfing.

What else do you love to do? What are your other interests? I do a lot of training when I am not surfing. I got to a point that I love training almost as much as surfing! I get very enthusiastic about it. I like running, swimming, bodysurfing, long rides in the bike, hiking and doing Bikram Yoga. Aside from physical activities, I also like meditating and reading about my spiritual path. I like spending time with my friends and family (when I get to see them). I also like writing for my blog and cooking great Argentinean meals!


Mercedes Maidana Not too many people can complete this task with such grace, style and lack of fear. Mercedes looking solid and confident when most needed. PHOTO Š BIDU


Mercedes Maidana

From South America to the Hawaiian Islands, Mercedes has made Waimea Bay her new playground.

PHOTO Š Terence Reis


You live in Hawaii right? How is the island life treating you? The island life suits me very well. I like having a simple life, with no stress and lots of time to dedicate to all the things that I like to do, mainly surfing. Having come from a big city, I find that my life is very different nowadays. I am happy and grateful to be able to live in paradise…

In your opinion, what do you think your (and anyone’s) responsibilities as a surfer and a water person should be? The ocean gives me the biggest fulfillment of my life. I go there to play, to find myself, to grow as a person and as an athlete. We can’t just be takers, we should learn to preserve it and protect it. I could never give back all the blessings that the ocean gives me. Any step in a more caring direction is good for a change. We can all do our part in the small things in our daily lives to live a greener lifestyle.

So you try and set an example for the new generations? I just try to live my life the best I can. If that inspires other people, then that’s great! If anything, being more aware about my environment comes naturally as a way of being grateful to Nature.

What are your career highlights or your most memorable times for you in the last few years? My career highlights were to become a back to back finalist in the XXL Billabong Big Wave Awards in the Women’s Overall Performance category during 2009 and 2010. Sine I started surfing big waves I had so many memorable moments. Each one is special in different ways. I usually remember the moments that are most intense. One I can recall is a wave at Waimea Bay last winter. It was the morning after they ran the Eddie and the waves were 15 feet and glassy as I had never seen before in Waimea. My friend yelled to me to catch this wave that stood in front of me. I felt that I was too deep for the take off but I trusted him and I just paddled my heart out and dropped it. I remember seeing a green glassy wall underneath me, it felt like cutting warm butter with my board. I will never forget the intensity of the ride and the colors that I saw.


Since you travel a lot, did you get to see a lot of ocean pollution problems in the places you have been to? What do you think of our oceans and beaches? It depends. In Tahiti the water is crystal clear and I found no trash anywhere around. Then you go to places like Mexico and it’s another story. I was impressed by the amount of pollution that came from the river mouth to the beaches. I also saw that a lot of the people spend the weekends at the beach but but forget to bring back their trash with them. It’s very sad. How about Argentina? Are you aware of the current state of the oceans and beaches down there? There is a cultural mentality that is hard to witness. During the summer places like Mar del Plata get tons of tourists that leave behind tons of trash on the beaches. The beaches get super polluted and nobody cares about it. Then there are other problems such as development projects on beaches that generate more erosion and kill great surf spots like the classic Torreon that was once a world class right that used to be one of the longest and most perfect waves in South America. The wave dissapeared after a jetty was built... You just organized a beach cleanup in Puerto Escondido, what’s the most memorable thing or the first thing that comes to mind when you think about the cleanup? It made me very happy to see the kids so involved with their place. They worked hard and promised to do their best to keep Zicatela cleaner. What can we expect to see from Mercedes Maidana in the future? I am very committed to my career as a big wave surfer. I want to grow in the sport and become the best that I can be, in and out of the water.


Mercedes Maidana

This is how you earn yourself a spot in the line up at big Waimea Bay-charging. Maintaining consistency at doing this will sure earn her a spot in the Eddie Aikau Invitational Contest. Go Mercedes, GO ! PHOTO Š www.greggmillerphoto.com


PHOTO Š www.greggmillerphoto.com


Mercedes Maidana Do you have any final words of advice for our readers, any tips out there for someone who is trying to organize a cleanup or wants to get something going in their community? Anyone can do it. You just have to want to do it. You need a few trash bags, gloves and a few friends or even strangers to start a beach cleanup. If you don’t find anyone, then just go by yourself. You’ll get a great tan and a good exercise while you are at it.

Shout outs and thanks? I’d like to thank Patagonia for helping me chase my dream of surfing big waves around the world. I am learning a lot by being involved with such a great company. I’d also like to thank Wave Tribe that gears me up before my trips with their eco board bags, leashes and deck pads. They are such a great small company with a big future. All their products are made from recycled materials. You can visit my website and follow my blog at: www.mercedesmaidana.com Thanks to Oceanforce and best of luck with all your projects. We need more people like you involved in the surfing world.

