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Catherine chose Benedictine Hospital for her knee replacement surgery.

Within 3 days, she was back home in Rhinebeck, New York. One month later, she was back at work‌ and back on the golf course.

Visit hahv.org to learn more. With premier facilities, minimally invasive surgery and experienced staff, The Center for Orthopedic Specialties at Benedictine Hospital is a patient’s first choice for orthopedic care anywhere in the region.

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SH_WoundCareCenter_Chronogram_Open OCT_mag_eth_female.qxd 9/20/11 12:21 PM Page 1

               

2 ChronograM 10/11


Celebrate the Season’s Bounty at

Adams Fairacre Farms Annual Rt. 9W, Kingston Saturday, October 8 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

FREE face painting, hay rides, pony rides, petting zoo and so much more! We’ll have good, inexpensive food for sale,

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so be sure to come hungry!

Sunday, October 9 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.

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What is the difference between a Will and a Trust? Do I need Long Term Care Insurance? What are Advance Directives? Can I afford to retire?

ESTATE PLANNING DAY Learn the answers to the questions we ALL want the answers to.

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Saturday, October 15, 8:30am Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY $20 per person Includes Continental Breakfast and Lunch

GUEST SPEAKERS Martin Hersh, Esq. - Advance Directives Blanche Lark Christerson, Managing Director Deutsche Bank Private Wealth Management – Wills & Trusts Louis W. Pierro Esq. - Medicaid Basics and Legislative Update Jeanne Brutman, LUTCF, CFS, CLTC - 40 Common Retirement Mistakes Christopher Byrne, CPA, JD - Charitable Giving

QUESTIONS: Call Eileen Osterby, Co-Chair (845) 341-5038 Orange County Trust Company

RESERVATIONS: Call Celeste (845)564-3654 DeLorenzo Financial Planning Associates

Bob Vandy, CLU, ChFC, LUTCF, CLTC - Long Term Care Insurance

MODERATOR Stewart P. Glenn, Esq. - Glenn & Breheney PLLC MAJOR SPONSORS: Glenn and Breheney PLLC, Attorneys • HOSPICE of Orange & Sullivan Counties, Inc. • Judelson, Giordano, & Siegel, CPA, PC Mount Saint Mary College • Orange County Trust Company • Rusk, Wadlin, Heppner & Martuscello, LLP, Attorneys • St. Luke’s Cornwall Hospital • Wm. A. Smith & Son, Inc./The Affinity Group/MassMutual MEMBER SPONSORS: Attorneys: Blustein, Shapiro, Rich, and Barone, LLP • Danziger & Markhoff, LLP • Drake, Loeb, Heller, Kennedy, Gogerty, Gaba & Rodd, PLLC. Law Offices of Stefanie A. Sovak • McCabe & Mack, LLP • Rider, Weiner & Frankel, PC • Tarshis, Catania, Liberth, Mahon and Milligram Financial Institutions & Investment Advisors: Ameriprise Investments • Hudson Valley Investment Advisors • Merrill Lynch Riverside Bank • Silverman Wealth Management Certified Public Accountants: DeRienzo & Rossi, CPAs • Goldstein, Karlewicz & Goldstein, LLP, • Nugent & Haeussler, PC Schain & Company, CPAs • Vanacore, DeBenedictus, DiGovanni & Weddell, LLP Certified Financial Planners: *DeLorenzo Financial Planning Associates


Grow healthy new ideas. Sign up for the free Northern Dutchess Hospital Fall Community Lecture Series.

t u e sday o ctob e r 1 1 th w ed ne sday o ctob e r 12 th w ed ne sday o ctob e r 19 th thur sday o ctob e r 2 0 th t u e sday o ctob e r 25 th

hom e sa f e t y a n d ac c e ssib ilit y Laura Watson, Occupational Therapy Super visor, NDH » Learn about the “Safe At Home” program and how to make sure your home remains accessible to you and your family throughout the aging process.

t r o ub led tum m y? Dr. Robert Rosenzweig, Medical Director, NDH Gastroenterolog y » Do you suffer from gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome? Answers to questions you may be afraid to ask.

c hildren a n d sleep d isorder s Dr. Barbara Chatr-Ar yamontri, Medical Director, NDH Sleep Center » Does your child snore? Come learn about children and sleep disorders, including when it’s time to get tested and symptoms to look for.

common foot deformitie s and advance s in treatment Dr. John Zboinski, Rhinebeck Foot Care » Learn about bunions, hammertoes, bone spurs, flat feet and the latest treatments available.

str oke: d iagn o sis a n d treatm en t Dr. Gerald Kufner, Medical Director, NDH Stroke Center, Kingston Neurological Associates » When it comes to a stroke, time is of the essence. Come learn about stroke risk factors, symptoms and available treatments that could save a life.

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your hips will thank you… anterior hip replacement surgery

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Dr. Frank Lombardo and Dr. Russell Tig ges, NDH Bone and Joint Center, Orthopedic Associates of Dutchess County » Learn about the latest hip surgery techniques, where surgeons work between the muscles and tissue without detachment for less pain, less scarring, and faster and improved mobility.

Dr. Sharagim Kemp, DO, HQMP—Division of P rimar y Care » Explore common, overlooked reasons for chronic fatigue, including anemia, depression and cardiovascular disease. Dr. Kemp will offer tips on energy-boosting lifestyle changes.

Dr. Jodi Friedman, Medical Director, Center for Healthy Aging » Learn about NDH’s Center for Healthy Aging program and the resources in place to help you feel young at heart again.

All lectures begin at 6:30 pm and are held in the NDH Lower Level Conference Room. Registration is required. Call 1- 877-729 - 2 4 4 4. 6511 springbrook avenue rhinebeck, ny 12572

www.Health-Quest.org

10/11 ChronograM 5


Chronogram

arts.culture.spirit.

contents 10/11

news and politics

efficient heating

22 while you were sleeping

37 home preparations: cost-effective heating solutions

Food stamps at stake, gay men still can't donate blood in the US, Weight Watchers more beneficial to losing weight than advice from doctors, and more.

23 beinhart’s body politic: entitlements vs. investments Larry Beinhart gets on Obama's case to tax the rich and bring back the economy.

HOME

Greg Fry talks to the experts of Central Hudson on how to creatively use home rennovations as an opportunity for sustainable living.

education 64 academic excellence: regional college preparatory schools

24 the house: timber frame meets union square

Peter and Elsje Brand spent years amassing architectural treasures salvaged from sites around Manhattan. When they built their timber frame house in Woodstock, urban trash became country treasures. By Jennifer Farley.

31 the garden: so you don't have a root cellar

Michelle Sutton finds subsitutes for those without a root cellar.

35 the craft: Color expert Joan Ffolliott. By Jennifer Farley.

community pages 40 kingston: an ongoing renaissance

A collaborative city with a blazing history that is constantly evolving.

72 pawling, hopewell junction , Wappingers Falls A tour of three friendly towns in southern Dutchess County.

whole living guide 92 ayurveda: the art of self-care

Wendy Kagan explores how India's medical system finds a home in the region.

98 flowers fall: letting go

Bethany Saltman remembers the Buddhist teaching that being born is not of our own volition, and yet the smell of fall is still sweet.

Community Resource Guide 85 tastings A directory of what’s cooking and where to get it. 88 business directory A compendium of advertiser services. 95 whole living directory For the positive lifestyle.

image provided

Peter Aaron highlights the leading qualities of prep schools in the Hudson Valley and the Berkshires.

120

Francis and the Lights perform on October 28 at EMPAC in Troy. FORECAST

6 ChronograM 10/11


FALL EVENTS AT BARD Works by Lou Harrison

Lou Harrison (1917–2003) was an American original. The three works on this program offer a generous glimpse of his musical world: Solo to Anthony Cirone, Suite for Violin and American Gamelan, and La Koro Sutro. Presented by New Albion Records and the Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts.

Saturday, October 15 at 8 pm

Tickets: $45, 35, 25, 15

American Symphony Orchestra

conducted by leon botstein, music director Godfrey Winham’s Sonata for Orchestra, Gustav Mahler’s R¨ uckert Lieder and Symphony No. 1 in D Major (“Titan”) Friday, October 28 and Saturday, October 29 at 8 pm

Tickets: $40, 35, 25

American Ballet Theatre

Works by Twyla Tharp, Merce Cunningham, Martha Clarke, Demis Volpi (world premiere), Robert Barnett, Felix Blaska, and Paul Taylor. (Check website for particular program information.)

Friday, November 4 and Saturday, November 5 at 8 pm Saturday, November 5 and Sunday, November 6 at 2 pm

Tickets: $55, 45, 35, 25

James Joyce, Marcel Duchamp, Erik Satie: An Alphabet by john cage

Working on the principles of collage, Cage created a cast of unlikely characters engaged in a dialogue suffused throughout with humor and irreverence. Produced by the John Cage Trust and New Albion Records.

Friday, November 11 and Saturday, November 12 at 8 pm

Tickets: $45, 35, 25, 15

Conservatory Sundays

Join us at the Sosnoff Theater for a series of delightful concerts performed by the talented students of The Bard College Conservatory of Music, with faculty and special guests

S¯o Percussion Sunday, September 18 at 3 pm Chamber Concert Sunday, October 16 at 3 pm Conservatory Orchestra Sunday, October 23 at 8 pm and Sunday, December 4 at 3 pm Suggested donation: $20, 15

All performances take place in the Sosnoff Theater. Additional program information is available on our website.

For tickets and information fishercenter.bard.edu | 845-758-7900 images: Lou Harrison, ©Eva Soltes; Leon Botstein conducting American Symphony Orchestra, ©Richard Termine; ABT’s Christine Shevchenko and Joseph Gorak in Duets, photo by Fabrizio Ferri; partial cast of Alphabet, photo by Donald Dietz, © John Cage Trust; Bard Conservatory students, photo by Karl Rabe

10/11 ChronograM 7


Chronogram arts.culture.spirit.

contents 10/11

arts & culture 50 Gallery & museum GUIDe

FOOD & DRINK 80 No farms, no food: taking stock after the devastation

54 music Peter Aaron interviews B52s love shack lady Kate Pierson.

56 nightlife highlights Sex Mob with The Black Crowes' Rich Robinson, The Misfits at The Chance, Neutral Milk Hotel singer-songwriter Jeff Mangum at Woodstock Benefit.

57 cd reviews Cheryl K. Symister-Masternson reviews Michael Bisio's Travel Music. Sharon Nichols reviews the poetic release Kalliope's Grace by Deborah Osherow. Mike Wolf reviews Druid Time Lords by The Brian Wilson Shock Treatment.

58 books Hillary Jordan deconstructs dystopia readily in red with Nina Shengold.

60 book reviews Robert Burke Warren reviews Fathermucker by Greg Olear. Jana Martin reviews Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend by Susan Orlean.

62 Poetry Poems by Amy K. Benedict, Stowe Boyd, John F. Buckley, Chloe Caldwell, Richard Donnelly, Linda McCauley Freeman, Kristen Henderson, Justin Hyde, Allen Livermore, Rosalinda McGovern, Paula Orlando, Thomas Perkins, Zeta Sion, J. R. Solonche, Zan Strumfeld, Asha Wilson. Edited by Phillip Levine.

128 parting shot Attracted to Light, a photograph by Kamil Vojnar.

53

This Was the Exact Moment Marge Decided to Kill Her Husband, a painting by John Lurie from his exhibit at Varga in Woodstock. galleries & museums

8 ChronograM 10/11

Peter Barrett visits the storm-ravaged farms of the Hudson Valley and Catskills after the one-two punch of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee. A special report.

the forecast 104 daily Calendar Comprehensive listings of local events. (Daily updates at Chronogram.com.) PREVIEWS 103 "Circa 1986" at the Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art in Peekskill. 104 Sonic New York starring Rhiannon Gidden at St. Paul's Parish Hall in Red Hook. 107 "From the Archive: Discovering Elizabeth Bishop" at Vassar College. 108 Franc Palaia signs his new book Nightlife at Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie. 109 Yvonne Rainer and dancers perform at Dia:Beacon. 110 Theatre Motus performs "Baobab" at Taconic Hills Performing Arts Center. 118 Celebration of the Arts at the Water Street Market is a multiday event this year. 119 "Works by Lou Harrison" performed at Bard College's Fisher Center. 120 Woodstock International Luthiers Showcase from October 21 to 23. 121 Gary Shteyngart reads at the Hudson Opera House as part of ArtsWalk 2011.

planet waves 122

124

call it what it is Eric Francis Coppolino criticizes lethal injection and eliminating Social Security. horoscopes What do the stars have in store for us this month? Eric Francis Coppolino knows.


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 A Smokin’ Halloween Party Saturday, October 30th at 8:30pm

They say there’s a ghost named Harper that lives in this old fire house. Well, last year, Joe & the gang got to know Ole Harper and he’s a pretty cool dude for a ghost. So, here’s the deal, just like last year, Joe and Big Sammy are moving all the furniture out, closing the restaurant for the night and turning the old house into studio 54. Yup, just like last year, he'll be putting on another Hell of a Halloween costume dance party. For only $15 a ticket, you get admission to this private party, passed appetizers, 2 for 1 draft beer and 2 for 1 well and call liquors. And at midnight Joe’s putting out free Bodacious BBQ Buffet!!! There will be a $400 prize for best costume $100 for best hand made costume and $200 for best costumed couple. Ze Zef will be here spinning your favorite dance DJ Zefi tunes so you can rock into the wee hours with Harper, Joe and the rest of the American Glory gang! TICKETS: $15 each. Available at the restaurant 7 days a week. Advanced reservations required. Tickets will be required for entry.

Go to www.americanglory.com and click on last years Halloween Bash photos. You don’t want to be on the outside looking in for this party.

AMERICAN GLORY BBQ RESTAURANT 342 WARREN STREET, HUDSON, NY 12534 518.822.1234 // AMERICANGLORY.COM OPEN: 7 DAYS LUNCH, DINNER, LATE-NIGHT

10 ChronograM 10/11


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10/11 ChronograM 11


on the cover

The uneven intensities of duration: suspended in the midst of an encounter with a flood, the unknown past carries itself into a current location and pressures a rescue from geographical forces. charlotte schulz | charcoal on paper |34" x 40" x 4"| 2010

Charlotte Schulz's early drawings look like Narnia folded into a Tim Burton-esque suburbia.The shadows and highlights melt, as though Dali got a hold of some charcoal after waking up from a dream where he was a little girl hidden away in a house full of looming trees and winding staircases. This is her shadow work. The highlights are few and far between. Her most recent exhibition exalts maximum contrast—the highlights gleam white while the shadows disappear into an abyss of vacuumed space. In place of the moltenslide of Schulz's earlier work, her more recent drawings fold in with razorsharp contrast. Schulz has moved from a dreamscape to the equivalent of an earthquake zone's fault line, or particularly here, to a floodplain. Despite Irene's relevancy to this piece, “the flooding drawing” (as Schultz calls it) was a reaction to Hurricane Katrina. Her present concentration focuses further on linking personal experience with world events. Since the creation of her earlier work, Schulz feels that in order to exist authentically, it is necessary to integrate personal experience into the collective experience, “like your traumatic event is a collective traumatic event.” Because Schulz's drawings serve as a space in which she can process personal experience with the external footing of global affairs, she would love to think of her drawings as a form of activism where other people can meet and do the same through them. It was when Schulz moved to the crowded city of Boston that she relinquished the need to start intrinsically with a house image, which had dominated her art until then. Schulz began interweaving seemingly opposing concepts like inside and outside, further shedding the view that these constructs were rigid and easily distinguishable from each other. Her compositions began to dissolve intimate personal space into historical happenings in an amalgamation of architecture, weather, and landscape. Since 2005, Schulz has turned from single-panel images to multiple-panel drawings in order to concentrate on exploring the tensions between real and imagined space. Her focus remains narrative and space, although now she works on the sculptural potential of paper, first by folding the paper, then following the folds with charcoal, allowing the piece to initiate its own direction. Schulz emphasizes that the absence of matter remains indispensably integral to its presence—the space within the folds of the paper is valued as essential to the artwork. “Things that are folded in still want to be included,” Schulz says. “So I think: What is not in the image but still wants to be included?” The uneven intensities of duration: suspended in the midst of an encounter with a flood, the unknown past carries itself into a current location and pressures a rescue from geographical forces and another of Charlotte Schulz's charcoal drawings on paper will be on display through November 27 in a group show at the Dorsky Gallery in Long Island City. The exhibition is curated by Zeljka Himbele Kozul. www.dorsky.org. Portfolio: www.charlotteschulz.com —Juliann Castelbuono

Visit Chronogram.com to see a short film profiling Charlotte Schulz by Stephen Blauweiss and Amy Loewenhaar, produced by ArtistDVD.com. 12 ChronograM 10/11


Mtk-Chronogram-Magazine

5/18/09

2:44 PM

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Fri Nov 4, 8pm at Bardavon

Fri Nov 11, 8pm at Bardavon

BILL MAHER Sun Nov 13, 7pm at UPAC Dr. Jeffrey Perchick Memorial Fund

10/11 ChronograM 13


EDITORIAL Editorial Director Brian K. Mahoney bmahoney@chronogram.com

The black Micarta handle features a distinguishing mosaic emblem and end cap. Warren Kitchen & Cutlery is the only area retailer to carry the full Zwilling J. A. Henckels range of cutlery and cookware. We’ve got the Hudson Valley’s best selection of fine cutlery, professional cookware, appliances, serving pieces, kitchen tools—and cooking classes.

Books editor Nina Shengold books@chronogram.com health & wellness editor Wendy Kagan wholeliving@chronogram.com Poetry Editor Phillip Levine poetry@chronogram.com music Editor Peter Aaron music@chronogram.com food & drink Editor Peter Barrett community pages editor C. J. Ansorge EDITORIAL INTErN Juliann Castelbuono proofreader Lee Anne Albritton contributors Larry Beinhart, Jay Blotcher, Eric Francis Coppolino, David Morris Cuningham, Larry Decker, Jan Larraine Cox, Greg Fry, Roy Gumpel, Jennifer Farley, Maya Horowitz, Annie Intercola, Jana Martin, Sharon Nichols, Anne Pyburn, Fionn Reilly, Bethany Saltman, Sparrow, Michelle Sutton, Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson, Robert Burke Warren, Mike Wolf

PUBLISHING FOUNDERS Jason Stern & Amara Projansky publisher Jason Stern jstern@chronogram.com

MIYABI KAIZEN, by Zwilling J. A. Henckels. Another step closer to perfection from Seki, Japan. The CRYODUR® blade consists of a resilient core of VG10 super steel, protected by a stunning 64-layer Damascus pattern. Its Katana edge is hand-finished by an artisan in the traditional 3-step Honbazuke method for scalpel-like sharpness.

chairman David Dell Chronogram is a project of Luminary Publishing advertising sales advertising director Maryellen Case mcase@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Eva Tenuto etenuto@chronogram.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Mario Torchio mtorchio@chronogram.com account executive Lara Hope lhope@chronogram.com account executive Ralph Jenkins rjenkins@chronogram.com account executive Barbara Manson bmanson@chronogram.com sales assistant Stephanie Wyant swyant@chronogram.com ADMINISTRATIVE director of operations Amara Projansky aprojansky@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x105 business MANAGER Ruth Samuels rsamuels@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x107

6934 Route 9 Rhinebeck, NY 12572 Just north of the 9G intersection 845-876-6208 Mon–Sat 9:30–5:30, Sun 11–4:30 Visit us on the web, or order on-line, at www.warrenkitchentools.com

Miyabi Kaizen: Quite literally, “A change for the better.”

creative Director David Perry dperry@chronogram.com

technology director Michael LaMuniere mlamuniere@chronogram.com PRODUCTION Production director Jaclyn Murray jmurray@chronogram.com; (845) 334-8600x108 pRoduction designers Kerry Tinger, Adie Russell Office 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY 12401 (845) 334-8600; fax (845) 334-8610

MISSION

Chronogram is a regional magazine dedicated to stimulating and supporting the creative and cultural life of the Hudson Valley. All contents © Luminary Publishing 2011

SUBMISSIONS

calendar To submit listings, e-mail events@chronogram.com. Deadline: Oct. 15. fiction/nonfiction/POETRY/ART www.chronogram.com/submissions

14 ChronograM 10/11 wkc_chron_hp-vert_kaisen_oct11.indd 1

9/19/11 4:28 PM


Local Luminary: Elizabeth Lesser david morris cunningham

Elizabeth Lesser and Stephan Rechtschaffen optimistically opened Omega Institute in Rhinebeck with absolutely no experience in running a retreat/ workshop center 34 years ago. The first catalog used words like "holism" and "consciousness," with “fringe” classes on alternative health, ecumenical spirituality, meditation, and yoga, all now mainstream. In 2008, Lesser moderated and co-produced with Oprah Winfrey a dynamic 10-week webinar, based on Eckart Tolle’s book A New Earth: each Monday fout to five million people worldwide tuned in to Oprah’s TV show to experience “the power of now,” emanating from mindfulness and meditation practices. Lesser’s effectiveness with these topics has led to current hosting on Sirius/XM for Oprah’s “Soul Series,” and speaking engagements nationwide. She identifies Sufi master Pir Vilayat as pivotal in her work and life. He inspired the co-founders to establish Omega, suggesting the name as well. “Omega Point” is a term used by philosopher Teillard de Chardin to describe the peak of unity and integration toward which all life is evolving. The concept has guided Lesser at Omega, now reaching 23,000 students each year in Rhinebeck, Manhattan, Costa Rica, and California. Describing the shift from “Me to We” in program orientation, Lesser asks how each of us can contribute to turning the destructive course of the planet around. Leading by example, Omega demonstrates 100 percent water recycling at its Sustainable Living Center, awarded the distinction of the first Living Building to also be Platinum LEED certified. New York Times best-selling author of The Seeker’s Guide and Broken Open, Lesser lives in Woodstock with her husband, and has two grown sons and a grandson, Will. I recently spoke with Elizabeth Lesser at Omega Institute in Rhinebeck. —Jan Larraine Cox

The Women and Power conferences that you spearhead at Omega are life-changing; what is the current impact of feminism? That is like asking a fish about the impact of water. The liberation of women has profoundly changed the world and continues to. The opportunities that young women have today look very, very different from the opportunities I or my mother or her mother had. And the gifts women have brought to the world are many and game-changing for the entire world. Of course, there are miles to go before women all over the world, and here in America, are safe, free, empowered, and respected. And miles to go before “feminine values” (for lack of a better word) are validated and utilized in all segments of society. While some empowered women will end up resorting to the old, fear-based, “powerover” style of leadership, research shows there is indeed a female style of leadership that is more inclusive, less combative, and more communicative. I believe when a critical mass of women join men in the leadership arena, there will be a better possibility of the eradication of violence as a way to solve anything. That we will see the creation of policies that help women and men balance the needs of family, children, and work. That the careful stewardship of the Earth will become a priority. Omega has developed a platform for leaders in fields from sustainability to meditation to reach thousands. What is Omega’s significance within our society? One of the strongest, best things about America is the separation of church and state. We are so fortunate to live in a society where people can worship as they want. But something has been lost. Culture has come to worship buying things, gathering at the mall. We’ve lost the true meaning of community, of belonging to something bigger than just the self or family. At Omega we put a lot of attention

on creating meaningful community, and because of that Omega has become “sacred space” for tens of thousands of people. It’s a warm-hearted center, where you can put down the burdens of everyday life, where you can ask the big and deep questions about life, where you can continue to grow and have meaningful connections with others of like mind, heart and spirit. I understand you feel psychology and spirituality are closely aligned; expand on that thought. One of humankind’s greatest ironies is that throughout history, prophets who have preached genuine, radical experience in place of dogmas have become, after death, central figures in “isms” they would never have supported. The world’s great spiritual personalities, like Jesus and Buddha, were considered revolutionaries and even heretics in their day. That’s one of the reasons their words are so fresh today. I believe that some of the best spiritual teaching today comes from psychology, which is a relatively new discipline. Religions preach love and tolerance and surrender to a higher power. Therapy helps us do that. If we try to be loving and open without first investigating what blocks the love within us, we just layer dogma on top of wounds, misconceptions, and entrenched opinions. Therapy breaks up old patterns so the love stream within us can flow. Good psychotherapy helps us transform unconscious, destructive behavior into something more healthy, loving and generative of harmony and creativity. From the beginning of human community there have always been those in the tribe elected to wake people up, give them kicks in the psychic butt, so they can fulfill their destinies and contribute something of value. They were called shamans in older cultures; today, they are called therapists—people who become a bridge between alienation and connection. 10/11 ChronograM 15


the events we sponsor, the people who make a difference, the chronogram community. Karl Rabe

chronogram seen

In the December 2004 issue of Chronogram, we published an article about a lesbian couple's long and difficult journey toward adopting a child. "The Right to a Family," by Amanda Bader, chronicled the legal hurdles, discrimination, and various indignities Peri Rainbow and Tamela Sloan endured to bring Cecilia (now Rainbow-Sloan), a foster child, into their family. On September 18, at Peace Park in New Paltz, Peri and Tamela, (now RainbowSloan), celebrated their 10th wedding anniversary and renewed their vows in the presence of Rabbi Jonathan Kligler, Mayor Jason West, and friends and family. Though the New York State Marriage Equality was passed in June, Peri and Tamela, like many committed same-sex couples, had already been united in a number of ceremonies, including a legal wedding in Canada, which precluded them from getting hitched again in New York State. A chronology of Peri and Tamela's unions: June 2001: United in a Civil Union in Vermont. September 2001: Married in a religious ceremony by Rabbi Jonathan Kligler in Woodstock. February 2004: Married by Mayor Jason West in New Paltz. August 2005: Legally married in Niagara Falls, Canada.

Top: Peri and Tamela renewing their vows underneath the chuppa at Peace Park in New Paltz on September 18. Rabbi Jonathan Kligler plays the guitar while Cecilia Rainbow-Sloan (in white shirt) holds the chuppa. Middle: Friends and family gathered for the renewal of Peri and Tamela's marriage vows. Mayor Jason West kneels in front. Bottom: Peri Rainbow-Sloan, Cecilia Rainbow-Sloan, and Tamela Rainbow-Sloan outside their home in October, 1994.

16 ChronograM 10/11


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18 ChronograM 8/11

“Patience is the mother of will. If you lack patience, how can you be born?” —G.I.Gurdjieff I try not to get caught up in the insanity of national and international politics, but a recent event caught my attention and wouldn’t let go. It was the execution of Troy Davis. If you’re not familiar, he was a black man convicted of murdering an off-duty white policeman in Georgia in 1989. Davis pleaded not guilty at his trial and maintained his innocence until he died.There was no physical evidence linking him to the crime. Seven of the nine witnesses who testified against him subsequently recanted their testimonies, saying they were pressured or threatened by police. Most of the jury members said that if they had known of the evidence that came out after the trial they would not have delivered a guilty verdict. After four rescheduled executions over 20 years, Davis was killed by the State of Georgia on September 21. In the final minutes, the US Supreme Court seemed to issue a stay, but then clarified that it was actually a “pause,” and four hours later Davis was hooked up to the killing machine, poison coursed into his veins, and he died. I have tried to push away the feeling of desolation that this event evoked. I wanted to shrug it off, together with other recent facts and events—the millions that have been killed and maimed by the United States’ illegal wars in the Middle East; the absurd health care system that kills 50,000 people a year in the US; the plutocratic economic system that creates a greater wealth gap than most Third World countries and makes the lives of so many a varnished brand of slavery. But the feeling of hurt remains. Not just that an innocent person was killed, but the cruel brutality of it. It is wrong, and it hurts. It’s an example of the primitive public displays of brutality that flourished with the Bush cabal and its media cheerleaders. One thinks of the glorious bombing of Baghdad as the distant explosions flashed across our screens; or the hanging/decapitation of Saddam Hussein; the sewn-up faces of Saddam’s sons who had been blown apart by Special Forces, billboarding the cover of the New York Post. It’s straight out of the Dark Ages and shows that despite possessing more sophisticated killing and torturing technology, our real collective progress has been nil or backwards. In a further Orwellian twist, the US keeps company with many of its “enemies” in the barbaric practice of execution. To date, executions have been reported in the following nine countries in 2011: Bangladesh, China, Iran, North Korea, the Palestinian Authority, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, UAE, and the USA. Of course this doesn’t include our government’s use of “extrajudicial” assassination squads and predator drones—including attacks on US citizens abroad—which have “executed” hundreds this year alone. And then there’s the big business of prisons.The US leads the pack in both per capita (more than 1 in 100 adults in jail or prison) and sheer numbers (2.4 million in 2009). Also in the news was Iranian President Ahmadinejad’s September speech at the UN. Our media didn’t report on the substance of the speech but focused instead on how the US diplomats all walked out, they were so offended. This piqued my curiosity as to what he actually said. Ahmadinejad’s speech was laden with religious rhetoric that marginalizes him in the context of the Western mindset. Nevertheless he asked some salient questions about world domination by the US and Western powers: If only half of military expenditures of the United States and its allies in NATO was shifted to help solve the economic problems in their own countries, would they be witnessing any symptom of the economic crisis? What would happen, if the same amount was allocated to poor nations? What is the justification for the presence of hundreds of US military and intelligence bases in different parts of the world, including 268 bases in Germany, 124 in Japan, 87 in South Korea, 83 in Italy, 45 in the United Kingdom, and 21 in Portugal? Does this mean anything other than military occupation? Don’t the bombs deployed in the said bases undermine the security of other nations? It’s a good read, and, notwithstanding the cultural religious rhetoric, Ahmadinejad’s speech is a refreshing dose of truthiness. It’s no wonder that the diplomats walked out. So what does a person do with the sinking feeling evoked by an epidemic of tragic events—made all the more so because they are caused only by ignorance? Wait and work. What are we waiting for? Corrupt, broken systems inevitably fail. Every empire becomes too greedy and overextended and eventually crumbles from within. It is only a matter of time. What are we working for? We are making our lives and communities sensible and sustainable. We are investing ourselves in the spheres we can actually affect—environmental, economic, familial, spiritual. We are nurturing and growing what is real, in a world that values reality little. We are working to repair the past and prepare the future. —Jason Stern


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For over 35 years Dr. Bruce Kurek and his staff at the Center For Advanced Dentistry have been setting the standards for excellence in dentistry. That’s why he’s been named a Hudson Valley Top Dentist by his peers for the past 4 years and, more importantly, why thousands of Hudson Valley residents have made him their first and only choice for general and cosmetic dental care.

Turning Point Entertainment Presents

Now accepTiNg New paTieNTs

Saturday, November 19th, 2011 The Chance Theater 6 Crannell Street, Poughkeepsie, NY 6pm doors, 6:30 show $10, with all proceeds going to the Food Bank. Canned food items will be accepted at the door. Tickets are available at the Chance Box Office, charge by phone at (845) 471-1966, or at www.ticketfly.com

Emergencies Promptly Seen

Featuring:

DriftDivision Sirsy Snaphammer What’s in This Juice? Headboard Jockeys Subconscious Prophet Lamb & Potatoes

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Copyright © 2011 The Center For Advanced Dentistry. All rights reserved.

845.691.5600 494 Route 299, Highland, New York

www.thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com

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At The Artist’s Palate, the focus is fresh food and fresh ideas. Drawing from locally sourced foods, as well as from domestic and foreign fare, The Artist’s Palate offers a culinary adventure in a relaxed but contemporary setting. Intriguing combinations and variations on comfort food mark the innovative menu created by chef-owners Megan and Charles Fells. A gracious knowledgeable wait staff will guide you through the many offerings, from meat and fish to vegetarian and gluten-free offerings. Tailoring a dining experience to the bold tastes of our customers– visually and gastronomically -- is the mission of the chefs and staff of The Artist’s Palate.

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307 main street, poughkeepsie, ny 12601 phone 845.483.8074, fax 845.483.8075 www.theartistspalate.biz lunch, dinner & catering available

The science behind environmental solutions

FREE PUBLIC EVENTS The Ecology of Lyme Disease Sunday, October 16 at 1 p.m. Explore how interactions among acorns, mice, deer, and ticks influence the risk of Lyme disease through a series of hands-on stations. Led by Disease Ecologist Dr. Richard Ostfeld, this event will meet at the Cary East (Gifford House) parking area, located at 2917 Sharon Tpk. (Rte. 44) in Millbrook, NY. Reservations suggested. Call (845) 677-7600 x121.

Fraser’s Penguins Friday, October 28 at 7 p.m.

Our hours are 11AM to 6PM, Friday - Sunday

Journalist and travel writer Fen Montaigne will chronicle how climate change is threatening Adélie penguins as told through his poignant story of melting sea ice and survival on the Antarctic Peninsula. The lecture will be held in our auditorium located at 2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44) in Millbrook, N.Y. Space is limited. Doors open at 6:30 p.m.

10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY 12542 Phone: (845) 236-7620.

Merritt Bookstore will be offering copies of Fraser’s Penguins for purchase at the event.

www.stoutridge.com

www.caryinstitute.org  (845) 677-5343

20 ChronograM 10/11


Brian K. Mahoney Editor’s Note Goodnight Irene roy gumpel

mud-caked tomatoes at taliaferro farms in new paltz.

I

n late August, the cities of the Eastern Seaboard prepared for the worst as Hurricane Irene swirled up from the Caribbean like a Biblical scourge sent to destroy Sodom and Gomorrah. New York City was forecast as a focal point of damage. Floodwater was expected to cover the bronze horns of the Bowling Green Bull outside the Stock Exchange. The Naked Cowboy built a raft to perform on while tourists floated by in Times Square. Heeding the Boy Scout motto (“Be Prepared”), Mayor Bloomberg shut down the nation’s largest mass transit system for the first time. Residents in low-lying areas were urged to evacuate. News cameramen licked their lips and prepared to shoot riveting footage of bewildered NewYorkers trudging through hip-deep water on Canal Street, heading to higher ground like the haggard masses of New Orleans after Katrina. (Of course, New Yorkers would be wearing snazzy black rain gear bought especially for the occasion at Eastern Mountain Sports.) In the Hudson Valley, we were also getting ready to be swamped—just without the fanfare. Living quiet existences of wholesome fulfillment far from the morally questionable activities of urbanites, we had nothing to fear—like child brides. The day before the storm hit, I saw people buying groceries at the supermarket as they would before a snowstorm. (Question: Why does everyone stock up on milk, eggs, and bread in the face of an emergency? Is there some proverb that prescribes French toast as a fitting meal for a disaster?) We schlepped all the lawn furniture into the shed. We moved our cars out from under menacing trees. And then we waited for the wind and the rain. God must have been asleep at the wheel of the hurricane because NewYork City was spared and we got a wallop. The power went off, the sump pumps didn’t work, and there was plenty of water in the basement. And then Lee wet us down again less than two weeks later. Luckily, that was the worst of it for most of us. Except the farmers. We don’t have lead features in Chronogram per se, but certainly the most pertinent (and poignant) article in this issue is Peter Barrett’s report on the state of farms across the region that were flooded in the wake of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee (“No Farms, No Food,” page 80). Ulster County was declared an agricultural disaster zone. The devastation was on par with

a one-hundred-year meteorological event: Estimates for the total damage range from $73 million to $1 billion across New York State. Three thousand acres of vegetables were ruined in Ulster County alone. Taliaferro Farms in New Paltz lost 80 percent of its crop. At RSK Farm in Prattsville—the true ground zero of the flooding damage from the recent storms—not only was there total crop loss, but “Potato Bob” Kiley lost all his topsoil as well. The Schoharie Creek rose and swept it all away, leaving only the bedrock underneath. (Before-and-after photos of RSK farm can be viewed at www.help-thefarm.org. You can also make a donation there, as Potato Bob is seeking to raise $150,000 to rebuild his farm.) For those of us who care about farms, the agricultural apocalypse visited upon the Hudson Valley and Catskills is a call to arms. Farms are not just a scenic addition to the landscape but an integral part of our communities— primarily as sources of locally grown food whose provenance we can be sure of, but also as a robust sector of economic activity and a bulwark against development. As we go to press, the Republican-controlled House refuses to pass a disaster-relief bill adequate to this calamity. Hopefully by the time you read this, this country’s legislators will have come to their senses. If history is any judge, most likely they won't. Therefore, we’ve created a Farm Aid page at www.chronogram.com with links to organizations collecting money for farmers, information about upcoming benefit events, and links to the farms themselves, many of which are selling shares for next year’s crop now. This money will allow farmers not only to buy seed for next year, but also to feed their families this winter. This is the time to put our money where our mouths are. Covers Show Redux Following up on the smashing success of our “Chronogram Covers” exhibition in February at the Art Society of Kingston, we’ll be mounting a show at Unison Arts Center this month in New Paltz, which will include 30 covers which were not shown in Kingston. The show runs October 2 through October 30. An opening reception will be held on Sunday, October 2 from 4-6pm. For more details, visit us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/chronogram. 10/11 ChronograM 21


A recent study published in the Lancet indicates that Weight Watchers is more effective than advice from doctors. After tracking 772 overweight and moderately obese people, researchers found that dieters following Weight Watchers were likelier to stick to their diet and shed more than twice as many pounds as those following weight-loss guidance from their primary care doctors. The motivation and accountability that Weight Watchers provides fuels its effectiveness, according to a study funded by Weight Watchers as well as an independent research team. As opposed to a oneon-one compliant interaction with a physician, Weight Watchers offers a networking component—it connects dieters via weekly meetings. According to registered dietitian Dawn Jackson Blatner, author of The Flexitarian Diet, “It’s important to have people who will pick you up when times are tough and cheer you on when you have successes.” Source: US News & World Report

The mass layoffs and home foreclosures in late 2008 and early 2009, at the peak of the recession, spiked food stamp use by 70 percent, a trend that is expected to continue. The Food Stamp Program cost taxpayers $68 billion last year. Although some economists advocate that the program helps the economy by allowing for people to spend money on gasoline and retail in general, many taxpayers are currently not keen to put food on other people’s tables at their own tables’ expense. Source: NPR According to Christopher Shays and Michael Thibault, who headed the bipartisan Commission on Wartime Contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan, in the last decade over $30 billion of spending for contracts and grants in Iraq and Afghanistan has been wasted through poor planning, vague and shifting requirements, inadequate competition, substandard contract management and oversight, lax accountability, weak interagency coordination, and subpar performance or outright misconduct. Forty million was spent on an unwanted and unfinished Iraqi prison and $300 million on an unstable and underfunded Kabul power plant. Shays and Thibault offer 15 strategic recommendations for improved government contract spending at www.wartimecontracting.gov. Source: Washington Post A new scientific study provides an explanation for why getting home always seems to take less time than getting to an initial destination. Niels van de Ven, a psychologist at Tilburg University in the Netherlands, has discovered the psychological phenomenon known as the “return trip effect,” or the positive feeling that people have upon returning home that gives the illusion of speeding up their travel time. His theory is that the trip back seems shorter because it’s more familiar, but van de Ven acknowledges that this is only one of many causes for the effect. Some psychologists, like Richard A. Block of Montana State University, think that the trip home seems shorter because there’s less pressure to reach the intended target on time. Source: NPR Local and state governments cut 203,321 more full-time equivalent employees in 2010 than in 2009 and 27,567 more part-time employees, according to the Census Bureau. Rhode Island severed the most city, town, and county full-time jobs, where the municipal workforce shrank 7.7 percent. California municipalities shed the most part-time employees at 47,620 jobs lost. Idaho and Connecticut lost 5 percent of their state workforces. Although states like Wisconsin increased their state government part-time workforces by 5,063 jobs, Florida shed the most state government part-time positions—a 7.5 percent decrease—which translates to cutting 3,555 jobs. “We are looking at the worst contraction of state and local government employment since 1981,” said John Lonski, chief economist for Moody’s Capital Markets Research. Source: Reuters

22 ChronograM 10/11

The UK, the US, and Canada all currently ban gay men from donating blood, a policy first adopted in the '80s, when officials feared AIDS could be spread in such a manner. After a recent review where the UK found no evidence to support the ban, November marks the implementation for its lifting by British health officials. However, there is one condition—the ban will be lifted as long as the last sexual contact with another man exceeds one year to date. Other countries including Australia, Japan, South Africa, Sweden, and New Zealand allow gay men to donate blood under similar conditions. Source: CBS News According to the recently released National Survey on Drug Use and Health, nearly 9 percent of the population, an estimated 22.6 million people, abused prescription drugs or regularly used cannabis, cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, or inhalants last year. Compared to 5.8 percent in 2007, pot increased in popularity in 2010 at 6.9 percent—or 17.4 million regular users, many of whom are underage. Approximately half of minors, ages 12 to 17, said it would be “fairly easy” or “very easy” to get marijuana, while one in five made similar statements about getting cocaine, and one in 10 about attaining heroin. However, parents didn’t seem to know, according to a study in Pediatrics—9.6 percent of parents surveyed thought their teenager consumed alcohol, while 25 percent of teenagers admitted to drinking. Similarly, 9.5 percent of parents thought their teenager smoked cannabis, while 17 percent of teens admitted to smoking it. Source: US News & World Report Health officials estimate that approximately 366 million people worldwide currently suffer from diabetes. According to a study published last June in the medical journal The Lancet, the global number of diabetes sufferers has more than doubled in the last three decades. Health systems spend $465 billion annually fighting the disease, which causes an estimated 4.6 million deaths every year. The International Diabetes Federation, an umbrella organization that represents associations from more than 160 countries, reported that one person dies from both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes every seven seconds. These figures were released in Lisbon during a meeting where world leaders discussed a global plan to fight diabetes. “The clock is ticking for the world’s leaders,” stated the federation’s president, Jean Claude Mbanya, “We expect action from their meeting next week at the UN that will halt diabetes’s relentlessly upwards trajectory.” Source: Associated Press According to recently released US Census data, the poverty rate rose to 15.1 percent last year—its highest level since 1993. This estimates that 46.2 million people are now considered poverty-stricken, 2.6 million more than last year. Moreover, the poverty rate increased to 22 percent for minors last year, meaning more than one in five children are living in poverty. Nearly one third of families headed by single mothers already live in or below poverty. The South has the highest poverty rate at 16.9 percent, where Mississippi households were the poorest in the country with a median income of $37,985. The Northeast had the lowest rate at 12.8 percent, where New Hampshire households had the highest median income at $66,707. The poverty rate was 13.9 percent in the Midwest and 15.3 percent in the West. The Office of Management and Budget updates the poverty line each year to account for inflation, defining the it this year as $22,314 a year for a family of four and $11,139 for an individual. Since the income used to calculate poverty status does not include capital gains, theoretically, millionaires could qualify as poor if they lived solely by selling off investments. Source: CNN —Compiled by Juliann Castelbuono


dion ogust

Larry Beinhart’s Body Politic

Entitlements vs. Investments

The most intelligent economic proposal that Barack Obama has ever made is that we raise taxes, specifically on the rich. Post-crash depressions and recessions—the kind we’re in now—end after tax hikes. Tax cuts created the bubble and crash, a distorted society, and a bad economy without jobs. The continuation of the Bush tax cuts will continue to stop job creation as they have done since they were instituted back in 2001. Then Obama framed it in the stupidest way possible. He called for “shared sacrifice.” Sacrifice? Do I want to sacrifice? Go and kill my favorite sheep on the lawn? Then share it? With whom? Glenn Beck? Sarah Palin? Not on your life. The Beckettes and the Palinophiles don’t want to share their sacrifice with shiftless welfare recipients, illegal aliens dropping anchor babies, gays, atheists, dope smokers, abortion-seeking sluts, hippies, intellectual elitists, and Al Gore. Which is exactly where they think all their tax money actually goes. Nobody likes sacrifices. Not even Abraham. (“God said to Abraham ‘Kill me a son’ / Abe said ‘Man, you must be puttin’ me on.’” The Bible according to Bob Dylan, “Highway 61 Revisited.”) How about we call it an “investment.” That sounds a whole lot better. I’m willing to invest in America. Happy to invest in America. Eager to invest in America. Because America is probably the best investment I can make. It’s better than Lehman Brothers, better than Bernie Madoff, better than General Motors. Paying taxes is the way we invest in America. To make it and keep it the best place in the world to do business. When your salary includes pension benefits, you are investing in your retirement. Unless the treasurer embezzles the funds (as happened to a friend of mine), or the fund gets looted in a corporate takeover, or the company declares bankruptcy to get out of their obligations, or actually goes bankrupt after having spent the pension fund. But social security—which you’ve invested in—will pay. It’s a great investment. The most solid, reliable, retirement fund in the world. You want a really good health care plan for your old age? Invest—as you already do—in Medicare.* Do not call Social Security and Medicare entitlements. Spoiled rich kids from the TV version of Beverly Hills feel entitled to things. Things you receive because you have a title are unearned. Social Security and Medicare are things we work for and pay for. They are our insurance. Government has several major roles in the economy. The first is to build a society in which effective economic activity can take place. It is an Ayn Randian fantasy that noble entrepreneurs march into the wilderness and build money-making empires that drag civilization along after them. Even such hard-working, innovative, and independent geniuses as Steve Jobs and Bill Gates required a society of literacy, industry, technology, and education to build their businesses in.You can’t sell a lot of computers or software to illiterates with no access to a power grid. Whether a people “earned” their way to riches, or got them the old-fashioned way, through inheritance, their wealth has been born out of the whole fabric of society—its laws, culture, education, labor force, security. As they continue to collect money, they continue to use more of what that society supplies—roads and bridges, airspace and airports, police and the legal system, the education of its workers and its consumers—than the fireman, the carpenter, and the janitor. Which is why it is moral and fair for the rich to pay a higher tax rate than those who make less money.

There is a more important reason for the rich to pay higher and higher rates as their incomes ascend. It’s healthier for us and even for them. If too much money accumulates in the hands of a very few people, especially in modern capitalist states (as opposed to old monarchies and feudal societies), the more unstable the economy gets. The basic impulse of “money” people—investors, the rich, their advisors, and parasites—is to make as much money as fast as possible. If too few of them have too much money, they run out of sound places to invest. The excess starts going into passive areas, like real estate and speculative financial instruments. As more and more money flows into such places they become bubbles. The real economy gets neglected. The bubble pops. There’s a crash. Free market theologians tell us that entrepreneurs are best left alone to create wealth, that government action can only interfere. In 1941, America went to war. There was unlimited spending, taxes over 90 percent, and unlimited deficits. There was massive public employment. When it was all over, the US was the only modern industrial power left standing. American finance, manufacturing, and even agriculture had won a dominant market share of everything. American businesses are still riding on that government-run accomplishment of all members of American society. Its entrepreneurs didn’t fight for Iwo Jima or storm Iowa Beach. After the war, the Japanese government joined forces with its banks, businesses, and even its unions to target certain sectors for development. It instituted a variety of protectionist policies while its new enterprises grew. Now we have Toyota, Nissan, Honda, Sony, and Panasonic. Meantime, in the United States, Dwight Eisenhower built a national highway system. Kennedy led us into the Space Race, which put satellites into orbit. Modern telecommunications would be inconceivable without the satellites that the government has pioneered. We have funded basic research and military research from airlines to the Internet. Modern commerce would not be what it is without government efforts. The job of government is to do what businesses cannot or will not do. Right now, our businesses are not creating jobs. So government should. Right now, our businesses can’t figure out what should be manufactured in America. Largely because in a free trade world, they have no reason to. Businesses have no patriotism. But we do, so it is up to us to tell our government to figure out what we can manufacture that can’t be outsourced overseas. Right now, though the banks get virtually free money from the Treasury, corporations are making record profits, and the world is awash with cash.That money is not going to start up businesses. It’s not going to business expansion. It’s not doing anything useful for society. That means it is up to the government to take some of that money—taxes— and redirect in useful ways—job creation, building physical and social infrastructure, making sound business loans—in order to create conditions in which an economy can thrive. There is a time and a place for free markets to work their magic. But when magic fails, it’s time to try thought and planning. This is that time. * Social Security and Medicare are great investments unless the Republicans manage to destroy them. As they’ve been trying to do since each was started. 10/11 ChronograM 23


The House

Timber Frame Meets Union Square Manhattan Trash/Catskills Treasure By Jennifer Farley Photographs by Peter Brandt Above: Peter and Elsje Brandt in front of their timber frame home in Woodstock. Opposite, above: The Brandt’s living room, furnished with personal treasures like the mantel over the fireplace (salvaged from a demo site in Manhattan), snowshoes from a former house in Canada, and a fireplace built with stones selected from the property. Opposite, below: Entry: the lower floor entry is decorated with wainscoating, door frames from the Manhattan loft building, doors from the Door Jamb on Rt. 28, antiques from local garage sales, and tiles from Nelson’s in Saugerties.

T

he Dutch are known for thrift; Germans for capable engineering; photographers for vision; and Canadian beauty queens for accessorizing a cute shorts-and-parka outfit with a Robertson screwdriver. Meet Peter and Elsje Brandt, postwar European immigrants to Canada who moved to Manhattan where they bought a 3,000-square-foot loft in an 11-story Beaux Arts building near Union Square in 1982. “It was needle park back then!” exclaims Elsje. As Miss Laval West in the 1967 Miss Canada pageant, Elsje roomed with Miss Montreal, Dayle Haddon, the ageless L’Oreal spokesmodel. After 27 years, the Brandts sold their loft in October 2008, two weeks after Lehman Brothers tanked, for “more than they’d ever imagined.” While a matter of public record, for discretion’s sake, just think well into seven figures. Elsje was born in Amsterdam; Peter was born in Hamburg. Witnessing the waste-nothing scramble as their native countries rebuilt afterWWII lent insight into the comparative wealth of lower Manhattan. Both Brandts were acutely aware of the intrinsic value of ripped-out “vintage” construction materials cluttering Manhattan’s curbs as garbage before “mix old with new” became the third millennium’s mantra. The resourceful pair scavenged Manhattan for castoffs, which they eventually used to build their mountain getaway. Elsje, like many Dutch, enjoys riding bikes; she’d call Peter from grimy pay phones, describing her discoveries. Sometimes she’d stand guard for hours until he could get to her with a pickup truck. (And in case you didn’t know, a Robertson screwdriver is a uniquely Canadian tool—a square-headed screwdriver that seldom slips. It’s miles above the Phillips as a design.)

24 home ChronograM 10/11

Monday Morning Surprise! Their son, Richard, a Fashion Institute of Technology graduate who designs Izola shower curtains, lived with his parents until age 31. The spacious loft was all his most weekends, as his parents dashed off to Bearsville. When asked about that, the couple begins bickering cheerfully about whether the girl Elsje saw in the hallway “that Monday morning” was “actually entirely naked.” Peter seems to think she was wearing lingerie, or perhaps a towel. “You see, we never drove back on Sunday nights, to avoid the traffic,” says Elsje. Street Fishing’s Glory Days When they bought their loft on lower Fifth Avenue, Peter was a fashion and advertising photographer. Elsje designed sets. “Our studio was in front, and our residence was in the back,” said Peter. The building, a 1906 design by Samuel Sass, later president of the NewYork Society of Architects, had an American Express branch office as its original anchor tenant. Featuring high ceilings and oak floors, the building was once home to a millinery business where the Brandts’ loft would eventually be. New owners usually gutted their loft’s original cabinetry, fixtures, and paneling. In the otherwise unused basement, Peter and Elsje were able to store, free of charge, everything collected from their neighbors’ loft renovations, plus whatever else they’d found. As years passed, the construction materials and furniture harvest grew massive, but the real impetus for buying upstate was clean air.When Richard went to scout camp, the quasi-Canadians discovered the Catskills. About a decade into loft ownership, the Brandts realized they were relatively apartment-rich. Although they continued to live modestly and work


10/11 chronogram home 25


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hard—with Peter eventually switching to architectural photography—in 1991 they bought a piece of land on Upper West Ohayo Mountain Road. “Prices at that time were high for terrible buildings,” said Peter. “We were looking for fresh air, and it was just coincidental that we had all that stuff in the basement.” On an early visit, the Brandts encountered Luke and Ingrid Whyte, both teachers, who were physically building their own home up the road. “We talked to them, and then we decided, well, if they can do it, we can too,” recalls Elsje. She began studying the magazine Fine Homebuilding. Twenty years later, the Whytes and Brandts remain friendly neighbors. Peter and Elsje decided to buy their sloped lot while sitting on its northern boulder, near a chestnut oak, long grown entwined with a hemlock. It felt like home. “I think our trees have sheltered us,” said Elsje, who met her future husband at an Independent Order of Foresters event at which she was speaking in her capacity as Miss Laval West. “We cut as few as possible.” Excessive Blasting? That’s a Dutch Drain! In 1992, the Brandts broke ground on a 2,200-square-foot post-and-beam built steeply into the side of Ohayo Mountain. Their excavation contractor, John Beesmer, “overdid” the rock-blasting. The Brandts ended up building a foundation atop the rubble heap.This permits water draining off Ohayo to pass beneath the house, an old-fashioned but effective system ironically known as a “Dutch drain.” It’s an architectural feature found in some of Ulster County’s oldest houses. After pouring the concrete footing and foundation, the Brandts hired E. F. Bufton, a timber-frame expert from Princeton, Massachusetts—who was renovating music legend Levon Helm’s fire-damaged house at the time—to build their home’s shell.While timber-frame is a centuries-old method of construction, it’s enjoyed a comeback in the past two decades due to its spacious feel, conservative use of materials, and thermal efficiency. Constructing their country place as inexpensively as possible, entirely with cash, took about a decade. During that period, the Brandts became well acquainted with the reliably and lovably crusty—and now deceased—local building inspector Paul Shultis, a frequent site visitor. Depending on the weather, the Brandts either camped or rented rooms nearby so they could shower and sleep comfortably. “We laid the floors ourselves, we sanded the timber frame, Peter did almost all the plumbing and electric,” said Elsje. “It took a while to get a [certificate of occupancy] from Paul Shultis, but when we finalized, he said we did a terrific job.” By late 1993, they had installed both plumbing and heat. Finally, they could sleep in their new home, still in need of much finish work. The Brandts remember Shultis fondly. Perhaps because they’d educated themselves adequately, working to near exhaustion each weekend—in the end, Shultis decided the Brandts were a notch above the usual annoying weekendhouse buyer.


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The Brandt’s bought the figurehead at a Donny Malone auction in Saugerties.

Most of the Brandts’ fixtures and features—and all of its extravagant details, such as the walnut flooring in Peter’s “digital darkroom”—were salvaged, or purchased inexpensively, from the streets and Dumpsters of New York. The stainless steel kitchen sink is from a restaurant; the kitchen cabinets were salvaged from another loft at their Fifth Avenue building; the stainless Frigidaire refrigerator was bought from a relocating architect. The secondhand dishwasher’s an older-model Magic Chef Peter claims outperforms a Bosch he once owned. And the kitchen dinner bell once rang at Peter’s childhood home. With the exception of Peter’s photographs, most of the other art and design accessories, including a corner cupboard filled with traditional blue-and-white porcelain, came from yard sales. Virtually everything which had to be purchased came from big-box retailers: the Olympic matte neutral white paint from Lowe’s; the huge frostedglass bedroom wardrobe on sale at IKEA for $1,000; the windows came from a now-forgotten out-of-state dealer who offered the lowest price. After three years of living in Bearsville full-time, the Brandts now seek a pied-à-terre in Manhattan. Thus far, four low-ball offers have been declined. RESOURCES

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The Garden

The Hudson Valley Seed Library’s Doug Muller experiments with storing produce in a sunken refrigerator.

So You Don’t Have a Root Cellar Simple Substitutes by Michelle Sutton Photographs by Larry Decker

D

oug Muller takes us behind his house to see a refrigerator set neatly in the earth. He and his partner, Ken Greene, co-founders of the Hudson Valley Seed Library, have numerous buildings on their land in Accord, but not one root cellar. Their farm, shared communally with others, is an old Ukranian camp where buildings weren’t designed for winter’s needs. So what are these committed self-sufficienados supposed to do with their potatoes, beets, and rutabagas? Fortunately, the previous landowners left behind a myriad of defunct refrigerators and freezers. Muller and Greene sunk one of them into the earth, door facing the sky, after drilling drainage holes in the bottom. It’s meant to mimic old-time, hand-dug storage pits that rely on the soil’s temperature-moderating abilities to keep produce cool but not too cold. Such pits can be made with a variety of materials—metal or plastic garbage pails, for instance—but the fellows thought, “Why not use what’s here?” The sunken fridge had some problems. The rutabagas and radishes did fine, but at a certain point in the winter, the potatoes froze and turned to mush. Muller says, “What would’ve made it work better is if we had used straw bales on top for additional insulation. Just the foam that’s in the door of the refrigerator didn’t cut it.” He says this winter, he’ll also add a piece of scrap metal sheeting that will allow moisture to drain away from the surface of the fridge. The second fridge, hoisted up to the old camp building closest to their house, was highly successful. As an aboveground storage unit, it would need a little help to keep the contents from freezing during the coldest parts of winter. Muller intended to run an electric cord out to the fridge to allow for a thermostatically controlled infrared light—like the kind used to warm reptiles— that would generate just enough heat to

keep the contents at about 40 degrees. (Infrared produces no light, which is important, so things don’t sprout.) But as a busy homesteader, farmer, and seed librarian, Muller ran out of time. In a pinch, he improvised a system that got the aboveground freezer contents through the winter nicely. Muller says, “Every other night during the coldest part of winter, we’d fill a halfgallon Ball jar with boiling water and put it in the freezer. It worked great.We did have to be ‘on it,’ though. We had tons of carrots, potatoes, beets, celeriac, and Jerusalem artichokes. We didn’t lose anything over the winter.” Out in a sunnier part of the property, the fellows have another winter food storage device, a 12-by-4-foot solar food dryer Muller built from plans found on www. geopathfinder.com. Greene and Muller use it to dehydrate tomatoes, summer squash, okra, corn, and peppers. “It works great for the most part,” Muller says. “We’ve made some modifications, like lifting it up higher to get better ventilation, and experimenting with the angle of the drying screens.” Muller says a solar dryer is a bit trickier than an electric one, however. “The most successful and the most difficult thing we dry is tomatoes,” he says. “They’re such a great product when it works out, so delicious, and you can get a lot from one plant. But you need several sunny days in a row to get good dehydration with no mold.”With such a wet and erratic summer as the one we’ve just had, it could be challenging to have three reliably sunny days in a row, and sometimes the fellows had to bring in food dryer crops and eat them up early. “You could put them on a tray in your oven to finish them off,” Muller says, “but they get crispy really fast and it’s not the same quality.” For those who dehydrate extensively like they do, Greene recommends the use of a pump-and-seal type of device that maintains a vacuum in the Ball jars of dehydrated veggies. 10/11 chronogram home 31


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captions

(Left) Ken Greene with the solar dehydrator built by partner Doug Muller. (Right) Tomatoes in the solar dryer at Hudson Valley Seed Library.

Going Underground Sunken fridges and winter storage pits are great for crops like potatoes, carrots, beets, and parsnips that require a relatively high degree of humidity to keep fresh. You can find plans for winter pits in classic food storage texts like Rodale’s Stocking Up or in Putting Food By (Hertzberg, Vaughan, and Greene) or Living the Good Life by Helen and Scott Nearing. In a more contemporary context, many follow the advice of master grower Eliot Coleman from books like The Winter Harvest Handbook. Among Coleman’s fans are Allyson Levy and Scott Serrano, owners of Hortus Conclusus LLC in Stone Ridge, who use their work in edible landscape design to fund the long-term development of a botanical garden on their property. Their house has no basement or cellar so they are working on plans for a greenhouse that will have modified storage bins to serve as root cellars within the structure. Levy says, “We will use plastic garbage cans and bins that will be partially dug into the ground inside the greenhouse for storing produce like potatoes, apples, beets, carrots, onions.” Levy and Serrano plan to use straw to line the cans and to separate layers of produce; this will help keep rot from spreading and encourage air circulation. In the meantime, Levy says, “We tend to leave many root veggies in the ground with extra soil and mulch hilled over them, and only dig them up right before the ground really freezes and we can no longer get a shovel in the ground.” Dryer is Better One major consideration in winter storage of vegetables is how much humidity each crop needs. So while carrots and potatoes need a relatively high level of ambient humidity, winter squashes, onion, and garlic need less humid conditions. That’s the mistake I made years ago when I lived in an apartment house with a root cellar. I put winter squashes down there, but it was too moist, and they rotted. I would have been better off putting them in my closet. Storing crops like winter squashes that like less humidity is easier than digging pits in the earth, but still requires some savvy. Respected local master gardener, volunteer, and vegetable gardening instructor, Mary Nisley, writes a terrific blog, Mary’s Veggie

Garden. From mid-July, when Nisley starts harvesting carrots, until February, about 98 percent of her family’s vegetables come from the garden! By April, she is still supplying her family with 50 percent of their produce from storage. Nisley doesn’t have a root cellar, but rather an unheated basement, where she stores quantities of winter squash on shelves in single layers. In the Cornell Cooperative Extension newsletter Dutchess Dirt, Nisley says, “The best winter keepers are squashes that have thick skins and somewhat dry flesh. Butternut, hubbard, buttercup, tetsukabuto, and spaghetti squashes all store extremely well. Squashes store best at 50 to 55 degrees F and a humidity of 50 to 70 percent. Even though the basement is warmer now, its temperature will drop to the ideal by winter.” She stores sweet potatoes in the same manner (they like conditions dryer than regular potatoes, interestingly). I don’t have an unheated basement like Nisley, but I have a guest bedroom that we run cool in the winter. I’m eyeing that space, picturing an undulating array of winter squashes. As long as I cull out any that get funky, I don’t think my guests will mind. RESOURCES Cornell Gardening Resources on Vegetables www.gardening.cornell.edu/vegetables/index.html Dutchess Dirt http://ccedutchess.org/aghort/community-horticulture/98-dutchess-dirt-newsletter Hortus Conclusus LLC www.hortus.biz Hudson Valley Seed Library www.seedlibrary.org Mary Nisley’s Veggie Blog https://marysveggiegarden.wordpress.com Winter Sun Farms www.wintersunfarms.com

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The Craft Color Expert Joan Ffolliott

According to 19th-century English art critic John Ruskin, “The purest and most thoughtful minds are those which love color the most.” Kingston-based Cabinet Designers Inc.’s paint department manager Joan Ffolliott has been an interior designer and professional color expert for over a decade. In the three years she’s managed Cabinet Designer’s paint department, Ffolliott’s developed a sterling reputation for helping discerning Hudson Valley customers craft an effective color scheme for their kitchens, which naturally leads to selecting an integrated palette for the whole house. In 2006, while working as an account executive for Design Within Reach in San Francisco, she founded her own interior design business, Double FF Design. Ffolliott holds a graduate degree from the Rhode Island School of Design—she also taught sculpture, drawing and welding at the prestigious school in Providence for 11 years. Ffolliott got a late start on building her impressive resume. After graduating from high school in New Hampshire in 1984, she went to Switzerland to study French and art, later living in an ashram in Italy. Next, Ffolliott zigzagged between the East and West coasts for about seven years, making jewelry she sold at craft fairs. She had a son, Nelson, now 21 and living in Brooklyn, where he works in technology for a major bank. Motherhood persuaded Ffolliott to take education seriously. To make ends meet, the single mom often worked at high-end hardware stores and DIY-friendly design centers while taking or teaching classes. Ffolliott asks that color-consultation customers bring photographs of “something which is going to stay”—for example, flooring, “hardscaping” they intend to keep. “I also need to see the architecture—how does the light hit,” she says, adding that new construction poses different challenges. She once did a color consultation for a woman who’d gone blind later in life; Ffolliott helped her comprehend the colors around her. In the high-quality pigment-intensive paint line C2, a North American brand launched 12 years ago and sold only to select dealers, Ffolliott favors rich chromatic grays accented with brighter shades such as chipotle. She’s underwhelmed by beige. On October 13, Ffolliott’s hosting a paint-naming event at the Cabinet Designers showroom. If you’re interested in attending, contact the store. C2 Paint is adding 60 new shades to its existing collection of 496. Right now, the new colors are numbered. “Moldy Insulation” seems a longshot, but “Simmering Feud” might fly, says Ffolliott. If your name gets chosen by C2 Paint, you’ll win two environmentally friendly gallons worth $100. —Jennifer Farley RESOURCES Cabinet Designers Inc. www.cabinetdesigners.com Double FF Design www.doubleffdesign.com

www.hvfurnituremakers.com 10/11 chronogram home 35


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Courtesy Central Hudson

Efficient Heating

Home

Preparations Small & Large

cost-effective heating solutions By Greg Fry a heating contractor inspects a heating system.

T

he story is a common one. Temperatures dip into the 40s, and sometimes briefly into the 30s, for one or two nights in October. Unsuspecting, busy, and sometimes forgetful homeowners turn on their home heating system for the first time in months. “You certainly don’t want to wait until the coldest day, and then flip a switch, and hope your heat comes on,” says Nella Mahoney, general manager for Newburgh-based Abbott and Mills Energy. A number of problems can occur as a result of waiting, says John Maserjian, a spokesperson for Central Hudson Gas and Electric. “The fall is the time of the year when we tend to see carbon monoxide incidents, where there may have been a blocked chimney over the summer, or perhaps an issue or problem with the heating system that didn’t really manifest itself yet,” says Maserjian. “It’s crucial that people ensure that their systems are operating properly, and that there are no issues inside the heating unit, so that they ensure not only that they have heat, but also that there are no dangers or safety issues associated with their system.” Home Heating Checkup Maserjian recommends a fall checkup of heating systems by a heating contractor. Early fall proves to be a busy time for contractors like Abbott and Mills Energy, which has been in business for over 75 years.The company provides a number of services, including fuel delivery and energy audits for residential and commercial properties. “There probably aren’t words to describe how busy we are right now,” says Mahoney. “People are making sure that they are getting the pricing they want, and making sure their boilers and furnaces are maintained.” While calls pour in to Abbott and Mills Energy, Mahoney says many customers still aren’t aware of what’s available to them, at least when it comes to replacing, retrofitting, or even repairing their systems. “We have quite a few customers who are on service plans, so they are aware, because we remind them all the time,” Mahoney says. “I don’t know if everyone is aware of that as much as they should be.” She goes on to say that the promise of savings has grabbed the attention of more people these days, who are looking for ways to bring down their heating costs. “People are so concerned about saving money and efficiency right now that they are a little more aware of getting their system tuned up, to make sure they are efficient as they can be.”

Time for an Upgrade? Utilities like Central Hudson Gas and Electric will typically offer a number of rebate programs designed to get customers thinking about the need for renovations. The utility is offering a rebate of $600 for customers to have their homes sealed by designed insulation professionals. Central Hudson also offers rebates ranging from $700 to $1,200 dollars for the installation of energy-efficient natural gas furnaces and boilers at homes and businesses within their service area. The utility serves about 300,000 electric customers, with an additional 74,000 customers who use natural gas. Maserjian says there’s no way to estimate just how many of those customers take advantage of the rebate programs. “It’s available for those who decide that they want an upgrade. Those that decide to make an upgrade have to weigh out the cost of a new system, and what sort of efficiency gains they may realize,” says Maserjian. “Often, trading up to a higher-efficiency system can pay for itself in a shorter period of time, if the original system is 25- or 30-years-old, and has not been operating well. Generally, providers can give an estimate of what the payback will be.” With an increasing volume of calls to fuel companies and contractors throughout the region, it doesn’t mean that homeowners are out of luck if they haven’t already made preparations for the fall and winter months, and the accompanying cold weather. Mahoney says any time is a good time, except for the middle of winter, when a day without heat while upgrades are made would be the most noticeable. “It’s not like there’s a white sale during the year where it’s cheaper or better to do,” says Mahoney. “It’s just all a matter of your personal choice when you might want to do that kind of thing.” Start with an Energy Audit Energy audits are often a serious consideration for homeowners who are committed to making their house energy-efficient. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, or NYSERDA, promotes free or reduced-cost audits for homeowners, specifically for those with incomes that are well below the median range for their area. However, NYSERDA hasn’t focused all of its energy on simply retrofitting existing heating systems, or replacing them altogether. 10/11 ChronograM efficient heating 37


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Courtesy Central Hudson Lighting accounts for about 10 percent of energy usage in the average home. Changing to energy efficient lamps can reduce energy use considerably.

In August, the state-run corporation re-introduced its ENERGY STAR Homes program, which has led to the construction of nearly 20,000 energy-efficient homes since 2001. Nearly 500 builders have joined on to the program since its initial inception. Through the reintroduction of the program, $14.5 million worth of incentives has been made available for home builders.Those incentives, which are set to expire at the end of the year, include $1,250 for homes built upstate, and $1,500 for new homes in Westchester County, New York City, and Long Island. “Many developers across the state are already building above code, so additional costs to meet NewYork ENERGY STAR Homes’ standards can be minimal,” according to Francis J. Murray, Jr., NYSERDA’s president and CEO. The authority estimates that it can cost a home builder one to three percent more to build a qualifying ENERGY STAR home, but that the home will be 18 percent more energy efficient, compared to a home built to meet average state code standards. Storm-Related Rebates A devastating span of weather may also benefit homeowners across the region when it comes to securing their homes for the winter, and ensuring that their heating systems are working in the correct fashion. While homes and businesses throughout the Hudson Valley and Catskills sustained varying levels of damage as a result of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee, which slammed into parts of upstate over late August and early September, the rebuilding process for some may be an opportunity to keep an eye on the future. In response to some of the unimaginable losses to homes in many areas, New York State has made $8 million available for the purchase of household appliances, including furnaces and boilers. “Our top priority is making sure those affected by these storms have the help they need to recover,” said New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, in a release announcing the establishment of the funds. “This program will cover the costs for critical household appliances and help NewYorkers who suffered property damage to save money as they rebuild after the storms.” Rebates are available for the purchase of hot-water heater tanks ($400), furnaces ($2,000), and boilers ($2,500), along with household appliances such as refrigerators

and washer and dryer units. The purchases must be for replacement purposes only. Replacement may not be needed, as Mahoney compares the operation of your home’s heating system to that of a car, as sometimes it’s as simple as replacing a part. “Sometimes, it’s a matter of drying it out, and everything is good to go. Other times, the water has done more damage than that, and that particular piece needs to be replaced,” warns Mahoney. “It doesn’t generally mean that your entire boiler or furnace needs to be replaced, but just a component of it.” While preparing homes for the winter may be a more daunting task for some this year due to the impact of Irene and Lee, it is also keeping energy providers busy. As many towns in the region are still attempting to rebuild and reinforce critical infrastructure after once-in-a-lifetime floods in recent weeks, Maserjian says they are “prepared to respond to any problem that may creep up, and that may have gone undetected.” “We suspect that there may be some water in certain gas lines,” Maserjian warns. “We’re addressing that before the weather gets too cold, but we don’t anticipate any major problems. There may be some minor issues in certain localized areas that may have seen extreme flooding, but we’re aware of that possibility, and taking steps to address those issues, so that it does not become a problem when the weather turns cold.” RESOURCES Abbott and Mills Energy www.abbottandmills.com Central Hudson Gas and Electric www.savingscentral.com NYS Household Appliance Grants (Irene and Lee) www.nyserda.org/Press_Releases/2011/PressReleas20110915a.asp NYSERDA ENERGY STAR Home Program www.nyserda.org/Press_Releases/2011/PressRelease20110823.asp 10/11 ChronograM efficient heating 39


KINGSTON An Ongoing Renaissance by Anne Pyburn photos by David Morris Cunningham

Like a patchwork quilt handed lovingly down and embroidered by generations, covered in fine, intricate patterns that draw the eye and send the mind journeying, Kingston is a collaborative masterpiece—formed by creative souls of every imaginable persuasion and constantly evolving.

upac

community pages: kingston

kingston court house

trolley museum

old dutch church

caption

mariner’s harbor

senate house

40 kingston ChronograM 10/11

A BLAZING HISTORY

It was 1777, and Kingston was deeply engaged in the Revolution. The key waypoint between New York and Albany, the town had always had a Dutch soul. Religious freedom and no taxation without representation had been business as usual in Holland for 200 years, and the Hasbroucks and DeWitts and Bruyns and their neighbors had no use for tyranny. In the words of General Vaughn, freethinkin’ Kingston was “a nest of rebels, a nursery for almost every villain in the country.” On a sunny Saturday in October, British troops rampaged through town and burnt the city to the ground, torching all but one of the homes. Seriously outgunned, the people of Kingston took refuge with their neighbors in Hurley, mourned their losses, counted their blessings, and pulled together to help one another rebuild. Much of rebuilt Kingston still stands, lending the Stockade District a gracious and faintly haunted aura. And although it wasn’t much fun in 1777, you’ll have a blast watching the Burning of Kingston reenacted. The First Ulster County Militia and the Queen’s 16th Light Dragoons will be mixin’ it up on October 15 and 16, starting with an invasion of Kingston Point Beach.


caption

COOL CREATIVE

R&F handmade encaustic paints

edmund eugene mullins at one mile gallery

The arts flourish here. The Arts Society of Kingston wreathes the city in sculpture on a regular basis, and a mass of diverse galleries await: the Kingston Museum of Contemporary Art, the Gallery at R&F, the Donskoj Studio and Gallery, the AIR Studio, Battledore Limited, Firehouse Glass Gallery and Artists’ Collective, Wright’s Gallery, One Mile Gallery—there are very good reasons why Business Week named Kingston fifth in a nationwide list of art-friendly cities. Kingston nurtures its arts scene with nifty settings like the Shirt Factory, offering gallery and studio spaces in repurposed industrial buildings, and collaborative efforts like the Brooklyn/Kingston Exchange Project at Gallery One Eleven. High-spirited nightlife abounds, with venues like Backstage Studio Productions, Deep Listening—currently presenting the annual Dream Festival—and the Stella May Theatre Gallery offering cutting-edge theatre, music and art. Midtown is home to the Ulster Performing Arts Center, offering everything from ballet to the B-52s. Down by the riverside, the neighborhood variously referred to as the Rondout or the Strand pulsates with creativity. The Hudson River Maritime Museum, which recently announced a new partnership with the justifiably renowned Clearwater organization, is showing a very Rondout photography exhibit at the moment: “The Faces of Work.” The Strand was—and is—a working waterfront, its center lined with clubs, restaurants, and shops and its outskirts with marinas and a steelyard…and there’s always something going on. Take a waterfront trolley ride or a tour on the Rip Van Winkle for another perspective on the sights. 10/11 ChronograM kingston 41

community pages: kingston

kevin paulsen at oo gallery


Yo u r C o m p l e t e R e s o u r c e f o r P r o f e s s i o n a l G r a d e E n c a u s t i c s a n d P i g m e n t S t i ck s ®

WORKSHOPS

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community pages: kingston

STORE

8 4 Te n B r o e c k A v e K i n g s t o n N Y 1 2 4 0 1 800.206.8088 | rfpaints.com

The 8-Day Week previews the most compelling events of the upcoming week. Delivered to your inbox each Thursday.

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ken abatayo, Traders of the Lost Art

tom keegan, owner & brewmaster, keegan ales

Claudia D’Arcy, dragon search

Maureen Byrd, Blue-Byrd’s Haberdashery & Music

Robert Van Kleeck, Schneider’s Jewelers

Theresa Misasi, Theresa & Co.

Mike Leonardo, paint department, Herzog’s

eugenia ballard, framer, Catskill Art & office Supply

Melody Tokash, Jen Gerard & Linden Miller, Hudson Coffee Traders

UPTOWN LOWDOWN

The Stockade District, commonly referred to as Uptown Kingston, is an eight-block area listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and marked by Green Street, Main Street, Clinton Avenue, and North Front Street that formed the original boundary lines of one of New York State’s first Dutch settlements. Historic buildings still stand intact from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries, including the original Ulster County courthouse, the Senate House where the State of New York was established in 1777, and the Old Dutch Church designed by Minard Lafever, another National Historic Landmark—some survivors of the burning of Kingston by British forces during the Revolutionary War. Today, the district throbs with activity. Alongside Kingston’s workaday life of business and government as the county seat, Uptown finds room for the exotic, the artistic, and the delightful. Uptown’s where you’ll find some of the Hudson Valley’s best and brightest hard at work on a variety of good causes. Family of Woodstock, the LGBTQ Community Center, the Rural Ulster Preservation Corporation (RUPCO), the Queens Galley, and HOPE’s Fund are strands in a creative safety net woven with enormous and inspired love. No matter the problem, somebody in Kingston has a good idea that will help. Kingston celebrations are epic, innovative and frequent. Consider the O Positive Festival, happening this month, in which the healing

arts come out into the street and jam with the fine arts. Art-loving dentists, chiropractors, and other experts barter their services directly with the participating artists, filling Uptown for three days with even more music and color and exuberance than usual. Shopping experiences not to be missed include Bop to Tottom, an eclectic bazaar full of goodies from around the world; Catskill Art and Office Supply, where tending to the needs of artists has become a fine art in itself; Half Moon Books, run by a true bibliophile; and BlueByrd Music and Haberdashery. The Parent Teacher store and J&J’s Hobby Shop are all about learning and fun. Columbia Beauty Supply’s got everything you need for any look imaginable, whether you’re looking to polish your everyday style, sparkle for a special occasion, or transform yourself into a mythological creature for Halloween. “I love it here. It’s home,” says Uptown Business Association President Kevin Quilty. “Not everybody thrives in a quaint little one-street town. This is pure organic river city with a great history and an ongoing renaissance that just keeps getting better. When I go to the Digital Corridor mixers at Keegan Ales, I’m always amazed at how many young, brilliant new media minds have gravitated to this town.” Amazing, yes, but logical—Kingston’s a place where such people will find a vibrant array of vital assets and amusements. Places like the Beahive and the Seven21 Media Center offer work and production facilities that creatives in many a town can only dream of.

www.newrivernotes.com/ny/kingston.htm www.kingston-ny.gov www.kingstonnycalendar.org www.opositivefestival.org www.thequeensgalley.org www.kingstonuptown.org www.seven21media.com www.deeplistening.org www.basementvenue.com

www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org www.hrmm.org www.healthykingston.org www.cce-kingston.org www.kinstonlandtrust.org www.bspinfo.net www.kingstondigitacorridor.org www.kingstoncorridor.wordpress.com www.byma.org/events/kingston.cfm 10/11 ChronograM kingston 43


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Steve Crist showing off the fresh organic produce at mother earth’s storehouse

In her position as Kingston’s Main Street Manager, Nancy Donskoj of the Donskoj Studio Gallery finds herself continually and happily overloaded with great new entries for her online events calendar—and new friends. “I’m constantly meeting restaurant owners, store owners, people opening new clubs, the directors of not-for-profits—just so many people who are actively living their passion,” she says. “There’s so much energy and the quality’s top-notch. Music, plays, poetry, art— there’s a constant blossoming.”

www.kingstonnycalendar.org/main-st-manager-blog

LOTS MORE ON THE MENU

From the Rondout to the westernmost reaches of Uptown, delectable eats are another Kingston art form. You’ll find gourmet takeout at Bistro To Go, grass-fed organic meats at Fleisher’s, fresh seafood at the Sea Deli—a family-run institution in Midtown for nearly four decades—and a wide selection of natural and organic treats at Mother Earth’s Storehouse. Uptown, it can be tough to make a choice: There’s Gabriel’s, sweet, homey and delicious. Then there’s Le Canard Enchaine (“Lift a fork. Imagine you are in Paris”), the Hoffman House Tavern (circa 1711), and the Elephant Wine Bar, to name just a few. The Strand beckons with longtime standouts like Mariner’s and Armadillo. The Kingston Farmers’ Market takes over Wall Street every Saturday morning with over 30 vendors. Kingston offers its citizens a charming variety of parks for outdoor contemplation and active recreation. Go watch the Tigers roar at Dietz Stadium one evening, or play some tennis at Forsyth Park, where there’s also a nature center and children’s zoo. There are neighborhood centers and playgrounds, trails by the water, and a public beach seasoned with water-smoothed fragments of historic brick. The YMCA operates a state-of–the-art facility in Midtown with fitness and wellness centers, three gymnasiums, a pool and whirlpool, and a wide variety of programming. New Kingstonian Jeffrey Robert Broido and his soulmate, Barbara, found their bliss in a 1900 Victorian they bought in Kingston. “We hung up the peace flag here, not sure what to expect, and a neighbor brought carrot cake,” Broido says. “Nobody even fussed when we put a witch on the roof. We’re home. We’re five minutes from great shopping, great sushi—we’re not lacking for any convenience. We sit in our garden and listen to the birds and the train whistle, the music floating up from the Strand on weekend evenings. People are real here. In Kingston, you wave and people wave back.” So it’s really just a question of which kind of adventure you’d like. But be careful; this town gets under your skin. You might be hurrying along on your way to some mundane business errand, thinking ordinary thoughts, when the church bells stop you in your tracks, making you look up; a flock of birds is taking wing from an ornate gingerbreadladen roofline you’d never noticed before. Across the street, a guy in a business suit and a Goth teen are laughing together. A blast of reggae from a passing car mingles with the church bells for a moment. There’s one open table left at the sidewalk café and it’s calling your name. A stranger smiles. Your heart lifts and you realize there is no better place and time than right here, right now.


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Claudine Craig Phd (917) 324-5595

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John M. Carroll www.johnmcarrollhealer.com

Kingston Farmers’ Market www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org

Kingston’s Opera House Office Building (845) 399-1212

Medical Aesthetics of the Hudson Valley (845) 339-5273

Mother Earth’s Storehouse www.motherearthstorehouse.com

O Positive Festival www.opositivefestival.org

One Mile Gallery www.onemilegallery.com

Prostate Cancer 101 (845) 331-7241

R&F Handmade Paints www.rfpaints.com

Ryan Insurance www.ryanandryaninsurance.com

Schneiders Jewelers, Inc. www.schneidersjewelers.com

Synergistic Wellness Center (845) 633-6300

The Syntax Rugrat http://thesyntaxrugrat.com 46 kingston ChronograM 10/11


John M. Carroll H ,T ,S C EALER

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“ John is an extraordinary healer whom I have been privileged to know all my life and to work with professionally these last eight years. His ability to use energy and imagery have changed as well as saved the lives of many of my patients. Miracles still do happen.” —Richard Brown, MD Author Stop Depression Now “ John Carroll is a most capable, worthy, and excellent healer of high integrity, compassion, and love.” —Gerald Epstein, MD Author Healing Visualizations

Massage and Acupuncture also available with Liz Menendez See John’s website for schedules of upcoming classes and events

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A 4-week symposium on Self Empowerment and Compassionate Medical Care Panel discussions and open dialogue for health care providers and the public Making more health care options known to the general public, offering opportunities for practitioners to network, and exploring ways to humanize the medical establishment Fostering cooperation for health.

Oct 5 Patient - Clinician Relationship, What is a healing relationship? “When we meet in love we shall be whole.” Eugene Gauggel and featured presenters. Oct 12 How to Handle a Caregiving Emergency Grant Abrams, PT, and guests will discuss his new book Caregiver Revolution and how to deal with common caregiving emergencies.

WEDNESDAYS IN OCTOBER, 4-6 PM

Oct 19 Alternative Healing Modalities: Mind/body healing, Qigong, guided healing meditations; samplings. Gary Mercurio, D.C., and guests

FREE ADMISSION

Oct 26 The Future of Health Care: Humanizing the Medical Establishment Panel discussion on possibilities of compassionate caregiving, with emphasis on patient empowerment and disease prevention.

All sessions held at Kingston Library, 55 Franklin St.

Call Eugene Gauggel for more info: 255-3982 sponsored by

Kingston’s Best Business Address

Claudine Craig, Ph.D. LMHC, CASAC

PSYCHOLOGICAL COUNSELING

OFFICE SUITES 300 sq. ft. to 1200 sq. ft.

children, adolescents, adults individuals, couples and families depression, anxiety, stress and anger issues eating disorders, drug/alcohol challenges, trauma

RETAIL STORES 600 sq. ft. to 2300 sq. ft. Contact Bill (owner/manager) for availability: (845) 399-1212 or email: 3991212@gmail.com

evaluations and psychological testing (917) 324 5595 New Paltz, NY

Strategies for a Meaningful Life

insurances accepted

275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY

10/11 ChronograM kingston 47

community pages: kingston

ERIE® insurance services are provided by one or more of the following insurers: Erie Insurance Company, Erie Insurance Property & Casualty Company and Flagship City Insurance Company (home offices: Erie, Pennsylvania) or Erie Insurance Company of New York (home office: Rochester, New York). Not all companies are licensed or operate in all states. Not all products are offered in all states. Go to erieinsurance.com for company licensure and territory information. Equal opportunity insurer.

constructive living


Human Form: An Enduring Inspiration group exhibition

Artist Reception: Saturday, October 15 6:00-9:00 pm

Mallory Wetherell Complicated Process, ceramic

galleries & museums

Exhibition runs through November 12

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(845) 784-1146

www.annstreetgallery.org

facebook.com/annstreetgallery

Tremaine Gallery at the Hotchkiss School 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, Connecticut Gallery hours: Monday - Saturday 10 - 4 ; Sunday, 12 - 4 (860) 435 - 3663 / www.hotchkiss.org

Linking Collections, Building Connections: Works from the Hudson Valley Visual Art Consortium Through December 11, 2011

48 galleries & museums ChronograM 10/11


arts & culture october 2011

Milton Glaser, Black Eyed Nude, Giclée Print, 2009 from the exhibit “Shakespeare and Other Subjects Prints and Drawings,” by Milton Glaser at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum October 15 through January 2.

10/11 ChronograM 49


galleries & museums

a 2007 strip from the syndicated “zippy the pinhead” series by cartoonist bill griffith, part of the exhibit “ARE WE HAVING ART YET?—selected drawings 1978-2011,” From October 1 through December 4 at BCB ART in hudson.

ADAMS HORSE STABLE

FOVEA EXHIBITIONS

WEST BRIDGE STREET, SAUGERTIES 246-1618 “Works by Wayne Sittner.” Through October 23.

143 MAIN STREET, BEACON 765-2199 “September 11: Photography of Hale Gurland.” Through November 6.

ADRIANCE MEMORIAL LIBRARY

THE FRANCES LEHMAN LOEB ART CENTER

93 MARKET STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 485-3445 “Oils by Don Rothman.” Through October 14.

VASSAR COLLEGE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5632 “A Pioneering Collection: Master Drawings from the Crocker Art Museum.” European drawings. Through December 11.

ALBERT SHAHINIAN FINE ART UPSTAIRS GALLERIES 22 EAST MARKET STREET, RHINEBECK 505-6040 “The Luminous Landscape 2011.” 14th annual invitational exhibition; solo exhibit: Arnold Levine. Through November 12.

ARTS UPSTAIRS 60 MAIN STREET, PHOENICIA 688-2142 “Underwater Paintings by Gary Ampel.” Through October 8.

ARTVIEW GALLERY 14 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-0999 “ArtEnsemble.” Susan Woods, Thomas Witte, Jeremy Foster-Fell, Clyde D. Finlay, Jeff Britton and poems from CC Arshagra. Through November 4.

BARRETT ART CENTER 55 NOXON STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-2550 “Barrett Art Center Faculty and Student Exhibition.” Through October 8.

BAU 161 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-7584 “Surrealism, Expressionism and Candy Boxes.” New work by Grey Zeien. Through October 2.

CARRIE HADDAD GALLERY 622 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-1915 “Natural History.” Archeological sculptures by Linda Cross, mixed media paintings by Ragellah Rourke, and linear color paintings by Ralph Stout. Through October 30.

CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY AT WOODSTOCK

front Street Gallery 21 Front Street, Patterson 490-4542 “Before and After 9-11: Images and the Aftermath.” Jeremy Wolff. Through October 16.

GALERIE BMG 12 TANNERY BROOK ROAD, WOODSTOCK 679-0027 “Kamil Vojnar: Flying Blind.” Through November 7. Opening Saturday, October 15, 5pm-7pm.

THE GALLERY AT STILL RIVER EDITIONS 128 EAST LIBERTY STREET, DANBURY, CONNECTICUT (203) 791-1474 “Moments of Grace: Portraits by Ben Larrabee.” Photography show. Through October 28.

Gallery on the green 7 Arch Street, Pawling 855-5642 Stephanie Anderson, 2011 watercolors. Through October 16.

GARRISON ART CENTER 23 GARRISON’S LANDING, GARRISON 424-3960 “Current 2011: Summer Sculpture Exhibition.” Through October 10.

The Harrison Gallery 39 Spring Street, Williamstown, MA (413) 458-1700 Realist painter, Nick Patten and bronze sculptor, Susan Read Cronin. Through October 31. Opening Saturday, October 1, 5pm-7pm.

HUDSON BEACH GLASS

59 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-9957 “Rewriting Loss.” Photographs and film by Carla Shapiro. Through October 9.

162 MAIN STREET, BEACON 440-0068 “Holography: The Art of Shaping Light,.” October 8-November 13. Opening Saturday, October 8, 6pm-9pm.

D&H CANAL MUSEUM

HUDSON VALLEY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART

23 MOHONK ROAD, HIGH FALLS 687-9311 “Chagall in High Falls.” Through October 30.

1701 MAIN STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 788-0100 “CIRCA 1986.” 70 artworks from more than 40 international artists who emerged with significant artworks between 1981 and 1991. Through July 31, 2012.

DOLCE 27 BROADWAY, KINGSTON 339-092. “Dogs, Crows, and Things.” Paintings by artist Suzanne V. Paddock. Through October 29.

DOWNING FILM CENTER 19 FRONT STREET, NEWBURGH 561-3686 “48th Annual Juried Art Exhibition.” Through October 16.

DUCK POND GALLERY 128 CANAL STREET, PORT EWEN 338-5580 “Glens and Gardens.” 15-artist watercolor show. October 6-27. Opening Saturday, October 6, 5pm-8pm.

FLAT IRON GALLERY 105 SOUTH DIVISION STREET, PEEKSKILL (914) 734-1894 “Summers Past.” Works by Lisa Steffens. October 1-31. Opening Saturday, October 1, 1pm-5pm.

50 galleries & museums ChronograM 10/11

IN THE STAIRWELL 291 MAIN STREET, BEACON 597-9850 “History on the Edge.” Images of endangered historic places in NY by Stefan Baumann. Through October 31.

JOHN DAVIS GALLERY 362 1/2 WARREN STREET, HUDSON (518) 828-5907 “Constructions: New Work.” La Wilson. Through October 9. “Drew Goerlitz.” Sculpture garden. Through October 9. “New Hesitation Blues.” Craig Olson. Through October 9. “Reveal.” Gillian Jagger. Through October 9. “Works by Liv Aanrud.” Through October 9. “Works by Margrit Lewczuk.” Through October 9. “Paintings by Sara Jane Roszak.” Also showing Bruce Gagnier, Gillian Jagger, Jen P. Harris, Meg Carlon, Linda Mussmann, and Osamu Kobayashi. October 13-November 6. Opening Saturday, October 15, 6pm-8pm.