Thank you so much Mercedes. It is been a great pleasure talking with you and we wish you the best! PLEASE VISIT

www.mercedesmaidana.com - www.greggmillerphoto.com www.surfshooterhawaii.com - www.kahiwakiwi.com www.patagonia.com - www.wavetribe.com


“Last week in Fernando De Noronha (BRZ), I had the luck to be in the right place at the right time. I was taking underwater photos at Cacimba do Padre and to my surprise spinner dolphins made an appearance. I saw that they were being very communicative and one of them appeared giving me a message for me to show to the world, a photo message for us to reflect on our consumption habits and their effect on the seas.” - JOÃO VIANNA

PHOTO ©

João Vianna


SURF FOR A CAUSE

PROJECT SAVE OUR SURF ROCKS HUNTINGTON BEACH WITH 24 HOURS OF OCEAN ADVOCACY Story: Areli Perez Photos © Alfonso Lopez

Peter Townsend and the brave b u

nch


H


A

beautiful half moon shone over the hundreds of ocean lovers who had gathered for Project Save our Surf’s Surf 24 event at the legendary Huntington Beach, CA in solidarity for the conservation of our fragile oceans and ecosystems. Our Oceanforce team was lucky enough to be part of this unique event. SURF 24 coincided with International Surfing Day 2010 and kicked off at 11 AM on Saturday June 19th and was scheduled to end on Sunday at 12 PM noon. Co hosted by surf champions Peter (PT) Townsend, Shaun Tomson, and actress Tanna Frederick, the event drew out professional athletes, actors, actresses, musicians, grassroots organizations and community members.

The 24-surf showdown was a mix of recreational and pro surfers joined by television and film celebrities competing to put up the best wave each hour. Teams were divided into two categories- brand teams such as Billabong and Hurley and recreational teams- that totaled 12 teams. Groups paid $2,400 to compete – or $100 an hour – meaning this segment of the fund-raising effort raised nearly $30,000 alone.


Contestants during each heat were numbered from 1 to 12 to be identified; teams kept the same number throughout the contest. Each surfer competed to get their best one-wave score out of 10 possible waves. For many, including myself, one of the highlights of the surf contest was stand up paddle heat that drew out some of California’s top riders, like Chuck Patterson to the event.

SURF 24 coincided with International Surfing Day 2010 and kicked off at 11 AM on Saturday June 19th and was scheduled to end on Sunday at 12 PM noon


one of the highlights of the surf contest was the stand up paddle heat that drew out some of California’s top riders.

Chuck Patterson


Contestants during each heat were numbered from 1 to 12 to be identified; teams kept the same number throughout the contest. Each surfer competed to get their best one-wave score out of 10 possible waves. For many, including myself, one of the highlights of the surf contest was stand up paddle heat that drew out some of California’s top riders, like Chuck Patterson to the event. At the end of the 24-hour period at noon Sunday, the team with the best 24 scores was named SURF 24

champion. Team Billabong took home the title of SURF 24 champions with a team that included their star juniors, ISA World Junior Champion Keana Asing, and former Pac Sun USA Surf Team members the Thompson brothers Cody and Evan. Besides a 24 hr surf showdown, the event festivities included live music, guest speakers, mural painting, volleyball, a surffilm program on the Pier Plaza, 7 A.M. beach cleanup organized by Vitamin Water and Surfrider Foundation and

an amazing Eco Village set up as you entered the event. The Eco Village featured over 40 vendors who sold everything from organic energy bars, to earth friendly products such as Amazon Earth sandals who take thousands of tires out of the waste stream by pressing the rubber into comfy sandal soles. Let’s point out that 20 million tires are discarded every year in Brazil, ending up in landfills, lakes and rivers. So far, Amazon has recycled over 800,000 tires.


The Eco Village featured over 40 vendors who sold everything from organic energy bars, to earth friendly products... Among the vendors were information booths sets up by organizations such as Heal the Bay, Surfrider Foundation and OC Board of Education Program Outdoor Adventures. Some of information distributed included details about AB 1998, a legislation that would reduce the distribution of single-use plastic shopping bags at


grocery stores, convenience stores and pharmacies in California. The bill recently failed to receive enough votes in the senate but the fate of AB 1998 is still unknown. If you’d like to help take a stand against plastic bag pollution visit our friends at Heal The Bay at www. healthebay.org/get-involved/ take-action

Also important to highlight was the presence of big media players such as Surfer Magazine and Fuel TV who showed their support and expanded their media advocacy efforts to help safeguard our oceans. Media Advocacy is a powerful tool in creating sustainable change. This philosophy lies at the very core of the things that gave birth to the magazine you are currently reading.

The oil spill that occurred in the Gulf of Mexico earlier this year was a wake up call for many. We, mankind are liable for some of the greatest assaults on our Earth. We have selfishly let our oceans and species suffer the consequences of our actions. I can only hope that this article serves as more than a report of an event. Hundreds of people attended SURF 24. Can you imagine hosting a similar event in your city, town, and neighborhood?


Let us never forget we are borrowing this earth from our children.

Graitbinit to a ball

Make wetsuit. Shove it under your

ce Dispose properly on onshore, and then...

REPEAT !

for the water A frequent practice big coastal enthusiasts living in cities.

There is work to be done and WE have the power to be catalyst of change. Let us never forget we are borrowing this earth from our children. Project SURF 24 in summary nothing but good times and good vibes for a good cause. The event raised $50,000 for organizations such as Heal the Bay, Inside the Outdoors and Surfrider Foundation.


24 hour Team W ork !

Tanna Frederick Kno ws how to bring out the crowds

But more important than any monetary figure the event successfully united people to raise awareness about one of the gravest environmental issues, the pollution of our oceans and destruction of fragile ecosystems. The combination of surf names and figures from the entertainment industry helped jumpstart this incredible event, but at the end of the day it was clear that the events success was largely due to the COLLECTIVE effort of many.

Kudos to all who were part of Project Surf 24 and my respect for all those who helped put this beautiful and empowering event together. We look forward to next years event!


AFTER

RAIN Story: Mercedes Maidana Photos Š Gregg Miller

On a chase for big waves, Mercedes Maidana takes a break to give back to the environment and the youth of Puerto Escondido, Mexico. This is the reality of Zicatela Beach on any given winter.


cleanup “Godo also mentioned that he had been interested in a beach with the Junior Lifeguards, so we decided to organize one.�


BY


W

hen I came to Puerto in May I fell in love with the place: a long sandy beach, perfect clean barrels and nice palapas where one could drink a beer, eat some good food, and watch the sunset. A few weeks later the rain started, and with it came the sacred offshore winds. However, the rain also brought in a bunch of trash that was carried from the river mouths and the streets all the way to the sand and the ocean. The high tide would eat all the trash and bring it to the ocean. It was hard to see so many plastic bottles and tin cans all over the place.

I asked Godo, the head lifeguard if he knew of any school that would be interested in bringing kids to the beach to do a cleanup. He told me that he was in charge of the Junior Lifeguard Program in Puerto Escondido, in which every weekend twenty kids attend to learn ocean skills and lifesaving techniques. Godo also mentioned that he had been interested in a beach cleanup with the Junior Lifeguards, so we decided to organize one.

to Mexico. This is the number one reason why Mercedes took the trip possibility Clean, huge waves ! At the same time, travelling offers the d you. of lending a hand to help the new community that welcome PHOTO Š Jeff Munson


When I met the Junior Lifeguards I was surprised to see how eager they were to clean up the beach. We had a little talk before we started. I explained to them how all the plastic harms the beach and the animals, and how we could start making a difference in small ways. I asked them how they would feel if their beach was so polluted

that one day they could not go to swim or surf there anymore. They shared how much the ocean is a part of their lives. It is a place where they can play, spend time with their families, surf, and enjoy nature. It was nice to hear their motivation to protect their place.


“We couldn’t have done it w ithout the great help of the Salvavidas of Puerto Escondido. Those guys save liv es every day in the gnarly currents of the Mex Pipe. They are one of the best waterm en in the world. They deserve more re cognition for the hard work that they do” -Mercedes Maidana.


We spent a few hours picking up all kinds of trash. There was a lot and we all felt very happy to see the difference in the area on Zicatela Beach that we cleaned up. The reality is that the trash problem here in Puerto is much bigger than the small effort we made that day, but you have to start somewhere. The bigger picture painted here was that the kids saw how making their own personal difference can help for the better.

They were very enthusiastic throughout the day, and stated that they planned to keep up with their efforts to keep Zicatela Beach more pollution-free in the future.

“Junior Lifeguards feeling a pride at the great job that they did that morning.�


PLEASE VISIT www.greggmillerphoto.com www.mercedesmaidana.com


BIRD OF WATER

JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE SWITCH SPECTACULAR PERSPECTIVE SWITCH

INTERVIEWED BY ALFONSO LOPEZ

ALL PHOTOS © ROBERT SNOW


BIRD OF WATER JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE

SWITCH SPECTACULAR

PERSPECTIVE SWITCH


Let’s go back in time. How old were you and who got you into surfing?

Did you share a strong connection with the environment and the outdoors before that time?

Well let’s see, I grew up going to the beach and every once in while I would mess around in the surf or get pushed into waves by some of my older cousins. I didn’t really get into surfing until I was around 11 or 12. From then on nearly everything else that mattered in life was put on hold for my new found love.

I’ve always shared a really strong connection with the environment and the outdoors. I was raised in a family that does absolutely everything outside. On any given day if we weren’t out playing some type of sport, my mom would have us out in the woods doing nature hikes. I wouldn’t want it any other way, which is one of the reasons it’s so hard for me to understand the rage with video games and other entertainment geared at keeping kids indoors.