Eric Sloane (1905-1985)

“September” 31" x 22" Oil on Board

Green river Gallery SincE 1975 SpEcializing in workS by Eric SloanE and amErican art of thE 19th and 20 th cEnturiES

for your fall reading pleasure www.sunypress.edu Six Weeks in

Saratoga How Three-Year-Old Filly Rachel Alexandra Beat the Boys and Became Horse of the Year

Brendan o’Meara

ThE Landmarks oF nEw York

An Illustrated Record of the City’s Historic Buildings

mike freeman

drifting two weeks on the hudson

Fifth Edition

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel

Hudson RiveR Towns Highlights from the Capital Region to Sleepy Hollow Country

photographs by HaRdie TRuesdale text by Joanne MicHaels

10/11 Chronogram museums & galleries 51

galleries & museums

1578 Boston Corners Road, Millerton, NY 12546 • 518 789-3311 open Saturday 10-5, Sunday 12-5, or by appointment Just 5 3/4 miles North of Millerton


JOYCE GOLDSTEIN GALLERY 16 MAIN STREET, CHATHAM (518) 392-2250 “Chip Fasciana.” Albany underground artist. October 22-November 19. Opening Saturday, October 22, 4pm-7pm.

KINGSTON MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART 105 ABEEL STREET, KINGSTON www.kmoca.org “As Is: Recent Works by Ken Gray.” October 1-25. Opening Saturday, October 1, 5pm-7pm.

KLEINERT/JAMES ARTS CENTER 34 TINKER AVENUE, WOODSTOCK 679-2079 “Eccentric Portraits.” Through October 16. “Hybrid.” A group exhibition curated by Carol March. October 21-November 27. Opening Saturday, October 22, 4pm-6pm.

52 Main Street Millerton, New York 12546 Open Thursdays - Mondays Noon - 5 p.m. Or by Appointment 518-592-1303 www.ladyaudreysgallery.com

The Marina Gallery 153 Main Street, Cold Spring 845 265-2204 Barbara Smith Gioia, mixed media. October 8-30.

MARIST COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1399 NORTH ROAD, POUGHKEEPSIE 575-3000 ext. 3182 “Rendering Reality.” Marist College Art Faculty 2011. Through October 15.

MARK GRUBER GALLERY NEW PALTZ PLAZA, NEW PALTZ 255-1241 “Eric Angeloch, Marlene Wiedenbaum: New Work.” Through October 17.

MILL STREET LOFT’S GALLERY 45 45 PERSHING AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 471-7477 “Art Institute Senior Project Exhibit.” Through March 19.

MILLBROOK VINEYARDS & WINERY 26 WING ROAD, MILLBROOK (800) 662-9463 “Art in the Loft: Fall 2011.” Through November 13.

OLANA STATE HISTORIC SITE 5720 STATE ROUTE 9G, HUDSON (518) 828-0135 “FARM: Agricultural Life of the Hudson Valley.” Photographer Brandt Bolding. Through October 30.

One Mile Gallery 475 Abeel Street, Kingston 338-2035 “High Water” Genesis Chapman. October 8 through November 5. Opening Saturday, October 8, 6pm-9pm.

galleries & museums

The Palmer Gallery College Center, Main Building, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie 437-5370 Group exhibition. 19 Hudson Valley artists from the Long Reach Arts Cooperative who work in a variety of media. Through October 16. Artists reception Thursday, October 6, 5pm-7pm.

The Gallery at R&F 84 Ten broenck Avenue, Kingston 331-3112 “Strange Currencies” solo exhibit by painter Cat Crotchett. Through November 19. Opening Saturday, October 1, 5pm-7pm.

SAMUEL DORSKY MUSEUM OF ART SUNY NEW PALTZ, NEW PALTZ 257-3858 “Hudson Valley Artists: Exercises in Unnecessary Beauty.” Through November 13. “Linking Collections, Building Connections: Works from the Hudson Valley Visual Art Collections Consortium.” Through December 11.

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SCENIC HUDSON’S RIVER CENTER 8 LONG DOCK ROAD, BEACON 471-7477 “Mill Street Loft Faculty Exhibition.” Through October 30.

SCOTT AND BOWNE

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SCOTT AND BOWNE FINE ART AND FURNISHINGS 27 NORTH MAIN ST. #1, KENT, CONNECTICUT (860) 592-0207 “Up, Up, and Away.” David Klein. Through October 16.

locations 56 east market

worldwide

27 NORTH MAIN STREET #1, KENT, ConnecTicut (860) 592-0207 “Trick or Treat? Art to Celebrate Halloween.” Works by local artists in a variety of media. October 22-November 6. Opening Saturday, October 22, 5pm-7pm.

17 church

Skoler Gallery 170 Canal Street, Ellenville (646) 325-5527 Halloween Group Show. Through November 10. Opening Saturday, October 29, 6pm.

THE SMALL GALLERY AT VALLEY ARTISANS MARKET 25 EAST MAIN STREET, CAMBRIDGE (518) 677-2765 “Irene Biller-Berkson: A Retrospective Art Exhibit, With Friends.” Through October 11.

THADDEUS KWIAT PROJECTS 1536 ROUTE 212, STUDIO #C, SAUGERTIES (917) 456-7496 “Anthony Krauss.” Through October 2.

artview GALLERY

TIVOLI ARTISTS CO-OP 60 BROADWAY, TIVOLI 758-4342 “Invitational: Greene County Council on the Arts.” Through January 30, 2012. “Never the Same.” Exhibit of paintings and prints by Marie Cole. Through October 9.

TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 484 LIME ROCK ROAD, LAKEVILLE, CONNECTICUT www.40cowsforpeace.org “40 Cows for Peace.” A public art project featuring 40 pieces of art featuring cows by artist Jo Ann O’Rear. October 7-23. Opening Friday, October 7, 7pm-9pm.

fourteen main st. chatham, new york 518 392 0999

artviewgalleryny.com

TWISTED SOUL

thurs - sat: 12-5 sun: 12-4

442 MAIN STREET, POUGHKEEPSIE 705-5381 “Gut Feelings.” Watercolor & gouache paintings by Katharyn Laranger. Through November 16.

Dead Sunflowers | Jeff Britton

have you viewed art today?

52 galleries & museums ChronograM 10/11

UNFRAMED ARTIST GALLERY 173 HUGUENOT STREET, NEW PALTZ 255-5482 “Monochrome.” Explore the beauty and tension between black and white. Through October 9.


Special Events Live Music Every Weekend

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WaterStreetMarket.com Barbara Smith Gioia, strata #6, from gioia’s upcoming solo exhibition at The Marina Gallery in Cold Spring, October 8-30.

Exit 18, NYS Thruway, take Route 299 West (Main Street) to Water Street. At the foot of the bridge go left onto Water Street. Just look for the Tower. 10 Main Street, New Paltz, NY • (845) 255-1403 0000927639

UNISON ARTS & LEARNING CENTER

UNISON GALLERY WATER STREET MARKET, NEW PALTZ 255-1559 “Works by Stephen Derrickson.” October 15-November 14. Opening Saturday, October 15, 5pm-7pm.

Varga Gallery 130 Tinker Street, Woodstock 679-4005 John Lurie solo exhibit of original paintings and limited edition, hand signed, and numbered prints. Through October 31.

VASSAR COLLEGE’S JAMES W. PALMER GALLERY RAYMOND AVENUE, POUGHKEEPSIE 437-5370 “Long Reach Arts at Vassar College.” Through October 16. Opening Thursday, October 6, 5pm-7pm. “Through The Student Lens: Photographs of and by Vassar Students, 1865-2011.” October 27-November 22. Opening Thursday, October 27, 5pm-7pm.

WALLKILL RIVER SCHOOL AND ART GALLERY 232 WARD STREET, MONTGOMERY 457-ARTS “Romancing the Landscape.” Exhibit of paintings by Lisa O’Gorman-Hofsommer and Nancy Reed Jones. October 8-31. Opening Saturday, October 8, 5pm-8pm.

White Gallery 342 Main Street, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-1029 Robert Kipniss: A Working Artists Life” book launch. Exhibition through January 1, 2012 Launch party and book signing Saturday October 1, 5pm-7pm. “Abstract Visions from Italy” Eduardo Giannattasio. Through November 27. Opening Saturday, October 8, 5pm-7pm “Natures Influence” Susan Bradley and Mari Skarp. Through November 27. Opening Saturday, October 15, 5pm-7pm.

WILDERSTEIN PRESERVATION 330 MORTON ROAD, RHINEBECK 876-4818. “Modern Art & the Romantic Landscape.” Through October 31.

WOLFGANG GALLERY 40 RAILROAD AVENUE, MONTGOMERY 769-7446 “Portrayal.” Oil paintings by Anna Weber. October 10-November 9. Opening Saturday, October 15, 6pm-8pm.

WOODSTOCK ARTISTS ASSOCIATION AND MUSEUM 28 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2940 “Cats and Caricatures.” Peggy Bacon. Through October 9.

WOODSTOCK BYRDCLIFFE GUILD 34 TINKER STREET, WOODSTOCK 679-2079 “Quick, Down and Dirty.” Focus on outdoor furniture & landscape/ garden accessory constructions, many of them “site specific”. Through November 6.

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galleries & museums

68 MOUNTAIN REST ROAD, NEW PALTZ 255-1559 “Chronogram Covers.” A Chronogram cover retrospective. October 2-30. Opening Sunday, October 2, 4pm-6pm.


by peter aaron

Y D A L K C A H S E V O L rson Kate Pie

54 music ChronograM 10/11

fionn reilly

Music


W

hen Hurricane Irene roared through the Catskills in late August, roads were flooded, houses were swept away, and entire livelihoods were destroyed. But right now it’s a sunny early September afternoon in Mount Tremper and all of that seems eons ago, especially when one is viewing the lush front lawn of Kate’s Lazy Meadow motel through the windows of one of its über-retroappointed cabins. Actually, amid all of the wood-lined coziness and Technicolor midcentury modern furnishings, today feels more like one from 60 years before the storm, rather than two weeks after it. Out back, along the edge of the Esopus Creek, however, it’s a different story. “This has no resemblance to how it usually looks, with all of this silt,” says front desk manager Carmon Deen about the plot normally reserved for the property’s fleet of vintage airstream guest trailers. “After the storm it was all under water.” And what about the motel’s namesake owner, Kate Pierson? Where was she when Irene ravaged the Hudson Valley? She was at work, with the band she’s performed with for nearly four decades—the B-52s. “We had the trailers off site when the flood happened, and thankfully we hadn’t brought them in for the season yet,” says Pierson, who co-owns the business with her life partner Monica Coleman, via phone. “We’ve had to clean them up after flooding twice before, and we’d just finished getting them ready. So we really lucked out this time. But everything else is all okay now, the motel’s totally up and running like usual.” Isn’t being a motel owner an unexpected sideline for the singer and keyboardist of one of the best-known bands of the new wave era? “Not to me,” she says, adding with a laugh, “I’ve certainly stayed in enough hotels on tour to know what makes a cool one.” At the time the B-52s hit the rock world in the late 1970s there was simply nothing else like them: Fred Schneider, an effeminate-voiced front man with a pencil moustache; Ricky Wilson, a guitarist playing spy-movie riffs on a beat-up Mosrite; Keith Strickland, an unwaveringly motorik drummer; and Pierson squeezing out cheesy Farfisa lines next to her frugging, giddy-voiced bookend, Cindy Wilson (Ricky’s sister). The group’s fluorescent imagery was gleaned from B-grade sci-fi and beach flicks and cast-off Jet Age chic found in thrift stores. The records were a flawless match: gyrating, primitively played, alchemical pastiches of surf, garage rock, exotica, early soul, and other forgotten styles. Somehow it makes perfect sense that it all began with a cocktail known as a flaming volcano. But maybe what’s most surreal is that the B-52s turn 35 this year. “Of course, none of us had any idea we’d still be doing this so many years later,” Pierson says. “At the beginning we were just hoping to get a gig in Athens [Georgia, where the group formed]. And then when we first came up to NewYork to play CBGB and Max’s Kansas City—well, we thought that was just the absolute pinnacle.” Catherine Elizabeth Pierson was born in Weehawken, New Jersey, and later moved to nearby Rutherford. Growing up next to New York City had a cultural impact on little Kate, and so did her musical family: Her grandmother played piano and sang, her brother played cello, and her father was a working jazz guitarist who played in big bands. In her teens Pierson loved Bob Dylan, the Beatles, and Joni Mitchell, and after high school she briefly attended Wheaton College in Illinois before graduating with a journalism degree from Boston University. “Those were the hippie days,” she recalls of her years in Boston, where she also worked as a nurse’s aide. “I was in sit-ins and got tear-gassed in Vietnam War protests. After [the shootings at] Kent State I felt like I had to get out of the US, so I traveled around Europe for a while.” She returned to Boston with a friend she’d met in England, but due to immigration laws he was unable to find work. When another friend offered him a job in Athens, the pair moved there. It was a different world. “At that time I was really into the whole back-to-the-land thing,” Pierson says. “I lived as a tenant farmer in a one-room shack with an outhouse for $15 a month outside of Athens. I’d ride my bike into town for work. It was great, because there was no one else for miles around and I could play guitar and write songs whenever I felt like it. Actually, [the B-52s’ 1989 hit] ‘Love Shack’ was inspired by that place. [Sings] ‘Well it’s set way back in the middle of a field / Just a funky old shack and I gotta get back...’” In University of Georgia-dominated Athens, Pierson joined an arty crowd that also contained locals Strickland and the Wilson siblings, and Schneider, a fellow New Jersey expatriate. The clique all loved quirky older sounds but by then most of the music that was around, especially locally, was far from exciting. “It was pretty much all Southern boogie rock, rednecks trying to be the Allman Brothers,” she remembers. “But we did get to hear records by Patti Smith and the Sex Pistols when they came out, and we were instant fans.” One night in 1976, after the five had shared the aforementioned flaming volcano (a tropical, rum-based drink with an ignited “crater” and sipped communally with long straws) at a Chinese restaurant, they held an impromptu jam session and as a joke decided to start a band. The name, Southern slang for a beehive hairdo— due to its resemblance to the nosecone of a B-52 bomber—came to Strickland in his sleep. “He had this dream where there was a lounge band playing, and their name was the B-52s,” Pierson explains. “He woke up and was, like, ‘That’s it!’” To underscore the point she and Cindy adopted ridiculous bouffant wigs as a stage trademark. The quintet debuted at a Valentines Day house party the following year, with

Wilson, stepping in as chief arranger. A highly original and underrated guitarist (“He invented all of these weird tunings because he’d break a string and wouldn’t have the money to replace it”), Wilson also came up with a now very familiar, nine-note lick. “Ricky ran into Keith one day and he was smiling,” Pierson recounts. “Keith asked him why and Ricky said, ‘I just made up the stupidest guitar riff ever!’” That riff was the opening of “Rock Lobster,” which as the B-52s’ debut single sold over 2,000 copies—formidable for an independent 45 in 1978—and led to successful club dates on the East Coast punk circuit and a deal with Warner Brothers Records, which sent the outfit to the Bahamas to record its classic eponymous 1979 first album. “I saw the B-52s the first few times they played in Boston, at the Rat and the Paradise,” says Human Sexual Response vocalist Dini Lamot, who today himself owns and manages a local B&B, the Hudson Inn, with his partner and co-vocalist, Windle Davis. “Besides them having such fun, danceable songs what really hit me was their lineup and image, which were very different for the time. We didn’t get to know them until years later, but when we did I remember them saying that early on the label wouldn’t let the girls go out anywhere without their wigs on.” As The B-52’s turned platinum the band’s international star continued to rocket. “Rock Lobster” hit the Billboard Hot 100 and John Lennon declared it inspirational, comparing Pierson’s and Cindy Wilson’s voices to Yoko Ono’s. That track, along with “Planet Claire” and “Dance This Mess Around,” became Top Ten singles in Australia, and the group blew up the charts in the UK and Canada as well. No sophomore slumpers, the fivesome followed up with the likewise great, gold-selling Wild Planet (featuring “Private Idaho” and “Party Out of Bounds”) in 1980, and appeared on “Saturday Night Live” and in the Paul Simon film One Trick Pony. Over the next few years the band settled into becoming one of the world’s top live acts, releasing on Warner Brothers the EPs Party Mix! (1981) and Mesopotamia (1982) and the album Whammy! (1983). But while the group was working on its fourth full-length, 1986’s Bouncing Off the Satellites (also Warner Brothers), something horrible and unforeseen happened. Unbeknownst to his bandmates, Ricky Wilson had been very ill for some time. It turned out to be an AIDS-related virus. At only 32, he passed away on October 12, 1985. “Ricky was very shy and never wanted anyone to worry about him, so at first he didn’t tell any of us he was sick,” says Pierson. “Actually, I don’t think he really even grasped what AIDS was at the time. There was much less known about it then.” Thrust into deeply painful shock, the band decided to take time off. The future was uncertain. During the lull Strickland put his drumsticks aside to learn guitar, and even began writing music. He played some of it for the others, and the four decided to try writing songs together again. The result was 1989’s Cosmic Thing (Warner Brothers), a worldwide smash and the B-52s’ biggest-selling album by far. Produced by Don Was and Nile Rodgers, the irresistible disc is both a contemporary dance club floor-filler and a classic pop tour-de-force, with the band’s Motown/girl group influences brought further to the fore. With the ubiquitous party anthem “Love Shack” the group had its first Top 10 single, and the cuts “Channel Z,” “Roam,” and “Deadbeat Club” (another reflection on the outfit’s Athens days) were huge hits as well. “It was wonderful, making Cosmic Thing was very much a healing process for us after Ricky died,” says Pierson. “And it felt like he was still right there with us.” Soon after, Cindy Wilson decided to take time out and the group waxed 1992’s Good Stuff (Warner Brothers) without her and toured with Julee Cruise filling in until she rejoined in 1998. After becoming a regular Hudson Valley visitor in the late ’80s, Pierson built a local home. She was looking for an investment property when she noticed a disused 1950s lodge-era motel nearby. “I fell in love with it, and asked Monica if she could work on getting it refinished while I was on tour—‘Piece of cake!’ I thought,” recalls Pierson, who with Coleman eventually opened Kate’s Lazy Meadow. “Of course, it needed way more work than I ever dreamed. But we finally got it opened in 2005. Most of the furniture and stuff are things I picked up on Route 28.” The B-52s’ most recent album is Funplex (2008, Astralwerks), which debuted at number 11 on the Billboard charts. Although the group played Bethel Woods the year of the album’s release, its 2006 show at Kingston’s Ulster Performing Arts Center was mysteriously cancelled. “We still have no idea what happened with that, it was the only time we ever had a promoter cancel on us,” says Pierson, who’s obviously looking forward to the rescheduled homecoming at UPAC this month. “It’s the exact same bill we had originally booked, with Big Sister opening and [drag performer] Lady Esther Gin emceeing.” With the B-52s, Pierson currently performs nearly 100 shows per year and makes no mention of stopping anytime soon. “People play ‘Love Shack’ at their weddings or tell me how our music got them through tough times,” she says in disbelief. And how would she like the band to be remembered? “Like it says on our website: ‘The World’s Greatest Party Band!’” Clearly, after all this time for Pierson and the B-52s the party’s still gloriously out of bounds. Just what was in that flaming volcano? The B-52s will perform at UPAC in Kingston on October 2 at 7pm. www.upac.org; (845) 339-6088. With the Wild Crowd! Live in Athens, GA is out October 11 on CD, DVD, and Blu-Ray on Eagle Records. www.theb52s.com; www.lazymeadow.com. 10/11 ChronograM music 55


nightlife highlights Handpicked by music editor Peter Aaron for your listening pleasure.

Sex Mob Wednesday and Thursday is OPEN MIC NIGHT, 7pm Sat, 10/1 Sun, 10/2 Fri, 10/7 Sat, 10/8 Sun, 10/9 Thurs, 10/13 Fri, 10/14 Sat, 10/15 Fri, 10/21 Sat, 10/22 Sun, 10/23 Fri, 10/28 Sat, 10/29 Sun, 10/30 Fri, 11/4 Sat, 11/5 Thur, 11/10 Fri, 11/11 Sat, 11/12

DEBBIE DAVIES Blues Band HOLLY NEAR HOT CLUB OF COWTOWN POPA CHUBBY Band PJ WALSH TOMMY MALONE of The Subdudes LARDNER & HERMOSILLA; also ROB MORSBERGER ARLEN ROTH BAND STEVE KATZ; guest Fred Ball CHRISTINE LAVIN; guest • Don White L’IL ED & BLUES IMPERIALS (Tent) Women’s Resource Center Benefit MacTALLA MOR - “Celtic Halloween!” BACK TO THE GARDEN 1969 SETH GLIER; guest Kiriaki Bozas KENNY WHITE; guest David Temple TIM O’BRIEN ACOUSTIC ALCHEMY PATTY LARKIN; guest Anthony da Costa

Up-to-date schedule: www.townecrier.com “««««” —Poughkeepsie Journal; “Exquisite desserts!”—New York Times “First rate!”—Rolling Stone; “Finest roots music club!”—The Wall Street Journal “” —Poughkeepsie Journal; “Exquisite desserts!”—New York Times “First rate!”—Rolling Stone; “Finest roots music club!”—The Wall Street Journal

Serving Dinner Serving DinnerWednesday Wednesday- -Sunday Sunday 130 Route 22, Pawling, NY 12564 • 845-855-1300

130 Route 22, Pawling, NY 12564 • 845-855-1300

October 7. Trumpeter Steven Bernstein’s out-but-danceable, deconstructed-New Orleans jazz unit Sex Mob has been kicking funky butt since 1995. The Grammy-nominated band’s “idea that repertoire can range from Nirvana to Prince, [James] Bond to Basie, and everything in between” wins over everyone from punks to pinstripes. This rare Club Helsinki hit comes on the eve on Bernstein’s 50th birthday, and as many locals also know him from his tenure in the Levon Helm Band, it should be quite a party. John Medeski and Roswell Rudd guest star. (The Black Crowes’ Rich Robinson alights October 13; Club d’Elf with John Medeski reconvenes October 15.) 9pm. $20. Hudson. (518) 828-4800; www.helsinkihudson.com.

Andrew Bird October 14. Chicago-based multi-instrumentalist, lyricist, and whistler (that’s what his website says) Andrew Bird hasn’t released an album since 2009’s acclaimed Noble Beast, but that doesn’t mean he hasn’t been busy. Besides penning an original score and several songs for the soundtrack of the film Norman, which opens in select theaters this month, he recently contributed a version of Kermit the Frog’s “Bein Green” to a Muppets tribute album and even found time to jam with West African folk collective Etran Finatawa. Bird lands in the Hudson Valley this month for a very special evening at the Bardavon. (The Hudson Valley Philharmonic presents “Viva Vivaldi!” October 15; Kris Kristofferson visits November 4.) 8pm. $35, $42. Poughkeepsie. (845) 473-2072; www.bardavon.org.

The Misfits October 14. It just ain’t October if the Misfits aren’t haunting the Chance. Every Halloween season, the legendary New Jersey horror punks make their return, their winkingly ghoulish songs and aesthetic dovetailing (batwinging?) all too well with the high holiday of plastic fangs and razor blade-filled apples. Although bassist-singer Jerry Only is the sole original member—founding front man Glenn Danzig left to take the concept to its humorlessly absurd conclusion long ago—the current lineup also stars ex-Black Flag guitarist Dez Cadena. With the Hub City Stompers, Welcome to Green Haven, and more. (Taking Back Sunday plays October 28; the Cro Mags crush October 29.) 7:30pm. $20. Poughkeepsie. (845) 471-1966; www.thechancetheater.com.

Sidi Toure October 15. Descended from Malian royalty, singer and guitarist Sidi Toure plays droning “African blues” much like those of his better-known namesake, the late Ali Farke Toure. Sidi’s second album, Sahel Folk, newly out on taste-making US indie label Thrill Jockey, is a sublimely heady and hypnotic acoustic session taped live, field recording style, at his sister’s house with friends over glasses of native tea. It’s not clear if any such beverages will be on the menu for this date at the Falcon, but don’t let that keep you from what’s sure to be a magical performance. (Spottiswoode & His Enemies play October 1; Leni Stern strums October 13.) 7pm. Donation requested. Marlboro. (845) 236-7970; www.liveatthefalcon.com.

Benefit for Woodstock Farm Sanctuary with Jeff Mangum October 27. The voice of far-reachingly influential neopsychedelic outfit Neutral Milk Hotel, singer-songwriter Jeff Mangum is deep of heart as well as creativity. In addition to this intimate Bearsville Theater benefit for the Woodstock Farm Sanctuary, Mangum has donated the proceeds from a recent tour and sales of a new box set of drawings and NMH vinyl reissues to Children of the Blue Sky, an organization that helps abandoned Mongolian children. Good music, good man. (Kate Taylor croons October 3; the North Mississippi All Stars arrive October 25.) 8pm. $40. Bearsville. (845) 679-4406; www.bearsvilletheater.com. sidi toure plays the falcon in marlboro on october 15.

56 music ChronograM 10/11


cd reVieWs MichAeL biSio TRAVEL MUSIC (2011, INDEPENDENT)

Travel Music Music, bassist, composer, and educator Michael Bisio’s first solo release, shouldn’t get lost in the cartful of recordings he’s appeared on thus far this year: pianist Matthew Shipp’s brilliant Art of the Improviser, saxophonist Louie Belogenis’s Tiresias, pianist Bob Gluck’s Returning, ing and a few others (and the year’s not over). Recorded at Karl Berger’s Sertso Studio in Woodstock, six of the eight compositions were written by part-time Upstater Biso and reflect a relaxed tempo of playing, as well as of his temperament. They’re not as much compositions as they are narratives. In an almost 30-year career, a journeyman’s reflections on the music he continues to produce. Bisio says he was ready to make Travel Music last year even as he immersed himself in the projects of others. “Livin’ Large,” he says, was written “in real time” during a CIMP Records session with a quartet. He performs with wiry energy that smoothly dissipates into the melody at the end. The solemn title tune holds a respect for the journey, “more so than the destination,” as demonstrated in Bisio’s patient delivery of each phrase. Whether bowed or plucked, there seems to be no end to the lyricism in his playing. His version of John Coltrane’s “Alabama” is more evidence of this, as is his sensitive interpretation of Charlie Haden’s “Human Being.” Michael Bisio’s Travel Music adds to his reputation as one of the most distinctive bassists in creative music. www.michaelbisio.com. —Cheryl K. Symister-Masterson

deborAh oSherow KALLIOPE’S GRACE (2010, INDEPENDENT)

The message of Kalliope is the eloquence of epic poetry. This is what makes Deborah Osherow’s 12-track CD doubly beautiful: Naming her first record after Homer’s oldest Greek muse, she combines a love of classic poetry with a love of acoustic Celtic music. After searching through early English poetry for lyrics, Osherow chose those that inspired her most deeply while meshing the best of style and rhythm to harp and guitar. She drew from Yeats, Shelley, Wordsworth, and other early poets, as well as lesser-known Australian ones. Joined by Hudson Valley favorites T. G. Vanini, James Kruger, Julie Parisi-Kirby, Ian Worpole, and others, Osherow produces a soothing work that brings poetry to life in a fresh and convincing way, summoning nature through vocals, harp, guitar, mandolin, viola, fiddle, bass, nyckelharpa, accordion, and bodhran. “Twenty Gallons of Sleep” introduces Osherow’s sturdy vibrato with upbeat harp and fiddle, highlighting Agnes Louise Storrie’s lullaby equating a drunken sleep to the slumbering of babies with angels aloft. Osherow’s nod to Yeats takes place in “The Fiddler of Dooney,” a fiddle-and-guitar-based tune that repeatedly harmonizes an infectious happy sentiment: “The merry love the fiddle/And the merry love to dance.” Taken from a Ben Jonson Elizabethan stage play, “The Hymn of Hesperus” is an a capella live piece comprised of a peacefully harmonizing quartet. Percy Shelley’s “Spirit of Delight,” a somber, sparse guitar piece, beautifies nature’s dark side.This recording is especially apropos as we await the mystery, magic, and haunting embrace of autumn and winter. www.kalliopesgrace.com. —Sharon Nichols

The briAn wiLSon Shock TreATMenT DRUID TIME LORDS 2011, POE/SLUTFISH RECORDS

Sometimes you can judge a book by its cover and still not know the whole story. The Brian Wilson Shock Treatment, wildmen (and -women) who split time between New Paltz and Brooklyn and ply a tough but simplistic brand of wiggy garage rock, ostensibly need a new CD mainly as an excuse for another round of touring, as many local release-party gigs as they can wrangle, and perhaps a new T-shirt design. More than this shouldn’t be expected from a band that features on its CD cover a guy with a box on his head and wielding a battle-axe, and a PO box address rather than a URL (hey, it’s 2011!) on the back. And the opening few tracks of Druid Time Lords bear out such modest goals: walking bass lines buried in admirable amounts of guitar goo-goo muck, and a likable knuckle-dragging aesthetic in general. But then comes the more ambitious “Bangladesh,” a hypnotic jam that’s kissin’ cousins with Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, and any assumptions made about this band get foggy. That tune is followed by a woolly cover of “Pleasant Valley Sunday” (yes, made famous by the Monkees) that retains its killer hook even as it threatens to spin out of control (it doesn’t), which in turn sets up the swinging monster beat of the title track. All of this action takes place in the first half of this 50-minute CD; later songs include “The Moons of Jupiter” (swirling, flute-driven dark ambience), “Snake Goddess” (bouncy distortion-pop), and the slow-burning, trippy ramble “Interstellar Loser.” www.myspace.com/thebrianwilsonshocktreatment. —Mike Wolf

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10/11 chronogram music 57


Books

SEEING RED

The Second Coming of Hillary Jordan By Nina Shengold

D

on’t expect to get anything else done while reading Hillary Jordan’s blistering new novel When She Woke (Algonquin, 2011). Its opening sentences are so arresting that the publisher printed them on the front cover of advance reading copies: When she woke, she was red. Not flushed, not sunburned, but the solid, declarative red of a stop sign. Jordan breezes into an Italian café near Grand Central Station, wearing a peachtoned sleeveless blouse, black jeans, and sandals, a large bag slung over one shoulder. She could as easily be a late-summer tourist as an award-winning novelist on the brink of a major book launch—at least until she pulls out a scarlet iPad to display her tour schedule. Between now and mid-December, she’ll appear at three major trade shows and 34 author events nationwide; When SheWoke is Indie Next’s #1 pick for October. 58 books ChronograM 10/11

The whirlwind is just getting started, but Jordan has been there before. Her debut novel Mudbound (Algonquin, 2008) won the Bellwether Prize—a biannual award for socially responsible fiction founded by Barbara Kingsolver—and numerous other honors. A saga of complex family ties and brutal racism, it unfolds in rural Mississippi post-WWII, as two traumatized soldiers return to a hardscrabble cotton farm. Jamie is the glamorous, broken brother of new owner Henry, Ronsel the proud son of black sharecroppers; their fates intersect with tragic force. Mudbound received glowing reviews and sold more than 250,000 copies worldwide. Such a breakout success is a hard act to follow. “Writing when you don’t know if anybody but your parents will ever read it is very different from writing under contract,” Jordan asserts, after asking a waiter for “iced tea—no sugar, no lemon, nothing.” As Mudbound’s sales climbed, Algonquin offered her a two-book contract, accepting the opening chapters of When She Woke as the first. This was an act of no


small faith, since the two novels are wildly different. Where Mudbound is a period piece, When She Woke takes place in a dystopian future a generation or so away, and too close for comfort. The US government has become a fundamentalist theocracy that resembles a Rick Perry rally on steroids (now known as “nanoenhancers”). It’s as if Jordan has watered the Monsanto seeds of today’s Christian right and let it grow like Jack’s beanstalk. Her Texan landscape is just outside the familiar—strip-mall chains mix new and old corporate logos; local readers may note there’s a coffeehouse called Muddy Cup. In this new society, prison overcrowding has been solved by “melachroming” criminals: chemically tinting their skins and releasing them onto the streets, where they’ve become a despised new underclass—literal people of color. When Hannah Payne wakes up as a Red, everybody who sees her knows she’s been found guilty of murder: Her full-body Scarlet A stands for Abortion as well as Adultery. Jordan is not the first writer to riff on Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter— Suzan-Lori Parks’s plays In the Blood and Fucking A remix the tale of Hester Prynne, as does the recent teen flick Easy A. But she may be the first to vault it into the rarified realm of literary dystopia colonized by Margaret Atwood and Doris Lessing. Like Hester Prynne, Hannah refuses to name her lover, a powerful man of the church. For some readers, Jordan’s most audacious creation may be Aidan Dale, a charismatic megachurch preacher of true faith and conscience. Though it’s certainly less cliched than portraying him as an opportunistic hypocrite, one might well wonder if such a person exists. “Billy Graham. By all accounts, he was a true man of God,” Jordan says, adding, “I didn’t want When She Woke to be a condemnation of faith. But I’m not a big fan of fundamentalism. In every fundamentalist religion, women are disempowered.” Jordan grew up in the Episcopalian church. Though her parents were “not really believers,” her grandparents on both sides were devout. “I’m probably a secular humanist, but I’m still trying to figure it out,” she says. “While working on this book, I found myself really thinking a lot about faith and spirituality.” The book’s bold premise also stems from within Jordan’s family. Many years ago, her uncle opined over dinner that all drugs should be legal, but they should turn you bright blue. “The conversation stuck in my mind and eventually bore this dark, strange, red fruit,” Jordan writes in her acknowledgments. She chose the color red for its associations with blood, rage, shame, red alert, Red States; Red was the book’s working title. The Scarlet Letter connection came later, as did the abortion storyline—in early drafts, Hannah was Chromed for killing her sister’s abusive husband. “Abortion is one of those things about which intelligent people can disagree. I believe it should be legal and rare,” Jordan says. “I can sympathize with why people might disapprove of it personally, but I don’t think that’s something anyone should impose on anyone else.” Those are fighting words in much of this country, and while she expresses concern about whether Mudbound’s many fans will embrace When She Woke, Jordan has no regrets. “I really wanted to get out of the past, to get out of the Jim Crow South, to get out of first person. I hope I will always be the sort of writer who does something different with every book,” she asserts with characteristic intensity. “After 9/11, I became very concerned about things that were happening in this country—government incursions into privacy, the rise of the religious right, laws limiting women’s choices, environmental degradation, the muddying of the line between church and state.” These concerns fed and shaped When SheWoke. It was a difficult birth. “I wanted the reader to be very close to Hannah, moment by moment, but her head was not always a fun place to be. This world was not always a fun place to be. I definitely went though some dark periods writing this book,” Jordan admits. “I literally wrote it not knowing what was going to happen in the next sentence, the next scene, the next chapter. It was dizzying at times, having every possibility be open. There were many moments of ‘What am I doing?’ But this is my process. Writing the book was probably a lot like it is for you to read it: What will happen next?” Short answer: plenty. Hannah goes from a televised solitary confinement cell to a halfway house called the Straight Path Center, whose name and ritual manipulations suggest “pray away the gay” conversion therapy. There she meets Kayla, a feisty biracial woman who was Chromed for shooting her abusive stepfather. They go on the lam in “a converted Honda Duo so old it had no smartfeatures, not even a nav.” Two female Reds traveling together are a magnet for violent males, but others are monitoring their movements as well. An underground group offers to smuggle them to sanctuary in Canada, a treacherous journey that echoes the Underground Railroad and networks of safe-houses for battered women. The suspense mounts chapter by chapter, and Hannah awakens to changes far more than skindeep. Hannah’s constant motion may mimic her author’s. After college, Jordan spent 15 years as an advertising copywriter. By her mid-thirties, she was a creative direc-

tor in Austin, successful but stalled. “I was married unhappily, and I really don’t love Texas,” she says. “I always had this dream of being a real writer, of writing the Great American Novel. I became afraid I would wake up at 60 and regret that I never did it.” In short order, she got divorced, quit her job, and started writing short stories, submitting her best to graduate programs. When Columbia accepted her, she pulled up stakes and moved to New York. The whole metamorphosis happened within 18 months. Once Jordan got moving, she didn’t stop. In the past decade, she’s relocated from upper Manhattan to a small house in Tivoli and back to Brooklyn; she’s also spent time at 11 writers’ colonies. “All the sort of time-sucking stuff of everyday life falls away,” she says of colony life. “You don’t have to shop, you don’t have to cook. They’re usually in an extremely beautiful place, and you’re in the company of other creative people. And there’s nowhere to hide from your work. At MacDowell, there’s no Internet in your studio and one bar of cell phone reception, so you better write.” The more Jordan talks about writing, the more animated she becomes. Her dark eyes shine behind tortoiseshell glasses; at times, her whole body sways back and forth very slightly, as if she can barely contain her excitement. “People need stories, now more than ever, because reality is harsh for many people. I have often escaped into fiction. It’s a way of understanding other people, the human condition. It can create bonds with people whose experience is very different from yours. That’s what you’re doing when you write fiction—you are illustrating the lives of other people, for other people. So I do think fiction is important. I do think it can influence the world, by showing us our common humanity.” Amen, sister. Jordan’s impassioned sermon recalls a passage in When She Woke. Hannah’s sister Becca marries a controlling man named Cole. When he joins a Klan-like vigilante group known as The Fist of Christ, Becca stops reading fiction because “Cole says it pollutes the mind with nonsense.” Hillary Jordan’s novels prove him deliciously wrong. Hillary Jordan will read from When She Woke at Oblong Books & Music in Rhinebeck on October 8 at 7pm.

10/11 ChronograM books 59


SHORT TAKES six local authors read from new works of fiction, fantasy, literary nonfiction, history, and a dash of decapitation. LEGENDS AND LORE OF SLEEPY HOLLOW AND THE HUDSON VALLEY JONATHAN KRUK THE HISTORY PRESS, 2011, $19.99

hold onto your head! storyteller Jonathan kruk, who’s performed regional legends and lore throughout the hudson Valley since 1996, compiles a charming conglomeration of the early Dutchamerican stories of Washington Irving, digging up their historical roots. after extensive research and consultations with historical reenactors, interpreters, professors, linguists, and longtime residents, kruk seeks to unravel the secrets of sleepy hollow, in fact and fiction. october events: www.jonathankruk.com. THE EMPEROR’S TOY CHEST TOBIAS SEAMON PS PUBLISHING, 2011, $11.99

seamon’s toy chest is a cabinet of wonders, bursting at the seams with cracked dreamers, harried grand Viziers, boardwalk sirens, and the odd kong Islander. In meticulously crafted fabulist fictions and deadpan reviews of an imaginary Francohungarian art film and a botched execution, seamon’s voice is a nonpareil shape-shifter. Reading with Dana Spiotta 10/27 at 7:30pm, College of St. Rose, Albany. THE POISONS OF CAUX: THE SHEPHERD OF WEEDS SUSANNAH APPELBAUM, ILLUSTRATED BY ANDREA OFFERMANN KNOPF, 2011, $16.99

The closing volume of the Poisons of Caux trilogy is catnip for fantasy fans young and old. Intrepid Ivy Manx steps up to the destiny plate to trump villains animal (ink monkeys!), vegetable (scourge bracken!), and human (her father!) appelbaum’s fluent prose shimmers with magical threads, like the tapestry into which one of her characters disappears. Readings 10/15 at 2pm at Inquiring Minds, New Paltz; 10/29 at 2pm, Barnes & Noble, Poughkeepsie. THE MAN WHO WOULD STOP AT NOTHING MELISSA HOLBROOK PIERSON W. W. NORTON & COMPANY, 2011, $24.95

Why would anyone ride a motorcycle 5,645 miles in under four days? Pierson offers an insider’s view of motorcycling’s ultramarathoners, the Iron butt association, and its elusive knight in grimy armor, John ryan. Interweaving her personal story with ryan’s, Pierson meditates eloquently on “the erotics of risk” and the ways in which people find their center by going to extremes. Reading 10/8 at 5pm, Peint O Gwrw, Chatham. GHOST ON THE THRONE: THE DEATH OF ALEXANDER THE GREAT AND THE WAR FOR CROWN AND EMPIRE JAMES ROMM KNOPF, 2011, $28.95

a colossus falls, leaving the empire he built to “the strongest.” For seven years, it teeters between inept heirs, scheming women, and infighting bodyguards. no, it’s not The Godfather—it’s the juicy aftermath of alexander the great’s demise. bard classicist romm animates ancient history in prose “like a good road bike: streamlined and stripped of all excess weight.” Readings 10/28 at 7:30pm, Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck; 11/8 at 4:30pm, SUNY New Paltz Honors Center. LOST AMUSEMENT PARKS OF THE HUDSON VALLEY WESLEY AND BARBARA H. GOTTLOCK GOTTLOCK BOOKS, 2011, $19.95

This lovingly researched volume, studded with nostalgic period photos, will make hudson Valley residents long for the days when lightbulbs blazed over the entry to kinderhook Lake’s Electric Park, dapper pedestrians thronged the ferris wheel at kingston Point Park, and Indian Point’s house of horror was a harmless thrill ride. Readings 10/18 at 7pm, Newburgh Library; 10/21 at 1pm, Poughkeepsie Barnes & Noble.

60 books ChronograM 10/11

Fathermucker Greg Olear

HArPer CoLLins, 2011 $13.99

J

osh Lansky, titular character of New Paltz resident Greg Olear’s rich Fathermucker, is primary caregiver to willful three-year-old Maude and brilliant-but-difficult five-year-old Roland, who hasAsperger’s syndrome. In addition to wrestling with the pervasive feelings of fear and failure that plague all fathers, Josh struggles with virility issues, a stalled screenwriting career, and a troubled marriage to lapsed actress Stacy, now an IBM employee haunted by lost opportunities. This is business as usual, until a foxy mom at a morning playdate reveals her suspicion that breadwinner Stacy, now five days into a business trip in LA, is having an affair. Kids are everywhere, so Josh keeps it together while heartbreak, shame, anger and dread roil about his overcaffeinated guts. Before he can get details (with whom, for how long, etc.) the foxy mom hurries away, and he must wait for Stacy to return the next day. He ruminates and rages, all while wiping young bottoms, getting pulled over by a cop, salivating at eye candy, listening to Penthouse Forum-style playdate gossip (it happens), being judged for eating verboten junk food, receiving physical abuse from unruly children, and trying to find a decent song on the radio. Almost everyone knows a stay-at-home dad—or SAHD, as Josh says. What most of you don’t know, and what Olear provides, is the passionate, devilish inner monologue often at odds with a SAHD’s (mostly) responsible exterior. Their friends view Josh and Stacy as a “great couple,” but inside, Josh is a piece of work; even before he tortures himself with screenplay versions of his wife’s infidelity— schadenfreude at its best—he’s just this side of a car crash. His frequently hilarious, insecurity-and-id-fueled conscience is stoked and soothed by hyperconnectivity to pop culture; tormented by tabloid titillation, calmed by Tom Petty, rankled by Facebook, saved by Noggin. Most men who care for kids don’t want you to know this stuff, but Josh’s frankness strikes a refreshing, power chord of truth. His little rebellions against the crunchy hipster class of New Paltz are deeply satisfying to anyone ever frowned upon for a substandard car seat. Olear provides a tantalizing rhythm between the raunch and roll of Josh’s “inside voice”—including an occasionally annoying fixation on detail—and what he actually does. The choices he makes more often than not reveal a deeply moving devotion to his family, an uncommon love burning constant under the worry and kvetching, all of which makes a cheating wife more compelling (and excruciating). One of the more striking chapters—Asperger’s: A Chronology—is fascinating and briskly informative; this multileveled story-within-a-story illuminates the Lansky family’s stressed situation while also delving into a history of the medical establishment checkered enough to make anyone turn punk. Just as Fathermucker should be given out to all new parents (instead of, say, What to ExpectWhenYou’re Expecting or Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother) the Asperger’s chapter alone should be made into an educational pamphlet. Olear’s writer chops don’t end there. In addition to Josh’s distinctive, relatable wit, the insertion of Dr. Seuss homages into a coarse, long-winded web of sexual intrigue amongst Josh and Stacy’s married friends is a bawdy, ballsy tour de force. At one point Josh notes that twins at a playdate “couldn’t be more different. No two snowflakes and so forth. Parenthood would fill your heart with wonder if it weren’t so fucking exhausting.” He’s wrong, though; in Fathermucker, even exhaustion can’t keep the wonder away. Reading 10/7 at 7pm, Inquiring Minds in New Paltz; 10/21 at 7pm, Golden Notebook at Oriole 9, inWoodstock, with Robin Antalek. —Robert Burke Warren


Experience What will you experience at Mirabai?

Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend Susan Orlean

Simon & Schuster, 2011 $26.99

M

any can leash the name Rin Tin Tin to a blurry image from the past: a black and tan German shepherd saving the day. But the real story is a crisp, riveting tale. NewYorker staff writer and Columbia County resident Susan Orlean spent ten years on Rin Tin Tin:The Life and the Legend, and much to the reader’s delight, became as obsessed with the story as the obsessives who populate it. This isn’t really a dog book, or one dog’s biography, or the story of a famous bloodline. As Orlean writes, many different dogs came to play Rin Tin Tin, and those involved, including the studio promoters, spun the truth of their origins out of reach. Moreover, to an admitted dog person, certain descriptions put affect before accuracy: German shepherd puppies are not bald; German shepherds are not blond. But why quibble with such a brilliant, meaty read? This is a book about an author digging up truths, ever deepening her sense of the people involved. These people believed in a dog’s universal, transformative power; in the ideal of a canine hero, and that belief took over their lives. They held fast to it the way a German shepherd works on a bone: never letting it out of sight; attacking it with endless relish, guarding it fiercely. (I was reminded of this daily, as I threw bones to my own shepherds so they’d stop wanting me to do something, and just let me read.)   “He believed the dog was immortal,” Orlean writes of Lee Duncan, the young corporal who discovered (and named) the original Rin Tin Tin in a bombed-out kennel in France during WWI and managed to bring the pup home. A dogless dog lover who had a mother but spent years in an orphanage, Duncan began dreaming up remarkable tales, starring the dog, that echoed his own childhood yearnings. He saw their shared future in show business and, in true Hollywood fashion, by dint of will, timing, luck, and associations, his vision came true. As in her 1998 bestseller The Orchid Thief, Orlean conjures up a vivid, particular world—here, the entertainment industry, which by turns devoured, chewed up, spit out, and renewed its grip on all things Rin Tin Tin over the course of 80-some years. Orlean is a great collector of details and their companion ironies, noting that producers of the 1950s TV show, set in the 1870s Western frontier, quarreled bitterly over whether its child star should ride a white mule or a fancy “Indian Pinto,” while ignoring the fact that German shepherds would not exist for another 30 years (the breed was established in 1909). She efficiently chronicles the changing roles of dogs in war and in society, how the changing entertainment industry changed its versions of Rin Tin Tin, how those involved never gave up. Always, she returns to a central theme that fills the book like delicious marrow. What does it mean—warts and all—to strive for glory, for immortality? “At what point does devotion become a form of willful blindness?” Orlean asks, addressing herself as well. Her writing here is marvelous, reassuring. “Those lasting things have been floated through time on someone’s ferocious devotion, on the will to remember only what was shiny and promising, even when that person is sometimes sunk in the process,” she concludes. Despite the myriad twists and turns, what endures at the end is Rin Tin Tin himself. I won’t give away Orlean’s final, gorgeous scene. But she, the self-designated keeper of the flame, rightly gives the dog wings, and the last word. He was by all accounts pretty terrific, and deserves it. —Jana Martin

Mirabai of Woodstock

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Books, sacred objects and workshops that can change your life in ways you’ve never imagined. Since 1987, always a new experience.

www.mirabai.com

Welcome to a place where art and agriculture meet. Our small fiber farm features local, hand dyed, and handspun roving and yarn, and a selection of lovely commercial fibers. We also have needles, hooks, patterns, books, and accessories and proudly sell many exquisite handmade items by local artisans. 815 Albany Post Road, New Paltz, NY (914) 456-6040 www.whitebarnsheepandwool.com

10/11 ChronograM books 61


POETRY

Edited by Phillip Levine. Deadline for our November issue is October 5. Send up to three poems or three pages (whichever comes first). Full submission guidelines: www.chronogram.com\submissions.

Love Love

i have this balloon

Oh I love love you Viper snake love Elephant love You love me Outstanding love Used to love Yay Yay Love Escaping Love Sì —Asha Wilson (7 years)

and the more i blow into it

The Alley Cat eating a can of tuna near my feet bolts under the bumper of my car as i reach down to scratch behind his ears two eyes lit up like a lake of fire adjudicating me in the moonlight.

the smaller it gets —p

Vacation

Autumn Wash

I am preparing for vacation making a sort-of list, and I only wrote things, just things,

If I’m to be caught in a wave of terror My whole sky life, wiped out Blown to a tiny dirt speck end Vaporized into my next life Without the long good bye The eye to eye pull kiss ending

but they say we can’t sense time, only its momentum. Where is the tug of the sea against my salted legs in this litany of goods? Could I, should I tally the stars at night, after the steaks, wine, and rusted beach gear? Should we mention the blood-drunk mosquitoes, that hiss that leaves the air at dusk, all the old old songs sung way way too loud? Every trip is a retreat, both ways. Heading out, we back up from a world far too close to list. We return, looking away, while the mirror sea ebbs out to an eeling edge, far too far to see. —Stowe Boyd

No Good

Then catch me hanging sheets out in the sun Out in the yard with the worms in the dark Beneath the green beneath my feet With the sounds of this small city murmuring around me The smell of clean of apple of breathing earth The memory of love sighing sobbing Airing out the rhythm of rising and falling Of giving in and letting go And rising again Finding just one edge to secure Wood on cloth on cord Forming a waving wall a flag a sail Catch me hanging sheets out in the sun Exposed unveiled and holy undone —Amy K. Benedict

(Not fully dressed without a bracket or parentheses; the punctuation mark is but a naked set of eyes; no dash for a nose; not quite sexy enough to wink; hanging on only long enough to think; so faceless and without emotion in, of all places, a poem. Smile semicolon; smile;)

I got rid of my best friend he was no good he took advantage of me the greatest enemy is a treacherous friend Henry Fielding said so I got rid of him and I got rid of a drinking partner who became too assuming I didn’t need his talk I didn’t need to be reminded of shortcomings failures so I got rid of him and I got rid of my friends at the club and I got rid of my golf partners and in the morning kissed my wife before heading out the door to work and again I kissed her coming home but the rest I got rid of I wanted to be clean none of them are any good

—Kristen Henderson

—Richard Donnelly

—Zan Strumfeld

you and every woman in this town lately my friend. —Justin Hyde

Pity the Semicolon

62 poetry ChronograM 10/11

Figure In death the hands are folded flat in the opposite gesture of a mudra pose in which the nerves of the fingers poise tenuously holding an awkward figure at the level of the manipura chakra. The thumb and forefingers meet and grasp the surface of the world’s umbra. Undoing movement is the body’s final act as the artificial center, the place where tongues meet the rosary of touch, the smooth wooden beads, the silence between prayers like the drumming repetition of sex— the body, arched taut as a snare and released, undone. —Paula Orlando

Mourning Sunflowers wept over the naked crop Washed away by the Wallkill. One towered over the others, Hovering like a tree nurturing a grave.


Hudson Valley Fall

God’s and Mine Together

Daffodils, Deodorant, and You

Lawns of the lazy like me are yellow crunchy carpets red and orange mountains burst against parachutes of blue I want to lie down in the day but it is cold.

I cry like the sky does in late July fat raindrops litter pavement and jeans pulling heat from the air and hearts hot wet drops wobbling through stratosphere down rounded cheeks

I will not die on my birthday. I will not die on my birthday. I will not die on my birthday even though the daffodils are up and alive already on this weird coast reminding me too early that my birthday is coming and that I will be another year older and that I still do not have myself as I want myself. I will not turn my birthday into a death day.

—Linda McCauley Freeman

Returning Home The neglect shone in sunlight Reflected off of our spider’s thread, A cable across the railing Ends Of Our Backdeck Steps Like a claim, Some barrier. —Thomas Perkins

Tonight’s Festivities I never give up on a poem. Three words makes a quorum. Seven and I’m committed to the oceanic. I’m loyal like the Titanic. Others with more legal minds exercise judgment rapidly and with certitude. Not me. I’m compulsive. I think I’ve got a problem. No putting the brakes on sounds. Cries, whispers, teasing, singing out, in, down, up, across, through and under every activity. Hello, hello, nice to see you! My good wife in the next room, tasting spleen: “Would you PLEASE take part in tonight’s festivities?” I’m still paying child support on poems from five years ago. Imperfect? Yes. I add words here subtract there eventually —Allen Livermore

Dumb Daffodils.

—Zeta Sion

I will not have a sobbing phone call. I will not have a mass email. I will not have a friend find me dead and alone in my kitchen. Birthday cake will not be eaten at my grave over the next few years because I will not die on my birthday.

I Approach My Sixty-Fifth Year

I will not copy you. I will not copy you. I will not copy you even though I used to copy you I will not copy you this time.

I approach my sixty-fifth year. Quietly. Carefully. From behind. So as not to frighten it away. —J. R. Solonche

I will not do heroin. I will not do heroin. I will not do heroin because I only did heroin once or thrice with you and I want it to stay there—with you—only you, with you on your wood floor, melted hot in your spoon by your bookshelves in your part of Brooklyn during the day. I will not do heroin even if it is free. Even if I am sad.

Eating Out Like a moth to the grease fire, I head inside to the counter to look at the menu, at thick oiled sandwiches and half-chickens, skin almost crisp where it’s blackened, the result of charring and steam tables, at combo meals. I try to catch the cashier’s eye, but she spits out her spiel while staring away at wall tiles, looking down now and again to press buttons with pictures on the semiautomatic register. Here, at this place, the mavens of eating locally, of regional cuisine must arrive, touch their lips, and head to their cars to MapQuest a bistro, as I should, looking around at this place, a place like the place near my home, far away, also filled with fluorescent lights, French fries, and strangers. —John F. Buckley

I will understand. I will understand because I do understand. I do understand wanting to die. I will understand what it is like to be in a sterile new apartment alone in a city with a high suicide rate and have your phone not ring for days. To give it a little shake to make sure it is alive and working. I will understand sending cryptic texts and having vacant sex. I will remember your backpack and wear my own. I will remember your preferred deodorant and vodka brands that you carried in your backpack and carry my own. I will remember to share my deodorant and vodka with whomever I am drinking or sleeping with. I will remember how you produced creatively constantly and I will produce my own. I will remember your hair dye and dye my own. I will remember your apartment, how it was more like a museum, colorful and messy and I will create my own. I will listen to your songs and sing my own.

Shore of This

I will read your poems and write my own.

My mother is between worlds, Watching TV she turns and says are you real? I’m Gilligan I say I’m Mary-Ann says my brother Then this must be the island she says Yes, we say, you are the Minnow

I will write.

We all look forward to banana cream pie —Rosalinda McGovern

I will sing. I will not die on my birthday. I will try to be the person you described me as in your poem: “Small locks fall on shoulders full of faith.” I will stay small and full and locked and faithed. I will write. I will sing. I will not hang myself on my birthday this spring. —Chloe Caldwell 10/11 ChronograM poetry 63


EDUCATION

Academic Excellence

Regional College Preparatory Schools By Peter Aaron students in front of the main building at buxton school in williamstown, massachusetts.

T

he home of innumerable social idealists and a welcoming setting for artist colonies and utopian communities since colonial times, the Hudson Valley-Western New England area has long been a bastion of progressive thought. And in keeping with the region’s tradition of non-traditional notions, this pattern has naturally carried over into the realm of education, with several of its maverick academic institutions dating back to the 18th century. In today’s climate of slashed public school budgets and an increasingly competitive, constantly evolving global job market, many parents are understandably concerned about making sure their children are adequately equipped for the future. But luckily for families in the region, when it comes to private college preparatory education, there are dozens of acclaimed, proven schools with widely varying curriculums to choose from.Whether parents are considering a highly creative, arts-oriented approach, or even the firm guidance of a military-style program, there’s a private school to fit their needs nearby. For this month’s Education Supplement, we focus below on seven of the region’s most exceptionally innovative college preparatory facilities. The Importance of Being Individual: Oakwood Friends School The oldest co-educational boarding and prep school in New York, Oakwood Friends School emphasizes the importance of the individuality of its students. Chartered by Quakers in 1796, the school had two other homes before opening its present Poughkeepsie location in 1920. A co-educational school, Oakwood Friends enrolls students in grades six through twelve and offers “a challenging curriculum within a diverse community, dedicated to nurturing the spirit, the scholar, the artist, and the athlete in each person.” “There’s so much versatility in the program here,” says Vince Vincent, a professional Manhattan opera singer who teaches music at the school. “The 64 education ChronograM 10/11

courses are very unique in that they cross over into and work together with other areas of study. For example, I teach a ninth-grade course called ‘Music, Culture, and Society,’ which covers issues of censorship in music, the place of music within popular culture, and the relationship between music and politics.” With its small classes, committed, accessible teachers (most of whom live on campus), and comfortable facilities, Oakwood Friends focuses on fostering a strong sense of community as its students prepare for the demands of college. In the Heart of the Arts: Buxton School Located in Williamstown, Massachusetts, Buxton School enjoys the cultural advantages of its close proximity to Williams College and three of the area’s leading temples to the visual and performing arts: the Francine & Sterling Clark Arts Institute (also known as the Clark), the Williams College Museum of Art, and Mass MoCA in nearby North Adams. Established in 1928, the boarding school has a campus encompassing 150 acres of meadow and forest and a student body that averages 90 students, with an equal number of boys and girls. The highly experiential curriculum at Buxton is broad and demanding, offering a combination of traditional subjects, courses in the arts, and some studies rarely encountered before college. “Here, we view academia and the arts as being equally important,” says Torie Nichols, an anthropology teacher as well as the school’s assistant director of admissions. “Throughout the course of a day a student might go from a class in drama to one in math, and then to one in video production or English. Our goal is to make students’ intellectual lives stimulating and eye-opening.” At Buxton, classes tend to be small and discussion-oriented, with the students being encouraged to be engaged, curious about the subjects, and excited by the world of ideas.


Chronogram Quarter Page Ad_cmyk:Layout 1

9/8/11

11:49 AM

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131 Millbrook School Road Millbrook, NY 12545 845-677-8261 www.millbrook.org

Miss Hall’s School

Located 90 miles north of Manhattan, Millbrook is a coeducational boarding and day school which offers its 265 students in grades 9-12 a rigorous college preparatory curricululm that integrates academics, service, athletics, arts & leadership. WE_ChronogramAd1112.qxp:Layout 1

9/22/11

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492 Holmes Road, Pittsfield, MA 01201 (413) 499-1300 www.misshalls.org e-mail: info@misshalls.org ALL-GIRLS • BOARDING AND DAY • GRADES 9-12

Page 1

Each Life

Speaks Fall InFormatIon SeSSIonS

INFORMATION Sunday, october 9, 2011 SESSION 1:00pm, turner Building

Sunday, november 6, 2011 Wednesday, October 7th

For a Good Time, Cook Looking for some fun in the kitchen?

One-Day Classes for Food Lovers

Spend a Saturday in a Taste of CIA

www.ciachef.edu/enthusiasts 1-800-888-7850

Cookbooks class with our expert chefs! With more than 25 to choose

Oakwood Friends School, guided by Quaker principles, educates and strengthens young people for lives of conscience, compassion and accomplishment. Discover Oakwood... and find your own voice.

1:00pm, turner Building SPEAKERS & CAMPUS TOUR Sunday, December 7, 2011 BEGIN AT 9:30AM– 9:30am, Collins library COLLINS LIBRARY Please call if you plan to attend Please call if you plan to attend 800-843-3341 or 1-800-843-3341 845-462-4200 ext.415

22 Spackenkill Road, Poughkeepsie, NY www.oakwoodfriends.org

from, you’ll find one just right for you.

©2011 The Culinary Institute of America

COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM s QUAKER VALUES s GRADES 6-12 s BOARDING & DAY s COEDUCATIONAL FINANCIAL AID AVAILABLE

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10/11 ChronograM education 65AM 9/18/09 11:19:44


Iona Gitt-Henderson rehearsing for the Fall Arts orchestra performance at buxton school.

Early and Inspiring: Bard College at Simon’s Rock Bard College at Simon’s Rock is the nation’s first early college. It’s an institution catering to 10th-and-11th-grade-level high school students and offering a small, selective, supportive, and intensive liberal arts and sciences program since 1966. With its campus in the bucolic Western Massachusetts town of Great Barrington, Simon’s Rock became part of Annandale-on-Hudson, New York’s Bard College in 1979 and is linked with Bard High School Early College in New York City. In addition to many other leading figures in business, social reform, politics, science, and the arts, the college counts filmmakers Joel and Ethan Coen among its more prominent alumni. With an average class size of 10 and a student-teacher ratio of 9:1, Simon’s Rock boasts a 275-acre campus with a strikingly diverse and intellectually advanced student body. “Our students come to us mainly because they weren’t being personally challenged enough in high school,” says Karen Anderson, the school’s associate director of admissions. “We’re a resident campus offering a college atmosphere to advanced high school-age students, and have both two- and four-year degree programs.” Social consciousness is also a major aspect of the climate at Simon’s Rock, and students are encouraged to take responsibility for the world they’re poised to enter by working with various advocacy groups. Girl Power: Miss Hall’s School Founded by educator Mira Hinsdale Hall in 1898, Miss Hall’s School is one of the foremost college-preparatory schools for girls in the country. Its 80-acre campus is situated in the Berkshires city of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, which in recent times has enjoyed a cultural renaissance, thanks to its Lichtenstein Center for the Arts, Berkshire Museum, frequent arts festivals, and neighboring state parks. The school is also recognized nationally for two highly innovative 66 education ChronograM 10/11

programs: Horizons, a weekly off-campus, experiential learning series, and the Girls’ Leadership Project, which transforms the institution into a “leadership laboratory.” In today’s more gender-equal era, an all-girls school might seem like an anomaly to some. But, as Jeannie Norris, the head of school, points out, Miss Hall’s gives its young women a sharper, more self-assured edge than they may get elsewhere. “In an all-girls school students are able to reclaim their authentic selves,” she explains. “As girls approach the teen years, they pick up the message loud and clear in the environment that in order to be accepted and fit in they need to be thin, beautiful, nice, and agreeable. ‘Don’t confront, don’t speak out, don’t disagree, don’t call attention to yourself,’ the culture says to them. [At Miss Hall’s] we say, ‘Who you are is what we’re interested in. You have value, what you think has value, the world needs what you will bring to it.’ Here, students learn to take charge of their lives.” Upright Citizenship: Poughkeepsie Day School Poughkeepsie Day School was set up in 1934 by a group of local parents and faculty members from Vassar College as “a place where students are valued as individuals, learning is active and hands-on, and the curriculum reflects the best thinking and research in education.” Since then, the school has grown to become the premier prekindergarten-through-grade-12 independent day school of the mid Hudson Valley. For its high school-level students, the institution offers a demanding college preparatory curriculum similar to one found in a small liberal arts college, and includes an individualized advisory program and exceptional college counseling. “Children are born digital and are growing up global,” says PDS’s head of school, Josie Holford, an active member of the New York State Association of


Why start college after the 10th or 11th grade? Because you’re ready.

We’re a community passionate about learning: independentminded, inquiring, and creatively intellectual. If you’re a high school student who fits this description, ask us about the Berkshire Regional Scholarship. C O N TA C T U S T O D AY: W E B : simons-rock.edu/admit

admit@simons-rock.edu P H O N E : 800.235.7186 EMAIL:

10/11 ChronograM education 67


Annual Festival of Storytelling, Puppetry, Music and Dance A wonderful day of storytelling, food, entertainment, puppetry, crafts and so much more!

Buxton S c ho o l intellectual inquiry artistic exploration community integrity 291 South Street, Williamstown, MA BuxtonSchool.org

grades 9-12 co-ed boarding and day college-preparatory Contact the Admissions Office 413-458-3919 admissions@buxtonschool.org

educating progressively and living intentionally since 1928

Where you belong.

Open House Wednesday, Nov. 2 at 9:00 a.m. Join us for an Open House for prospective families, tour our 27-acre campus and classrooms, and have one-on-one conversations with Berkshire Country Day School’s faculty and administration. Call Director of Admission and Financial Aid Amy Freeman at 413 637 0755 to register. eric korenman photo

Preschool through ninth grade 55 Interlaken Road, Stockbridge 413 637 0755 berkshirecountryday.org

Delight in the magical puppetry of Arm of the Sea Theater as they perform Criss-Crossing Borders and Turtle Island Medicine Show. Performances by The Caravan Kids, The Bernstein Bard Quintet and Mountain Laurel’s own Star Penny Puppetry. Storytelling for all ages by the nationally acclaimed Storycrafters, James Brushac - wilderness expert and author, Suzanne Stapleford - The Spinner of Tales, slackrope walker Signora Bella, stilt walker Carl Welden and others. Children’s games with Thomas Gallo, horse drawn carriage rides, local artisans. Enjoy award-winning food and desserts from area restaurants including The Village Tea Room, Harvest Café and Reggae Boy.

Sunday, October 23, 2011 10:00am to 5:00pm Ulster County Fairgrounds 249 Libertyville Rd, New Paltz, NY General admission covers all entertainment, horse-drawn carriage rides & games! Single admission $10, Children 5 and under FREE Special family rate of $25

845-255-0033 ext. 110 • www.mountainlaurel.org

Sponsored by

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School Note: Advertised performers and attractions are subject to change.

68 education ChronograM 10/11


10/11 ChronograM education 69


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Located in the downtown arts district of the city of Peekskill, this Center offers over 100 Apple post-production stations dedicated to graphic design, digital imaging and illustration, digital filmmaking, animation, interactive design, and music technology. Integrate technology into your portfolio and join a community of artists working in the digital age. 4QSJOHDMBTTFTCFHJO +BOVBSZJO1FFLTLJMM+BOVBSZJO7BMIBMMB Westchester Community College



Center for the Digital Arts

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High Meadow School FALL FESTIVAL &

Canterbury School An independent Catholic coeducational boarding and day school for grades 9-12.

OPEN HOUSE Saturday, October 15 Registration at 9:30 a.m. 2360s  

discover a deeper knowledge Canterbury School 101 Aspetuck Avenue New Milford, CT 06776 860-210-3934 admissions@cbury.org www.cbury.org 70 education ChronograM 10/11

OPEN HOUSE Sunday, October 30th, 11:00am - 3:00pm 3643 Main St., Stone Ridge, NY Visit our campus & meet our teachers. Buy new & used books. Enjoy hearty food & drink, hands-on craft activities, and music by dog-on-fleas!

Nursery - 8th Grade

845.687.4855 www.highmeadowschool.org

Bishop Dunn Memorial School Nestled on Mount Saint Mary College’s scenic campus is a picture-perfect place where children are taught how to learn, how to live and how to love. The place is called Bishop Dunn Memorial School.

BISHOP DUNN

Offering a quality Pre-K to 8th grade education and an equally unique summer enrichment camp

Call 845-569-3496 for a tour www.bdms.org


accent on the arts at hotchkiss sch-ool in lakefield, CT (left to right): Joe Wichitchu in the printmaking studio; Martha Ashe in the Advanced art Studio

Independent Schools’ board of directors. “The adult task is to help them be ready to thrive in a future that we cannot predict.” To this end, the school was recently awarded a $50,000 grant to develop its new Digital Citizen Project, which centers on teaching, learning, and ethical conduct in the digital era to ensure that every student graduates as a skilled and ethically aware digital citizen. Steady Structure: New York Military Academy Cornwall-on-Hudson is the home of the venerated New York Military Academy, founded in 1889 by Charles Jefferson Wright, a Civil War veteran and former school teacher from New Hampshire who believed that a military structure provided the best environment for academic achievement. Although NYMA proudly adheres to this tradition, it’s foremost an academically focused college preparatory boarding school with top-level athletic teams and an exceptional leadership program that challenges its cadets to be good citizens. At the co-ed academy, cadets attend tightly scheduled, grade-specific classes and participate in organized or intramural sports, activities, and study hall; they also take part in additional leadership training, drill, and ceremony, and maintain the appearance of their respective barracks. “In the classroom, our cadets pursue a cutting-edge and relevant 21stcentury curriculum alongside a structured, leadership-and-life-skills-focused military program, guided by our school’s long affiliation with the United States Army JROTC,” says Superintendent and retired US Army Maj. Jeffrey E. Coverdale. “Our distinguished list of graduate scholars, businessmen and businesswomen, male and female career military officers, and world-renowned musicians, energize the campus and provide our cadets with a distinguished networking and mentoring base to help them as they step into the future.”

Accent on Art: Hotchkiss School With 810 acres that include academic and residential buildings, playing fields and green lawns, a working farm, the deepest freshwater lake in the state, and lovely vistas of the Berkshire Mountains, Lakefield, Connecticut’s Hotchkiss School opened as an all-male school in 1891. Since then, it has become coeducational, grown in size and scope, and established itself as one of the premier secondary schools in the country. The arts are an integral part of life at Hotchkiss, where students are encouraged to venture into the school’s many and varied arts programs to see what they can discover about themselves and others. “In addition to fostering creative expression, the arts (and the humanities, another strong focus at Hotchkiss) also help students to become creative problem solvers,” says Terri Moore, a fine-arts instructor and gallery director. “We strive to help students become risk-takers while maintaining an environment in which they feel safe to be themselves and respect each others’ ideas in salonlike exchanges. Regular self-assessment is also key, to encourage students to take responsibility for their actions and futures.” Hotchkiss’s interdisciplinary curriculum is further populated with studies in classical and modern languages, mathematics, English, science, human development, and the social sciences. RESOURCES Oakwood Friends School www.oakwoodfriends.org Buxton School www.buxtonschool.org Bard College at Simon’s Rock www.simons-rock.edu Miss Hall’s School www.misshalls.org Poughkeepsie Day School www.poughkeepsieday.org New York Military Academy www.nyma.org Hotchkiss School www.hotchkiss.org 10/11 ChronograM education 71


by Anne Pyburn photos by David Morris Cunningham

the john kane house

DUTCHESS DESTINATIONS

Pawling • Hopewell Junction • Wappingers Falls To fully understand the gracious pleasures of southeastern Dutchess County, know this: the Quakers of the Oblong Meeting eliminated slavery nearly a century before the Emancipation Proclamation. “They reasoned that, since God is in every person, they could not enslave God,” recounts Pawling historian Robert Reilly in the town’s historical archives. That level of logical decency, mated with some of the prettiest countryside imaginable and the advantages of proximity to Manhattan, has shaped a region brimming with kindhearted gentility. Try a day trip to this part of the world, and you may well find yourself heading back for a weekend, the better to explore the many good things being done well here.

“GOOD NIGHT AND GOOD LUCK” Edward R. Murrow’s radio broadcasts from London as a war correspondent during World War II where followed by millions of listeners. His unflinching TV news reports on Senator Joseph McCarthy were a turning point in television history. He was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom and left a legacy that stands as one of the cornerstones of broadcast journalism…but, at the end of the day, Edward R. Murrow came home to Pawling, for decades, to live and, finally, to die on April 27, 1965 at the age of 57. His ashes were scattered at his estate, Glen Arden Farm at Quaker Hill in Pawling where the Edward R. Murrow Park at Lakeside Drive and Old Rt. 55 is named after him in the community he loved. 72 pawling + hopewell junction + wappingers falls ChronograM 10/11


pawling: a peaceable kingdom Pawling’s warmth and sweetness may have something to do with the elegance of the natural surroundings. How many towns have a Great Swamp? The 63,000-acre watershed has nine rare species and is a rich source of archaeological finds dating back several millenia. The Great Swamp is gloriously unsuited to development and perfect for hiking, kayaking, bird watching, fishing and otherwise getting away from it all. On October 22 and 23, the Friends of the Great Swamp hold their annual Art Show and Celebration, with art and music and eco-education done right. If you’re in the mood for an elevated perspective, Pawling also happens to contain a section of the Appalachian Trail with its own rustic Metro North station. Head up into the hills for a moderate hike to Cat’s Rock, with a lush 180-degree panorama of Pawling and western Connecticut. Or bust out your clubs for a trip around the oldest nine-hole municipal golf course in the US. Established in 1890, the Dutcher Golf Course is surrounded by age-old stonewalls and pretty as a picture. According to Golf.com, it also has no water hazards or sand traps—golfers can experience a downright archaic lack of frustration. Ready to come back indoors and contemplate some of the finer connections humans can make with the earth? Stop in at Earthlore, where you’ll find minerals, crystals, unique jewelry and sculpture, and fossils. What better keepsake by which to remember this gem of a town? “People come up from New York and find a friendly, warm feeling in the air, radiating from the merchants and residents alike,” says Pawling Chamber of Commerce President Peter Cris. “The city transplants and the longtime locals meld well together…people who live and work in Pawling are ambassadors for warmth and comfort. Residents feel it; visitors feel it.” An ambiance like that creates fertile soil for dreams. “I always wanted to open a knitting shop; I’ve been a knitter since I was eight. I’ve been here 21 years now,” says Marie Stewart, owner of the Yarn and Craft Box. “I have customers from all over the area and some who come up from Manhattan, and they all seem happy that I’m able to help them. I teach, too. And every fall, the Dutchess County Sheriffs pick up a pile of scarves and other handmade items we’ve made and take them to the needy and homeless. It’s my dream come true, and I’m living it.” Stewart’s a fan of the Book Cove, another local dream made real, where the staff know and love both the merchandise and the customers and maintain a full schedule of author events for families and children, the better to raise the kind of thoughtful citizens befitting a town that supports its own public radio station and a resource center that tends to the needs of residents in crisis. “If you need a ride to the doctor, somebody will get you there,” says Cris. “This could be a microcosm for what I like to think is the real American spirit and, hopefully, we’re contagious. After all, we’re the hometown of Thomas Dewey and Dr. Norman Vincent Peale. This is the birthplace of positive thinking.” Come to Pawling and find out why folks drive long distances to experience the fine wines and homemade baked treats of McKinney and Doyle, where they like to say that the cuisine is serious but the atmosphere definitely lighthearted. Or enjoy an evening at the Town Crier Café, where they’ve been presenting an eclectic array of entertainment for nearly four decades. October offerings include Holly Near, Popa Chubby, and a Celtic Halloween bash. Outdoors folk will find it’s well worth the journey for the personalized attention at the Pawling Cycle and Sport Shop. Whether you prefer to travel by bike, kayak, skateboard or cross-country skis, you’ll find a staff that shares your passion. Once outfitted with a new toy, there’s no better place to try it out than the Dutchess County Rail Trail. Accessible from the Walkway Over the Hudson, the Trail winds through prime leafpeeping territory and can take you to two other standout places: Wappingers Falls and Hopewell Junction. To fully understand the gracious pleasures of southeastern Dutchess County, know this: The Quakers of the Oblong Meeting eliminated slavery nearly a century before the Emancipation Proclamation. “They reasoned that, since God is in every person, they could not enslave God,” recounts Pawling historian Robert Reilly in the town’s historical archives. That level of logical decency, mated with some of the prettiest countryside imaginable and the advantages of proximity to Manhattan, has shaped a region brimming with kindhearted gentility. Try a day trip to this part of the world, and you may well find yourself heading back for a weekend, the better to explore the many good things being done well here.

Paul Rabin, Dutch Oven

Marcus J. Feighery, owner, synchronicity

Louise Manzino, Tara Lombardozzi and Deborah Ballman, The Book Cove

Robert Kelley, Pawling Cycle & Sport

phil ciganer, proprietor, The Towne Crier

Eleanor Nurzia, abruzzi

Andrew Sarubbi, Manager, McKinney & Doyle Fine Foods

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Marie Stewart, Yarn & Craft Box

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www.pawling.org 10/11 ChronograM pawling + hopewell junction + wappingers falls 73


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WAPPINGERS FALLS Sweet Village Still more Dutchess County adventures can be found in Wappingers Falls, where Bowdoin Park—over 300 riverside acres laced with trails, boardwalks and a world-class cross-country course—beckons picnickers and hosts a variety of special events. Among other treats, they’ve been producing an outstanding Haunted Mansion every autumn for 30 years. Wappingers is home to the Chapel of Sacred Mirrors, devoted to “the mystic core of love uniting all wisdom traditions and the transformative power of art to awaken human potential.” Though the Chapel’s wisdom-works and its 40-acre campus are open only by appointment or during one of its scheduled events, getting a taste of the unique work under way there online may entice you to sign up for a full moon ceremony, visionary art party or nature mysticism seminar. At the end of the month, CoSM celebrates the season with “Deities and Demons Masquerade: Egyptian Underworld and the Cult of the Dead.” You’ll find all kinds of choices for shopping and eating in the Route 9 retail corridor that abuts Wappingers Falls. Alto Music is there, and Starr’s Oak Furniture. There are eateries like Greenbaum and Gilhooley’s (think exquisite prime rib and lobster), and the Kabab Palace, specializing in Indian cuisine. Jam-packed with businesses ranging from the mundane and useful to the specialized and quirky, this area is fun to explore and easy to reach. Wappingers has an arty streak that may take a little digging to find, but is nonetheless vital. It’s home to the County Players, a Hudson Valley Magazine pick for “Best Community Theatre,” with a 50-year history; next month’s production is “Once On This Island.” Sports folk will enjoy a visit to the Sports Museum of Dutchess County where homegrown heroes are honored in a Hall of Fame. It’s where Nicole and Chris Morris create unique wearable art for Dohrmor.com. “This is a sweet village,” says Nicole, “It’s walkable. We’ve got nice parks and lots of good pizza.”

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United States. “Sheerholders” are blessed with fine wool and mohair from a flock of Merino and Cormo sheep and Angora goats, sustainably shepherded by their humans and by Maremma sheepdogs described by their humans as “hearts with feet.” If your creative urges run more toward wood than wool, don’t miss Hopewell’s William Tell True Value Hardware, renowned for a vast variety of unexpected odds and ends.” They have what Home Depot doesn’t,” raves a customer in an online review. Another great source of the unexpected: the Hopewell Antique Center, with its two huge lofts loaded with all sorts of stuff. Hopewell Junction, like Pawling, prides itself on its unique offerings like “stones that speak” from the neighborhood jewelers at Belizzi, a great combination with the teddy bears, floral extravaganzas, and exotic sweets from neighboring Bouquets by Christine when there’s someone you really want to spoil the right way. Then there’s Frankie’s Superette, that increasingly rare creature, an independent grocery and meat market where they’ve got treats you just won’t find at the supermarket, and a great place to provision for a picnic on that Rail Trail ride. If you’d prefer to have someone cook for you, Hopewell Junction restaurants offer some exceptional possibilities. How about French cuisine in an 1863 Georgian colonial estate? That would be Le Chambord. Goodfellas prides itself on the widest selection of beer in five counties, with 37 varieties on tap and hundreds of bottled choices, paired with fine American cuisine including burgers you’ll never forget. Zagat’s found the best Italian in the valley at Hopewell’s Blue Fountain in 2009; yet another take on Italian cuisine can be found at Tiramisu, where they’ll serve you up brick oven pizza in a casual Internet café setting.

www.hopewelljunction.org 10/11 ChronograM pawling + hopewell junction + wappingers falls 75


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Food & Drink

No Farms, No Food

Taking Stock After the Devastation By Peter Barrett Photographs by Roy Gumpel ravaged tomato fields in new paltz at taliaferro farms.

T

he meteorological one-two punch of Hurricanes Irene and Lee did massive amounts of damage to hundreds of farms in New York; over 200,000 acres of food and feed crops were flooded. The agricultural losses were worst of all in the Schoharie and Mohawk Valleys, with severe erosion, flooding, and the destruction of many structures and livestock; one farm lost its entire herd of cattle. But the Hudson Valley got hammered hard as well, and our farmers are reeling in the aftermath. They need help. The rich, fertile bottomlands in our region are prone to flooding, and that’s part of what makes the soil so good. But the floods normally happen in late winter and spring, before any seeds are in the ground. Standing next to a hand-painted sign reading “High Water Mark Irene” that’s more than twice his height, Chris Kelder of Kelder’s farm in Accord explains why the timing of this disaster could not have been worse for farmers: “We’ve spent all our money, and the crop was ready to harvest, but now it’s gone. Since 1955 [flooding has] never happened during the growing season.” The end of the summer is the point at which all of the money farmers have put into their fields begins to come back out. It’s exactly like Black Friday in the retail world. The Force of Water In the Hudson Valley, the Walkill River was one of the most destructive to farmland. While the raging Esopus tore roads, bridges, and houses apart all along the Route 28 corridor, making for dramatic stories and footage, the slower-moving Walkill just rose and rose and rose, submerging scores of farms from southern Orange County all the way up to where it joins the Rondout in Rifton. The force of the water in these and other streams shifted rocks and gravel, blew out retaining walls, and scoured away riverbanks and countless tons of topsoil. Fine silt has clogged the remaining soil, blocking the capillary action that pulls water down below the surface.The still-high water level means that any more rain has nowhere to drain to, so in some areas the flooding from Lee was worse than Irene.There are millions of tons of logjams, boulders, and debris that need clearing and dredging so that the next storm doesn’t drive the rivers right back into these same fields. 80 food & drink ChronograM 10/11

Farms that were bright green and full of food are now drab, soggy expanses of brown. Driving around the area, one sees the tree lines at the edges of many of the flooded fields highlighted in orange; pumpkins that once filled the fields now lie broken and rotting where the trees caught them. Dave Davenport, owner of Davenport Farms in Stone Ridge and president of the Rondout Valley Growers Association (RVGA), explains what happened to all the rest: “Thousands of pumpkins floated downstream into the Hudson. A lot of people saw them coming down the creek, getting caught in a net over the dam in High Falls.” Someone who fished one out of the water there e-mailed the RVGA asking whom she could pay for it, and that led to a fundraising idea. Because there will now be a shortage of pumpkins this fall, the RVGA will also be selling paper pumpkins, marked with the donation amount, that customers can buy, decorate, and hang on their front doors to show their support. Davenport is currently talking with Whole Foods about selling the paper pumpkins at Whole Foods stores throughout the metropolitan area. CSA as Saving Grace Sylvester “Pete” Taliaferro farms almost 40 acres of certified organic vegetables with his wife, sons, and daughter in New Paltz. They lost 80 percent of their crop. “Without the support of our CSA we’d be darn near out of business. We had stuff in the greenhouses ready to plant right after Irene, so we went down and planted it. Then Lee came along and wiped much of that out. People sent me checks, wine, food. People come buy $5 worth of food, hand me a twenty, and say ‘Keep the change.’ They’re buying shares for next year now. It’s helped us out tremendously.” Deborah and Peter Kavakos own Stoneledge Farm in South Cairo, where they grow approximately 200 acres of certified organic produce for their 1,400 CSA members. Deborah Kavakos explains how: “It was the worst possible time for almost everything. We harvest weekly for our members, and with two weeks of summer vegetables left we hadn’t even started on the fall crops. And then we got six to ten feet of water in all our fields.” Even crops like winter squash that could be washed off had to be thrown away, per a ruling from the FDA that


clockwise from top left: a corn field underwater at wallkill view farms in new paltz; Pete taliaferro holding a drowned tomato plant on his farm on the wallkll river in new paltz; a drowned squash at bradley farm in new paltz.

anything underwater for more than three hours could not be sold for consumption. Kavakos, like all the farmers I spoke with, calmly discussed the damage and financial ruin that the storms have brought. The only time her composure broke was when she talked about the support from their members and the community. “We would not be in business next year if it weren’t for our members. One couple moved away earlier this year and they still bought two shares for next year to help us out.” Kavakos says they have some insurance, but the payout will be a small fraction of their losses. “We’ve been building this for 25 years. Last year, we finally had enough collateral to buy the rest of the land. We can’t possibly take out another loan.” ns at the new jersey center for

Stressing a Fragile Economy performing arts in newark Ulster County Executive Mike Hein recently participated in a press conference about agricultural storm damage. “This is the worst natural disaster in the history of Ulster County. When I was doing a flyover of Ulster County, it broke my heart. We came over Mohonk, and what we saw was an enormous lake. The only thing I could recognize was the roof of [Ferrante’s] market.” Peter Ferrante, speaking at the same event, held at his Walkill View farm stand in New Paltz, explained the economic impact on his family-run business succinctly: “Six households just had their income drop to zero. We had 160 acres of complete loss.” These losses are going to ripple out into the larger community, further stressing an already fragile economy. Hein continued: “The most important thing that people can do to help farmers is to understand that they’re open for business. Come to the farm stands and enjoy the produce. There has been an agricultural disaster declaration for our community, but there’s a problem: the funding that is supposed to be there simply isn’t there. We’re calling on the US government to understand how severe the situation is.” Governor Cuomo has created a $15 million fund for stream bank restoration and agricultural recovery, but that’s a fraction of what is needed: estimates for the total damage range from $73 million to $1 billion. Of the $15 million, 2.4 million has been released for immediate relief at 125 farms throughout the state. Just under $750,000 is allocated for the

Hudson Valley, and the allotments reveal the vast disparity in damage between the two sides of the river: Dutchess and Columbia get $61,000, while Orange, Ulster, and Greene get $685,000. As of press time, there is no proposed legislation in the state legislature that addresses the disaster. The US Senate recently passed a bill providing $6.9 billion in disaster relief funds, of which the bulk would go to FEMA, with the rest divided among other agencies including the Army Corps of Engineers and the Department of Agriculture. The Republican-controlled House has yet to move on it, and has instead offered a much smaller and yet more complex bill providing $3.65 billion that includes $1.5 billion in cuts to other programs as offsets. Democratic Congressman Maurice Hinchey, from New York’s 22nd District, which covers much of the affected area, supports House passage of the Senate version: “The easiest, simplest and smartest thing to do is immediately take up the Senate bill, which provides the funding necessary to address this crisis without delay. We cannot afford to play politics with this issue.” This sentiment has been echoed almost verbatim by Hein, Cuomo, and others, and yet the funding is being held for ransom in the House. The entire government may shut down as a result. In addition, both New York Senators and several area Congressmen have introduced the Post-Irene Emergency Farm Aid Act, which would provide $10 million to the Emergency Conservation Program and the Emergency Watershed Protection Program. These programs, coordinated through the USDA’s Farm Service Agency, offer funding and help to farmers to clear, restore, and protect waterways and agricultural land. Both programs pay for only 75 percent of the cost of a given project, though, so given the scope of the damage and the dire financial straits of the affected farmers, this money represents a first step at best. Every State has farms, and the footage of the storms and their aftermath has been dramatic and widely seen, so officials and staff contacted for this piece expressed cautious optimism that the proposed legislation may end up passing, even in this age of pathological austerity. Chris Pawelski is a fourth-generation onion farmer in Goshen, in the fabled Black Dirt Country of Orange County that boasts some of the most fertile soil in 10/11 ChronograM food & drink 81


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chris kelder standing in front of the sign indicating the high-water mark at kelder’s farm in accord.

America. Reached on his cell phone in Washington, DC, where he’s meeting with legislators and their staff, trying to implement some meaningful reforms to the crop insurance program and agitate for an effective response to the storms, he is impassioned and blunt about the crisis. “The crop insurance programs are terrible. They pay pennies on the dollar. In 2009 [a wet summer where rot was a big problem] I took $150,000 in crop losses after paying a $10,000 insurance premium, with another $20,000 subsidized by taxpayers. My indemnity was $6,000: I spent $4,000 for nothing and the rest of the $26,000 premium went into the pockets of the insurance company. So I’m still carrying all the debt from that year and I can’t take out another loan.� Besides insurance reform, Pawelski is lobbying for a temporary waiver that would allow FEMA to consider crops as inventory and thus cover their loss. “The president could do this with an executive order; it’s a chance for him to step up and really make a difference.� Put Your Money Where Your Mouth Is Our support is vital to these farmers, and communities are responding. Buying local has never been more important, and there are fundraisers scheduled throughout the fall all over the impacted region. State agencies can also help, but the scale of the disaster makes it clear that federal funds are the only way to really get these farmers back on their feet. Besides financial relief, the Corps of Engineers looks to be the only entity capable of the massive stream bank remediation that is required. There’s no doubt that the recovery will take time, but it needs to be timely. Pawelski concludes: “I have to place my seed orders next month and I can’t pay for them. I’m not looking for handouts. But if we don’t get some real help, we’re not going to farm next year.�

INTRODUCING

292 Main St • Poughkeepsie • 845 473.0292 • www.Brasserie292.com

RESOURCES FOR AIDING FLOODED FARMERS At www.chronogram.com, we’ve created a Farm Aid page with links to organizations that are collecting money for farmers, as well as links to benefit events and the affected farms. 10/11 ChronograM food & drink 83


Hawthorne Valley Farm Store

Fresh foods made on our farm! Certified organic, artisan breads, pastries, cheese, yogurt, raw milk, sauerkrauts and more!

The CraftedKup TEA & COFFEEHOUSE 44 Raymond Avenue Poughkeepsie, NY 845-483-7070 www.craftedkup.com

Your Neighborhood Coffeehouse A great place to be! Hours of Operation Monday to Friday 7am to 7pm Saturday 8am to 7pm Sunday 8am to 3pm

1.5 miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/Philmont exit 20 minutes from Hudson • 15 minutes from Chatham

All You Can Eat*

Monday – Saturday 7:30 to 7 • Sundays 9 to 5

MONDAY - THURSDAY

tastings directory

Interested in taking a tour of the farm, sampling foods made on the farm, or finding out about other on-farm activities? Call 518-672-7500 x 231.

$19.95 Adults $9.95 Kids 8 & under FRIDAY - SUNDAY

$21.95 Adults $10.95 Kids 8 & under * Order must include combination of sushi, sashimi and roll.

FARM STORE | www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY 12075 | 518-672-7500

26 Raymond Ave, Poughkeepsie, NY • 845.471.5245 www.sushivillagepok.com • Order Online for To Go or Delivery Service

U-Pick Apples Pumpkins, corn stalks, and fall mums Apple cider, apple cider donuts, pies, and more Beer Garden open Friday through Sunday with live afternoon music and seasonal craft beer Harvest Grill and Apple Grader Pub open daily Weekend activities for the whole family

www.penningsfarmmarket.com 845-986-1059 or 845-986-5959 Route 94 & Warwick Turnpike, Warwick, New York

SATURDAY

October 8

HENRY HUDSON RIVERFRONT PARK

Chili

HUDSON, NY

Contest

Fire up your hottest recipe and enter to win Best Chili:

Fall Fun! ✩Corn ✩ Maze ✩Jumping ✩ Bean Mini-Golf ✩Edible ✩ ✩Farm ✩ Animals ✩Farm ✩ Store

$500 First prize, $300 Second prize, $150 Third prize

Best Table Presentation: $100 prize

For more information, rules and entry form, visit www.hudsonvalleybounty.com or call 518.851.5888 SPONSORED BY Ginsberg’s Foods

84 tastings directory ChronograM 10/11

5755 Rte 209 Kerhonkson✩KelderFarm.com


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Carmela’s Harvest Cake (914) 489-3737 sites.google.com/site/carmelasharvestcake

CafĂŠs Bistro-to-Go 948 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 340-9800 www.bluemountainbistro.com Gourmet take-out store serving breakfast, lunch, and dinner seven days a week. Featuring local and imported organic foods, delicious homemade desserts, sophisticated four-star food by Chefs Richard Erickson and Jonathan Sheridan. Off-premise full-service catering and event planning for parties of all sizes.