Over the years, did your new connection with the ocean make you see things in a different way? As my love for the ocean grew, my perspective on every aspect of life changed. The feeling that you get when you’re in the ocean is powerful and addicting. It is the most natural and healthy high you could ever feel.


BIRD OF WATER JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE

SWITCH SPECTACULAR

PERSPECTIVE SWITCH

What issues surrounding the ocean and its beaches have you seen as part of your surf traveling and where? Coastal over development, polluted waters, dirty beaches, denied public access? The second I read this question one particular image came to mind from a recent trip to El Salvador. During one of the rainy days of our trip we were cruising around, when we came across this little river mouth that was pouring into the lineup of one of the main point breaks in the country. I kid you not, it looked like a major industrial city had dumped every last bit of its waste into this river. There was everything from shopping carts, oil drums, to semi truck tires. I can’t even describe how sad it was to see all this trash being emptied straight into the surf. It is really heartbreaking, and opens your eyes to how harmful we are being to something that gives us so much.


BIRD OF WATER JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE

SWITCH SPECTACULAR

PERSPECTIVE SWITCH


Have you had a chance to interact with community members from those areas? If yes, what was it like? For the most part, my interaction with the locals from these areas has been pretty limited. I can recall times where I have been just disgusted by the amount of trash and waste that was being pumped into the lineups while the locals just looked at it like nothing was going to change, so why stress about it. It’s pretty sad because many of these problems can be taken care of with little work and minimal expenses. With more education in these areas about how important it really is to keep our environment healthy, we may see some major changes for the future.

How do you think the watermen should get more involved and active in the conservation and protection of our oceans? I definitely feel as a waterman, that it is our responsibility to protect the environment, especially the ocean. There are so many different ways to get involved and make a difference. In this day and age, there is no excuse for someone to not do their part to help out.


BIRD OF WATER JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE

SWITCH SPECTACULAR

PERSPECTIVE SWITCH


What do you think your responsibility should be then? As of this year, I have decided to do whatever I can to be a part of the solution to this ongoing problem. I am hoping to link up with other watermen who share similar beliefs and values on this subject and who are ready to make a difference. The ocean has given me everything and I still continue to make my livelyhood from it, so I feel like its time to stop being so selfish and actually put some work and effort into protecting it.

I know you deeply care about your playground and are trying to get more involved in supporting ocean awareness efforts whenever you can. How did it feel to be a part of Surf 24? It was an amazing honor to be part of the Surf 24 event in Huntington, not to mention being labeled as the MVP of the entire event (that was just icing on the cake). To be competing alongside some of the biggest names in surfing as well as some of the biggest names from Hollywood was really cool. Not to mention the fact that everyone in the event came together to protect and preserve the world’s greatest “playground,” our oceans. That event was really special to me; I was able to meet so many genuinely good people that have given so much back to our oceans and environment. It was really inspirational and put me in check. By the next morning, I was asking myself why I hadn’t been involved in these programs and organizations that are doing everything to keep our oceans clean and healthy. It really lit the flame for some humanitarian work in the near future!!!


BIRD OF WATER

JESSE HEILMA N PERSPECTIVE SWITCH SPECTACULAR PERSPECTIVE SWITCH

What should we expect to see from Jesse Heilman in the near future? You should expect to see me living life as happily as possible, while working to change lives and the environment for the better along the way. I feel really blessed to be given my job as a professional surfer, and I intend to do anything and everything possible to ensure that my “office” stays as clean and healthy as possible for years to come.

Any shout outs, sponsor acknowledgements, last words? I would really like to thank my sponsors, Alpinestars, Able Planet Linx Audio, Firewire Surfboards, Maui Nix Surf Shop, Black Flys, and Dakine, for without you I would not be able to be doing what I am today. You guys have given me crazy amounts of support and opportunities over the years and I look forward to the future….


Focused on a more sustainable future Angel Surfboards is innovating with simplicity and bold creativity. PHOTO Š Alfonso Lopez


INTERVIEWED BY ALFONSO LOPEZ

PRESERVING

THE ENVIRONMENT ONE BOTTLE CAP AT THE TIME Tell us what you do and a bit about your family’s history. Hi, my name is Angel “Lito” Antifora, I am a surfer and surfboard manufacturer by trade. I have been involved in the fabrication of surfboards since an early age. My father is a pioneer in this sport and the shaper with the most experience and longest career here in Argentina – next year will mark 50 years since he shaped his first surfboard! How did the idea of recycling water bottles and turning the caps into leash plugs came about? I remember my dad making the leash plugs out of resin and then running a metal rod through them. Years later came the availability of plastic leash plugs and that’s what we have been using since. Just a few months ago I thought about following in my dad’s footsteps and making the plugs from scratch only this time using the necks and cap of soda bottles. It worked out great! Do you just recycle the caps and necks of these bottles? We use about ¾ of the bottles. The bottoms are used as resin mixing cups. We use them at least three to four times here in the factory. The neck and the cap undergo a simple assembling process and are turned into colorful leash plugs.


Creativity and hard turns to show the world a new way of pluggin in - research and development at its peak. PHOTO Š Adrian Ortiz


How are these new recycled leash plugs performing in high surf? After creating different versions and doing a lot of testing, we have developed a highly a reliable product. One of our team riders Juan Piccolo, just got back from Chile where he rode our surfboards in big surf – these recycled plugs took quite the beating and held on perfectly! What’s the feedback you get from those who have tried it? Some of our customers thought it was weird at first. But they liked the idea once they realized how sturdy the plugs are and that we created them as a way of bringing awareness about our consumption habits and the importance of recycling in this city. These plugs have really made my customers understand a recycled product can be strong and fashionable. People love it! What’s the ecological philosophy of Angel Surfboards? We are always trying to improve our products any way we can, especially when it comes to reducing our impact on the environment. We are also constantly recycling and reducing our waste. What are you working on right now, what’s coming? Our minds never stop working and creating new things. We are currently working on the development of polyurethane foam that will be less toxic and harmful to the environment. Also, we recycle all of our factory scraps and are trying to turn ANGEL SURF into an even more sustainable company. Please check out www.angelsurf.net to read more about our creations and see our full line of surfboards!


L A I C E P S S E C PLA E H T F O SEA Story: Areli Pérez

As a kid I wondered what lied beneath

Marine Protected Areas have proven to be an effective tool for rebuilding the peaceful ocean surface. It both degraded marine habitats and wildlife intrigued and really frightened me. As and are gaining support worldwide. an adult now I fear my kids will wonder However, more public support and why all that beauty disappeared. This collaborative stewardship among is the reality we are living; hundreds of marine species are vanishing and entire policymakers and community members ecosystems are degraded due to global is needed. Maybe you want to ensure your favorite surf, swim, or dive spot is warming, pollution, over fishing, and irresponsible habits. As a consequence protected but aren’t sure how. There is a lot of information out there about we are losing a source of food, jobs, MPAs, which I know can definitely be and vital environmental services -like oxygen- that a healthy ocean generates. overwhelming. We’ve created a list of Currently, “less than one percent of our commonly asked questions to jumpstart oceans are under legal protection.” This you on your own research. Hopefully you find some useful information here is both a challenge and an opportunity and are encouraged to join us in the to find ways to care and protect the campaign to safeguard these “special health of our waters. As one solution, places of the sea.” communities of ocean activists, grassroots organizations, scientist, and governments, globally support the creation of marine reserves, also known as Marine Protected Areas (MPAs).


Currently 13% of land on earth is protected, while less than 1% of the oceans are under legal protection.

PHOTO Š Steve Sawitz


L A I C E SP S E C A L P E H T F O SEA What are MPAs?

“Much like national parks [on land such as] Yosemite or Yellowstone, these underwater parks are special places in the sea that protect sensitive plants and animals while allowing people to experience a healthier marine environment.” Marine Protected Areas” (MPAs) are legally defined in the U.S. as, “areas where natural and/or cultural resources are given greater protection than the surrounding water.” In 2006 the President of the United States gave an Executive Order 13158 on Marine Protected Areas. This order directed government agencies like National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Department of the Interior, to work with other federal agencies and states, territories, tribes, and the public to develop a national system of MPAs. Some people have the misconception that marine protected areas are completely closed to all human activities but actually nearly all MPAs allow activities such as beach use, diving, surfing, kayaking, and even certain types of fishing. MPAs are scientifically monitored and evaluated by state and local marine scientists for their effectiveness. In the U.S., MPAs span a range of marine habitats including the open ocean, coastal areas, inter-tidal zones, estuaries, and the Great Lakes. Other countries may define MPAs a little differently but follow the same concept.


A global MPA database was created in 2004. Since then 6000 MPAS have been added. PHOTO Š Colin Brown


L A I C E SP S E C A L P E H T F O SEA

PHOTO © Steve Sawitz


How are the National (U.S) MPAs chosen? MPAs must go through a nomination and review process before being chosen. In places like California, the state Department of Fish and Game who oversees the MPA process, receives a proposal that was created by a stakeholder group. This group is formed of fishermen and the local community members, grassroots organization representatives, and marine business representatives. Before reaching the Fish and Game Commission for final approval, the proposal is reviewed by experts in the field. But the real success of the proposal depends on a community driving and pushing it forward. The Fish and Game Commission in California has 10 public hearings before voting.