Crafted Kup 44 Raymond Avenue #1, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-7070 www.craftedkup.com

The Bees Knees CafĂŠ at Heather Ridge Farm 989 Broome Center Road, Preston Hollow, NY (518) 239-6234 www.heather-ridge-farm.com Great lunches right on the farm! Enjoy views of the Catskill Mountains from shaded picnic tables or eat inside our 1820s farmhouse. Our own grassfed meats and pastured poultry lovingly prepared with local organic produce and cheeses. CafĂŠ and farm store open Saturdays and Sundays, Memorial Day through Columbus Day Weekends. Menu and schedule on website. "Soup Kitchen" Saturdays, November-April.

Catering Terrapin Catering 5371 Albany Post Road, Staatsburg, NY (845) 889-8831 www.terrapincatering.com hugh@terrapincatering.com Escape from the ordinary to celebrate the extraordinary. Let us attend to every detail of your wedding, bar/bat mitzvah, corporate event or any special occasion. On-site, we can

accommodate 150 guests seated, and 250 for cocktail events. Off-site services available. Terrapin’s custom menus always include local, fresh, and organic ingredients.

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Delis

A casual, elegant bistro in downtown Goshen serving fresh and delicious fare.

Jack’s Meats & Deli 79 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2244

★★★★!– Times Herald-Record (Jan. 14, 2011)

Restaurants

Lunch Dinner

American Glory BBQ 342 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-1234 www.americanglory.com American Glory is a restaurant specializing in “legendary wood smoked regional BBQ of the United States, and classic American comfort foods.� In addition to the extensive BBQ fare, the menu includes a wide selection of grilled burgers, steaks and fish, along with an assortment of fresh salads, several vegetarian options, and numerous side dishes like collard greens, cheese grits, garlic mashed potatoes, mac & cheese, cornbread, and creamy ole country coleslaw. All menu items are prepared fresh daily and all BBQ is smoked on site using local wood.

Tues-Fri: 11:30am-2:30pm

134 W. Main St, Goshen, NY www.bistrolilly.com

845.294.2810

Please also The Goshen Gourmet CafĂŠ visit:

B A K E RY & D E L I C AT E S S E N

Tues-Thurs: 5-9pm Fri & Sat: 5-9:30pm Reservations accepted. Wine • Beer 18 W. Main St, Goshen, NY www.goshengourmetcafe.com

Baba Louie’s Woodfired Sourdough Pizza 517 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 751-2155 34 Depot Street, Pittsfield, MA (413) 499-2400 www.BabaLouiesPizza.com Handcrafted with fresh, all natural ingredients. Italian brick-oven woodfired pizzas made with sourdough crust & fresh mozzarella. Choose from our creative signature pizzas or build your own! Heaping salads with fresh greens, house made soup, pasta specials, lunchtime sandwiches & ciabatta panini. Family friendly! Delicious gluten-free and vegan options available everyday!

Babycakes CafĂŠ 1-3 Collegeview Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-8411 www.babycakescafe.com

10/11 ChronograM tastings directory 85

tastings directory

Bakeries

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Sunday Brunch • Live Music Wed., Fri. & Sat. )HDWXULQJ*UDVV)HG %HHIDQG/DPE IURP8SKLOO)DUP (JYVZZMYVT[OL-+93PIYHY`HUK4\ZL\T (SIHU`7VZ[9VHK‹/`KL7HYR5@‹  ;(7:‹^^^O`KLWHYRIYL^PUNJVT

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Open 7 Days 845-255-2244

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Local Organic Grass-Fed Beef • Lamb • Goat • Veal • Pork • Chicken • Wild Salmon

No Hormones ~ No Antibiotics ~ No Preservatives Custom Cut • Home Cooking Delicatessen Nitrate-Free Bacon • Pork Roasts • Beef Roasts

tastings directory

Bone-in or Boneless Ham: smoked or fresh

Local Organic Beef • Exotic Meats (Venison, Buffalo, Ostrich) • Wild Fish #=NIPK1=>HA!EJEJCEJ$=NNEOKJ #=NIPK1=>HA!EJEJCEJ$=NNEOKJ

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Enjoy Thai cooking by Real Thai Chefs “Golden Buddha Restaurant gets Rave Reviews!�

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~Poughkeepsie Journal 7/10

Sun & tues-Thurs 11:30am-9:30pm Fri & Sat 11:30am-10:30pm Let our family Closed Mon serve yours 985 Main St, Fishkill, NY (845) 765-1055

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Poughkeepsie’s 1st Gastropub! Inside & Courtyard seating. Upscale Tapas style plates, Signature Drinks, Craft Beers, Wine Bar. Live Blues & BBQ every Sunday, rain or shine. 202 main st poughkeepsie, ny 845-473-4294 www.karmalounge.us

86 tastings directory chronograM 10/11

tues – sat : 4pm to 2am sun : 12pm to 2am full menu served until closing


Bistro Lilly 134 West Main Street, Goshen, NY (845) 294-2810 www.bistrolilly.com

Brasserie 292 Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-0292 www.brasserie292.com

Bull and Buddha 319 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 337-4848 www.bullandbuddha.com Bull and Buddha restaurant fuses an urban interior with exotic design elements of the East nestled in Poughkeepsie’s revitalized downtown. Served under the watchful eye of a hand-carved two-ton Buddha, the Asian-themed menu reflects the bounty and diversity of the Hudson Valley: an inspired dining experience in a chic yet casual setting. Upstairs is Orient, Hudson Valley’s newest and most elegant Ultra Lounge. Orient sets a new standard for destination nightlife and an experience once unavailable outside of Manhattan’s Meat Packing district.

Gilded Otter 3 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-1700 A warm and inviting dining room and pub overlooking beautiful sunsets over the Wallkill River and Shawangunk Cliffs. Mouthwatering dinners prepared by Executive Chef Larry Chu, and handcrafted beers brewed by GABF Gold Medal Winning Brewmaster Darren Currier. Chef driven and brewed locally!

Golden Buddha Thai Cuisine 985 Main Street, Fishkill, NY (845) 765-1055

Howell’s Café

Karma Lounge 201 Main Street, Poughkeepise, NY (845) 473-4294 www.karmalounge.us

Karma Road Organic Café 11 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255 1099 www.karmaroad.net info@karmaroad.com Winner of “Best Vegetarian Restaurant in the Hudson Valley” 2010. Friendly, casual breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, juices and award-winning smoothies for a delicious, healthy alternative to standard fare. GlutenFree aplenty! Steps from the Rail-Trail in historic downtown. Open 8am-8pm, 7 days. Find us on Facebook!

Kavos 4 North Clover Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473 4976 www.kavosgyros.com kavosgyros@gmail.com

LaBella Pizza Bistro 194 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2633 www.labellapizzabistro.com LaBella Pizza Bistro voted Best Pizza in The Hudson Valley. We serve more than just great pizza, including catering for any occasion. Our dishes feature LOCALLY GROWN organic produce! We offer a healthy WHOLE GRAIN PIZZA CRUST! Vegan Pizza is now available as well.

Leo’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria 1433 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3446

Matchbox Café 6242 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3911

Osaka Restaurant 18 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7338 or (845) 876-7278 Want to taste the best Sushi in the Hudson Valley? Osaka Restaurant is the place. Vegetarian dishes available. Given 4.5 stars by the Pough-

“Best Sushi”~Chronogram & Hudson Valley Magazine

Rock & Rye Tavern 215 Huguenot Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-7888 www.rockandrye.com

Rusty’s Farm Fresh 5 Old Farm Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-8000 www.rustysfarmfresheatery.com

Sushi Village 26 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 471-5245 www.sushivillagepoughkeepsie.com Sushi Village serves authentic, great tasting Japanese food and sushi with friendly service and great prices. Located near Vassar College in Poughkeepsie, Sushi Village offers all-youcan-eat sushi and lunch specials.

Japanese Restaurant o saka su sh i. ne t

TIVOLI 74 Broadway (845) 757-5055 RHINEBECK 22 Garden St (845) 876-7338

Rated “Excellent”~Zagat for 16yrs • “4.5 Stars”~Poughkeepsie Journal

Terrapin Restaurant and Bistro 6426 Montgomery Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3330 www.terrapinrestaurant.com custsvc@terrapinrestaurant.com Voted “Best of the Hudson Valley” by Chronogram Magazine. From far-flung origins, the world’s most diverse flavors meet and mingle. Out of elements both historic and eclectic comes something surprising, fresh, and dynamic: dishes to delight both body and soul. Serving lunch and dinner seven days a week. Local. Organic. Authentic.

Have a smart phone? Check out our menu!

EAT HEALTHY & ENJOY EVERY MOUTHFUL.

The Artist’s Palate 307 Main Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 483-8074 www.theartistspalate.biz Installed in a building once occupied by a Golden Era clothing store, M. Schwartz, The Artist’s Palate restaurant has brought back life to Main Street in Poughkeepsie. Designers have reworked the interior space of the 70-seat dining room to combine cosmopolitan elegance with an edgy industrial accent. Like the décor, the menu showcases innovation: An extensive array of wines, handcrafted beers and unique cocktails complement our revolving seasonal menu.

CHINA JAPAN KOREA INDONESIA Open 7 days  Lunch and Dinner  Reservations accepted ROUTE 300 NEWBURGH, NY (845) 564-3848 YOBORESTAURANT.COM

The Garrison 2015 Route 9, Garrison, NY (845) 424-3604 www.thegarrison.com

The Hoffman House 94 North Front Street, Kingston, NY www.hoffmanhousetavern.com

Toad Holly Pub 713 Route 32, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-2097 www.toadhollypub.com Toad Holly Pub Offers International Cuisine with Backwoods of the World recipes that’s why Gastronomical Pleasures are us. We offer Catering in house and all of our menu is available To Go! Check out our European Style Bar, Happy Hour Daily, and Drink Specials. Come Dine with us.

My family invites your family to dine at

Towne Crier Café Pawling, NY (845) 855-1300 www.townecrier.com

Yobo Restaurant Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845) 564-3848 www.yoborestaurant.com

Snacks Mister Snacks, Inc. 500 Creekside Drive, Amherst, NY (800) 333-6393 www.mistersnacks.com steve@mistersnacks.com

Family Friendly Fall Menu

New look,old feel,same great food! NEW HOURS: WED-SAT 5-9PM

DOWNTOWN Goshen • 845-294-5561 • www.howellsdeli.com • Like Us Today 10/11 ChronograM tastings directory 87

tastings directory

27 W. Main Street, Goshen, NY (845) 294-5561 www.howellsdeli.com

keepsie Journal. Visit our second location at 74 Broadway, Tivoli, NY, (845) 757-5055.


business directory Accomodations Diamond Mills 25 South Partition Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 247-0700 www.DiamondMillsHotel.com info@DiamondMillsHotel.com

Alternative Energy Hudson Valley Clean Energy, Inc (845) 876-3767 www.hvce.com

Wittus-Fire By Design (914) 764-5679 www.wittus.com

Antiques Water Street Market (Antiques Center) 10 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1403 www.waterstreetmarket.com

Appliances business directory

Firescapes 445 Robinson Ave, Newburgh, NY (845)863-0013 www.firescapesny.com

Architecture North River Architecture 3650 Main Street, PO Box 720, Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-6242 www.nriverarchitecture.com

Art Galleries & Centers Ann Street Gallery 104 Ann Street, Newburgh, NY (845) 784-1146 www.annstreetgallery.org facebook.com/annstreetgallery

Mark Gruber Gallery New Paltz Plaza, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-1241 www.markgrubergallery.com

Mill Street Loft’s Gallery 45 45 Pershing Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 471-7477 www.millstreetloft.org info@millstreetloft.org Mill Street Loft’s Gallery 45 features yearround exhibits of works by a wide variety of distinguished Hudson Valley artists as well as students from the Art Institute of Mill Street Loft, the Dutchess Arts Camps and art courses and workshops. Mill Street Loft provides innovative educational arts programming for children and adults of all ages and abilities in Poughkeepsie, Beacon, Millbrook & Red Hook.

Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art 1 Hawk Drive, New Paltz, NY www.newpaltz.edu/museum

Tremaine Gallery at the Hotchkiss School 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-3663 www.hotchkiss.org

Art Supplies Catskill Art & Office Supply Kingston, NY (845) 331-7780

Rhinebeck Artist’s Shop Rhinebeck & New Paltz, NY www.rhinebeckart.com

White Barn Farm 815 Albany Post Road, New Paltz, NY (914) 456-6040 www.whitebarnsheepandwool.com

Artisans Collaborative Concepts (845) 528-1797 collaborativeconcept@optonline.net

Artview Gallery

www.markertek.com

Back Door Studio 9 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-3660 sydhap@aol.com

Country Gallery 1955 South Road Square, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 297-1684

HnL Woodworking Contact: Brenda Hall (860) 480-1021 www.facebook.com/HNLwoodworking HnlWoodworking@gmail.com

Audio & Video Markertek Video Supply

Auto Sales & Services Jenkinstown Motors, Inc. 37 South Ohioville Road, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2500

Banks Ulster Savings Bank (866) 440-0391 www.ulstersavings.com

Beverages

Green River Gallery 1578 Boston Corners Road, Millerton, NY (518) 789-3311

Lady Audrey’s Gallery 52 Main Street, Millerton, NY (518) 592-1303 http://ladyaudreysgallery.com

Esotec (845) 246-2411 www.esotecltd.com www.thirstcomesfirst. com www.drinkesotec.com sales@esotecltd.com Choose Esotec to be your wholesale bever-

88 business directory ChronograM 10/11

Book Publishers SUNY Press www.sunypress.edu

Bookstores Mirabai of Woodstock 23 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2100 www.mirabai.com The Hudson Valley’s oldest and most comprehensive spiritual/metaphysical bookstore, providing a vast array of books, music, and gifts for inspiration, transformation and healing. Exquisite jewelry, crystals, statuary and other treasures from Bali, India, Brazil, Nepal, Tibet. Expert Tarot reading.

Broadcasting WDST 100.1 Radio Woodstock Woodstock, NY www.wdst.com

Building Services & Supplies Cabinet Designers

Human Form: An Enduring Inspiration: A group of contemporary artists whose work is inspired the theme of the human form opens with an artist reception on Saturday, October 15, 2011 from 6-9pm. This thematic grouping of artists, offers the opportunity to compare and contrast works of different styles and mediums inspired through a variety of approaches using human form as an inspiration for their work. The exhibition runs from Saturday, October 15, 2011 through to Saturday, November 12, 2011. 14 Main Street, Chatham, NY (518) 392-0999 www.artviewgalleryny.com

age provider. For 25 years, we’ve carried a complete line of natural, organic, and unusual juices, spritzers, waters, sodas, iced teas, and coconut water. If you are a store owner, call for details or a catalog of our full line. We’re back in Saugerties now!

747 Route 28, Kingston, NY (845) 331-2200 www.cabinetdesigners.com

Four Seasons Insulators, IN 445 Robinson Ave, Newburgh, NY (845)863-1484 www.fourseasonsinsulatorsinc.com

Ghent Wood Products 483 Route 217, Hudson, NY (518) 672-7021 www.meltzlumber.com

H. Houst & Son Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2115 www.hhoust.com

Kitchen Cabinet Company 17 Van Kleeck Drive, Poughkeepise, NY (845) 471-6480 www.kitchencabinetco.com

L Browe Asphalt Services (518) 479-1400 www.broweasphalt.com

N & S Supply www.nssupply.com info@nssupply.com

Northern Dutchess Hardwoods and Floor Coverings 19 East Market Street, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-2005 www.northerndutchesshardwood.com sales@ndhardwoods.com

Stone Resource Inc 3417 Route 343, Amenia, NY (860) 209-7015 http://stoneresourceinc.com

Williams Lumber & Home Centers (845) 876-WOOD www.williamslumber.com

Cinemas Rosendale Theater Collective Rosendale, NY www.rosendaletheatre.org

Upstate Films 6415 Montgomery St. Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-2515 132 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-6608 www.upstatefilms.org

Clothing & Accessories Woodstock Design 9 Tinker Street, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8776 www.shopwoodstockdesign.com

Collaborative Workspace Beahive Kingston 314 Wall Street, Kingston, NY www.beahivekingston.com bzzz@beahivebeacon.com

Consignment Shops Encore Inc. Consign for a Cause Cornwall Plaza, 45 Quaker Avenue, Suite 100, Cornwall, NY (845) 458-8313 www.encoreconsign4acause.com encore@consign4acause.com

Past N’ Perfect 1629 Main Street (Route 44), Pleasant Valley, NY (845) 635-3115 www.pastnperfect.com A quaint consignment boutique that offers distinctive clothing, jewelry, accessories, and a unique collection of high-quality furs and leathers. Always a generous supply of merchandise in sizes from Petite to Plus. Featuring a diverse & illuminating collection of 14 Kt. Gold, Sterling Silver and Vintage jewelry. Enjoy the pleasures of resale shopping and the benefits of living basically while living beautifully. Conveniently located in Pleasant Valley, only 9 miles east of the Mid-Hudson Bridge.

Cooking Classes Natural Gourmet Cookery School 48 West 21st Street, New York, NY (212) 645-5170, Fax (212) 989-1493 www.naturalgourmetschool.com info@naturalgourmetschool.com

Craft Galleries Crafts People 262 Spillway Road, West Hurley, NY (845) 331-3859 www.craftspeople.us Representing over 500 artisans, Crafts People boasts four buildings brimming with fine crafts; the largest selection in the Hudson Valley. All media represented, including: sterling silver and 14K gold jewelry, blown glass, pottery, turned wood, kaleidoscopes, wind chimes, leather, clothing, stained glass, etc.

Custom Home Design and Materials Atlantic Custom Homes 2785 Route 9, Cold Spring, NY


www.lindalny.com www.hudsonvalleycedarhomes.com

Equestrian Services

customer service as well as a grand selection of high quality organic and natural products. Visit one of our convenient locations and find out for yourself!

Frog Hollow Farm

Pennings Farm Market & Orchards

Esopus, NY (845) 384-6424 www.dressageatfroghollowfarm.com

161 South Route 94, Warwick, NY (845) 986-1059 www.penningsfarmmarket.com

Events Celebration of the Arts Historic Hugenot Street, New Paltz, NY www.CelebrationoftheArts.net

EMPAC at Rensselaer Troy, NY (518) 276-3921 www.empac.rpi.edu

Estate Planning Day Mount Saint Mary College, Newburgh, NY (845) 341-5038 Contact Eileen Osterby

Film Columbia Chatham, NY (518) 392-3446 www.filmcolumbia.com info@filmcolumbia.com

Handmade in America

75 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-5361 www.sunflowernatural.com info@sunflowernatural.com Since 1978, Your source for organic and local, farm fresh produce, eggs, dairy products, bulk coffee, rice, beans, granolas, teas, all natural body & skin care, supplements, homeopathy. And so much more!

Farms Jones Farm 190 Angola Road, Cornwall, NY (845)534-4445 www.jonesfarminc.com

Kelder’s Farm 5755 Rte 209, Kerhonkson, NY www.kelderfarm.com

Kinderhook Farm

Hudson Valey Furniture Makers Exhibition & Sale

Ghent, NY (518) 929-3076 www.kinderhookfarm.com

Woodstock Invitational LLC Bearsville Theater, Woodstock, NY www.woodstockinvitational.com

Sterling Silver charms from $25

Financial Advisors JSA Financial Group 7 Livingston Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-1923 www.jsafinancial.com jeff@jsafinancial.com

1955 South Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601 845.297.1684

1240 Route 300, Newburgh, NY (845)569-0303 1560 Ulster Avenue, Lake Katrine, NY (845) 336-6300 765 Dutchess Turnpike, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-4330 www.adamsfarms.com

We are an independent financial firm that has been helping people establish & maintain their long-term financial goals through all aspects of Financial Planning. We also offer our cliMKTG21193_COUGALL.indd ents the option to utilize socially responsible investments. Securities & Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network—Member FINRA/SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser.

Harvest Spirits

Third Eye Associates, Ltd

3074 US Route 9, Valatie, NY (518) 758-7683 www.goldenharvestfarms.com

38 Spring Lake Road, Red Hook, NY (845) 752-2216 www.thirdeyeassociates.com

Adams Fairacre Farms

Hawthorne Valley Farm Store 327 County Route 21C, Ghent, NY (518) 672-7500 www.hawthornevalleyfarm.org Mon - Sat 7:30 to 7, Sundays 9 to 5 A full-line natural foods store set on a 400-acre Biodynamic farm in central Columbia County with on-farm organic bakery and dairy. Farmfresh foods include cheeses, yogurts, raw milk, breads, pastries, sauerkraut, and more. Two miles east of the Taconic Parkway at the Harlemville/Philmont exit. Farm tours can also be arranged by calling the Farm Learning Center: (518) 672-7500 x 231.

Hudson Valley Bounty (518) 392-9696 www.hudsonvalleybounty.com

Kingston Farmers’ Market Wall Street, Uptown Kingston, NY (845) 853-8512 www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org

Mother Earth’s Store House 1955 South Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 296-1069 249 Main Street, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-9614 300 Kings Mall Court, Route 9W, Kingston, NY (845) 336-5541 www.motherearthstorehouse.com Founded in 1978, Mother Earth’s is committed to providing you with the best possible

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18 Maple Lane Woodstock NY Liomag@gmail.com 917-412-5646

www.AspectsGallery.com

Gardening & Garden Supplies Mac’s Agway

Aspects Inn

68 Firehouse Lane, Red Hook, NY (845) 255-0050, (845) 876-1559

A sensual retreat in the heart of Woodstock

Graphic Design Annie Internicola, Illustrator www.aydeeyai.com

Hair Salons Allure

Fruit Truffles Bouquet™

12 Garden Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-7774 allure7774@aol.com

Androgyny 5 Mulberry Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0620

Dazzles Salon & Day Spa 2722 W. Main Street, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 297-5900 738 Route 9, Fishkill Plaza, Fishkill, NY (845) 897-5100 www.dazzlessalon.com

Hardware Stores Herzog’s True Value Home Center Kingston Plaza, Kingston, NY (845) 338-6800 www.herzogs.com

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EdibleArrangements.com ©2011 Edible Arrangements, LLC. Containers may vary. Delivery not available in all areas. Available in a variety of sizes. Franchises available call 1-888-727-4258 or visit eafranchise.com

10/11 ChronograM business directory 89

business directory

Farm Markets & Natural Food Stores

BRACELET

Sunflower Natural Foods Market

www.valatievillage.com

High Meadow School, Stone Ridge, NY www.hvfurnituremakers.com

Come see the new


Home Furnishings & Decor

INVEST IN A SUSTAINABLE FUTURE

Colors Home 14 Railroad Avenue, Warwick, NY (845) 544-7111 www.colorshome.com

7 Livingston Street Rhinebeck, NY 12572 PHONE: 845-876-1923 FAX: 845-876-4105 www.jsafinancial.com

Integrate Social Responsibility Into Your Financial Plan Contact us today to discuss your investments goals, dreams and needs for your future.

Comprehensive Financial Planning Insurance Sustainable Investing Securities and Advisory Services offered through Commonwealth Financial Network®, Member FINRA, SIPC, a Registered Investment Adviser.

This communication is strictly intended for individuals residing in the states of CA,CT,FL,IL,MA,MD,ME,MI,NC,NH,NJ,NY,VA. No offers may be made or accepted from any resident outside these states due to various state regulations and registration requirements regarding investment products and services.

Lounge High Falls, NY (845) 687-9463 www.loungefurniture.com

Silken Wool 36 & 56 Main Street, Warwick, NY (845) 988-1888 www.silkenwool.com

The Futon Store Route 9, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 297-1933 www.thefutonstore.com

Home Improvement Basement Solutions of the Hudson Valley (845) 564-0461 www.basementshv.com

Certapro Painters (845) 987-7561 www.certapro.com

Hudson Valley Contracting Group Inc. 2713 Route 17M, New Hampton, NY (845) 294-8242 www.hudsonvalleykitchens.com

business directory

William Wallace Construction (845) 750-7335 www.williamwallaceconstruction.com

Insurance Ryan & Ryan Insurance Brokers, Inc. 400 Stockade Drive, Kingston, NY (845) 340-0001 www.ryanandryaninsurance.com Bob.Ryan@RyanandRyanInsurance.com

Interior Design Van Maassen Interiors

Doug Motel, Author, Speaker & Marketing Wiz www.SiteOptimized.com 845.363.4728

3304 Route 343, Suite 1, Amenia, NY (845) 373-8400

Internet Services

(845) 471-3282 jodem54@aol.com Joining Hands and Hearts since 2003 90 business directory ChronograM 10/11

Call DSD Services, Inc. handles over 3000 items

Call Mac

1.877.642.5622 www.mistersnacks.com

Warren Kitchen & Cutlery 6934 Route 9, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-6208 www.warrenkitchentools.com

Landscaping Coral Acres, Keith Buesing — Topiary, Landscape Design, Rock Art (845) 255-6634

Native Landscapes, Inc. (845) 855-7050 www.nativelandscaping.net

Lawyers & Mediators Jane Cottrell (917) 575-4424 www.janecottrell.com Mediation is the best opportunity for the parties, not courts or juries, to control the outcome of a dispute. Experienced lawyer and mediator certified in US and UK. Choice of mediation techniques. Landlord/tenant, debtor/creditor, commercial/business, wills/trusts, arts/ creative, employment. Free consultation.

Schneider, Pfahl & Rahm, LLP Woodstock: (845) 679-9868 New York City: (212) 629-7744 www.schneiderpfahl.com

Wellspring (845) 534-7668 www.mediated-divorce.com

Marketing Services The Syntax Rugrat (201) 377-5524 www.thesyntaxrugrat.com mail@thesyntaxrugrat.com

Martial Arts At the Byrdcliffe Barn, Upper Byrdcliffe Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8153 www.woodstockaikido.com

Site Optimized (845) 363-4728 www.dougmotel.com

Dreaming Goddess

10 Circular Road Poughkeepsie, NY 12601

Kitchenwares

(845) 383-0890 www.dragonsearchmarketing.com dragon@dragonsearch.net

1122 Route 82, Hopewell Jct., NY (845) 227-1816 www.clovebranchgiftshoppe.com

Civil Wedding Officiant

290 Wall Street, Kingston, NY (845) 331-1888 www.schneidersjewelers.com

Woodstock Aikido

Clove Branch Gift Shoppe

Jodé Susan Millman

Schneider’s Jewelers

DragonSearch

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts

Give your customers the best snacks and we’ll give you the best service.

Jewelry, Fine Art & Gifts

Hudson Home 356 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 822-8120 www.hudson-homecom

Online Marketing Coaching & Classes: Google, Facebook, Twitter and more...

butterscotch, cognac ‚ fashioned into jewelry that makes a statement. From amethyst to zirconium, Earthlore offers an awesome display of Nature’s Artistry. Open Thurs thru Sat 11am-5:30pm, Sun 11am- 3pm and by appointment.

44 Raymond Avenue, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2206 www.DreamingGoddess.com

Earthlore/Amber Waves of Grain 2 Fairway Drive, Pawling, NY (845) 855-8899 Walk into a world of natural wonder: amethyst caves and crystal spheres, orbs of obsidian, azurite, septarian, chrysocolla‚ to name a few; museum-quality mineral ores, and sculptures of breath-taking beauty. PLUS a gallery of wearable art: Navajo necklaces of turquoise and coral, pendants and bracelets of moldavite, tektite, and meteorite; an array of Baltic amber in all its hues: honey, lemon,

A traditional United States Aikido Federation affiliated dojo situated in the Byrdcliffe artist community in Woodstock, NY. We have the extreme privilege of training under Harvey Konigsberg, Shihan.

Musical Instruments Imperial Guitar & Soundworks 99 Route 17K, Newburgh, NY (845) 567-0111 www.imperialguitar.com

Networking Dutchess County Regional Chamber of Commerce www.dcrcoc.org

Organizations Country Wisdom News (845) 616-7834 www.countrywisdomnews.com Country Wisdom News —Subscribe to Country Wisdom News, Ulster County’s newest source for good news—age old and modern thoughts


on food, the land, and the home. An annual subscription is $35. Send checks to PO Box 444, Accord, NY, 12404.

Prostate Cancer 101 Hurley, NY (845) 338-9229 www.prostatecancer101.com

US Green Building Council, Hudson Valley Branch www.greenupstateny.org hvbranchcoordinator@gmail.com

Performing Arts Bardavon Opera House 35 Market Street, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 473-2072 www.bardavon.org

Renee Burgevin, owner and CPF, has over 20 years experience. Special services include shadow-box and oversize framing as well as fabric-wrapped and French matting. Also offering mirrors.

Printing Services Fast Signs 1830 South Rd, Ste 101, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-5600 www.fastsigns.com/455 455@fastsigns.com

Real Estate Freestyle Realty Woodstock, NY (845) 679-2929 Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-2929 www.freestylerealty.com

Eisenhower Hall Theatre — USMA

Kingston’s Opera House Office Bldg.

West Point, NY www.ikehall.com

275 Fair Street, Kingston, NY (845) 399-1212 Contact Bill Oderkirk (owner/manager) 3991212@gmail.com

Falcon Music & Art Productions 1348 Route 9W, Marlboro, NY (845) 236 7970 www.liveatthefalcon.com

Paramount Center for the Arts 100 Brown Street, Peekskill, NY (914) 739-2333 www.paramountcenter.org

Starling Productions The Rosendale Theater, Rosendale, NY (845) 658-8410 astarlingproduction@gmail.com

The Living Room

The Richard B. Fisher Center for the Performing Arts at Bard College

YMCA of Ulster Country (845) 338-3810 ext. 116 www.ymcaulster.org

Schools Bard College at Simon’s Rock (800) 235-7186 www.simons-rock.edu/admit admit@simons-rock.edu

Berkshire Country Day School P.O. Box 867, Lenox, MA (413) 637-0755 www.berkshirecountryday.org

Buxton School

Annandale-on-Hudson, NY (845) 758-7900 www.fischercenter.bard.edu

291 South Street, Williamstown, MA (413) 458-3919 www.buxtonschool.org admissions@buxtonschool.org

WAMC—The Linda

Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies

339 Central Ave, Albany, NY 518-465-5233 www.thelinda.org The Linda provides a rare opportunity to get up close and personnel with world-renowned artists, academy award winning directors, headliner comedians and local, regional, and national artists on the verge of national recognition. An intimate, affordable venue, serving beer and wine, The Linda is a night out you won’t forget.

Photography Corporate Image Studio 1 Jacobs Lane, New Paltz, NY (845)255-5255 www.mgphotoman.com mgphotoman@gmail.com

2801 Sharon Turnpike, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5343 www.caryinstitute.org

Center for the Digital Arts / Westchester Community College Peekskill, NY (914) 606-7300 www.sunywcc.edu/peekskill peekskill@sunywcc.edu

High Meadow School (845) 687-4855 www.highmeadowschool.org

Indian Mountain School 211 Indian Mountain Road, Lakeville, CT (860) 435-0871 www.indianmountain.org admissions@indianmountain.org

Fionn Reilly Photography

Millbrook School

Saugerties, NY (845) 802-6109 www.fionnreilly.com

131 Millbrook School Road, Millbrook, NY (845) 677-8261 www.millbrook.org

Photosensualis

Miss Hall’s School

15 Rock City Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-7995 www.photosensualis.com

492 Holmes Road, Pittsfield, MA (413) 499-1300 www.misshalls.org info@misshalls.org

Picture Framing Atelier Renee Fine Framing The Chocolate Factory, 54 Elizabeth Street, Suite 3, Red Hook, NY (845) 758-1004 www.atelierreneefineframing.com renee@atelierreneefineframing.com A visit to Red Hook must include stopping at this unique workshop! Combining a beautiful selection of moulding styles and mats with conservation quality materials, expert design advice and skilled workmanship,

Mizzentop Day School 64 East Main Street, Pawling, NY (845) 855-7338 www.mizzentop.org

Mountain Laurel Waldorf School 16 South Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0033 www.mountainlaurel.org

New York Military Academy 78 Academy Avenue, Cornwall-on-Hudson, NY (845) 534-3710

New York Military Academy is an important part of America’s independent school heritage. Today, we offer a rigorous global curriculum for students who actively seek to be set apart for excellence in a structured program that enables them to enter college inspired, engaged, and ready for the future.

BRAVE

Oakwood Friends School

10 Ann Kaley Lane, Marlboro, NY (845) 236-7620 www.stoutridge.com

22 Spackenkill Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 462-4200 www.OakwoodFriends.org SummerCamp@OakwoodFriends.org

Hudson Valley / New York City www.bravenyc.com

Vineyard Stoutridge Vineyard

Web Design

Poughkeepsie Day School

icuPublish

260 Boardman Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 462-7600 www.poughkeepsieday.org admissions@poughkeepsieday.org

PO Box 145, Glenham, NY (914) 213-2225 www.icupublish.com mtodd@icupublish.com

Randolph School

Weddings

Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 297-5600 www.randolphschool.org

HudsonValleyWeddings.com 120 Morey Hill Road, Kingston, NY (845) 336-4705 www.HudsonValleyWedding.com; www.HudsonValleyBaby.com; www.HudsonValleyBabies.com; www.HudsonValleyChildren.com; www.same-sexweddings.com, www.hudsonvalleysame-sexweddings.com judy@hudsonvalleyweddings.com

SUNY New Paltz School of Fine and Performing Arts New Paltz, NY (845) 257-3860 www.newpaltz.edu/artnews

Vassar College 124 Raymond Ave., Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 437-7000 www.vassar.edu

Wild Earth Wilderness School New Paltz / High Falls area, NY 845-256-9830 www.wildearthprograms.org info@wildearthprograms.org Wild Earth, a not-for-profit located in the Shawangunk Ridge region of the Hudson Valley, joins inspired leaders in offering multi -generational programs and events that strengthen connections with ourselves, others and the Earth while building ecological, social and cultural resilience. Our programs, which draw on a broad spectrum of teachings from indigenous cultures to modern natural sciences, offer adventure and fun, primitive skiils and crafts, awareness games, and story and song to boys and girls ages 4 to 104.

Specialty Food Shops 900 Ulster Avenue, Kingston, NY 10 IBM Road Plaza, Poughkeepsie, NY www.EdibleArrangements.com

10 Circular Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 471-3282 jodem54@aol.com

Wine & Liquor In Good Taste

Workshops Learn Photoshop— Stephen Blauweiss

Stained Glass DC Studios

Kingston, NY (845) 338-0331 www.ASKforArts.org

21 Winston Drive, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-3200 www.dcstudiosllc.com info@dcstudiosllc.com

R & F Handmade Paints 84 Ten Broeck Avenue, Kingston, NY (800) 206-8088 www.rfpaints.com info@rfpaints.com

Sunrooms Hudson Valley Sunrooms Route 9W, Beacon, NY (845) 838-1235 www.hvsk.fourseasonssunrooms.com

Tattoos Hudson River Tattoo 724 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (518) 828-5182 www.hudsonrivertattoo.com hudsonrivertattoo@gmail.com Custom tattoo parlor with friendly cozy environment. 18 years experience as professional tattoo artist with wide range of skill in any style. Preference towards American traditional clean bold TATTOOS! Phoenicia, NY (845) 688-3166 www.skinflower.org

Jode Millman

45 Main Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-0110 ingoodtaste@verizon.net

Edible Arrangements

SkinFlower Tattoo

The only resource you need to plan a Hudson Valley wedding. Offering a free, extensive, online Wedding Guide. Hundreds of weddingrelated professionals. Regional Bridal Show schedule, links, wed shop, vendor promotions, specials, and more. Call or e-mail for information about adding your wedding-related business.

R & F has been internationally recognized as the leader in manufacturing high quality Encaustic Paint and Pigment Sticks for over twenty-two years. R & F’s ongoing workshop, demonstration and exhibition programs have introduced thousands of artists to these exciting mediums. The Gallery at R & F continues to offer bi-monthly exhibits of wax and oil-based artworks from around the world. Stop in for a tour of the factory and visit the Gallery and the Factory Store. Workshops are offered year-round.

Writing Services Peter Aaron www.peteraaron.org info@peteraaron.org

10/11 ChronograM business directory 91

business directory

103 Main Street, Cold Spring, NY (845) 270-8210 www.coldspringlivingroom.com

Recreation

Video Production

www.nyma.org admissions@nyma.org


whole living guide

Ayurveda

The Art of Self-Care

India’s venerable medical system finds a home in the Hudson Valley by wendy kagan illustration by annie internicola

I

t’s not every day that you receive an Ayurvedic pulse diagnosis in a busy café at lunchtime. But that is exactly what I find myself doing on a recent Wednesday at Oriole 9 in Woodstock with Linda Lalita Winnick, a yoga studio owner and self-described “Ayurvedist.” I feel like I’m about to have my palm read by a fortune teller, and I think the dark-haired, doe-eyed Winnick would look perfectly natural in flowing clothes and a colorful headscarf. She puts her fingers on my wrist and visibly turns inward, listening deeply. Then she does what you don’t want any healthcare provider to do in your presence, especially with a hand on your pulse. She gasps. “Am I dead?” I ask. “No,” she says, smiling. “But your digestion is.” The daughter of three generations of Western physicians, I was raised on a steady diet of scientific empiricism. I’m drawn in by soulful alternative practices like Ayurveda—Sanskrit for “the science of life”—but there’s a skeptic living inside me with one eyebrow raised; he has my grandfather’s voice. Nevertheless, I have to admit that Winnick is barking up the right tree about my digestion, which, though far from dead, is often in disarray. She goes on to tell me that she believes my digestive fires (called agni in Sanskrit) are “displaced” and perhaps lower than my stomach, their proper home. I’m intrigued, and I have to admit to that inner skeptic (sorry, Grandpa)—she’s right.

(water and earth). The concept is similar to the somatotypes developed by William Herbert Sheldon in the 1940s, with slim ectomorphs resembling active vata types, muscular endomorphs reminiscent of fiery pitta, and softer mesomorphs corresponding with earthy kapha. Yet in Ayurveda, the typing is not so simplistic; the system recognizes that these qualities can blend into a constitution as one-of-a-kind as a snowflake. An individual will have one primary dosha, while another dosha will be secondary and the last, tertiary. An Ayurvedic doctor or practitioner can assess one’s dosha through diagnostic tools like Winnick’s insightful pulse reading, as well as tongue analysis, eye analysis, and discussion with the client. Ayurveda regards all disease and bodily disorder as the result of a doshic imbalance, and treatment involves restoring the delicate equilibrium of vital energies through various approaches ranging from herbal remedies, diet, and exercise to daily habits and lifestyle changes. A great gift of Ayurveda—and one that is sorely lacking from the Western medical approach—is its offering of a complete program of preventive self-care tailor-made for each person. “It’s a matter of educating people about how to take care of themselves really well,” says Winnick, who holds a master’s degree in the science, consults with clients, and threads Ayurveda’s teachings through her yoga classes.

Wisdom from the East Ayurveda is a complete medical system developed over 6,000 years ago in India. Its teachings are said to be passed down directly from the rishis, or realized beings, who established this method of caring for the body alongside interwoven concepts of philosophy and religion. In modern India, nearly 80 percent of Indians use it for health care, either exclusively or combined with conventional (Western) medicine. Here in America, Ayurveda is considered a complementary or alternative practice like traditional Chinese medicine. Though it has been slower to catch on than TCM, Ayurveda has gained recognition over the past decade—due in part to the work of Deepak Chopra, MD, the celebrity physician and New Age guru who unites the Indian practice with Western medicine. According to the National Ayurvedic Medical Association, the US is now home to more than 30 Ayurvedic training programs, many introduced in the past few years. And thanks to the widespread popularity of yoga—Ayurveda’s sister science and physical discipline—Ayurveda is poised to emerge from the realm of spas and health care “lite” to the larger mainstream world of holistic medicine. Rooted in the five elements, Ayurveda holds that all health depends on the balance of the doshas, or vital bodily energies. Each person presents a unique mix of the three doshas: vata (ether and air), pitta (fire and water), and kapha

A Path to Wellness When Kate Hagerman discovered Ayurveda eight years ago, she had just returned from a sailing trip around South America. The writer, photographer, and yoga teacher—now based in both New York and Woodstock—came back to the States filled with parasites, frightfully thin, and in a constant state of nerve-frayed exhaustion. She met with Ayurvedic practitioner Beth Biegler in the East Village, who told Hagerman that her vata dosha was so far out of balance that “she was going to put me in the ground and water me.” Hagerman was prescribed a pacifying diet of warm cooked foods, lots of ghee and oil, ginger tea, and dosha-balancing dishes like mung bean kitchari. She was told to steep herself in Epsom salt baths and to start a daily routine of abhyanga, or self-massage with warm oils and therapeutic herbs. Caffeine and other stimulants were banned—as was her vigorous, vinyasa-style yoga practice, which Hagerman replaced with a calmer Iyengar and restorative style including lots of meditation and gentle pranayama (breath work). “[Biegler] told me that I needed to lie on the floor for a year before I could do another sun salutation,” says Hagerman. “And I basically did.” Trusting the age-old system, Hagerman changed her lifestyle completely; gradually, the Ayurvedic program nursed her to back to wellness and restored her energy. It was sometime later that a Western doctor confirmed her parasite

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condition—prompting a trip to an Ayurvedic center on the West Coast for the intense detoxification program known as panchakarma. An immersive experience lasting about a week—and involving a mono diet, purgatives, and herbal bhasti (enemas), among other methods—the program is designed to purify every organ, from the intestines to the spleen. “It’s an ancient cleanse for your body, but it cleans your mind as well,” says Hagerman. “It makes you so clear.” Best of all, when the panchakarma was over, a lab test delivered good news: Her parasites were gone. Ultimately, says Hagerman, “Ayurveda brought me to effortlessness. Before I found it, I didn’t have a sense of peace from my aggravated states. We are our environment, our bodies are our environment, and what we put into them, even where we live, affects us.” Today, she views just about everything through the lens of Ayurveda and the quest for balance, even her physical surroundings. “There’s a reason why we’re drawn to Woodstock—it’s such a watershed. There’s water everywhere, there’s shade, which is kapha [earthiness]. We’re drawn to certain people for that too.” Colony of the (Healing) Arts Could the earthy, quirky Hudson Valley become a magnet for India’s science of life? Her hands wrapped around a mug of Oriole 9’s chai tea, Winnick tells me her grand plan: “I want to make this area a place to come for Ayurveda,” she says. And it just might happen: In spring 2012, Winnick’s own Shakti Yoga studio in Woodstock will become the East Coast satellite campus for the American University of Complementary Medicine’s certification program in Ayurvedic medicine. Tailored to distance learners as well as locals, classes will be led by a faculty that includes Winnick along with several Ayurvedic doctors trained in India. Some of these specialists—including Dr. Manjula Jishnu Paul, who trained in her native Indian state of Kerala, considered the home of Ayurveda—will be available to locals for consultations and treatments by appointment starting as early as November. Asked how Westerners can benefit from using Ayurveda as a complement to conventional healthcare, Dr. Paul explains that the Indian system offers a more individualized context. “Your body type, eating habits, behavior, and attitude are all integral to establishing who you are and how to treat you,” she says. “This is not always the way with Western health care, which gives you medicine based on your illness or symptoms.The goal of Ayurveda is to look deeper into the body and determine what caused those symptoms. Two people displaying similar symptoms may walk out of my clinic with two completely different regimens and suggested treatments. The Ayurvedic dietary modifications and herbal and physical remedies are all based on one person— specifically, you.”