As an example, this past October 2010, San Diego Coastkeeper, a grassroots organization in Southern California reported nearly 700 supporters showed up to the California Fish and Game Commission meeting in support of MPAs. What message did that send to Fish and Game Commission? WE, the Community, WANT MPAs. What we was the result? SUCCESS! In December 2010, the Commission voted on a network of MPAs in Southern California. Research shows very positive responses from fish, invertebrates, and seaweed from marine reserves around the world. Scientific studies of over 124 marine reserves world- wide have shown that on average, reserves allow the number of plants and animals in their boundaries to more than triple and boost their individual sizes by an average of 27%. “A 2009 study from the Gulf of California found a three-fold increase in the density of fish species in the waters around protected areas,� showing that marine reserves improve fishing conditions in nearby open areas.

90% IN THE U.S. 5000 10% INTERNATIONAL MARINE PROTECTED AREAS


L A I C E SP S E C A L P E H T F O SEA


Benefits of local MPAs? There is plenty of research out there that shows very positive responses from marine reserves around the world. Scientific studies of over 124 marine reserves world- wide have shown that on average, reserves allow the number of plants and animals in their boundaries to more than triple and boost their individual sizes by an average of 27%. “A 2009 study from the Gulf of California found a three-fold increase in the density of fish species in the waters around protected areas,” showing that marine reserves improve fishing conditions in nearby open areas.

What are the benefits of having MPAs globally? Many marine species live in small, specific habitats while others require protection across their migration routes that cover vast areas. Research also shows that as the numbers of fish increase inside marine reserves, fish are more likely to “spillover” into surrounding areas and benefit local fisheries. This is one reason why it’s so important to have a global network of MPAs. Other benefits of creating a network include the opportunity to work and coordinate with other MPAs on common issues, give greater public and international recognition and share resources. More importantly, a network of MPAs will improve ecological viability and health of our oceans.

How do you set up a successful MPA? Making sure that the needs of the future generations are met is one of the greatest objectives of MPAs. In order for a Marine Protected Area to be sustainable it needs to consider three important factors: • Cultural and Social Conservation (protecting our culture) •

Economic (financial) and Social Conservation

Biological Conservation (Maintaining species diversity—preserving as many plants and animals as possible)

Remember that community involvement is paramount for a successful MPA. “When people engage across group lines, they strengthen a

community’s capacity for problem solving.”

PHOTO © www.lighthawk.org


L A I C E SP S E C A L P E H T F O SEA What are some communities doing? Not for profit organizations in California such as San Diego Coastkeeper, Heal the Bay, Santa Monica Baykeeper and Surfrider Foundation are taking the lead in local MPA initiatives. Their efforts include community awareness, education and engagement. They provide the community with helpful resources such as online petitions through their websites, presentations by scientific experts, Q & A forums and other valuable information to engage communities and promote action. Recently Coastkeeper, in partnership with other organizations and community members led a very successful campaign to establish MPAs in Southern California. Other groups doing their part are organizations such as LightHawk and their network of pilots. For 31 years, LightHawk has donated flights to advance conservation efforts across North America and Central America. Since 2006, LightHawk has played an important role in the efforts to establish marine protected areas by making the aerial perspective freely available to conservation groups. These donated flights help photographers capture iconic images of coastal areas, provide important data on the commercial and recreational uses of the ocean and help media educate a wider audience about the proposed marine sanctuaries. . The aerial photography captured during LightHawk flights has proven to be instrumental in the process of designating successful Marine Protected Areas.


PHOTO © Colin Brown


L A I C E P S S E C A L P OF THE SEA

How does an MPA affect my community and me? You will hear a lot of opinions out there about the effect MPAs have on coastal communities. In California, some argue MPAs would not only benefit the marine ecosystems, but also the people who live in or visit the state’s coastal areas and those who depend on the state’s coastal waters for work. California’s beaches and coastal waters draw millions of visitors to the ocean each year. MPAs could help draw many more visitors who enjoy swimming,

kayaking, scuba diving, wildlife viewing and many other activities. There is also the belief that the MPAs would hinder and affect the fishing industry and therefore the livelihood of the many people who depend on fishing for work. But restoring ocean habitat would actually help boost fish populations and rebuild this sector of the ocean economy that has suffered sharp decline in some fish


PHOTO Š Alfonso Lopez

populations over the past several decades. Places like California have seen revenues from commercial fishing decline by more than 45% since 1990. Naturally, everyone is different and is bound to have different social, cultural and economic points of view. It is important that we take the time to familiarize ourselves with these arguments to formulate our own opinion about how it might affect you and your community.


L A I C E SP S E C A L P E H T F O SEA What happens after an MPA is established? The best case scenario is you, your friends and community work together to advocate for a network of MPAs but then what? How do you know what the boundaries are, who ensures the area is protected and for how long? Many people in Southern California are wondering the same thing. More than 350 square miles of ocean, stretching from Santa Barbara to the Mexican Border, were established as an MPA network by Department of Fish and Game. This is an AMAZING success for MPA advocates in the Southern California region that dedicated years of work and commitment. The newly created MPA regulations are receiving the final touches and expected to go into effect sometime in 2011. The locations of the MPAs have been chosen; boundary coordinates will be incorporated into boating GPS systems and on navigation maps and permanent signage will be installed around the actual MPAs. The information can be found on the internet – like Coastkeeper’s website

and the Department of Fish and Game’s site http://www.dfg.ca.gov/mlpa/pdfs/ scmpas121510.pdf. For now fishing is still allowed in all the spots that will be legally protected later this year. But the real success of an MPA network in Southern California or anywhere for that matter will require much collaboration especially between government and community members. Although there is still a lot to do in Southern California and everywhere really, let the success of MPA advocates in Southern California serve as an example of the great things that can be accomplished. The creation of a MPA network in Southern California didn’t happen over night. Passionate citizens spent years advocating. As a native of Southern California I am proud of their work and am happy to know we are taking the necessary measure to protect our marine wildlife for a long long time.


PHOTO © www.lighthawk.org


L A I C SPE ES PLAC E OF TH SEA T A

C

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The ocean needs your help. Protecting it is a shared responsibility. The need to ensure its well being is urgent, so that oceans are healthy for the future and people can work, play and use oceans in sustainable ways. We depend on the oceans as much as they depend on us. “If we do something today, we know we’ll have an impact tomorrow.” Don’t forget to tell at least one person about MPAs as a way of spreading the good word. Have a family member, friend, or neighbor read our magazine. Additionally, we encourage you to contact local grassroots organizations to see if they are currently working on any MPA initiatives and how you can help. Please visit their websites:

www.sdcoastkeeper.org www.lighthawk.org www.healthebay.org www.surfrider.org www.nature.org www.sanctuaries.noaa.gov www.oceanconservancy.org www.ocean.nationalgeographic.com/ocean/missionblue www.marinebio.org/oceans/conservation - www.caloceans.org/mlpa-regions/south-coast - www


w.mpa.gov


JIMMORIARTY

Surfrider Foundation Chief Executive Officer Interviewed by Alfonso López All Photos © Kyle Lishok

This time we decided to dig into the thoughts and visions of one of the most prominent figures of today’s ocean activism movement. We interviewed Surfrider Foundation’s Chief Executive Officer, Jim Moriarty, while working at his HQ’s office in San Clemente, CA. For all of you who don’t know, the Surfrider Foundation is a non-profit grassroots organization dedicated to the protection and enjoyment of our world’s oceans, waves and beaches. Founded in 1984 by a handful of visionary surfers in Malibu, California, the Surfrider Foundation now maintains over 50,000 members and 90 chapters worldwide. With that being said I give you to the past, present and future of global environmental grassroots organizing as seen trough the eyes of Mr. Jim Moriarty. Enjoy!


“ Our mission statement acts as the umbrella vision for why we exist. We believe that our oceans, waves and beaches should be appreciated and protected.�


“...so if you’re a digital photographer that only wants to contribute to coastal conservation via your craft… you’ll find that place to plug into a large, global network of others that are all contributing in different ways but toward a common goal.”


JIMMORIARTY How do you see the current state of “ocean activism and conservationism” that we are going through right now, and how do you see it evolving in the future? I see a past, present and a future. The past is on-ground, face-to-face initiatives that are powerful and relevant locally, but don’t scale. The present is a continuation of that model but amplified via stronger organizing and communications-oriented toolsets brought on by the Internet. The future is a continuation of both these models but highly individualized… so if you’re a digital photographer that only wants to contribute to coastal conservation via your craft… you’ll find that place to plug into a large, global network of others that are all contributing in different ways but toward a common goal.

Being able to interact and work with so many people all over the world, do you see a difference in the perception of the problems by different cultures across the globe? Do different culture sectors develop different strategies to counterpart these problems? Yes and no. All cultures around the world see poor water quality and pollution as a bad thing. There is universal agreement on that subject. That said, Surfrider Europe for example, has chosen an education-based approach, while Surfrider San Diego has chosen to go after changes in local policy. Both of those approaches address the problem but from very different perspectives.

Is the overall strategy, work method and approach the same for all Surfrider Foundation chapters and affiliates in different countries? How does Surfrider Foundation deal with such diversity within its network? Our mission statement acts as the umbrella vision for why we exist. We believe that our oceans, waves and beaches should be appreciated and protected. People in over a dozen countries are working on making that a reality. They may do so in different languages or from different cultural perspectives but they all agree on that mission.


JIMMORIARTY Does community commitment to solving a given problem in a certain area, play a major role in Surfrider’s decision to jump-start a new campaign? Our community defines us. Without local communities we do not exist. We are a global bottom-up, grassroots model. Our headquarters in San Clemente, California never tells a local chapter what campaigns to engage in, those are ALWAYS local decisions. As long as our chapters stay under the umbrella of our collective mission, they are free to take on any campaign and as many campaigns as they can handle.