Dr. Paul is encouraged by Westerners’ increasingly warm embrace of the ancient science, which she notes is particularly helpful for health issues such as diabetes, high blood pressure, migraines, psoriasis, and digestive disorders. She also points out a bonus: Ayurveda offers none of the horrendous side effects of conventional medicine. But she acknowledges that in order to receive Ayurveda’s full gifts, Westerners must make a certain mental shift. “People are beginning to see the futility of the old mindset that says the answer to an unhealthy lifestyle can be cured overnight with a single pill—a concept that never made sense to me,” she says. “Ayurveda demands active participation from the person seeking care. If the client isn’t ready or willing to engage on this level, then the Ayurvedic experience won’t be as fruitful for them. It’s about doing your part and being responsible for your own health—and I’m glad to see that Americans are coming around to this approach.” Feel-Good Secrets Clearly, there’s a lot to love about Ayurveda: the soul-warming foods, the individualized yoga practices, and the sensual, spa-adopted rituals like shirodhara— in which a stream of warm oil cascades over the forehead to quell anxiety and treat headaches and insomnia. But what can I say to satisfy those white-masked physicians, my inner skeptics? I go back to Winnick and ask how she would defend the venerable science from those who hold up Western medicine and its advances—life-saving antibiotics, gene therapy, and the like—as the gold standard of care. “Ayurveda is a complex, broad system of medicine with branches in everything from pediatrics and psychiatry to fertility,” she says. “People can sit there in their modern world of newness, with Western medicine like the ultimate Mac computer, but computers are in their infancy, too. Ayurveda has been around for thousands of years, and there’s some practical knowledge that goes with its longevity. But the beautiful thing about Ayurveda is that it can evolve. It doesn’t disregard modern surgery and say, ‘Sorry, we only have leeches.’ It’s a living science. Yet Ayurveda recognizes that most daily care has nothing to do with groundbreaking medical practices. It’s concerned with questions like, What do you eat? What time do you wake up in the morning and go to bed at night? These things are much more intimate and immediate to our relationship to feeling well day to day.” RESOURCES
 Linda Lalita Winnick www.shaktiyogawoodstock.com Dr. Manjula Jishnu Paul www.soundshoreayurveda.com American University of Complementary Medicine www.AUCM.org 10/11 ChronograM whole living 93


HILLARY HARVEY

Flowers Fall By Bethany Saltman

Yet, though it is like this, simply, flowers fall amid our longing, and weeds spring up amid our antipathy. — Dogen Zenji, Genjokoan

Letting Go

T

here is so much wrong in the world. And so maybe because of the sad and desperate flooding of our valley and its fragile towns, or maybe because one of my oldest, dearest friends (my age) was just diagnosed with ovarian cancer, or maybe because yesterday was the 10th anniversary of 9/11, maybe because a young girl I know is being taken off her ventilator to die...maybe because I have been bracing myself for the end of summer—the heat, late nights, sweaty kids, tomatoes. There are so many good reasons to have missed this. And yet today, the day I dropped A off for her first day of kindergarten, I noticed that fall is here, and it’s actually really beautiful.When did it happen? When did the curled-up leaves blow on to our deck? When did the light change from funky summer softness to this silver sun, brightening every edge? It’s been a long year. Last winter and its dumps of snow, freezing cold, and weekly preschool cancellations got me thinking about Florida way more than any self-respecting Northerner should. T and I pulled a bloated dead raccoon through a hole in our basement wall. My various crises of identity have loomed so large at times it’s been hard to even see, let alone appreciate, the bounty that is, today, so obvious. And when I’m not feeling the love, it’s awfully hard to feel any gratitude. So the whole thing can get pretty small, and a little dark. And familiar. When I was A’s age, being dropped off into my life, I felt like I was already in the middle of a freefall, so it wasn’t much of a transition, shall we say. And I remember feeling incredulous that anything would be asked of me. My mom, who demanded so little (for better or for worse), would occasionally enlist my help in emptying the dishwasher or setting the table. I balked, feeling—though definitely not saying out loud—that I never asked to be born, and how dare you (perpetrator of my aliveness) add one bit of misery to my burden. I swear, I had these thoughts, often. It is only recently, humbled as I have been by the love I feel for my daughter and the desire to do right by her, that I have sat with and uncovered some of these fundamental beliefs I hold about being a human being, and the ways in which I carry these ideas into my parenting. For instance, the sad, quiet truth of feeling like I have wronged A by bringing her into this world, and my scrambling to try to make it right. And then making a mess of that, getting impatient, the grip of my assumptions getting tighter and tighter. Though the Tibetan Buddhists say otherwise, let’s just assume it’s true: Be-

94 whole living ChronograM 10/11

ing born is not of our own volition. Does this mean that life, therefore, sucks because we didn’t choose it, and having to withstand anything unpleasant is adding insult to injury? I have a strong sense that there is another option. Like, maybe it’s a good thing we fell into this existence. Not just relatively, like, at least I was not born with X or Y affliction to contend with. But maybe we can feel lucky to be born at all, and as the Tibetans also say, in the insanely unlikely position of being a human being (a woman no less) who has the opportunity to practice the Dharma and even be able to invite a fellow traveler to do the same. The way A inspires me to practice, the way I take her to the monastery for lunch on Sundays. It’s not just that eating noodles in a Buddhafield is better than a potch in the tuchus, but it’s truly, in and of itself, wondrous. Or maybe we are lucky to be born because we get to smell fall. And go to kindergarten where we get to learn how to read. And then we get to read. And then we get to write. About everything, including how much it hurts, sometimes, to be alive, and for things to change. Even though I have been sitting at this desk, alone, in this house, for years now, as A grows up for hours at a time elsewhere, without me, there is something to this kindergarten thing. It’s not just that it’s more days away, or that she might take a bus. It’s more like I know that, in one sense, she is never coming back. And I long for her already. In these last five years we have gotten to know each other so deeply, and so privately, winding around each other in the house for hours and hours at a time. I know there is a whole huge thing ahead of us, believe me, but it was in this first part that I have received the unfathomable gift of really becoming a mother. And I will miss the one who taught me how to do that, playing with her legion of Barbies in the living room as I cook, scurry around, listen, make mistakes, and try to learn from them. Looking out the window into our backyard I see the bottom of still-green maple leaves scattered between brown limbs, the whole thing spreading across the sky. There are millions of ways to try to hang on to what I want: summer, the perfect life. But none of them work, and then I am stuck with a half-assed version of nothing much. Zen Master Dogen writes, “When you let go, the Dharma fills your hands.” Because I can let A—even for just a moment—walk, as she does, back straight, head bent, into the world alone, I can feel her here, soft curls, gentle hands, working it out, alongside me. Whether or not we should bring people into the world is a question worth asking. And letting yet another summer die completely is a life worth living.


whole living guide

New Paltz Community Acupuncture

Amy Benac, M.S., L.Ac. Active Release Techniques Dr. David Ness (845) 255-1200 www.performancesportsandwellness.com

Acupuncture

232 Broadway, Port Ewen, NY (845) 338-2964 Why suffer needlessly? Affordable treatments in a community acupuncture setting. Offering a sliding scale of $15-$35 per treatment. Acute and chronic conditions, smoking cessation, stress-related conditions, preventive medicine. 25 years’ experience using needle and nonneedle techniques.

SearchLight Medical 2345 Route 52, Suite 1F, Hopewell Junction, NY (845) 592-4310 www.searchlightmedical.com

Transpersonal Acupuncture (845) 340-8625 www.transpersonalacupuncture.com

Institute for Music and Health Rhinebeck & Millbrook, NY (845) 677-5871 www.judithmuir.com.com

Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 (845) 338-2965 joanapter@earthlink.net

10 years in Rosendale - new name and location! Specializing in the treatment of chronic and acute pain, fertility and gynecological issues, pregnancy support, digestive issues, and addictions and other emotional issues. Private treatment rooms. Sliding scale, nofault, many insurances.

Hoon J. Park, MD, PC 1772 South Road, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 298-6060

21 S. Chestnut Street, New Paltz TEL: 845-255-2145 www.newpaltzacu.com

INtEGRAtE youR LIFE I t ’ S

A

B A L A N C I N G

A C t

Hypnosis • Holistic nurse consultant• coacHing Manage Stress • Apprehensions • Pain • Improve Sleep Release Weight • Set Goals • Change Habits Pre/Post Surgery • Fertility • Hypno Birthing Immune System Enhancement • Nutritional Counseling Past Life Regression • Intuitive Counseling Motivational & Spiritual Guidance

Relax • Release • Let Go • Flow

H Y P N O c Oac H i N g

Kary Broffman, R.N., C.H. 845-876-6753 • karybroffman.com

Bette r Balance B etter Health

See also Massage Therapy.

Art Therapy Deep Clay Art and Therapy New Paltz/Gardiner and New York City, NY (845) 255-8039 deepclay@mac.com Michelle Rhodes LCSW ATR-BC, 20+ years leading individual and group psychotherapy and expressive arts healing sessions. Brief intensive counseling for teens and adults, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, child and family play therapy, parent counseling, and “Dreamfigures” a clay art therapy group for women.

Astrology

New Paltz Community Acupuncture Amy Benac, L Ac

Planet Waves

21 S. Chestnut Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-2145 www.newpaltzacu.com

Kingston, NY (845) 797-3458 www.planetwaves.net

$25-$40 sliding scale (you decide what you can afford). As a community-style practice, treatments occur in a semi-private, soothing space with several people receiving treatment at the same time. This allows for frequent, affordable sessions while providing high quality care. Pain management, relaxation, headaches, TMJ, smoking cessation, Gyn issues, anxiety, depression, trigger point release, insomnia, fatigue, recovery support, GI issues, arthritis, fertility, muscle tension, cancer support, immune support, asthma, allergies, menopausal symptoms, general wellness, and much more.

Please see Whole Living Directory listing for more info

Aromatherapy

44 West Street, Warwick, NY (845) 986-7860 www.bluestoneacupuncture.com

371A Main Street, Rosendale, NY (845) 546-5358 http://www.creeksideacupuncture.com

Effective, affordable acupuncture in a beautiful community setting

Alexander Technique

Bluestone Acupuncture, PLLC

Creekside Acupuncture and Natural Medicine, Stephanie Ellis, LAc

$25-$40 a session (You decide what you can afford)

Body & Skin Care Clairvoyant Beauty (888) 758-1270 www.clairvoyantbeauty.com

Made with Love (845) 674-3715 (845) 338-2967 Handcrafted skin care products using natural ingredients, pure essential oils and phthalatefree fragrance oils. No parabens, petroleum or carcinogenic chemicals are used.

Judith Muir M.M. M.AmSAT Alexander Technique Private Lessons

Judithmuir.com (845) 677-5871

from a founding member of AmSAT

Rhinebeck, Millbrook

Thyroid Nightmare?

Free info at www.thyroidfix.com

Free Thyroid SeminarS: ocT 11Th and 25Th

Ford F. Franklin, DC Neurology-Based Chiropractor

102 W. Market Street, Red Hook, NY 12571 845-758-3600

RedHookChiropractor.com

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whole living directory

Active Release Techniques (ART®) is a patented soft tissue treatment system that heals injured muscles, tendons, fascia (covers muscle), ligaments, and nerves. It is used to treat acute or chronic injuries, sports injuries, repetitive strain injuries and nerve entrapments like carpal tunnel syndrome, and sciatica. ART® is also used before and after surgery to reduce scar tissue formation and build up. ART® works to break up and remove scar tissue deep within and around injured muscles, tendons, ligaments, and nerves. The injured muscle, joint, ligament, and nerves are moved through a range of motion while a contact is held over the injured structure. This breaks up the scar tissue and heals the tissue faster than traditional treatments. ART® doctors are trained in over 500 hands-on protocols and must undergo rigorous written and practical examination to become certified. In order to maintain their certification in ART® doctors attend yearly continuing education and recertification by ART®.

Port Ewen Acupuncture Center. Beverly Halley, L Ac.


Sacred Traditions

Dr. Tammi Price ND, MSOM, LAc Naturopathic Physician

Acupuncture and Classical Chinese Medicine Qi Gong & Certified Yoga Instructor

Medical Aesthetics of the Hudson Valley 166 Albany Avenue, Kingston, NY (845) 339-LASER (5273) www.medicalaestheticshv.com

Body-Centered Therapy Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC — Body of Wisdom Counseling & Healing Services (845) 485-5933 By integrating traditional and alternative therapy/healing approaches, including BodyCentered Psychotherapy, IMAGO Couples’ Counseling, and Kabbalistic Healing, I offer tools for self healing, to assist individuals and couples to open blocks to their softer heart energy. Ten-session psycho-spiritual group for women.

Naturopathic & Chinese Private Consultations

whole living directory

“If you want to awaken all of humanity, then awaken all of yourself” – Lao Tsu

website: www.drtammi.com email: sacredtraditions@gmail.com telephone: 845.626.1414 Kerhonkson • Hudson • New Paltz

Chiropractic Dr. David Ness (845) 255-1200 www.performancesportsandwellness.com Dr. David Ness is a Certified Chiropractic Sports Practitioner, Certified Active Release Techniques (ART®) Provider, and Certified Kennedy Decompression Specialist. In addition to traditional chiropractic care, Dr. Ness utilizes ART® to remove scar tissue and adhesions from injured muscles, ligaments, tendons, and nerves. Dr. Ness also uses non surgical chiropractic traction to decompress disc herniations in the spine. If you have an injury that has not responded to treatment call Dr. Ness today.

Healthy Place Red Hook, NY (845) 758-3600

Constructive Living Barbara Sarah (845) 802-0970 Barbara@ThirdOpinion.net Barbara Sarah is the founder of the Oncology Support Program at Benedictine Hospital and the director of Third Opinion, a resource for cancer patients to explore treatment options, chart a course for survivorship, coordinate healthcare plans, and heal through living fully. Constructive Living therapies are the basis of her work.

Perri Ardman (845) 338-4496 perriblaze@yahoo.com

www.anandaashram.org Daily Hatha Yoga Classes & 200 hour Yoga Teacher Trainings

13 Sapphire Road, Monroe, NY 10950 ~ 845.782.5575

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Perri Ardman teaches strategies and skills for living well. Her work is based on Constructive Living. The Buddhist-inspired Japanese therapies Morita (action) and Naikan (reflection), include accepting your feelings, knowing your purpose, doing what needs to be done, and cultivating gratitude. She is an interfaith minister and spiritual counselor.

Counseling IONE ‚ Healing Psyche (845) 339-5776 www.ionedreams.us www.ministryofmaat.org IONE is a psycho-spiritual counselor, qi healer and minister. She is director of the Ministry of Maåt, Inc. Specializing in dream phenomena and women’s issues, she facilitates Creative Circles and Women’s Mysteries Retreats throughout the world. Kingston and NYC offices. For appointments contact Kellie at ioneappointments@gmail.com.

CranioSacral Therapy Michele Tomasicchio, Holistic Health Practitioner New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4832 essentialhealth12@gmail.com Headaches? TMJ? Insomnia? Pain? Brain trauma? Depression? CranioSacral is a gentle approach that can create dramatic improvements in your life. It releases tensions deep in the body to relieve pain and dysfunction and improve whole-body health and performance. If you need help feeling vibrant call or e-mail for a consultation.

Dentistry & Orthodontics Dr. Jane McElduff 616 Route 52, Beacon, NY (845) 831-5379 www.drjanemcelduff.com

Holistic Orthodontics ‚Dr. Rhoney Stanley, DDS, MPH, Cert. Acup, RD 107 Fish Creek Road, Saugerties, NY (845) 246-2729 and (212) 912-1212 www.holisticortho.com I believe in expansion and gentle forces. Too much pressure squeezes out essential blood supply and there is no support for tooth movement. I do not recommend extraction of permanent teeth. When teeth are extracted, the bone that holds the teeth is lost and the skin of the face sags. With aging, this is exaggerated. As a holistic practitioner, I consider the bones, teeth, and face, components of the whole. Dental treatment has an impact on whole health. The amount of plaque and calculus on the teeth is correlated with that in blood vessels. Movement in orthodontics affects the balance of the cranium, the head, and the neck. To support holistic treatment, I am certified in acupuncture and a registered dietician, trained in homeopathy and cranial osteopathy. At every visit, I do cranial treatments for balance. I offer functional appliances, fixed braces, invisible braces, and invisalign. I treat snoring and sleep apnea as well as joint and facial pain. We welcome children, teenagers, and adults. Insurance accepted. Payment plans available.

The Center For Advanced Dentistry‚ Bruce D. Kurek, DDS, FAGD 494 Route 299, Highland, NY (845) 691-5600 www.thecenterforadvanceddentistry.com

Fitness Trainers Mountainview Studio 20 Mountain View Avenue, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-0901 www.mtnviewstudio.com mtviewstudio@gmail.com

Herbal Medicine & Nutrition Empowered By Nature (845) 416-4598 www.EmpoweredByNature.webs.com lorrainehughes@optonline.net Lorraine Hughes—Herbal Wellness Guide, offers Wellness Consultations that therapeutically integrate Asian and Western Herbal Medicine and Nutrition with their holistic philosophies to health. This approach is grounded in Traditional Chinese Medicine with focus placed on an individual’s specific constitutional profile and imbalances. Please visit the website for more information and upcoming events.


Holistic Health John M. Carroll 715 Rte 28, Kingston, NY (845) 338-8420 www.johnmcarrollhealer.com John is a spiritual counselor, healer, and teacher. He uses guided imagery, morphology, and healing energy to help facilitate life changes. He has successfully helped his clients to heal themselves from a broad spectrum of conditions, spanning terminal cancer to depression. The Center also offers hypnosis, massage, and Raindrop Technique.

Kara Lukowski, CAS, PKS, E-RYT 243 Fair St, Kingston, NY 845-633-0278 www.karalukowski.com kara@karalukowski.com Kara Lukowski is a Clinical Ayurvedic Specialist who helps clients with disorders of digestion, weight, circulation, skin, reproduction, chronic fatigue, emotional instability and more. Offering one-on-one counseling with supportive guidance you will receive a personalized nutrition plan, lifestyle recommendations, custom organic herbal formulas, aromatherapy, yoga therapy and body therapies.

Kary Broffman, RN, CH (845) 876-6753 Karyb@mindspring.com

Nancy Plumer, Energy Healing and Spiritual Counseling Stone Ridge, NY (845) 687-2252 www.womenwithwisdom.com nplumer@hvi.net Nancy is an intuitive healer, spiritual counselor and long time yoga teacher. Would you like to relieve stress, anxiety, fear, pain and increase your vitality, joy, balance and connect to one’s True Self? Nancy guides one to release blocked or stuck energy that shows up as dis-ease/illness/anxiety/discomfort/ fear and supports one to open to greater selfacceptance, integration and wholeness.

Quantum Herbal Products (845) 246-1344 www.quanumherbalproducs.com

Sacred Traditions Dr. Tammi Price, ND, MSOM, Lac (845) 626-1414 www.drtammi.com sacredtraditions@gmail.com

Hospitals Kingston Hospital, Member of HealthAlliance of the Hudson Valley 396 Broadway, Kingston, NY (845) 331-3131 www.hahv.org info@hahv.org Kingston Hospital is a 150-bed acute care hospital with a commitment to continuous improvement. In addition to the new, state-ofthe-art Emergency Department, a full compliment of exceptional, patient-focused medical and surgical services are provided by staff with dedicated and experienced professionals.

Northern Dutchess Hospital

and breathe…

Rhinebeck, NY www.NDHKnowsBabies.com

Sharon Hospital 50 Hospital Hill Road, Sharon, CT (860) 364-4000 www.sharonhospital.com

Vassar Brothers Medical Center 45 Reade Place, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 454-8500 www.health-quest.org

Hypnosis Dr. Kristen Jemiolo Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-7168 mysite.verizon.net/resqf9p2

Sharon Slotnick, MS, CHT New Paltz and Kingston, NY (845) 389-2302 Increase self-esteem and motivation; break bad habits; manage stress, stress-related illness, and anger; alleviate pain (e.g. childbirth, headaches, chronic pain); overcome fears and despondency; relieve insomnia; improve learning, memory, public speaking, and sports performance; enhance creativity and address other issues. Change your outlook. Gain control. Make healthier choices. Certified Hypnotist, two years training; broad base in Psychology.

At Kripalu, we invite you to breathe—to intentionally pause the ongoing demands of life, bring your attention inward, and rediscover your authentic nature. Conscious engagement with the breath connects you with the intelligence and power of the life force within and around you. Whenever you are faced with a challenge—on the yoga mat, in a relationship, at work, or with your health—you can draw on a deep sense of ease, purpose, and mastery to create positive change. We call it the yoga of life.

read kripalu.org/onlinelibrary/whydopranayama join the conversation

Stockbridge, Massachusetts

800.741.7353 kripalu.org kripalu.org

Integrated Kabbalistic Healing Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC (845) 485-5933 Integrated Kabbalistic Healing sessions in person and by phone. Six-session introductory class on Integrated Kabbalistic Healing based on the work of Jason Shulman. See also Body-Centered Therapy Directory.

Massage Therapy Conscious Body Pilates & Massage Therapy 692 Old Post Road, Esopus, NY (347) 731-8404 www.consciousbodyonline.com ellen@consciousbodyonline.com Deep, sensitive and eclectic massage therapy with over 24 years of experience working with a wide variety of body types and physical/medical/emotional issues. Techniques include: deep tissue, Swedish, Craniosacral, energy balancing, and chi nei tsang (an ancient Chinese abdominal and organ chi massage).

Judy Swallow MA, LCAT, TEP

PSYCHOTHERAPIST • CONSULTANT

Rubenfeld Synergy® Psychodrama Training

~

25 Harrington St, New Paltz, NY 12561 (845) 255-5613

Erin Galucci, LMT 822 Route 82, Suite 2, Hopewell Junction, NY (845) 223-8511 or (845) 489-0887

Hands On Massage & Wellness, Inc.‚ Heather Kading, LMT, CIMI 258 Titusville Road, Poughkeepsie, NY (845) 485-6820 www.hands-on-massage.org handsonmassagewellness@yahoo.com Heather specializes in prenatal/postpartum massage. Recently having her first child, she understand what a woman experiences physically, mentally and emotionally when pregnant and/or caring for a newborn. Heather is a Certified Infant Massage Instructor, so

Imago Relationship Therapy julieezweig@gmail.com

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15 plus years of helping people find their balance. As a holistic nurse consultant, she weaves her own healing journey and education in psychology, nursing, hypnosis and integrative nutrition to help you take control of your life and to find True North. She also assists pregnant couples with hypnosis and birthing.

With the only accredited Chest Pain Center in the Hudson Valley, other specialized programs include: The Family Birth Place, Wound Healing Center, Hyperbaric Oxygen Center, Cardiology Services and Stroke Center.


Esthetician

Kathleen Osterhoudt DiamondTome crystal free microexfoliation, beyond microdermabrasion!

Featuring Rena

anti aging

Skin Care

Acid Peels (glycolic, lacticm salycilic)

23 Livingston St., Rhinebeck, NY 12572 • Kathyskincare@hotmail.com

Call for appointment (845) 464-0290

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PIANO AND VOICE LESSONS Classically trained, local musician Lessons in my home in Rosendale or yours Children and adults welcome!

Andrea Maddox 347-563-2126 maddoxandrea@yahoo.com

8/22/2011 JM: wants text only in her ad: see screenshot plitting p? of how she kind of wants layout SAMADHI MASSAGE THERAPY AND YOGA Make the eMpowered, reSponSible ChoiCe... Need Motivation!? middle bolder &larger : Yoga Nude in Albany left margin under heading: INTEGRATIVE THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE / SWEDISH / SHIATSU private session: 518 - 577 - 8172 THAI YOGA / HOT STONE / DEEP TISSUE / NEUROMUSCULARwww.YogaNudeinAlbany.com POSITIONAL THERAPY / MEDICAL / YOGA / PILATES Design Your Own Future Nurture Your Children Sarite Sanders LMT RYT MH Preserve Your Assets

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Mediation

(845) 679-5336 • skydancer@hvc.rr.com Relaxation / Injuries / Stress Relief

Bluestone Acupuncturepllc

IYENGAR YOGA IN RHINEBECK

Clinic and Herbal Dispensary

Wholistic Health & Wellness Fair

Need Motivation!?

Sunday OctOber 23rd 12-5pm

Elting Memorial Library Garden

Iyengar Yoga is perfect for beginners and all levels. A safe supportive exercise that builds, strength, flexibility and peace of mind. Call Today for a Free Consultation

845-986-7860

Free Admission!

Come, explore the rich wholistic health & wellness options our community has to offer! 12-5pm 3pm 4:15pm 5:00pm

www.bluestoneacupuncture.com 44 West St, Warwick, NY Open Tuesdays and Thursdays, Saturdays by appointment

Rodney Wells, CFP 845-534-7668 www.mediated-divorce.com

event schedule: Wholistic Health & Wellness Fair Qigong documentary & demonstration by Gary Mercurio, D.C. My Search for Health by Eugene Gauggel Raffle & Prizes

All proceeds benefiting elting memoriAl librAry! sponsored by:

clearyogarhinebeck.com

98 whole living directory ChronograM 10/11

elting memoriAl librAry, eArthgoods, pdQ printing &

Yoga Nude in Albany private session: 518-577-8172 www.YogaNudeinAlbany.com


The Natural Gourmet Cookery School healthy cooking. They come to the Chef’s Training Program to prepare for careers in the burgeoning Natural foods Industry.

For more than 20 years people around the world have turned to Natural Gourmet’s avocational public classes to learn the basics of

With the growing awareness of the effect that food has on health and well-being, there is a great demand for culinary professionals who can prepare food that is not only beautiful and delicious, but health-supportive as well. Our comprehensive Chef’s Training Program, the only one of its kind in the world, offers preparation for careers in health spas and restaurants, bakeries, private cooking, catering, teaching, consulting, food writing and a variety of entrepreneurial pursuits. Please browse our website to see how much we can offer you!

whole living directory

www.NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com TelePhoNe: 212-645-5170 FaX: 212-989-1493 48 weST 21ST STreeT, New York, NY 10010 emaIl:INFo@NaTuralGourmeTSChool.Com

The Mother-Daughter Connection a parenting support group

A support group for women raising teenage daughters

Saturday mornings and Wednesday evenings • New Paltz, NY Facilitator: Amy Frisch, LCSW (845) 706-0229 for more information www.itsagirlthinginfo.com

Integrated Health Care for Women Healing mind, body, and spirit combining traditional medical practice, clinical hypnotherapy, 12-step work, and Reiki energy healing.

stress-related illness

hypertension • asthma • headache • gastrointestinal disturbance • chronic fatigue • fibromyalgia & chronic lyme

anxiety/depression

panic • phobia • insomnia

eating disorder, weight loss, and smoking cessation Kristen Jemiolo, MD American Board of Family Medicine, Diplomate American Society of Clinical Hypnosis, Certification Poughkeepsie (845) 485-7168 For more information visit http://mysite.verizon.net/resqf9p2

• Integrating Talk & Body-Centered Therapy • IMAGO Couples Relationship Counseling • Blended Family Counseling • Integrated Kabbalistic Healing • Exceptional Marriage Mentoring (couple to couple)

Irene HumbacH, LcSW, Pc Office in Poughkeepsie (845) 485-5933 10/11 ChronograM whole living directory 99


she can teach you how to bond with your new bundle of joy. She also teaches women how to prepare for the marathon of labor and how to lose their mummy tummies. Heather and the other therapist also specialize in pain & stress management and sports massage. Ask about our monthly massage memberships.

Hudson Valley Therapeutic Massage Michele Tomasicchio, LMT, Vesa Byrnes, LMT 7 Prospect Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4832 hvtmassage@gmail.com Do you have chronic neck, back or shoulder problems? Headaches? Numbness or tingling? Or do you just need to relax? Utilizing a blend of soft tissue therapies, we can help you resume the activities you need to do and love to do with freedom from discomfort and pain.

Joan Apter (845) 679-0512 www.apteraromatherapy.com joanapter@earthlink.net Luxurious massage therapy with medicinal grade Essential Oils; Raindrop Technique, Emotional Release, Facials, Stones. Animal care, health consultations, spa consultant, classes and keynotes. Offering full line of Young Living Essential oils, nutritional supplements, personal care, pet care, children’s and non-toxic cleaning products.

whole living directory

Maternal Massage & Fitness— Heather Kading, LMT, CIMI (914) 456-9051 www.mamafithv.com maternalmassagefitness@gmail.com

ColleCtions by Eileen Fisher Flax James Perse CP Shades Lynn Ritchie Margaret O’Leary Durango Boot Aerosole

tone on tone hues of warm and cool grays mix with earth tones an nudes to create unexpected combinations

Heather specializes in pre-/postnatal massage and fitness. Being a mom herself, Heather understand what women experience as they go through their pregnancies and beyond. She can also develop a customized fitness plan to help you prepare for the marathon of labor and how to lose your mummy tummy after having the baby.

Mid-Hudson Rebirthing Center (845) 255-6482

Sarite Sanders, LMT, RYT, MH (845) 679-5336 skydancer@hvc.rr.com

Optometrists Rhinebeck Eye Care 454 Warren Street, Hudson, NY (845) 828-0215 6805 Route 9, Rhinebeck NY (845) 876-2222 www.drsmadiganandgibbons.com

Osteopathy

692 Old Post Road, Esopus, NY (347) 731-8404 www.consciousbodyonline.com ellen@consciousbodyonline.com Husband and Wife team Ellen and Tim Ronis McCallum are dedicated to helping you achieve and maintain a strong healthy body, a dynamic mind, and a vibrant spirit, whatever your age or level of fitness. Private and semiprivate apparatus sessions available.

Psychics Psychically Speaking (845) 626-4895 or (212) 714-8125 www.psychicallyspeaking.com gail@psychicallyspeaking.com

Psychologists Emily L. Fucheck, Psy D Poughkeepsie, NYC (845) 380-0023 Offering therapy for individuals and couples, adults and adolescents. Insight-oriented approach with focus on understanding patterns of thought and behavior that interfere with life satisfaction and growth. Licensed psychologist with doctorate in clinical psychology and five years of post-doctoral training and certification in psychoanalytic work with adults, young adults, and adolescents. Located across the street from Vassar College in Poughkeepsie.

Psychotherapy Amy R. Frisch, LCSW New Paltz, NY (845) 706-0229

Debra Budnik, CSW-R , New Paltz, NY (845) 255-4218 Traditional insight-oriented psychotherapy for long- or short-term work. Aimed at identifying and changing self-defeating attitudes and behaviors, underlying anxiety, depression, and relationship problems. Sliding scale, most insurances accepted including Medicare/Medicaid. NYS-licensed. Experience working with trauma victims, including physical and sexual abuse. Educator on mental health topics. Located in New Paltz, one mile from SUNY.

Irene Humbach, LCSW, PC (845) 485-5933 Body of Wisdom Counseling and Healing Services. See also Body-Centered Therapy directory.

Janne Dooley, LCSW, Brigid’s Well

Joseph Tieri, DO, & Ari Rosen, DO 3457 Main Street, Stone Ridge, NY 138 East Market Street, Rhinebeck, NY (845) 687-7589 www.stoneridgehealingarts.com

New Paltz, NY (347) 834-5081 www.Brigidswell.com Janne@BrigidsWell.com

Physicians Barbara R White, DO

100 whole living directory ChronograM 10/11

Conscious Body Pilates

Stone Ridge Healing Arts

Drs. Tieri and Rosen are NY State Licensed Osteopathic Physicians specializing in Osteopathic Manipulation and Cranial Osteopathy. Please visit our website for articles, links, books, and much more information. Treatment of newborns, children, and adults. By appointment.

Open 7 days from 10AM, until 6PM Sun-Thurs, until 7:30PM Fri & Sat

Pilates

129 Clove Branch Rd., Hopewell Junction, NY (845) 592-4036

Brigid’s Well is a psychotherapy and coaching practice. Janne specializes in childhood trauma, addictions, codependency, relationship issues, inner child work, EMDR and Brainspotting. Janne’s work is also informed by Emotional Intelligence and Interpersonal Neurobiology. Coaching for all life transitions as well as Mindful Parenting, Mindful Eating and Spirited Midlife Women. Call for information or free 1/2 hour consultation. Newsletter sign up on website. FB page: www.Brigidswell. com/facebook.


Judy Swallow, MA, LCAT, TEP 25 Harrington Street, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-5613

Julie Zweig, MA, Certified Rosen Method Bodywork Practitioner, Imago Relationship Therapist and NYS Licensed Mental Health Counselor 66 Mountain Rest Rd, New Paltz, NY (845) 255-3566 www.zweigtherapy.com julieezweig@gmail.com 20+ years of experience successfully treating adults, couples, families, children and adolescents through verbal body-centered psychotherapy, Rosen Method Bodywork, Play Therapy and Imago Relationship Therapy. I can guide you from feeling stuck, and experiencing painful symptoms, to blossoming into your genuine self...a place of ease.

Meg F. Schneider, MA, LCSW Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-8808 www.megfschneiderlcsw.com I work with adolescents and adults struggling with depression, anxiety, anger, eating disordered behaviors, loneliness and life transitions. I’ve helped teens and adults with substance abuse and trauma connected to physical, emotional and sexual abuse. My approach is psychodynamic, linking the painful past with current and cognitive problems which reframes negative beliefs allowing for positive outcomes. I also practice EMDR, a technique for relieving distress by exploring critical memories.

New Paltz/Gardiner and New York City, NY (845) 255-8039 www.deepclay.com deepclay@mac.com 25 years experience providing individual and group psychotherapy and inter-modal expressive arts therapy. Brief intensive counseling for teens and adults, psychoanalytic psychotherapy, child and family play therapy, parent counseling, and “Dreamfigures” a clay art therapy group for women.

Residential Care Always There Home Care (845) 339-6683 www.alwaystherehomecare.org

Resorts & Spas Aspects Gallery Inn Woodstock, NY (917) 412-5646 www.aspectsgallery.com liomag@gmail.com

Buttermilk Falls Inn & Spa 220 North Road, Milton, NY (877) 7-INN-SPA (845) 795-1310 www.buttermilkfallsinn.com

Giannetta Salon and Spa 1158 North Avenue, Beacon, NY (845) 831-2421 www.gianettasalonandspa.com

Jal Day Spa and Salon 1285 Route 9, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 231-4041 www.jalspa.com

Retreat Centers Garrison Institute Rt. 9D, Garrison, NY (845) 424-4800 www.garrisoninstitute.org garrison@garrisoninstitute.org

Spiritual Flowing Spirit Healing 33 Mill Hill Road, Woodstock, NY (845) 679-8989 www.flowingspirit.com Jwalzer@flowingspirit.com

Manufacturers of Extraordinary Herbal Tinctures

Tarot Tarot-on-the-Hudson‚ Rachel Pollack Rhinebeck, NY (845) 876-5797 www.rachelpollack.com rachel@rachelpollack.com

Yoga Clear Yoga www.claryogarhinebeck.com

Jai Ma Yoga Center 69 Main Street, Suite 20, New Paltz, NY (845) 256-0465 www.jmyoga.com Established in 1999, Jai Ma Yoga Center offers a wide array of Yoga classes, seven days a week. Classes are in the lineages of Anusara, Iyengar, and Sivananda, with certified and experienced instructors. Private consultations and Therapeutics available. Owners Gina Bassinette and Ami Hirschstein have been teaching locally since 1995.

whole living directory

Michelle Rhodes, LCSW ATR-BC

Retreats supporting positive personal and social change in a monastery overlooking the Hudson River. Featuring Advancing the Science and Practice of Contemplative Teaching and Learning, November 4-6: educators will gather to examine mindfulness practices in the classroom, with the goal of improving the lives of children, teachers and families.

Kripalu Center for Yoga and Health Stockbridge, MA (800) 741-7353 www.kripalu.org

Yoga Nude in Albany Albany County, NY (518) 577-8172 www.yoganudeinalbany.com yoganudeinalbany@yahoo.como Transcend body & mind. Transcend societal & religious negativity around the body. Experience your sensual self with naked bodies flowing in movement ignited by their ujjaji breathes. Private sessions for couples or individuals.

Yoga Society of New York — Ananda Ashram 13 Sapphire Road, Monroe, NY (845) 782-5575

The Yoga Way 985 Route 376 at Brookmeade Plaza, Wappingers Falls, NY (845) 227-3223 yogaway@earthlink.net www.yogaway.info Yoga Way is celebrating our 10th year of Service! Come visit us in October at our new yoga home! Classical yoga—taught in a way that is both practical and accessible for every stage of life. Ongoing classes for adults and special short-series programs offered for meditation, prenatal, babies, toddlers and kids. Introductory workshops will be offered on Saturday October 1 st and again on Saturday the 15th . Call to reserve your space! Affiliate of Lakulish Yoga LLC. Jahnvi Formisano, Director.

Natural Healing & Herbal Medicines as Alternatives to Pharmaceutical Drugs Organic, Aged, and Handmade Full-Spectrum Extracts Made from Whole Plants, Just as they occur in nature Local Whenever Available

Phone: 845.246.1344 Fax 800.305.3238 QUANTUMHERBALPRODUCTS.COM

10/11 ChronograM whole living directory 101


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Anthony Robinson will read from his newest novel in an intimate setting at The Greens restaurant overlooking the golf course at Copake Country Club. Please join us, Sunday, October 9th, at 2pm. For more information email mary@copakecountryclub.com

Proudly sponsored by, and our thanks to

Put New Paltz on your Calendar www.newpaltz.edu/fpa 845.257.3860

THEATRE

Season ticket subscriptions www.newpaltz.edu/theatre

MUSIC AT THE DORSKY MUSEUM 6:30 p.m., Free

THREE SISTERS by Anton Chekhov

Bella Winds

October 13 - 23

Electro-Acoustic Concert

October 4

NEW-PLAY READING SERIES November 4 - 6

October 18

Choral & Jazz Vocal Fest October 25

FAT RAM, An adaptation of The Second Shepherds Play November 30 - December 4

ART LECTURE SERIES

Lecture Center 102, 7:00 p.m. Free

Alex Kanevsky October 12

Coco Fusco October 14 Bella Winds S TAT E U N I V E R S I T Y O F N E W Y O R K

102 forecast ChronograM 10/11

44 Golf Course Rd. | Copake Lake, NY Open for Lunch & Dinner Daily; Sunday Brunch www.copakecountryclub.com | (518) 325.0019


the forecast

event listings for october 2011

image provided Jeff Koons,

That Was Then, And So Is Now

Two Ball 50/50 Tank

“It was a time in the art world when the East Village was booming, and people were driving up to these crummy buildings in their stretch limos and fur coats—they were all trying to find what the new art was,” recalls Livia Straus, director of the Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art in Peekskill. “Circa 1986,” a survey of art from the 1980s, mostly from New York City, will run at the center until July, 2012. The show consists of 65 artworks created between 1981 and 1991. The `80s in downtown New York was a delirious decade, and the art itself feels like a party. Even Jeff Koons’ Two Ball 50/50 Tank may be seen as the aftermath of a wild spree. Paintings and sculptures were created to fit in small, artist-run galleries. The art is social, conversational. “Low” art—especially cartoons and comic books—influenced painters. The audience was friends, scenesters, people outside the “art world”—which, come to think of it, included me. Living in the East Village in 1988, I visited galleries, and found art I could believe in. This period of experimentation unleashed superstars of contemporary art: Damien Hirst, Robert Gober, Julian Schnabel, Richard Prince (all of whom appear in “Circa 1986”). In the world before personal computers and cellphones, an artwork was still essentially a physical object. “Circa 1986” has a tactile feeling, as if the artists were smearing paint with their hands. Walter Dahn’s Trying to Look like a Flower shows a naked man—maybe a caveman?—bowing against a wall. We see the man’s motion, and also the impulses of Dahn’s brush. People use the word “expressionistic,” but a better word would be “grappling.” One feels the art being grappled with by the artists. Painters learned from punk that art could be profound without being serious. The Ramones were great because they rejected the “skill” of rock. Hip-hop, similarly, evaded the solemnity of jazz. The word

Glass and steel tank with 2 basketballs in distilled water, 1985,. 62.75" x 36.75" x 13.25"

“transgressive” was often used to describe art of the 1980s. It referred to work that was radical, indelicate, shocking. This type of art could also be extremely funny. Rona Pondick’s Little Bathers is an installation of numerous flesh-colored balls, each equipped with a set of teeth. Eventually, this movement erupted in political struggle, when the Corcoran Gallery of Art refused Robert Mapplethorpe’s exhibit in 1989.

Mapplethorpe is represented in “Circa 1986” by a self-portrait from 1988 of the photographer already emaciated from AIDS, clutching a cane with a skull handle. Another theme was “appropriation”: taking an image from another source. Richard Prince cut out a picture from a Marlboro ad, entitled it Untitled (Cowboy) and deemed it a work of art. Sherrie Levine’s Untitled (After Walker Evans Negative #9) is a photograph of a Walker Evans picture from a catalog. This movement is now called the Pictures Generation. A number of the artists in the show, who were living in New York City in the `80s, have since moved to the Hudson Valley: Rick Prol to Beacon, Richard Artschwager to Hudson, Nancy Dwyer to New Paltz, Jenny Holzer to Hoosick Falls. Welcome to the East Village diaspora! “Circa 1986” will appear at the Hudson Valley Center for Contemporary Art in Peekskill until July, 2012. (914) 788-0100; www.hvcca.org. —Sparrow 10/11 ChronograM forecast 103


SATURDAY 1 Art 11th Annual Tivoli Street Painting Festival 9am-5pm. A day-long paint-in by artists of all ages. Broadway, Tivoli. www.tivoliny.org. Byrdcliffe Shop: Fall Artist Showcases 12pm-6pm. Featuring Miriam Bisceglia and Kristine Baker, textile designers. Byrdcliffe Shop, Woodstock. www.byrdcliffe.org. Cold Spring Arts First Annual Open Studios 12pm-6pm. Representing a diverse range of styles and media, 33 artists will participate in the self-guided tour covering the Cold Spring/Garrison area. www.ColdSpringArts.com. Landscapes and Still Life by Howard Miller 1pm-2pm. Suruchi Indian Restaurant, New Paltz. 255-2772. Summers Past 1pm-5pm. Works by Lisa Steffens. Flat Iron Gallery, Peekskill. (914) 734-1894. The Farm Project 2011 Mid-Run Reception 1pm-6pm. Collaborative Concepts. Saunders Farm, Garrison. 528-1797. As Is: Recent Works by Ken Gray 5pm-7pm. Kingston Museum of Contemporary Art, Kingston. www.kmoca.org

Body / Mind / Spirit Vividly Women: Circles to Spirals Workshop Call for times. Reconnect with your feminine power through dance, ritual and creativity. The Abode of the Message, New Lebanon. (518) 794-8095. Qi Gong 9am-10am. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Reflexology Sessions 9am-9:45am. $10. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Clinic Day 10am-4:30pm. Wellness consultations using traditional Chinese medicine as method of assessment . $60. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Introductory Orientation Workshops 11:30am-1:30pm. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. EFT and Power of Attraction Healing Circle 2pm-4pm. $5. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Finding Your Sacred Voice 6:30pm-9pm. Singing from your heart center; with special guest Naaz Hosseini. $30. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Maintinaing a Healthy Hive: Fall/Winter Prep 12pm-4pm. $50. HoneybeeLives, New Paltz. 255-6113. Ballet Master Teacher David Howard 1pm. Youth ages 12+ with previous training. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Ballet Master Teacher David Howard 4pm. Adults ages 18+ with previous training. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Events New York Zen Center for Contemplative Care Call for times. Compassion and ethics. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800. Meet the Animals Tour Call for times. 90-minute tour and talk. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. Pakatakan Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Woodstock British Car Show 9am-4pm. Over 100 classic British cars. Woodstock Playhouse, Woodstock. 679-4101. Kingston Farmers' Marjet 9am-2pm. Featuring Crafts on John Street. Kingston Farmers' Market, Uptown Kingston. 853-8512. Old Chatham Quaker Meeting Book and Art Sale 9am-4pm. Old Chatham Quaker M, Old Chatham. 77th annual Berkshire Botanical Garden Harvest Festival 10am-5pm. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, Massachusetts. (413) 298-3926. Pine Island Black Dirt Farmers' Market 10am-2pm. Pine Island Town Park, Pine Island. www.pineislandny.com. 22nd Annual Huguenot Street Apple Festival 10am-4pm. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. www.newpaltzrefomedchurch.org. Saugerties Farmers Market 10am-2pm. Featuring Men's Cook-Off. Saugerties. 246-9371. 77th Annual Harvest Festival 10am-5pm. Autumn activities, farmer's market, vaulting demonstrations (gymnastics on horseback), vendors, artisans and crafters. $10. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, Massachusetts. (413) 298-3926. Finale Celebration of Bi-Centennial Year 10am-5pm. History presentation, artists' tug boats, Taste of Esopus, farmers' market, demos and more. Esopus Town Hall, Port Ewen. 331-5776. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955.

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Ghent Community Day 11am-3pm. Mud Creek ELC will have games, crafts, and other activities. Ghent Town Garage and Grounds, Ghent. www.townofghent.org. Historic Hudson's 6th Annual Old House Tour 11am-5pm. Featuring 6 historic houses. Reception to follow from 5pm-7pm. $45 tour/$75 reception/$100 both events. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. The New England Wild Flower Society Visit 1pm-4pm. Brine Garden, Pawling. duncan@gardenlarge.com. Ione Dream Festival Gala 3pm-9pm. Opening with Marathon of Dreamers, opening reception for La Leona Arts' 100 Artists/100 Dreams, film premiere. $10/$8. Stella May Gallery Theater, Kingston. 331-7955. Another Dip Dinner! 5pm. An amazing array of home cooked food made by members and friends of the Shawangunk Church. Reformed Church of Shawangunk, Wallkill. 895-2952. Cornutopia 2011 7pm. A celebration benefit for the Woodstock Byrdcliffe Guild. $50/$40. Byrdcliffe Barn, Woodstock . 679-2079.

Film Manhattan Short Film Festival 5pm. Screenings of 10 internationally acclaimed short films. Downing Film Center, Newburgh.

Blues Guitarist-Singer Debbie Davies 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Guy Davis 9pm. Blues. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Hart Attack 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Charlie Sabin 9:30pm. Acoustic. Max's on Main, Beacon. 838-6297. Daphne Willis 9:30pm. Featuring guests JP Patrick and Dave McDowell. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

The Outdoors Farm & Forest Trail and South Family Hike 3pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

Spoken Word China and I 1pm. A presentation about Chinese history, geography, other facts, and the tribal culture of the Bai people. Stanmeyer Gallery, West Otis, Massachusetts. (413) 854-3799. Green Stories to the Rescue 3pm-6pm. Learn about and support environmental activities through personal stories. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 338-0071.

SUNDAY 2 Art Cold Spring Arts First Annual Open Studios 12pm-6pm. Representing a diverse range of styles and media, 33 artists will participate in the self-guided tour covering the Cold Spring/Garrison area. www.ColdSpringArts.com. Special Tour: Looking at Art 3pm-4pm. Photographer and author Jerry L. Thompson illustrates his talk with pictures. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org. Chronogram Covers 4pm-6pm. Photographs of past Chronogram magazine covers. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Body / Mind / Spirit Traditional Huichol Shamanic Healing Camp Call for times. Blue Deer Center, Margaretville. 586-3225. The Metaphysical Center Interfaith Worship Service 11:30am. Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-4993. Healing Circle and Blessing of the Animals 12pm. Akasha's Journey, Wassaic. 729-8999.

Classes Ballet Master Teacher David Howard 10:30am. Teacher seminar. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Events

Sonic New York How many bands have someone who beatboxes over a celtic fiddle? Meet Sonic New York. Vocalist and fiddler Rhiannon Gidden (whose other band, Carolina Chocolate Drops, won the 2011 Traditional Folk Album of the Year Grammy) leads the quartet. But folk is a bashful abstraction of a genre for Sonic New York. Giddens, Adam Matta, Sxip Shirey, and Joseph “joebass” Dejarnette sharpen the funk of Stevie Wonder with the violin cries of an Irish reel. The band also draws on the experimental percussive accents of Radiohead and the Roots, the vocal sultriness of Ella Fitzgerald, and a touch of the tango tones of Astor Piazzolla. Saturday, October 15, 8pm at St. Paul’s Parish Hall in Red Hook. (845) 758-0151; www.studioredhook.com. Kids Kids Expo 2011 10am-4pm. Two-day event that provides hands-on fun and educational activities for children and their families. $8. Poughkeepsie. www.kids-expo.org. Saturday Children's Art Workshops 11am-1pm. Ages 5-12. $12. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. The Magic of Derrin Berger 11am. $9/$7 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Music Phowa 10:30am-5pm. Transference of consciousness workshop with Chagdud Khadro. $150. Evam Institute, Chatham. (518) 392-6900. The Virginia Wolves 3pm. Acoustic. Widow Jane Mine, Rosendale. Spottiswoode & His Enemies 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. John Abercrombie 7:30pm. Jazz. $10. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Joint Chiefs 7:30pm. Acoustic. $5. Northeast-Millerton Library, Millerton. (518) 789-3340. Ablaye Cissoko and Volker Goetze 8pm. Afro/jazz fusion. $21/$16 members. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Alex Meixner 8pm. Folk. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (800) 486-8376. Bluestone Unplugged 8pm. Acoustic. Babycakes Café, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. The People's Open Mike 8pm. Peint o Gwrw Tavern, Chatham. (518) 392-2943. Keb' Mo' 8pm. Somewhere between the soul of Delta blues and the melodic feel of contemporary folk. $29.50-$44.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Pyeng Threadgill 8pm. Jazz. $20/$18 members. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Japanese Gum + Avondale Airforce 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006.

We Are What We Remember: Memory and the Biological Basis of Individuality 3:45pm. Columbia University neuropsychiatrist and Nobel prize winner Eric R. Kandel. Villard Room, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Poetry on the Loose 4pm. Featuring Ann Ratcliffe, followed by open mike. College of Poetry, Warwick. 294-8085. A Surprising History of High Art on the Popular Stage 4pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Poetry Reading and Book Signing 5pm-7pm. Poet Jan Conn with paintings by Julie Hedrick. Arte Artigianato Restauro, Kingston. 338-1688. Chronogram Open Word 7pm. Featuring Cheryl Rice and Samuel Claiborne. Beahive Kingston, Kingston.

Theater Auditions for 3rd Annual RitzKidz "Newburgh's Got Talent!" Talent Show 10am-4pm. Ritz Theater, Newburgh. 562-6940 ext. 107. Cooking with The Calamari Sisters, Mangia Italiano! 6:30pm. Dinner-theater live “broadcast” of a small public access cooking show hosted by two larger-thanlife Italian sisters. $50/$35 show only. Lycian Center, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. Dutchman 7:30pm. Obie Award-winning play. $12. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-7955. Medal of Honor Rag 8pm. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Glass Menagerie 8pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops The Natural Kitchen Call for times. Join a peaceful food revolution. $125. Omega Institute, Rhinebeck. (800) 944-1001. Autumn on the Catskills Escarpment 10am-3pm. Also Oct. 2, 8 and 9. With Richard Kathmann. $300/$250 for WKC Members. Platte Clove Nature Preserve, East Merideth. www.westkc.org. Psychedelic Zombie BBQ II 10:30pm-12am. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Columbia County Bike Tour 9am. $25. Germantown Central School, Germantown. (518) 392-5252 ext. 214. Woodstock Riding Club's October Classic Show 9am. Full range of classes and shows including Western , Driving, English, Hunter and trail events. Woodstock Riding Club, Woodstock. 657-8005. 77th annual Berkshire Botanical Garden Harvest Festival 10am-5pm. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, Massachusetts. (413) 298-3926. Ellenville Farmers' Market 10am-2pm. Locally grown produce, grass fed meats, specialty foods, cooking classes, live music weekly, monthly visits from master gardeners. Market and Center Street, Ellenville. ewcoc.com/ewcocmarkets12428.aspx. 77th Annual Harvest Festival 10am-5pm. Autumn activities, farmer's market, vaulting demonstrations (gymnastics on horseback), vendors, artisans and crafters. $10. Berkshire Botanical Garden, Stockbridge, Massachusetts. (413) 298-3926. Kingston Sailing Club Fall Racing Series 10am. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 331-1264. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. The Harvest Festival 11am-4pm. Traditional farmers' market with a diverse craft village, offering music and educational programming. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Legacy Farm CoHousing Open Meeting 11:30am-2pm. Come and see how we are planning a safe, sustainable, old fashioned community where neighbors know and care for neighbors and the environment. Rosendale Recreation Center, Rosendale. www.legacyfarmcohousing.com. Oktoberfest 12pm-8pm. Bull and Buddha, Poughkeepsie. 337-4848. 2011 Annual Kingston Historic Bluestone Festival 12pm-6pm. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 338-0071. The 4th Annual Taste of Italy 1pm-9pm. Music, kid's activities, wine tasting, food. TR Gallo Park, Kingston. Attic Access Tour 2pm. From basements to attics, the All Access Tour offers the chance peek into the rarely seen areas of the Village. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. The Woodstock Chess Club 2pm-4pm. Woodstock Golf Course Pub & Restaurant, Woodstock. 679-2914. Community Foundations of the Hudson Valley 2011 Garden Party 3pm-6pm. Catered affair publicly recognize the community service and contributions of citizens in Dutchess, Ulster and Putnam Counties. $140. 29 Rombout Road, Poughkeepsie. 452-3077 ext. 15. 1st Annual Roasted Pig Dinner 4pm-7pm. Locally-raised pork, meet the farmers and music. $35/$10 children over 10/under 10 free. Theater @ University Settlement Camp, Beacon. 231-4424. One Book, One New Paltz Kick-Off Event 4pm. Readings from War Dances by Mohonk Mountain Stage Company, followed by discussion. SUNY New Paltz Atrium, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org.

Kids Kids Expo 2011 10am-4pm. Two-day event that provides hands-on fun and educational activities for children and their families. $8. Poughkeepsie. www.kids-expo.org.

Music Open Mike to Bob Dylan Tunes 10am-2pm. Live@The Falcon, Marlboro.


COTA

CelebrationoftheArts.net 11:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. on Historic Huguenot street saturday, october 8, 2011 over 100 artists Live music, dancers and performers tHrougHout tHe day Large scaLe instaLLations

produced by

Kids activities autHor and poetry readings at tHe frencH cHurcH sampLe dance cLasses at tHe reformed cHurcH of new paLtz free to tHe pubLic

www.CelebrationoftheArts.net THAT BACK ISBY POPULAR DEMAND! MY MAIL?

the covers Show

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information IT’S MY STORY FOR T.M.I.dol!

12 WOMEN. 12 UNFORGETTABLE STORIES. DIRECTED BY EVA TENUTO

select covers from

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Topic:

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october 2-30

Opening ReceptiOn Sunday, October 2 4pm-6pm

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true stories from the page to the stage

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true stories from FOR theWOMEN page to the stage TMI WRITING WORKSHOP STARTING OCT. 9 TMI CO-ED WRITING WORKSHOP STARTING OCT. 12 FRIDAY & SATURDAY, SEPT. 9&10 WOMEN’S8PM WEEKEND FEBRUARY AT THERETREAT: ROSENDALE THEATRE,25-27, 2012 FOR MORE INFORMATION, CHECK OUT TMIPROJECT.ORG MAIN STREET, ROSENDALE, NY

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10/11 ChronograM forecast 105


Phowa 10:30am-5pm. Transference of consciousness workshop with Chagdud Khadro. $150. Evam Institute, Chatham. (518) 392-6900. Brunch with El Rancho Deluzo's Cuban Blues 11am-2pm. Mezzaluna Café, Saugerties. 246-5306. Bernstein Bard Trio 11:30am-2:30pm. Jazz. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Pawn Shop Saints 1pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. U.S. Air Force Band of Liberty' Jazz Band 2pm. Lycian Centre, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. Bearfoot 2pm. Roots, Americana, folk, bluegrass. $20. West Kortright Centre, East Merideth. Concert for Mr. Piliouras 3pm. Concert and reception to say thanks to Mr. P from so many of us who remember the music program. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Susan Schoeppe 4pm. Featuring the Boccherini Quintet for Guitar and Strings. Presented by the Rhinebeck Chamber Music Society. $25/$5 students/children free. Church of Messiah Parish, Rhinebeck. 876-3533. Lac La Belle 6pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. WeMustBe 6:15pm. Acoustic. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Madeleine Peyroux and Nellie McKay 7pm. Jazz, blues, folk. $34.50/$29.50/$24.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. The B52s 7pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. An Evening of Jazz and Blues Piano with Jessica Roemischer 7:30pm. $16. Chocolate Springs Café, Lenox, Massachusetts. jessica@pianobeautiful.com. Alex Meixner 8pm. Folk. Hunter Mountain Resort, Hunter. (800) 486-8376. Holly Near 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Music at the Movies 8:30pm. Mikhail Horowitz and Gilles Malkine. $15/$12 members. Upstate Films, Woodstock. 679-6608. Keith Pray's Big Soul Ensemble 9pm. Tess' Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

Theater Cooking with The Calamari Sisters, Mangia Italiano! 12:30pm. Dinner-theater live “broadcast” of a small public access cooking show hosted by two larger-thanlife Italian sisters. $50/$35 show only. Lycian Center, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. Medal of Honor Rag 2pm. Shadowland Theater, Ellenville. 647-5511. The Glass Menagerie 3pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Dutchman 3pm. Obie Award-winning play. $12. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-7955.

Workshops Plein Air Painting with Andrew Lattimore 9am-3pm. $110/$90. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Invasive Species Removal and Monitoring Training 10am-1pm. Invasive Species Removal and Training. Scenic Hudson's River Center, Beacon. 473-4440 Ext. 273. Backyard Fruit Tasting and Workshop 2pm-5pm. Learn what fruits are best and easiest to grow organically, see the fruit plants, and learn how to grow them with Lee Reich. $40. Call for location. 255-0417. Intro to Plant Spirit Medicine 2pm-4pm. $30/$25. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

MONDAY 3 Body / Mind / Spirit Reflexology Sessions Call for times. $45. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 742-8494. Zumba 6pm-7pm. $12/$10 members/$50/$40 members series. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Women's Healing Circle 6:30pm-8pm. $10. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Learn to Meditate: Raja Yoga Meditation 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Qigong with Zach Baker 7:30pm-8:30pm. $15/$13 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Classes Argentine Tango Tango basics: 6pm-7pm, Intermediate: 7pm-8pm. Hudson. (518) 537-2589.

Music Jackson Browne 7:30pm. Acoustic. $39.50-$64.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

106 forecast ChronograM 10/11

Kate Taylor: Monday Night Live at the Bearsville Theater 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

The Outdoors Guided Night Sky Observations 7pm. The Nature Institute, Ghent. (518) 672-0116.

SPOKEN WORD Book Reading 4pm. Joyce Carol Oates's new Sourland. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7054.

TUESDAY 4 Body / Mind / Spirit Private Spirit Guide Readings 12pm-6pm. $65/$40. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. High Frequency Channeling: Master Teachers 7pm-8:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Music

7pm. Taylor Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-7745.

Jazz Wednesdays 8pm. Featuring Guitarist Tom DePetris, Jody Sumber on drums and Allan Murphy on upright bass. Dave's Coffee House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Theater

The Outdoors Exploring a Sense of Place 12:30pm-4:30pm. Topic: Observing Nature through Science Illustration. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7414.

Theater The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Photoshop Seminar 7:30pm-9pm. Shirt Factory, Kingston. (212) 741-8378.

THURSDAY 6

Classes

Art

Belly Dance with Barushka 7pm-8:30pm. Open Space, Rosendale. (917) 232-3623. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541.

Long Reach Arts at Vassar College 5pm-7pm. Palmer Gallery, Poughkeepsie, NY. 437-5370. Late Night at the Lehman Loeb 5pm-9pm. Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902.

Events Solopreneurs Sounding Board 6:30pm. Ad hoc advisory board meets group therapy for your work. Beahive, Beacon.

Music Bella Woods 6:30pm. Classical music. $8/$6/$3. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858. Blues & Dance with Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fi's 7pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Small Town Sheiks 8pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Spoken Word The Artful Dodger 12pm. Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 4375902. Vassar Alum Steven Cook: Egypt Discussion 7pm. US-Middle East expert on the future of the "Arab Spring." Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Theater ASK Playwrights Lab 6:30pm. Featuring The Fire Inside by Julie Rosier. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30pm-8:30pm. Woodstock Writers Workshops lead by Iris Litt. $15/$60 series. Call for location. 679-8256. Stand in Your Light, Protect Yourself 7pm-9pm. $20/$15. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

WEDNESDAY 5 Body / Mind / Spirit Qi Gong Classes 7am-8am. $5. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 742-8494. Patient - Clinician Relationship: What is a healing relationship? 4pm-6pm. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. T'ai Chi Chuan 6pm. $10. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Beginners Mind Meditation 6pm-7pm. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Meditation for Beginners 6:30pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Heart Opening Channeling 7pm-8:30pm. With Nancy Leilah Ward. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, woodstock. 679-5650. A Course in Miracles 7:30pm-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Classes Trace Print Monotypes with Carol Struve Call for times. Weekly through Oct. 19. $140/$120. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550.

Events Woodstock Farm Festival 3:30pm-8pm. Farmers' Market, children's activities, food by local chefs, live music, entertainment. Maple Lane, Woodstock. www.woodstockfarmfestival.com. Solopreneurs Sounding Board 6:30pm. Ad hoc advisory board meets group therapy for your work. $10/members free. Beahive Kingston, Kingston.

Kids Yo Gabba Gabba: It's Time to Dance Call for times. $29.50/$39.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Kid's Yoga Class 5pm-6pm. Ages 5-12. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Body / Mind / Spirit Beginning/Continuing Tai Chi Chuan Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Private Astrological Readings 11:30am-6:30pm. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. Yoga on the Waterfront 12pm-1pm. Long Dock Beacon, Beacon. 473-4440. Euro Dance for Seniors 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. A Meditative Walk in the Woods: How to Calm the Mind 6:30pm-8pm. Experience the fall foliage while learning how to move my thoughts from the mundane world to my beautiful inner world. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Gathering with Clark Strand 6:30pm-9pm. Weekly meeting & conversation on excess and green living in the mind body spirit. $10. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Hands on Photoshop with Lori Adams 6pm-9pm. Weekly through Oct. 27. $180/$160 members. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Color: Learned Intuition with William Noonan 6:30pm-9:30pm. Weekly through Oct. 27. $180/$160 members. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Creating True Prosperity 7:30pm-9:30pm. 7-week course to introduce you to tools to help you alter your relationship with money . $160. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. uncoveryourtrueself@gmail.com.

Events Check Mates Chess Club 4:30pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Rhinebeck Historical Society Shopping Night 5pm-7pm. Fundraiser for Rhinebeck Historical Society. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Film Wisdom's Way DVD series 7pm-8:30pm. Featuring videos of Guy Finley's presentations on how to find a life of inner freedom and true happiness. New Windsor Community Center, New Windsor. 764-6892.

Music Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Matinees & Music- US Air Force Liberty Jazz Band 2pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. Featuring different performers each week. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fis 7pm. Live@The Falcon, Marlboro. Music from China 7pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Chris Pasin, George Russell, Buddy Rich, Toshiko Akiyoshi, Bob Albanese 8pm-11pm. Jazz. The Silver Spoon, Cold Spring. www.silverspooncoldspring.com. Talking Machine 8pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Spoken Word Reform, Antislavery, and Women's Rights 5:15pm-6:30pm. Rebecca Edwards, Eloise Ellery Professor of History. Taylor Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-5670. Woodstock Business Discussion Forum 6pm. Featuring Jan Wallen, author of Mastering LinkedIn in 7 Days or Less. $7. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. www.CometoWoodstock.com. Kaleidoscope: Interdisciplinary Views on Art: Translating St. Jerome

The Diary of Anne Frank 3pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Kitchen 7pm. London's National Theatre: live in HD broadcast. $18-$25. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Workshops Transformational Kinesiology Clinic 9am-4pm. $90. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Euro Dance for Seniors & Others 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Archetypes, Identities and Roles: Transformational Kinesiology Workshop 6:30pm-8pm. $20-$40. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

FRIDAY 7 Art 40 Cows for Peace 7pm-9pm. A public art project featuring 40 pieces of art featuring cows by artist Jo Ann O'Rear. Trinity Episcopal Church, Lakeville, Connecticut. www.40cowsforpeace.org.

Body / Mind / Spirit Gelek Rimpoche Call for times. The healing practice of the Medicine Buddha. Garrison Institute, Garrison. 424-4800. Private Angelic Channeling 11:30am. $125. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. Prenatal Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Projective Dream Group 6:30pm-8:30pm. With Melissa Sweet. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Tango New Paltz Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, practica 8pm. $15/$50 4-part series. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 256-0114.

Events The 2nd Annual O+ Festival Celebration of art and music that creates a bridge to access health care for artists. Backstage Studio Productions, Kingston. opositivefestival.org. On Earth 'Tis a Heaven: Shaker Spiritual Life Tour 2pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Chatham Farmers' Market 4pm-7pm. Chatham Real Food Market Co-op, Chatham. (518) 392-3353. Math Circle 6pm. Join the Bard College Math Team & the Tivoli Free Library for math games and projects. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Hudson Valley Furniture Makers Exhibition and Sale 6pm-9pm. Opening reception. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. www.hvfurnituremakers.com.

Film B+ Fest, Beatle Bash Movie Night 8pm-11pm. Concert footage, movies & more. A.i.r. Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662. Brazilfest Woman on Top 10pm. Rosendale Theater, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Music Setting Sun Call for times. Snug Harbor, New Paltz. 255-9800. Carmen Souza 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. The Bean Runner Jazz Project 7:30pm. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Three Guitar Heroes: Michael Schenker, Uli Jon Roth & Leslie West 7:30pm. Guitar. $34.50/$29.50/$24.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. The Junkyard Angels 8pm. Harmony, Woodstock. 679-7760. Bernstein Bard Trio 8:30pm-11pm. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Hot Club of Cowtown 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Sexmob 9pm. With Roswell. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

The Outdoors Planting DEC Trees for Tributaries 4pm-6:30pm. Streambank Restoration Project. 17 Bostock Road, Shokan. 657-8314.

Theater Dutchman 7:30pm. Obie Award-winning play. $12. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-7955. The Glass Menagerie 8pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Community Playback Theatre 8pm. Improvisations of audience stories. $8. Community Playback Theatre, Highland. 691-4118.


poetry "Discovering elizabeth bishop" at vassar college © Vassar College / Courtesy Archives & Special Collections, Vassar College Libraries

Poet Elizabeth Bishop (pictured here circa 1954) is the subject of “From the Archive: Discovering Elizabeth Bishop,” at Vassar College through December 15.

The Armored Cars of Dreams “The armored cars of dreams, contrived to let us do so many a dangerous thing.” —Elizabeth Bishop “All the untidy activity continues,” observed American poet Elizabeth Bishop (1911-1979) in her verse titled “The Bight.” It was an accurate perspective, not only of the world, but of her own troubled existence as well. Despite a life marked by alcoholism and emotional upheaval, Bishop wrung beauty from the chaos within and around her. True, hers was a modest output: four books of poetry in the space of three decades. But depth, not breadth, was her strongest suit; the Massachusetts native and future Poet Laureate of the United States would ultimately garner the choicest laurels: the National Book Award, Guggenheim Fellowships, the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the Pulitzer for poetry. This year, Bishop would have marked her hundredth year. In her absence, the festivities will be conducted by her alma mater, Vassar College. September saw a day long symposium, in which a cadre of Bishop scholars deconstructed their heroine, capped by a keynote speech by former United States Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky, disarmingly titled “Elizabeth Bishop: The Bee’s Knees.” For those seeking to delve deeper into Bishop’s complex psyche and the verse that sprang from its recesses, an exhibition of her most compelling papers remains on display through December 15 in the Thompson Memorial Library on the Vassar campus. Titled “From the Archive: Discovering Elizabeth Bishop,” these works are culled from Vassar’s expansive collection of Bishop papers, obtained from her estate beginning two years after her death. The collection numbers in excess of 3,500 pieces and includes draft poems and prose, as well as her correspondence, personal papers, working papers, notebooks, diaries, memorabilia—even her baby book and the doorplate from her residence in Brazil. For the exhibit, curator Ronald D. Patkus, the head of special collections at the

Vassar College Libraries, asked 10 Elizabeth Bishop scholars and editors to select for display items that they felt shed significant light on their muse. Among the totems are a 1934 composition book filled with Bishop’s jottings, just after graduating college; an early draft of the poem “12 O’Clock News”; and two drafts of the unfinished story “Homesickness.” Even unfinished pieces from Elizabeth Bishop’s work will stand up to intense scrutiny, says Thomas J. Travisano, president of the Elizabeth Bishop Society and professor of English at Hartwick College, Oneonta. “Literary excellence is the defining characteristic of Bishop’s work,” says Travisano, who moderated one of the September 24 panels. ”Her work is just too well written, on the level of metaphor, rhythm, musicality, observation, wit, humor, insight, structure, subtlety, and sheer intelligence to be readily dismantled by the critics. As a writer, she doesn’t offer many points of vulnerability. It’s hard to attack a master of understatement.” The 1934 Vassar alumna influenced contemporaries as varied as Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, W. H. Auden, Sylvia Plath, Flannery O’Connor, and Mary McCarthy. And, despite her lesbianism, Bishop carried on an epistolary love affair of sorts with the noted poet Robert Lowell, in whom she recognized a similarly gifted but bruised soul. “Elizabeth Bishop was in many ways ahead of her time, and her work anticipated many of the key issues that are now on people’s minds,” says Travisano. “She deals with contemporary issues such as gender, outsider-hood, otherness, cultural boundaries, and global interdependence in very sophisticated ways. At the same time, she touches on such eternal themes as love, loss, and humanity’s relationship to nature in fresh and exciting ways.” “From the Archive: Discovering Elizabeth Bishop” will be exhibited through December 15 at Vassar College’s Thompson Memorial Library. (845) 437-5799; www.vassar.edu. —Jay Blotcher 10/11 ChronograM forecast 107


SATURDAY 8 Art Garrison Art Center Artist on Location Call for times. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. 424-3960. COTA: Celebration of The Arts 1am-5pm. Fine and performing art fair, with artists and performers from within the Hudson Valley and beyond. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 430-8470. Card-Makers Gathering 10:30am. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Celebration of the Arts Fine and Performing Art Fair 11am-5pm. Presenting works for sale from over 100 artists, as well as live music, dance performances, author & poet readings and children's activities. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 430-8470. Romancing the Landscape 5pm-8pm. Exhibit of paintings by Lisa O'GormanHofsommer and Nancy Reed Jones. Wallkill River School, Montgomery. 457-ARTS. Arts Walk Reception: Meet the Artists 6pm-8pm. Hudson & Laight Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1700. Holography: The Art of Shaping Light 6pm-9pm. Hudson Beach Glass, Beacon. 440-0068. Wild About Butterflies Group Art Show 6pm-9pm. In collaboration with Maraleen ManosJones fundraising event. Cornell St. Studios, Kingston. 331-0191. Touching One Billionth of a Meter Recent works by multimedia artist Carol Flaitz. Bau, Beacon. 440-7584. New Works by Stephen Brook, Shira Toren, and Brooke Larsen 6pm-8pm. Hudson & Laight Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1700.

Kids

Spoken Word

Saturday Children's Art Workshops 11am-1pm. Ages 5-12. $12. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568.

Woodstock Poetry Society & Festival 2pm. Featuring poets Teresa M. Costa and Victoria Sullivan. The Colony Café, Woodstock. pprod@mindspring.com. Poetry Reading with Eamon Grennan 4pm. College of Poetry, Warwick. 294-8085. Author Hillary Jordan: When She Woke 7pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Wanda Sykes 8pm. Comedy. Maverick Concerts, Woodstock. 679-8217.

The Magic Trunk with Sylvia Fletcher 11am. $9/$7 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Music African Masters Series Call for times. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Six For New Time Call for times. Backstage Studio Productions, Kingston. 338-8700. Keller Williams Family Concert 3:30pm. $20. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. John Street Jam 7:30pm. Dutch Arms Chapel, Saugerties. www.johnstreetjam.net. Zumbi Zumbi 7:30pm. Latin. Cornell St. Studios, Kingston. 331-0191. B+ Fest, Annual John Lennon B'day Beatle Bash 8pm-11pm. All Beatles all night. A.i.r. Studio Gallery, Kingston. 331-2662. David Kraai & Amy Laber 8pm. Classic rock. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4988.

Qi Gong 9am-10am. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Energy Cultivation, Body Preparation and Shaping 11am-5pm. For healing and personal power Hawks Brother Kirouana Paddaquahum. $65. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. EFT and Power of Attraction Healing Circle 2pm-4pm. $5. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Intro to Yoga and Ayurveda 2pm-4:30pm. $35. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Gong Bath 7pm-8pm. With special guest gong master Nigol Koulajian. $20. Bliss Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-8700.

Dance An Evening of Dance 8pm. Recess by Jonah Bokaer and Three Lives and Something by Nina Winthrop. $10. Basilica Hudson, Hudson. Contradance 8pm. Peter Blue with music by Tunescape. $10/$9 members/kids half price. Woodstock Community Center, Woodstock. 246-2121. Swing Dance 8pm-10:30pm. Lesson at 7:30pm. $10. Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. 236-3939.

Events Meet the Animals Tour Call for times. 90-minute tour and talk. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Featuring the Healthy Eating Series and Glorious Greens. Kingston Farmers' Market, Uptown Kingston. 853-8512. Pakatakan Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Pine Island Black Dirt Farmers' Market 10am-2pm. Pine Island Town Park, Pine Island. www.pineislandny.com. Guided Churchyard Tours 10am. Guide will conduct churchyard tour of St. James' churchyard with special emphasis on interred persons of note. St. James Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820. Hudson Valley Furniture Makers Exhibition and Sale 10am-6pm. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. www.hvfurnituremakers.com. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. 1st Annual Raise The Roof Old Fashioned Barnyard Fundraiser and Music Fest 2pm-7pm. Presented by Friends of Sargent and Downing Garden and Nursery. $35/$35/children free. Theater @ University Settlement Camp, Beacon. 476-1660. Green Stories to the Rescue 3pm-6pm. Creative arts to invite local activists and average citizens for some fun and encouragement to protect our land and waters in the mid Hudson-Valley. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 338-0071. Food & Wine in the Orchard 5:30pm-8:30pm. A post-Irene fundraiser in support of Rondout Valley farms and farming, with live music and auction. $60/$50 in advance/$35/$10 . Stone Ridge Orchard, Stone Ridge. 626-7919.

Film Brazilfest Woman on Top 10pm. Rosendale Theater, Rosendale. 658-8989.

108 forecast ChronograM 10/11

James Hall Group 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Keller Williams 8pm. $30/$26. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Vassar College Orchestra 8pm. Skinner Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-7294. Mid Hudson Animal Aid Cat Sanctuary Catstock Concert 8pm-12am. All proceeds benefit MHAA, a no kill, free range cat sanctuary. Howland Cultural Center, Beacon. 831-4321. Lennon-Live 8pm. Tribute to John Lennon. $26.40-$35.20. Lycian Centre, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. Me & My Ex 8:30pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Popa Chubby Band 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Mother Fletcher 9pm. Mix of ska, rock and reggae. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. The Bush Brothers 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. The Chris O'Leary Band 9:30pm. Blues. $10/$5. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Vixen Dogs Band 10pm. Blues. Pawling Tavern, Pawling. 855-9141.

The Outdoors The Garden Conservancy's Open Days Program Call for times. Explore two private gardens in Brewster and Pawling. $5. www.opendaysprogram.org. Birds of Storm King Art Center 8am-12pm. Morning bird identification walk guided by the Edgar A. Mearns Bird Club. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org. Farm & Forest Trail and South Family Hike 3pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Exploring a Sense of Place 7:30pm. Astronomy: Observe the Moon Night. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7414.

Film A Suitcase Full of Chocolate with Lincoln Mayorga 3pm. $10. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Kids Eclectic Paganism 9am-12pm. Ages 5-12. Akasha's Journey, Wassiac. 729-8999.

Music

Theater Dutchman 7:30pm. Obie Award-winning play. $12. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-7955. The Glass Menagerie 8pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Return & Learn: A Closer Look at the Collections: Textiles & Innovation Tour 2pm. $17/$8/$4. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

SUNDAY 9 Art Garrison Art Center Artist on Location Call for times. Garrison Art Center, Garrison. 424-3960

Franc Palaia’s Nightlife Richard Hambleton’s shadow paintings come to life through Franc Palaia’s haunting photographs in Nightlife, Palaia's new book on street art. With razor-sharp precision, Palaia captures Hambleton’s clandestinely accomplished artwork, which appears to melt off the walls of New York City in a molten explosion of flat black and stark white figures. From 1981 to 1985, Hambleton roamed the streets at night dressed in a long black trench coat, hiding both paint can and brush to strike at carefully calculated spots that would deliver maximum impact to unsuspecting pedestrians, arguably carving out the frontier of street art during the post Punk and New Wave years in the Soho and Tribeca neighborhoods. Barnes & Noble’s Local Author Day hosts Palaia for a book signing of Nightlife in Poughkeepsie, where he will talk about his work with Hambleton. Saturday, October 22, 2pm at Barnes & Noble in Poughkeepsie. (845) 485-2224; www.barnesandnoble.com.

Body / Mind / Spirit

The Woodstock Chess Club 2pm-4pm. Woodstock Golf Course Pub & Restaurant, Woodstock. 679-2914.

Eccentric Portraits Curator's Talk 3pm. Curated by Nancy Azara and Sylvia Leonard Wolf. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2079.

Body / Mind / Spirit Sacred Chanting 10:30am-12pm. $10. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Metaphysical Center Interfaith Worship Service 11:30am. Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-4993. Art/LifeCounseling 12pm-7pm. With Linda Mary Montano. X'clusive Boutique, Kingston. www.opositivefestival.org. Stone Mountain Dream Group 3pm-5pm. With Robin and Steven Larsen. Half Moon Books, Kingston. 331-5439. Crystal Sound Circle 4pm-6pm. With Philippe Pascal Garnier. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. The Yoga of Sacred Song and Chant 8pm. $25-$55. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-0100.

Classes Mastering Wok Cooking 3pm-5pm. With Youko Yamamoto. $35/$30 members. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Events Kingston Sailing Club Fall Racing Series 10am. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 331-1264. Hudson Valley Furniture Makers Exhibition and Sale 10am-6pm. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. www.hvfurnituremakers.com. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. The Harvest Festival 11am-4pm. Traditional farmers' market with a diverse craft village, offering music and educational programming. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Attic Access Tour 2pm. From basements to attics, the All Access Tour offers the chance peek into the rarely seen areas of the Village. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

Brunch with Bella Winds Trio 10am-2pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Perry Beekman 11:30am-2:30pm. Jazz. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Jazz at the Falls 12pm. Featuring The Matt Finck Trio. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Lizzy Pitch 1pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Jazzstock Autumn Festival 2pm-9pm. The Colony Café, Woodstock. www.jazzstock.com. PJ Walsh 7:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300.

Spoken Word 17th Annual Hawthorne Valley Fall Festival 10am-4pm. Hay rides, slides, jumps, and mazes, children's games, workshops, local artisans, music, farm-fresh foods, and more. Hawthorne Valley Association, Ghent. (518) 672-4465. Fran Dunwell 4pm. Author of The Hudson: America's River. The Beacon Institute, Beacon. 838-1600. Is It Now Yet? 4pm. Singer/comedienne Debra Vogel. $12. Unitarian Universalist Congregation, Rock Tavern. 496-9696.

Theater The Glass Menagerie 3pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Dutchman 3pm. Obie Award-winning play. $12. Trolley Museum, Kingston. 331-7955.

Workshops Herbal Wisdom Medicine Circle 12pm-2:30pm. $45. The Living Room, Cold Spring. 270-8210. Japanese Wok Cooking with Youko Yamomoto 2pm-5pm. $35/$30. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Sexy Herbs 2pm-4pm. With Susun Weed. $30/$25. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

MONDAY 10 ART Immagination Explorers Tour 2pm-4pm. Browning Kay leads with a workshop to follow. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org.

Body / Mind / Spirit Private Soul Energy Readings 12pm-6pm. $75/$40. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. Zumba 6pm-7pm. $12/$10 members/$50/$40 members series. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Learn to Meditate: Raja Yoga Meditation 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. The Woodstock Psychic Wisdom Meetup Group: Psychic Enrichment Circle 7pm-8:30pm. Psychic enrichment circle. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Qigong with Zach Baker 7:30pm-8:30pm. $15/$13 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Classes Argentine Tango Tango basics: 6pm-7pm, Intermediate: 7pm-8pm. Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Swing Dance Class Beginner at 6pm, intermediate at 7pm, and advanced at 8pm. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Events Hudson Valley Furniture Makers Exhibition and Sale 10am-4pm. High Meadow School, Stone Ridge. www.hvfurnituremakers.com. Installation Celebration for Sukkah Shelter 5pm. Followed by panel discussion. Students' Building, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Film A Suitcase Full of Chocolate with Lincoln Mayorga 7pm. $10. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Music Jazzstock Autumn Festival 2pm-10pm. The Colony Café, Woodstock. www.jazzstock.com.


dance yvonne rainer at dia:beacon photo by paula cort; courtesy of performa Yvonne Rainer (picture rear right) and dancers performing Assisted Living: Good Sports 2. Yvonne Rainer's works will be performed at Dia:Beacon this month, in a series lasting through next year.

Looking At Me While I’m Looking at You Choreographer Yvonne Rainer likes to blur the lines between “the business of being looked at and looking” and the esoteric “fourth wall” of proscenium stages. As a result, her dancers remain on stage even when they aren’t part of the choreography. Not having the opportunity to imagine what dancers may be doing in the wings gives the audience a better ability to be as aware of themselves as they are of the performance. Less opportunity for the spectator to morph choreography into “spectacle.” “The self is at best irrelevant and at worst a distraction from the real business of dancing,” says Rainer, who will illustrate this point at Dia:Beacon over three weekends of revivals and new works during the next six months. Arriving in Manhattan from California in 1956 to study acting, Rainer became disenchanted by the theater’s distinction between what was or wasn’t “real.” Having studied dance as a child, she switched from acting to modern dance classes with Martha Graham and with Merce Cunningham, who influenced her with his compositional methods of chance and improvisation when she began to choreograph in 1960. A member of the illustrious second generation of postmodern dancers, Rainer cofounded the seminal Judson Dance Theater in 1962 with Steve Paxton, who is credited for inventing “contact improvisation.” A collective of a dozen or so (now famous) experimental dancer-choreographers housed in the arts-friendly Judson Church in Greenwich Village, JTD’s members were described as “aesthetic adventurers” by esteemed dance critic Jack Anderson. Born during a rich and heady time for the arts in New York, Rainer described JTD’s coming together as, “There was new ground to be broken and we were standing on it.” Highly trained themselves, JTD members used one another, nondancers, and prominent NYC artists in their choreography, as well as appeared in experimental choreography by painters and sculptors such as Robert Morris. They eschewed emotionality, took dance off the proscenium stage, brought it into the round and outdoor locations, danced in the nude, pioneered the use of smooth, flowing repetition

and patterns, and incorporated everyday movements and activities such as dragging mattresses, perching on seesaws and echoing movements from rooftop to rooftop. The influence of JTD’s movement purely for movement’s sake can still be seen in the work of today’s modern and pop choreographers as they perform in parks, streets, on facades and in music videos. Projecting films behind her choreography in 1968, by 1975 Rainer had switched her focus entirely to filmmaking, which remained her passion for 30 years. Dealing with feminist issues, she made seven experimental feature films and many shorts. Returning to choreography in 2000 (when Baryshnikov offered her a commission for his White Oak Dance Project), Rainer realized she was more comfortable making dances then films, feeling the return to dance was like coming home. Among the revivals Rainer will be presenting is Trio A (originally a section of The Mind Is A Muscle), perhaps her best-known work. Performed in silence, the series of simultaneous solos with upper and lower body movement juxtapositions repeated in different directions at a steady pace makes for endlessly fascinating possibilities. Also an exercise in focus (and ego), the dancers try to avoid looking at the audience, which denies them the pleasure they might derive from being looked at while dancing. Currently working on a piece for the Martha Graham Dance Company, author of nearly a dozen books, the recipient of Guggenheim Fellowships, Rockefeller Fellowships and a MacArthur Fellowship, Rainer is currently professor of studio art (performance, film history) at UC Irvine. Each Dia:Beacon program will contain different configurations of five revivals and three recent works from Rainer’s repertoire. The first programs will take place on Saturday, October 22, and Sunday, October 23, at 1pm and 3pm. Tickets: $35 (general admission); $28 (students/seniors); $24.50 (members). (845) 440-0100; www.diabeacon.org. —Maya Horowitz

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TUESDAY 11 Body / Mind / Spirit Merkaba Activation Under the Guidance of Master Teachers 7pm-8:30pm. With Suzy Meszoly. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Belly Dance with Barushka 7pm-8:30pm. Open Space, Rosendale. (917) 232-3623. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541.

Music Stephen Stills 7:30pm. The influential singer, songwriter and guitarist of Buffalo Springfield and Crosby, Stills & Nash. $34.50-$9.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. The Rhodes 8pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

The Outdoors Seed Safari 2pm-3pm. Explore seeds on the trails. Mud Creek Environmental Learning Center, Ghent. (518) 828-4386 ext. 3.

Spoken Word

Theater

Spoken Word

The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Using Neurofeedback as Enlightenment Training 7pm. Physicist and neurologist Lincoln Stoller explains how EEG biofeedback enhances your mental functions and aptitudes, how this can remedy dysfunction and accelerate "enlightenment". Beahive Kingston, Kingston.

Workshops Knitting as Meditation 7pm-9pm. $20/$15. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

THURSDAY 13 Art Late Night at the Lehman Loeb 5pm-9pm. Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902. AgriCULTURE Work by local artists who have been invited to submit art depicting, or inspired by, the agriculture that is so much part of our community. 7490 South Broadway, Red Hook. redhookcan@gmail.com.

Body / Mind / Spirit Beginning/Continuing Tai Chi Chuan Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Yoga on the Waterfront 12pm-1pm. Long Dock Beacon, Beacon. 473-4440. Euro Dance for Seniors 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Theater The Diary of Anne Frank 3pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869. What in the World is Happening? 8pm. Hurricanes, floods, power outages, government gone mad; do you have stories? Tell them and listen to others at our evening of improv theater about real people and their lives. Deyo Hall, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Workshops Euro Dance for Seniors & Others 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Paper Mache Halloween Mask Making 7pm-9pm. White Barn Farm, New Paltz. (914) 456-6040. The Beautiful Mind 7:30pm-8pm. Through guided meditation we will experience our inner beauty and refine the virtues within ourselves. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

Home Safety and Accessibility 6:30pm. Learn about the “Safe At Home” program and how to make sure your home remains accessible to you and your family throughout the aging process. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444. Healthy Weight Control using Self-Hypnosis 7pm. East Fishkill Community Library, Hopewell Junction. 226-2145.

Theater The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

WEDNESDAY 12 Body / Mind / Spirit Qi Gong Classes 7am-8am. $5. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 742-8494. How to Handle a Caregiving Emergency 4pm-6pm. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Beginners Mind Meditation 6pm-7pm. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. T'ai Chi Chuan 6pm. $10. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Troubled Tummy? 6:30pm. Do you suffer from gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea or irritable bowel syndrome? Answers to questions you may be afraid to ask. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444. A Course in Miracles 7:30pm-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Events Woodstock Farm Festival 3:30pm-8pm. Farmers' Market, children's activities, food by local chefs, live music, entertainment. Maple Lane, Woodstock. www.woodstockfarmfestival.com. Wild Wednedays: Tree Detective 4:15pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

Film Experience the Power of the Soul/Soul Masters 7:30pm-9:30pm. A documentary - movie screening with Elaine Ward and Rick Riecker. $5. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Screening of Dance in America 8pm. Kenyon Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-7470.

Kids Kid's Yoga Class 5pm-6pm. Ages 5-12. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Music Empire State Youth Jazz Ensemble and The College of Saint Rose Jazz Ensemble 1pm. Classical music concert for seniors. Proctor's Theatre, Schenectady. (518) 346-6204. Stephen Kellogg & The Sixers 7pm. $22/$18 students. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Jon Cobert 8pm. Singer/songwriter. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Jazz Wednesdays 8pm. Featuring Guitarist Tom DePetris, Jody Sumber on drums and Allan Murphy on upright bass. Dave's Coffee House, Saugerties. 246-8424. The Gimp's Birthday 8pm. With a screening of Pulp Fiction. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Spoken Word Getting to Know the ABCs & D's of Medicare:s How the New Health Care Reform Affects Your Coverage 7pm. James Farnham, MBA, MS. Rosendale Library, Rosendale. 658-9013. Rudolf Steiner and Natural Science 7:30pm. A talk by Craig Holdrege. Space 360, Hudson. (518) 697-3360.

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Théâtre Motus: “Baobab” The legendary tree of Saint-Exupéry’s The Little Prince is the star of this adaptation of a West African legend where a magical child summons the courage to save his community from a drought in the new theatrical experience for children, “Baobab.” The music and the dance itself tell a story, beginning with slow poetic flowing motions before crescendoing to athletic jumps and spectacular up-tempo movements engaging the whole body as well as the exquisitely crafted costumes. The Senegalese and Malian rhythms and songs blend with puppetry and shadow theater in the enchanting visuals and rattling percussions of a collaboration between Quebec’s Théâtre Motus and Mali’s SÔ Company. The Hudson Opera House presents “Baobob” at Taconic Hills Performing Arts Center in Craryville on Friday, October 21, at 8pm. (518) 822-1438; www.hudsonoperahouse.org. Gathering with Clark Strand 6:30pm-9pm. Weekly meeting & conversation on excess and green living in the mind body spirit. $10. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Events Check Mates Chess Club 4:30pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. Open Hive/Game 7:30pm. Socialize, laugh, think, play. Beahive, Beacon. 418-3731.

FRIDAY 14 ART Autumn Green Living Weekend 7pm. Exhibitions Talk. "Living Here" and "Karma Kagyu: 900 Years of Tibetan Art." Byrdcliffe Kleinert James Center for the Arts, Woodstock. 679-5906 ex: 1121.

Body / Mind / Spirit

Wisdom's Way DVD series 7pm-8:30pm. Featuring videos of Guy Finley's presentations on how to find a life of inner freedom and true happiness. New Windsor Community Center, New Windsor. 764-6892.

Dreams and Letting Go Call for times. Dr. Jeremy Taylor. Miriam's Well, Saugerties. 246-5805. Prenatal Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Medical Intuitive Connection 6:30pm-8:30pm. With Darlene Van de Grift. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Music

Classes

Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877.

Tango New Paltz Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, practica 8pm. $15/$50 4-part series. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 256-0114.

Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. Featuring different performers each week. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Dance

Film

Hippiefest 7pm. Featuring Dave Mason, Mark Farner (of Grand Funk Railroad), Rick Derringer & Felix Cavaliere's Rascals. $29-$59. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Leni Stern 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Matt Finley, Don Miller, and Peter Tomlinson 7pm. Contemporary jazz with Brazilian flair. Savona's Trattoria, Kingston. 339-6800. Tommy Malone of the Subdudes 7:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. British Folk Rock Legend Richard Thompson 8pm. $34.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Rich Robinson 8pm. Rock. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Open Mike Featuring Steve Chizmadia 8:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Zydeco Dance 8pm-11pm. Music by ZydeGroove. Beginner's lesson at 7pm. $15. White Eagle Hall, Kingston. 255-7061.

Events On Earth 'Tis a Heaven: Shaker Spiritual Life Tour 2pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Chatham Farmers' Market 4pm-7pm. Chatham Real Food Market Co-op, Chatham. (518) 392-3353. Woodstock Artists Tour Opening Night Party 7pm-10pm. Meet the artists. The Colony Café, Woodstock. aurora@flyingrainbowlasagna.com.