What are some of the most recent highlights for Surfrider Foundation to achieve its mission? We have over 125 environmental victories worldwide that you can read about at www. surfrider.org/wins. What you must keep in mind is that the list online represents only about 1/3 of the work we as an organization do, as we’re engaged in various outreach, activation and education programs globally. That being said, some highlights we’ve had over the past few years include driving change in consumer behavior via bag fees or outright bans in Hawai’i, California, Washington, and Florida to name a few. We’ve also been successful in protecting waves in Florida, Puerto Rico and at Trestles in Southern California. In addition, we’ve also secured and protected beach access in California and Florida. Here is your chance to get more people involved. What would you tell our readers? Think globally, act locally. The think globally can be as simple as signing up for our free, weekly email newsletter called Soup. Sign up at www.surfrider.org. You can act locally by just paying attention to the coastal places you frequent. If you love a certain wave just keep your eyes and ears open about that place, pay attention to the water quality, beach access and anything else that makes it special. When those things are threatened then... it’s time for you to act. Thank you so much for your time Jim. We look forward to continue working with you and help Surfrider Foundation spread its mission! Check out www.surfrider.org


“If you love a certain wave just keep your eyes and ears open about that place, pay attention to the water quality, beach access and anything else that makes it special. When those things are threatened then... it’s time for you to act.”


COMMUNITY

TALK

What do you think about there being a law that banned using plastic bags?

Roger Harvey. 23 Susana Cota. 32 Ed Lewis. 30

www.dailyshacka.com I agree with it. Personally I think taking the convenience out would help us all break the tie to using them. I try not to use them now. I’d be stoked not to have to avoid them and have easier access to more eco options.

Homemaker I like the idea because it would remind us about recycling our current resources on hand. We will eventually get to the point where we will run out of these resources. I wouldn’t mind, I’m sure there was a point in time when we didn’t have them. What was used then?

Musician, aka Dandelion Snow

I wished it could have passed, plastic is extremely wasteful. Many retail stores and coffee shops include discounts with the use of reusable bags and containers. I think a life without plastic and with more useful reusable containers is a logical step to a more progressive ecofriendly culture and a more sustainable planet.


How do you think your life would change if you couldn´t youse plastic grocery bags or plastic bottles?

Grace Lee. 21 Student/Yogi

For it. I’ve seen what plastic can do to our oceans and marine life so anything we can do to prevent further damage and even protect our water critters is one step in the right direction. I already use reusable bags and fill my stainless steel bottle so life wouldn’t change much.

Stephanie. 21 Student Amazing! Amazing! Amazing! It’s about time we banned plastic bags. We are one of the last developed countries to get rid of these toxic products We have to take care and nurture our mother ocean. I don’t use plastic bags or bottles anyways! I’m all about the re-usable recycle!

Tobias Schultz. 26 Mechanical Engineer Sustainable Designer Paper bags, have a much larger environmental footprint than plastic, we need to find a better solution than swapping materials that require fossil fuels. I don’t buy plastic bottles anyway, the water taste bad wouldn’t it be better if I bought resource intensive cloth bags every time I forgot my reusable bags at home?


Enjoy


ying the sun as the storm approaches. San Blas, Panama. Photo Š Alexander Carrion


Riding in the cold. Southern California. Photo Š Alfonso Lopez


Mc Way Falls at sunset. Big Sur, California. Photo Š Colin Brown


Pa


aper mill polluted waterfalls. Saltito, Durango Victoria. Mexico. Photo Š Alfonso Lopez


The best waterpark, the best ride, and it’s free. California. Photo Š Alfonso Lopez


C


Coastal landscape with tide pools at sunset. Northern California. Photo Š Colin Brown


B


Big surf and restricted beach access. Mar del Plata, Argentina. Photo Š Alfonso Lopez


Sunset Beach. Oahu, Hawaii. Photo Š Ricardo Giaccagglia


Classic view of the Wind ‘n Sea hut. San Diego, California. Photo © Alfonso Lopez


Sunset reflection through wave. Northern California. Photo Š Colin Brown


Unknown


n surfer paddles out at Zicatela. Puerto Escondido, Mexico. Photo Š Francisco Lacaze


Photo Š Alfonso Lopez

R E N IVN I S I O N S

In our experience, protecting the environment is not easy. This photograph is a reminder that even when things get difficult and the walls seem to be closing in on us, there is always a light at the end of the tunnel! As agents of change we must keep a positive attitude and have the courage to safeguard the health of our planet!


WANT MORE? PLEASE VISIT THE MAGAZINE’S WEB SITE TO EXPLORE NEW ARTICLES, PHO


UT E BACK !

THAN

> COM G IN IT IS V R KS FO

OTOGRAPHS, VIDEOS, BLOGS AND MANY OTHER INTERACTIVE FEATURES > WWW.OCEANFORCE.ORG


Š Copyright 2010 - 2011 Oceanforce Foundation. All rights reserved.

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