Music The Trapps Call for times. Babycakes Café, Poughkeepsie. 485-8411. Bow Thayer & Perfect 7pm. Opening: The Folkadelics. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. 2nd Friday Jam with Jeff Entin and Bob Blum 8pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

John Abercrombie Trio 8pm. Jazz. $15. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. Josh Ritter 8pm. Singer/songwriter. $34.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Richard Thompson 8pm. $30-$35. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Lardner and Hermosilla 8:30pm. Also Rob Morsberger. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Vague Assurances 8:30pm-11pm. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. In The Pocket 9:30pm. Covers. Quiet Man Pub, Wappingers Falls. 298-1724. Rhonda Dene & The Bad Cats 9:30pm. Soul, jazz, r&b. $10/$5. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Theater The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

SATURDAY 15 Art David Borenstein Call for times. Works using recycled water bottles. Robibero Family Vineyards, New Paltz. 255-WINE. ArtEast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. Self-guided road trip through eastern Northeast Dutchess County that highlights the diversity of of the local arts community. www.arteastdutchess.com. Artist Walkthough of the Palermo Exhibit 2pm. Liliana Porter. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100. Milton Glaser's Shakespeare and Other Subjects 2pm. Gallery talk. Woodstock Artists Association & Museum, Woodstock. 679-2940. Milton Glaser's Shakespeare and Other Subjects 4pm-6pm. Opening reception. Woodstock Artists Association & Museum, Woodstock. 679-2940. Kamil Vojnar: Flying Blind 5pm-7pm. Opening reception for talented Czechborn artist, whose diaphanous images of black and white still-lifes emerge resplendently in full-fledged phosphorescence, lingering in between both dream and waking states. Galerie BMG, Woodstock. 6790027. Works by Stephen Derrickson 5pm-7pm. Unison Gallery, Water Street Market, New Paltz. 255-1559. Portrayal 6pm-8pm. Oil paintings by Anna Weber. Wolfgang Gallery, Montgomery. 769-7446. Carlon, Linda Mussmann, and Osamu Kobayashi 6pm-8pm. John Davis Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-5907. Monsters and Masks: Personal Demons/ Private Monsters GCCA Catskill Gallery, Catskill. (518) 943-3400. New Works by Stephen Brook, Shira Toren, and Brooke Larsen 6pm-8pm. Hudson & Laight Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1700.

Body / Mind / Spirit Reflexology Sessions 9am-9:45am. $10. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Qi Gong 9am-10am. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Reflexology Day 10am-4:30pm. $45/session. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Psychic Fair & Crystal AURA Photography 10am-5pm. Crystal Connection, Wurtsboro. www.crystalconnectioncenter.com. Introductory Orientation Workshops 11:30am-1:30pm. This workshop offers postures, breathing exercises, and relaxation techniques, along with an overview and approach to practice. $15. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Experience the Power of the Soul Workshop 1pm-4pm. $25. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. EFT and Power of Attraction Healing Circle 2pm-4pm. $5. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Crystal Activation 2pm-4pm. With Liz Connell. $20/$15. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. What Astrology is Telling Us About Our Times 2pm-4pm. With Pamela Cucinell. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Hudson Valley Community Reiki 11pm-1pm. Free Reiki sessions. Town of New Paltz Community Center, New Paltz. 616-1219.

Classes Creating Enchanted Mosaics 12pm-3pm. Second date of class: Oct. 17, 7-9pm. $75. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Events 23rd Annual Country Seats Tour Call for times. The self-driving tour will feature 6 historic Hudson Valley Farms. Call for location. 876-2474. Meet the Animals Tour Call for times. 90-minute tour and talk. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447.


Spoken Word Food for Thought Poetry Reading 1pm-2pm. Local poet Roger Roloff. Suruchi Indian Restaurant, New Paltz. 255-2772. Talking About Cheetahs 1pm-5pm. Educational talk and fund raiser. Brigg Mountain Gallery, Red Hook. 758-3266. Gallery Talk: Hudson Valley Artists 2011 2pm-3pm. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858. Book Talk and Signing 3pm-4:30pm. Author Barbara Pollack discusses the resurgence of the Chinese art scene and signs The Wild, Wild East. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org.

Theater Herb Marks Freelance: Time Wounds All Heals 8pm. The Air Pirates Radio Theater. Lycian Center, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. The Air Pirates Radio Theater 8pm. $20. Lycian Centre, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/ staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Workshops Autumn Organic Vegetable Gardening Workshop 1:30pm-4pm. $45. Pike Lane Gardens, Woodstock. 679-0551. Return & Learn: Order and Sustainability in Shaker Architecture 2pm. $17/$8/$4. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Art Appraisal Seminar 4pm. With Appraiser Kathy Rosenblatt. Albert Shahinian Fine Art Upstairs Galleries, Rhinebeck. 505-6040.

SUNDAY 16

Kids Saturday Children's Art Workshops 11am-1pm. Ages 5-12. $12. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. Pirate School: A Pirate's Life for Me! 11am. $9/$7 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Max & Ruby: Bunny Party 4pm. Mid-Hudson Civic Center, Poughkeepsie. 454-5800.

Music

Art ArtEast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. Self-guided road trip through eastern Northeast Dutchess County that highlights the diversity of the local arts community. www.arteastdutchess.com. The Many Dilemmas of Kinetic Sculpture 3pm-4pm. Viewing and discussion of George Rickey's sculptures. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org.

Donizetti's Anna Bolena 11am. Lecture and Metropolitan Opera: live in HD. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, MA (413) 528-0100. Sidi Toure 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Orlando Marin, The Last Mambo King 7:30pm. Latin. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. John Abercrombie Trio 8pm. $25. Ritz Theater Lobby, Newburgh. 784-1199. Dream Theater 8pm. Rock. $29.50-$49.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Hudson Valley Philharmonic: Viva Vivaldi 8pm. With Duo Parnas. The Bardavon, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Buskin & Batteau 8pm. Folk. $21/$16 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Liv Carrow + The Concrete Rivals 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Marji Zintz and Jude Roberts 8pm. Accord Body Language, Accord. (917) 623-0645. Works by Lou Harrison 8pm. Presented by New Albion Records. $15/$25/$35/ $45. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Susan Pereira and Sabor Brasil 8pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Tommy Malone 8pm. $24. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Vixen Dogs Band 8pm. Blues. Gail's Place, Newburgh. 567-1414. Sidi Toure 8pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Arlen Roth 8:30pm. With Matt Rae (guitar) and Eddy Denise (bass). Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Club d'Elf with John Medeski 9pm. Jazz and funk. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Perfect Thyroid 9pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240. Lara Hope & The Champtones 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Dave Fields and J.T. Lauritsen 9:30pm. Blues. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Body / Mind / Spirit

The Outdoors

The Walking Dead: Episode 1 Film Screening 9pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Exploring a Sense of Place 9am. A Day in the Life of a Woodpecker. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7414. History & Dig Walk: Heron & Johnson 10am. CEIE, Beacon. 838-1600. Farm & Forest Trail and South Family Hike 3pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

EMPAC 2011 photo by Thomas Bethge

Pakatakan Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Round Barn, Halcottsville. 586-3326. Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Featuring the Storytelling Series with Betty Cassidy. Kingston Farmers' Market, Uptown Kingston. 853-8512. Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org. Autumn Green Living Weekend 10am. Green Living Day. Karma Triyana Dharmachakra Monastery, Woodstock. 679-5906, ex: 1121. A Day at Vassar 10am. Periods of lectures in the arts, sciences, and humanities and performances. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. (888) 328-8528. St. James' Tea Room and Craft Fair 10am-4pm. Tea, treats, and handmade gifts. St. James Church, Hyde Park. 229-2820. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Millbrook Winery's 21st Annual Harvest Party 12pm-4pm. A Hudson Valley inspired menu by Chef Angelo Sosa. $125. Millbrook Vineyards & Winery, Millbrook. (800) 662-9463. Family Music and Dancing Festival 12:30pm. Featuring music of the Civil War Era. James Vanderpoel House, Kinderhook. (518) 758-9265. 2011 Southeast Historic Sites Tour 2pm-5pm. T. Kelley House, Drewsclift Castle, and Enoch Crosby House. $14/$5 per house. Call for location. 279-7500. 5th Annual Pumpkin Walk 4pm. $6. Mental Health Assoc. of Columbia and Greene Counties, Hudson. (518) 828-4619 ext. 302.

The Metaphysical Center Interfaith Worship Service 11:30am. Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-4993. Sacred Chumpi Stone Illumination-Chill 1pm-4pm. With master healer and teacher, Eleanora Amendolara. $35. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Medium Gallery: The Reunion 5:30pm. Forum for the process of mediumship while offering evidence of “life after life” and the eternal quality of the human spirit. $35. Crystal Connection, Wurtsboro. www.crystalConnectionCenter.com. Special Meditation for World Peace 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

Dance West Coast Swing/California Mix Dance 5:30pm-8pm. Beginners' lesson 6:30-7; Intermediate workshop 5:30-6:30 (separate admission $12). $8/$6 FT students. Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. (914) 475-0803. Symphony for the Dance Floor 7pm. Millicent Johnnie & Dancers with live music by Daniel Bernard Roumain. $24. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

PERFORMANCE

Friday October 7 8 pm

AKOUSMA at EMPAC International works across the spectrum of electronic music from this year’s AKOUSMA festival in Montréal, featuring artists from France, Canada, and Argentina playing live music over a 16-channel audio system. empac.rpi.edu 518.276.3921

a

science

and

management

forum

Saturday, October 22  9:00 a.m.– noon

Events Wellness Walk for The Women's Cancer Wellness Fund 9am. 4-mile walk/run. $25. Southfield, Massachusetts. www.thepastures.org. Kingston Sailing Club Fall Racing Series 10am. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 331-1264. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Young Artist Talent Search 12:30pm. Hudson Valley Mall, Kingston. (607) 229-6087. Attic Access Tour 2pm. From basements to attics, the All Access Tour offers the chance peek into the rarely seen areas of the Village. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, MA. (800) 817-1137. The Woodstock Chess Club 2pm-4pm. Woodstock Golf Course Pub & Restaurant, Woodstock. 679-2914.

Film

climate change in t he h u d s on va l l e y

Experts in environment, health, and economy will discuss how climate change is impacting the Hudson Valley. Learn how citizens and municipal officials can help. Free and open to the public. Registration required. online: www.caryinstitute.org/climate-change-forum.html

Kids Tiny Yoga Workshop for Babies 12pm-1pm. Non-walkers. $16.50. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Tiny Yoga Workshop for Toddlers 1:15pm-2:15pm. Toddlers through age 3. $16.50. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223.

2801 Sharon Turnpike (Rte. 44)|Millbrook, NY 12545|845 677-5343

10/11 ChronograM forecast 111


Music

BEST MUSICAL 2005 TONY AWARD WINNER! ÂŽ

Jeremy Siskind Trio Featuring Nancy Harms 10am-2pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Elaine Rachlin 11:30am-2:30pm. Jazz. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Faculty/Student Chamber Concert 3pm. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Unplugged Acoustic Open Mike 3:30pm. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Cardinale Montano and Lee Dixon 3:30pm. $10. Poughkeepsie Reformed Church, Poughkeepsie. 452-8110. Unplugged Acoustic Open Mike 4pm-6pm. $6/$5 members. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Greg Westhoff's Westchester Swing Band 5:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624.

Spoken Word SPAM is a registered trademark of Hormel Foods, LLC, used with permission here.

ON BROADWAY AT THE SHUBERT THEATRE www.MontyPythonsSpamalot.com

Author Jacky Davis: The Amazing Adventures of Bumblebee Boy 12pm-2pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Poetry by Elizabeth Elliot 2pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Susan Fox Rogers 4pm. Author of My Reach: A Hudson River Memoir. The Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries, Beacon. 838-1600.

Theater The Sisters 2pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

MONDAY 17 ART Paintings and Sculpture by Fred Woller 6pm-12am. 60 Main, New Paltz. 255-1901.

Body / Mind / Spirit Reflexology Sessions Call for times. $45. Sacred Space Healing Arts Studio, Beacon. 742-8494. Zumba 6pm-7pm. $12/$10 members/$50/$40 members series. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Learn to Meditate: Raja Yoga Meditation 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Qigong with Zach Baker 7:30pm-8:30pm. $15/$13 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Film Service: When Women Come Marching Home 7:15pm. $6. Rosendale Theater, Rosendale. 658-8989.

Kids Boabab Call for times. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088.

Music Electro-Acoustic Concert 6:30pm. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858. Blues & Dance with Big Joe Fitz & The Lo-Fi's 7pm. High Falls CafĂŠ, High Falls. 687-2699.

Spoken Word School Violence Lecture with Robert Eiler 5pm. Seelig Theatre at Sullivan County Community College, Loch Sheldrake. 434-5750 ext. 4303. Weird Al Yankovic: The Alpocalypse Tour 9pm. Comedy. $24.50-$39.50. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Theater ASK Playwrights Lab 6:30pm. Featuring The Ceiling's the Limit by Karen Rich. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. Auditions for Waiting for Godot 7pm. Cocoon Theater, Rhinebeck. 876-6470. The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Long Term Care Insurance Workshop 6pm. Presented by Albert Marma of AJM Asset Management, LTD. Vassar-Warner, Poughkeepsie. 454-3754. Writing Poetry, Short Story, Novel, Memoir or Creative Non-fiction (and Getting It Published) 6:30pm-8:30pm. Woodstock Writers Workshops lead by Iris Litt. $15/$60 series. Call for location. 679-8256.

WEDNESDAY 19 Body / Mind / Spirit

If You Give a Moose a Muffin Call for times. Kings Theater Company. $15/$12 children. Lycian Centre, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287.

Alternative Healing Modalities 4pm-6pm. Mind/body healing, Qigong, guided healing meditations; samplings. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. T'ai Chi Chuan 6pm. $10. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Beginners Mind Meditation 6pm-7pm. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Freedom from Painful Emotions 7pm-8:30pm. Buddhist teachings explain that suffering is caused by uncontrolled and painful states of mind. $10/$5 seniors and students. Friends Meeting House, New Paltz. 856-9000. Talking Stone Dream Circle 7pm-8:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. A Course in Miracles 7:30pm-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Music

Events

Classes Argentine Tango Tango basics: 6pm-7pm, Intermediate: 7pm-8pm. Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Swing Dance Class Beginner at 6pm, intermediate at 7pm, and advanced at 8pm. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Kids

World Music Lecture and Balinese Performance 7pm. Prof. Peter Schoenbach's lecture "Music of the World" and Bard Balinese Gong Kebyar Gamelan ensemble Giri Meka performs. Bard College, Annandale-on-Hudson. 462-7061. Andrew Bird 8pm. Indie-rock. $42/$35. The Bardavon, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Shannon McNally: Monday Night Live at the Bearsville Theater 8pm. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Spoken Word On Augustine's Confessions 4:45pm. Mark Lilla. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900. Readings of Native American Poets 6pm. By SUNY New Paltz faculty and students. Lecture Center 108, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org.

TUESDAY 18 ART Beaux-Arts architecture paintings. Darren Winston, Sharon, Connecticut. (860) 364-1890.

Body / Mind / Spirit High Frequency Channeling: Archangel Metatron and Master Teachers 7pm-8:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Belly Dance with Barushka 7pm-8:30pm. Open Space, Rosendale. (917) 232-3623. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541.

Events 2011 Business Women's Forum: Power, Passion, Purpose 8am-5pm. $175. Connecticut Convention Center, Hartford. www.2011BWF.com.

112 forecast ChronograM 10/11

Teacher Appreciation Night Party 6pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Fiori Restaurant's Food and Wine of Piedmont Call for times. Four-courses with Vietti wines. $65. Fioir Restaurant, Great Barrington, MA. (413) 528-0351. Woodstock Farm Festival 3:30pm-8pm. Farmers' Market, children's activities, food by local chefs, live music, entertainment. Maple Lane, Woodstock. www.woodstockfarmfestival.com.

Film FilmColumbia Festival Chatham. www.filmcolumbia.com.

Kids Boabab Call for times. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. Kid's Yoga Class 5pm-6pm. Ages 5-12. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Music The Tedeschi Trucks Band 7:30pm. $84/$59/$49. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Jazz Wednesdays 8pm. Featuring Guitarist Tom DePetris, Jody Sumber on drums and Allan Murphy on upright bass. Dave's Coffee House, Saugerties. 246-8424. Open Mic Night 9:30pm. Sign up at 8:30 p.m. Tess' Lark Tavern, Albany. (518) 463-9779.

Spoken Word Children and Sleep Disorders 6:30pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444.

Theater The Diary of Anne Frank 8pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Introduction to Farmland Leasing 7pm. Down To Earth workshop series. Farm Credit East, Claverack. (518) 392-5252 ext. 211.


photo by Nicole Boudier

EMPAC 2011

PERFORMANCE

Saturday October 15 8 pm

Namasya and Swayambhu Shantala Shivalingappa

Acclaimed for her exquisite performances, Shantala Shivalingappa offers a dynamic double program of contemporary solos and traditional Indian dance.

empac.rpi.edu | 518.276.3921

Crafts at Rhinebeck & Decadent Chocolate Show October 1st & 2nd

www.craftsatrhinebeck.com

New York State

Sheep & Wool Family Festival • October 15 & 16, 2010 •

Rhinebeck, NY

Hundreds of Sheep, Llamas & Alpacas, Fiber Artists & Crafts, Petting Zoo, Children’s Carnival & Activities, Hay Maze, Scavenger Hunt, Mad Science, Frisbee & Flyball Dogs, Punkin’ Chunkin’, Wine, Cheese & Specialty Foods and Much More!

www.sheepandwool.com Save Money With Advanced Tickets www.dutchessfair.com For more information call 845-876-4000 • Route 9, Rhinebeck New York • 10/11 ChronograM forecast 113


THURSDAY 20 Art Late Night at the Lehman Loeb 5pm-9pm. Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902.

Body / Mind / Spirit Beginning/Continuing Tai Chi Chuan Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Yoga on the Waterfront 12pm-1pm. Long Dock Beacon, Beacon. 473-4440. Euro Dance for Seniors 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Gathering with Clark Strand 6:30pm-9pm. Weekly meeting & conversation on excess and green living in the mind body spirit. $10. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

HIPPIEFEST: A CONCERT FOR PEACE AND LOVE October 14, 2011 - 8:00pm

Events Check Mates Chess Club 4:30pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

Film FilmColumbia Festival Chatham. www.filmcolumbia.com. Wisdom's Way DVD series 7pm-8:30pm. Featuring videos of Guy Finley's presentations on how to find a life of inner freedom and true happiness. New Windsor Community Center, New Windsor. 764-6892.

Kids

THE TARTAN TERRORS October 22, 2011 - 8:00pm

HOWARD JONES October 28, 2011 - 8:00pm

Reading by Judy Collins 7pm. Author of When You Wish Upon a Star. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Music Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Chamber Orchestra Kremlin 2pm. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. Featuring different performers each week. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. The Real Band 8pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Spoken Word Common Foot Deformities and Advances in Treatment 6:30pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444.

Theater

HERMAN’S HERMITS STARRING PETER NOONE & GUEST LOU CHRISTIE November 11 at 8:00pm

The Diary of Anne Frank 3pm. $24/$22 seniors/$16 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Auditions for Waiting for Godot 7pm. Cocoon Theater, Rhinebeck. 876-6470. The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/ staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869.

Workshops

AN EVENING WITH PAULA POUNDSTONE November 19 at 8:00pm

Introduction to Farmland Leasing 10am. Down To Earth workshop series. Farm Credit East, Claverack. (518) 392-5252 ext. 211. Euro Dance for Seniors & Others 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Still Mind 6:30pm-8pm. Once I learn to bring the virtues into my life, I can more easily detach from action, recharge my battery and feel more empowered during challenging moments. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Paper Mache Halloween Mask Making 7pm-9pm. White Barn Farm, New Paltz. (914) 456-6040.

FRIDAY 21 Body / Mind / Spirit

THE NUTCRACKER BY NEW YORK THEATER BALLET November 26 at 3:00pm

Drop by the Box Office, Call or Order Tickets Online Paramount Center for the Arts 1008 Brown Street, Peekskill, NY 10566

877-840-0457

www.paramountcenter.org

114 forecast ChronograM 10/11

Renaissance: Embracing the Pivotal Crossroads of Life Call for times. Dr. Andrea S. Gould, Ph.D. Miriam's Well, Saugerties. 246-5805. Ancestral Healing Fire Ritual Call for times. Blue Deer Center, Margaretville. 586-3225. Prenatal Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Transformation With Shamanic Sound 6:30pm-8:30pm. Grandmother Barbara Threecrow. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. An Intimate Evening with White Eagle 7pm-9pm. $25/$20. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Classes Tango New Paltz Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, practica 8pm. $15/$50 4-part series. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 256-0114.

Dance Monica Bill Barnes & Company 7pm. $24. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Events On Earth 'Tis a Heaven: Shaker Spiritual Life Tour 2pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

Film FilmColumbia Festival Chatham. www.filmcolumbia.com. The Rocky Horror Picture Show 12am. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Kids Kids Yoga 4:30pm-5:30pm. $16.50. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223.

Music The Trapps Call for times. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. Jacob Fred Jazz Odyssey 7pm. Opening: Freddie Jacobs. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Howard Fishman 8pm. $10. The Community Music Space, Red Hook. 444-0607. Shana Falana 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Steve Katz 8:30pm. With special guest Fred Ball. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Taraf Taraf Taschengreifer Duo 8:30pm-11pm. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. The Lifesize Gorgeous Cocktails 10pm. Rock. The Sunset House, Peekskill. (914) 734-4192.

Spoken Word The Right to Dissent: A Discussion with Michael Ratner and Frances Fox Piven 7:30pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. In God We Rust 8pm. Comedian Lewis Black. $29.50-$55. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334.

Theater Hairspray 7:30pm. Performance by Upstage Productions, Inc. $10/$7 students and seniors. Columbia Greene Community College Performing Arts Center, Hudson. (518) 719-0633. Black Tie 8pm. Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. $18/$14 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869. Ragtime: The Musical 8pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111. Theater Motus: Baobob 8pm. $15/$10 children. Taconic Hills Performing Arts Center, Craryville. (518) 325-0447.

SATURDAY 22 Art Masters On Main Street Round 3 Main Street, Catskill. www.welcometocatskill.com. Miller Craft Fair 10am-4pm. Miller School, Lake Katrine. 331-1448 ext. 1155. Befriend Your Sewing Machine Class 10:30am. $10. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771. ArtEast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. Self-guided road trip through eastern Southeast Dutchess County that highlights the diversity of the local arts community. www.arteastdutchess.com. Frogs Annual Great Swamp Celebration and Art Show 11am-5pm. Local conservation information is combined with a slide show of the swamp, live birds of prey, nature and ecological exhibits, great food, and beautiful artwork from area artists. Christ Church, Pawling. duncan@gardenlarge.com. Hybrid 4pm-6pm. A group exhibition curated by Carol March. Kleinert/James Art Center, Woodstock. 679-2079. Chip Fasciana 4pm-7pm. Albany underground artist. Joyce Goldstein Gallery, Chatham. (518) 392-2250. Trick or Treat? Art to Celebrate Halloween 5pm-7pm. Works by local artists in a variety of media. Scott and Bowne, Kent, CT. (860) 592-0207. New Works by Stephen Brook, Shira Toren, and Brooke Larsen 6pm-8pm. Hudson & Laight Gallery, Hudson. (518) 828-1700.

Body / Mind / Spirit Qi Gong 9am-10am. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Weekly EFT and Power of Attraction Healing Circle 2pm-4pm. $5. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.


Still from the music video “The Top”, directed by Jake Schreier

EMPAC 2011 CO L L ABOR AT I V E SPAC ES F OR WORK + COM M UN ITY

OCT EVENTS

DETAILS AT BEAHIVEBZZZ.COM BEACON / 291 Main St SOLOPRENEURS SOUNDING BOARD Oct 4, 6:30PM COMMUNITY STIMULUS Local Currency + Barter Networks as Social and Economic Drivers Oct 22, 10:30AM-12:30PM OPEN HIVE / FILM Oct 27, 7 PM OPEN HIVE / ART Rob Penner Opening Reception + Birthday Party Oct 29, 6-11PM

KINGSTON / 314 Wall St CHRONOGRAM OPEN WORD

Cheryl Rice + Samuel Claiborne Oct 1, 7PM SOLOPRENEURS SOUNDING BOARD Oct 5, 6:30PM

USING NEUROFEEDBACK AS ENLIGHTENMENT TRAINING Oct 13, 7-8PM

PERFORMANCE

Fri+Sat Oct 28+29 8:30 pm

The White Room

Francis and the Lights An EMPAC-commissioned pop spectacle by reclusive singer, songwriter, and pianist Francis Farewell Starlite.

empac.rpi.edu | 518.276.3921

RENT THE HIVE FOR YOUR OWN EVENT • BEAHIVEBZZZ.COM bzzz@beahivebzzz.com

OctOber 4 Documentary: Forks Over Knives $10 | 7:15 pm OctOber 7 + 8 BRAZIL FEST: Woman on Top (Fri) & Quilombo (Sat) $6 | 10 pm OctOber 9 Dance Film Sundays: Don Quixote from The Bolshoi Ballet $6 | 2 pm OctOber 16 OpERA In CInEmA: Cilea’s Adriana Lecouvreur /Royal Opera House $20 | 2 pm OctOber 18 DOCumEnTARy: Service, When Women Come marching Home $6 | 7:15 pm OctOber 22 Actors & Writers by donation | 8 pm OctOber 25 Hurricane Relief Benefit: American Heretic (live theater) $20 | 8 pm NOvember 5 Arm-of-the-Sea Theater: Criss-Crossing Borders by donation | 8 pm NOvember 5 Live Theater: poe’s Last mystery $15/12.50 students | 7:30 pm NOvember 6 Live Theater: poe’s Last mystery $15/12.50 students | 2:00 pm

VOLunTEER www.rosendaletheatre.org

408 Main St, RoS endale, n Y 12472 | 845-658-8989

L A V I T FES

for youth development for healthy living for social responsibility

YMCA of Kingston and Ulster County leaders in quality childcare

Serving New Paltz, Highland, Kingston, Ellenville and Marlboro Holiday, snow day, before and after school programs

845.338.3810 ext. 116 www.ymcaulster.org 10/11 chronograM forecast 115


Journey to the Andes: Oscar Santillan 2pm-5:30pm. Sound healer, Ecuadorian Lachak Shaman. $45. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Restorative Yoga and Sound Healing Workshop 5:30pm-8pm. With Lea & Philippe Garnier. $35. Bliss Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-8700. VortexHealing: Divine Healing Energy Through the Magic of Merlin 6:30pm-8:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Dance Dance Works by Yvonne Rainer 1pm/3pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

Events

F E AT U R I N G

Meet the Animals Tour Call for times. 90-minute tour and talk. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447. Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Featuring the Fall Festival and Healthy Eating Series. Kingston Farmers' Market, Uptown Kingston. 853-8512. Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Uptown Kingston, Kingston. www.kingstonfarmersmarket.org. Electronics Recycling Day 9am-1pm. City Hall, Beacon. info@zerotogo.org. The 19th Annual Columbia County Golden Gathering 9:30am-12:30pm. Co-Sponsored by C-GCC & Senator Stephen Saland. Columbia-Greene Community College, Hudson. (518) 828-4181 ext 5513. Fifth Annual Mid-Hudson Woodworkers Show 10am-5pm. Displays, demos, and more. $3/children free. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. www.midhudsonwoodworkers.org. Community Stimulus: Local Currency + Barter Networks as Social and Economic Drivers 10:30am-12:30pm. $10/members free. Beahive, Beacon. 418-3731. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Atrisans Showcase 11am-5pm. Jewelry, fabric, woodwork, pottery, fine food and wine. Main St., Valatie. (518) 758-8999. Village Invasion II-Crawl of the Dead 7pm. Drink and dinner specials, horrific treats from local shops, music, Tarot card readers, best costume prizes and more. Downtown Saugerties. www.crawlofthedead.com.

Film

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116 forecast ChronograM 10/11

FilmColumbia Festival Chatham. www.filmcolumbia.com. The Shining 7pm. $6. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

Shawn Mullins 8pm. $35/$40. Bethel Woods Center for the Arts, Bethel. (866) 781-2922. Pat Dinizio 8pm-8pm. Singer/songwriters. $20. Marbletown Multi-Arts, Stone Ridge. 687-4143. Christine Lavin 8:30pm. Also special guest Don White. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Helen Avakian 9pm. Acoustic. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Questionable Authorities 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. The Pop Pistols 9pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240. Blues Buddha Band 9:30pm. 12 Grapes Music and Wine Bar, Peekskill. (914) 737-6624. Cassandra Lee Band 10pm. Rock. Gail's Place, Newburgh. 567-1414.

The Outdoors Plant a Tree and Save a Shoreline 10am-1pm. Esopus Meadows Point Preserve, Esopus. 473-4440 ext. 270. Autumn Hike on Moodna Creek Trail 2pm-3:30pm. Leisurely hike with commentary by Ron Romary on the placement of sculptures and sitespecific work. Storm King Art Center, Mountainville. www.stormkingartcener.org. Farm & Forest Trail and South Family Hike 3pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

Spoken Word Stories From Around the World 2pm. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. Poetry Reading 5pm. Woodstock Poetry Society & Festival presents Jean Valentine and Time Seibles. $10. Kleinert/James Arts Center, Woodstock. 679-2205. Author Nayana Currimbhoy: In Conversation 5:30pm. New novel Miss Timmin's School for Girls. Omi Center, Ghent. (518) 392-4747. Music and Book Reading 6pm. Book party for David Rothenberg's "Survival of the Beautiful". $10. The Living Room, Cold Spring. 270-8210. Night of Stories 7pm-10pm. Local writers interested can share their work with friends and family. Beahive Kingston, Kingston. www.Transformative-writing.com. Author Michael Walsh: Shock Warning 7:30pm. Oblong Books & Music, Millerton. (518) 789-3797. Author Paul La Farge: Luminous Airplanes 7:30pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Theater

Halloween and Day of the Dead: An Art and Story Experience 10am-2pm. $10/$8 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Saturday Children's Art Workshops 11am-1pm. Ages 5-12. $12. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. Criss-Crossing Borders by Arm of the Sea Theater 11am. $9/$7 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. A Brown Bear, A Moon and A Caterpillar 3pm. Treasured stories by Eric Carle with Mermaid Theatre of Nova Scotia. $12. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Hairspray 7:30pm. Performance by Upstage Productions, Inc. $10/$7 students and seniors. Columbia Greene Community College Performing Arts Center, Hudson. (518) 719-0633. Black Tie 8pm. Mohonk Mountain Stage Company. $18/$14 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Sisters 8pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869. Ragtime: The Musical 8pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111.

Music

Workshops

Kids

African Masters Series Call for times. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438. The Trapps Call for times. Whistling Willies, Cold Spring. 265-2012. 2011 Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase 10am-6pm. Alternative guitar show, featuring fine, handmade acoustic guitars and stringed musical instruments exhibited by their makers. $15/$25 two-day pass. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Met Live in HD: Anna Bolena Encore Presentation 1pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072. John Keller 1pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Natalie Merchant 7pm. 13th annual Pink October Fundraiser benefiting breast cancer research at the Dyson Center for Cancer Care at Vassar Brothers Medical Center. $35-$99/$10 children. Old Dutch Church, Kingston. RadioWoodstock.com. Carolyn Wonderland 8pm. Blend of many genres. $20. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. David Sanborn with Joey DeFrancesco 8pm. Contemporary Jazz. $34.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Venus Flytrap 8pm. Berkshire Bach Society. First Congregational Church, Great Barrington, MA. (860) 435-4866. Reality Check 8pm. Rock. La Puerta Azul, Millbrook. 677-2985.

Hair & Makeup Pin Up Workshop 10am-2pm. 5 different pin up hair styles and pin up make up with photo shoot. $125. Cornell St. Studios, Kingston. 331-0191. The Amazing Chair Project with Jeff Johnson 10am-3pm. Working with recycled materials and your imagination, design and build a structurally sound chair that is unique, functional and sculptural. $145/$125. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Raku 11am-4pm. With ceramic artist Steve Ladin. $100. Hudson Valley Pottery, Rhinebeck. 876-3190. Return & Learn: Energy Assessment 2pm. $17/$8/$4. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, MA. (800) 817-1137.

SUNDAY 23 Art Miller Craft Fair 10am-4pm. Miller School, Lake Katrine. 331-1448. ext. 1155. ArtEast Open Studio Tour 11am-5pm. Self-guided road trip through eastern Southeast Dutchess County that highlights the diversity of of the local arts community. www.arteastdutchess.com. Frogs Annual Great Swamp Celebration and Art Show 1pm-4pm. Local conservation information is combined with a slide show of the swamp, live birds of prey, nature and ecological exhibits, great food, and beautiful artwork from area artists. Christ Church, Pawling. duncan@gardenlarge.com.


photo by Paulo Fernández

EMPAC 2011

SCREENING + TALK + INSTALL ATION

Saturday November 5

DANCE MOViES Commission World premiere of four new dance film and video projects, a live punk marching band, and behind-thescenes artist talks! SCREENING + LIVE MUSIC

ARTIST TALKS

INSTALLATION

7–8 pm

8:15–9:15 pm

Noon–10 pm

empac.rpi.edu | 518.276.3921

Brave is a film production company. We create high-end commercials, music videos, promotional videos and web content. Let us craft a film that will express your voice, strengthen your brand and inspire your consumers. Based in NYC and the Hudson Valley founded by Editor/Director Beth Cramer.

bravenyc.com adventures in storytelling

10/11 ChronograM forecast 117


Body / Mind / Spirit Sacred Chanting 10:30am-12pm. $10. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Metaphysical Center Interfaith Worship Service 11:30am. Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-4993. Wholistic Health & Wellness Fair 12pm-5pm. Featuring qigong documentary & demo by Gary Mercurio, D.C. and Eugene Gauggel to share his perspective on his quest for health. Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz. 255-5030. Cupping Class 1pm-4pm. Patricia Holtz teaches the traditional technique of cupping to break up muscle tension and relieve chest congestion. $60/$75/ $100/$130 couples. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Rainbowheart Chakra Meditation 6pm-7:30pm. Balancing & intuitive feedback with Kia Abilay. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Dance Dance Works by Yvonne Rainer 1pm/3pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

Events A Festival of Storytelling, Puppetry, Music & Dance 10am-5pm. $10/children under 5 free. Ulster County Fairgrounds, New Paltz. 255-0033 ext. 110. Kingston Sailing Club Fall Racing Series 10am. Hudson River Maritime Museum, Kingston. 331-1264. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Community Book Discussion & Bagel Brunch 12pm. Rabbi Bill Strongin will lead the discussion on both Alexie books. Jewish Community Center, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Young Artist Talent Search 12:30pm. Hudson Valley Mall, Kingston. (607) 229-6087. 3rd Annual Ann Street Gallery High Tea Party Fundraiser 2pm-4pm. Fundraising event which will benefit the gallery's programming. $40. Ann Street Gallery, Newburgh. 562-6940 ext. 119. The Woodstock Chess Club 2pm-4pm. Woodstock Golf Course Pub & Restaurant, Woodstock. 679-2914. Attic Access Tour 2pm. From basements to attics, the All Access Tour offers the chance peek into the rarely seen areas of the Village. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Guided Walking Tour 2pm. Old Main Street. $3/children free. Hurley Reformed Church, Hurley. 331-4121.

Author James Romm: Ghost on the Throne 7:30pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Theater The Sisters 2pm. $18/$16 seniors, SUNY New Paltz faculty/staff/$14 students. SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. 257-7869. Hairspray 2pm. Performance by Upstage Productions, Inc. $10/$7 students and seniors. Columbia Greene Community College Performing Arts Center, Hudson. (518) 719-0633. Ragtime: The Musical 3pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111.

Workshops Delivering the Message: Dynamic Speaking and Teaching Skills for Healers 1pm-5pm. Peter Blum. $40. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. The Photographer and the Photobook 2pm. Creating and self-publishing. Hudson Opera House, Hudson. (518) 822-1438.

MONDAY 24 Body / Mind / Spirit Zumba 6pm-7pm. $12/$10 members/$50/$40 members series. Unison Arts and Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

TUESDAY 25 High Frequency Channeling: Archangel Metatron and Master Teachers 7pm-8:30pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes

Kids

Spontaneous Pastel Painting with E.S. DeSanna 10am-1pm. Weekly through Nov. 8. $140/$120 members. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550. Belly Dance with Barushka 7pm-8:30pm. Open Space, Rosendale. (917) 232-3623. Mother/Daughter Belly Dancing Class 7:30pm. $20/4 weeks $69/mother daughter $118. Casperkill Rec Center, Poughkeepsie. (914) 874-4541.

Kids' Yoga Class 5pm-6pm. Ages 5-12. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Events Community Book Discussion 10:30am. Jan Schmidt, SUNY NP Distinguished Teaching Professor, Department of English will lead the discussion. "The Absolutely True Diary of a PartTime Indian" will be the primary focus. Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Investigating the Paranormal 7pm-9pm. Presentation and Q&A w/ The Dutchess Paranormal Investigators. $20/$15. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

Celebration of the Arts Now in its fourth year, the Celebration of the Arts (COTA) is a multi-day event that honors art and community in New Paltz. COTA has paired artists with certain shops to create site-specific installations in their display windows that remain halfway through this month. Thursday brings Broad’s Regional Arm Wrestling League (BRAWL), who tear it up at the Water Street Market to raise funds for local women’s charities. Friday features the sounds of Setting Sun [pictured] and Los Doggies at Snug Harbor to support COTA’s new Artists Stipend Fund, made available for artists to realize next year’s projects. The full-day event on Saturday, October 8, includes the poetry and fiction of local favorites Jan Schmidt, Phillip Levine, Larry Carr, Alice Andrews, and Susannah Appelbaum, a variety of free sample dance classes including belly dance, tango, and choreography, and children’s activities that include book crafting, mural painting, and Teddy Bear Story Time. Large scale installations, live music featuring The Trapps and the Eastern European stylings of Szélrózsa, as well as dancers and performers including the School of Kuchipudi Classical Dance, all make up this explosion of culture this year. Thursday-Saturday, October 6-8. (845) 255-2713; www.celebrationofthearts.net.

Film FilmColumbia Festival Chatham. www.filmcolumbia.com. The Walking Dead: Episode II Film Screening 9pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240. Michael Buckley 4pm. Author of NERDS & The Sisters Grimm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500.

Learn to Meditate: Raja Yoga Meditation 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. New Moon Sound Healing 6:30pm-7:30pm. With Philippe Pascal Garnier. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Qigong with Zach Baker 7:30pm-8:30pm. $15/$13 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Music

Classes

Kids

2011 Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase 10am-6pm. Alternative guitar show, featuring fine, handmade acoustic guitars and stringed musical instruments exhibited by their makers. $15/$25 two-day pass. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406. Brunch with The Compact with Erin Hobson 10am-2pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Blue Gardeni 11:30am-2:30pm. Jazz. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Jazz at the Falls 12pm. The Rebecca Coupe Franks Quartet. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. Tedeschi Trucks Band 7pm. Ulster Performing Arts Center, Kingston. 339-6088. Dance Night with The Saints of Swing 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Conservatory Orchestra 8pm. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Pieta Brown 8pm. Singer/songwriter. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. In The Pocket 10pm. Dance music. Bacchus, New Paltz. 255-8636.

The Outdoors Breakneck Ridge Challenge 1pm-4pm. 12-mile interpretive trek from Cold Spring to Beacon along some of the most rugged trails in the Hudson Highlands. Mount Beacon, Beacon. 473-4440 Ext. 273.

Argentine Tango Tango basics: 6pm-7pm, Intermediate: 7pm-8pm. Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Swing Dance Class Beginner at 6pm, intermediate at 7pm, and advanced at 8pm. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Dance Dance Works by Yvonne Rainer 1pm. Dia: Beacon, Beacon. 440-0100.

Events Community Book Discussion 4pm. SUNY New Paltz Sociology Professor Emerita Dorothy Jessup and Janet Winn, SUNY NP and DCCC Philosophy and Sociology Lecturer lead a book discussion. Woodland Pond, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Navigating the Legal System: Your Lawyer, Your Family, Yourself 5:30pm-9pm. Workshops conducted on the attorneyclient relationship, practical aspects of safety and independence, and financial guidance for women going through divorce. Locust Grove, Poughkeepsie. www.womenintransitionhv.com/wordpress/events. Community Book Discussion 7pm. Rennie Scott-Childress, Teacher of the Year, History Dept, SUNY NP. Both books will be discussed. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org.

Music Amos Lee 8pm. Singer/songwriter. $42.50/$38.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845.

Spoken Word

Theater

Ted Spiegel 4pm. Author of "Hudson Valley Voyage," Through the Seasons, Through the Years. The Beacon Institute for Rivers & Estuaries, Beacon. 838-1600.

Baobab by Quebec's Theatre Motus Call for times. West African tale told through puppetry. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100.

118 forecast ChronograM 10/11

Events Woodstock Farm Festival 3:30pm-8pm. Farmers' Market, children's activities, food by local chefs, live music, entertainment. Maple Lane, Woodstock. www.woodstockfarmfestival.com. Wild Wednedays: Bird Feeding Frenzy 4:15pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

Body / Mind / Spirit

Music

Jazz Wednesdays 8pm. Featuring Guitarist Tom DePetris, Jody Sumber on drums and Allan Murphy on upright bass. Dave's Coffee House, Saugerties. 246-8424.

Spoken Word Community Book Discussion 9:30am. Discussion led by Larry Winters, a Viet Nam War veteran, licensed mental health counselor, widely published poet, men's group leader and group psychotherapist. Anatolia Restaurant, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpalzt.org. Interactive Book Discussion 7pm. Town of New Paltz Community Center, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Storyteller Christine Cooper 7pm. Inquiring Minds Bookstore, Saugerties. 255-8300.

THURSDAY 27 Art Through The Student Lens: Photographs of and by Vassar Students, 1865-2011 5pm-7pm. Palmer Gallery, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370. Late Night at the Lehman Loeb 5pm-9pm. Lehman Loeb Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 437-5902.

Body / Mind / Spirit In The Caravan of Rumi: An Introduction To Sufi Poetry & Practices Call for times. Rev. Karuna Teresa Foudriat. Miriam's Well, Saugerties. 246-5805. Beginning/Continuing Tai Chi Chuan Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Yoga on the Waterfront 12pm-1pm. Long Dock Beacon, Beacon. 473-4440. Euro Dance for Seniors 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Gathering with Clark Strand 6:30pm-9pm. Weekly meeting & conversation on excess and green living in the mind body spirit. $10. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Classes Time Out 6:30pm-8pm. Take time out of your busy day and give yourself a gift. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000.

Events

Music Choral & Jazz Vocal Fest 6:30pm. $8/$6/$3. Samuel Dorsky Museum of Art, New Paltz. 257-3858. Community Music Night 8pm-9:45pm. Six local singer-songwriters. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048. Eddie Fingerhut with Kevin Williams 8pm. Acoustic. Rosendale Café, Rosendale. 658-9048.

Spoken Word Academic Panel Discussion 5:30pm. The focus will be on War Dances. Honors Center SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Stroke: Diagnosis and Treatment 6:30pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444.

WEDNESDAY 26 Body / Mind / Spirit The Future of Health Care: Humanizing the Medical Establishment 4pm-6pm. Panel discussion on possibilities of compassionate caregiving, with emphasis on patient empowerment and disease prevention. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. T'ai Chi Chuan 6pm. $10. Pine Hill Community Center, Pine Hill. 254-5469. Beginners Mind Meditation 6pm-7pm. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. Freedom from Painful Emotions 7pm-8:30pm. Buddhist teachings explain that suffering is caused by uncontrolled and painful states of mind. $10/$5 seniors and students. Friends Meeting House, New Paltz. 856-9000. Message Circle: Delivering Messages from the Other Side 7pm-8:30pm. With Adam Bernstein. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. A Course in Miracles 7:30pm-9:30pm. Study group with Alice Broner. Unitarian Fellowship, Poughkeepsie. 229-8391.

Classes The Art Of Photo Silk Screen with Kristopher Hedley 6:30pm-9:30pm. Weekly through Nov. 30. $220/$200. Barrett Art Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-2550.

Craft Show 3pm-9pm. Benefit: Miles of Hope Breast Cancer Foundation. Knights of Columbus, Wappingers Falls. erctiptop@yahoo.com. Check Mates Chess Club 4:30pm. Tivoli Free Library, Tivoli. 757-3771.

Film Smoke Signals Film and Discussion 5pm. Lecture Center 100, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. Wisdom's Way DVD series 7pm-8:30pm. Featuring videos of Guy Finley's presentations on how to find a life of inner freedom and true happiness. New Windsor Community Center, New Windsor. 764-6892. Open Hive/Film 7pm-10pm. A film with a message, each month. Drinks and conversation before and after screening. Beahive, Beacon.

Music David Cassidy Call for times. Lycian Center, Sugar Loaf. 469-2287. Jam Session 1pm-2pm. Bring an instrument to play with other musicians. New York State Museum, Albany. (518) 474-5877. Acoustic Thursdays with Kurt Henry 6pm. Featuring different performers each week. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699. The Funk Junkies 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Jon Anderson & Rick Wakeman 7:30pm. Project 360 Tour. $75/$45/$31. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Rasputina 8pm. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Jeff Magnum 9pm. Benefit for Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary. $40. Bearsville Theater, Woodstock. 679-4406.

Spoken Word Inventing Women's Education 5:15pm-6:30pm. Rebecca Edwards, Eloise Ellery Professor of History. Taylor Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-5670. Stroke: Diagnosis and Treatment 6:30pm. Northern Dutchess Hospital, Rhinebeck. (877) 729-2444.


music "works by lou harrison" at the fisher center eva soltes / www.harrisondocumentary.com "Works by Lou Harrison" will be performed at Bard's College's Fisher Center on October 15.

Outsider Inside Lou Harrison (1917-2003) was an outsider original if ever there was. A pioneer in the writing of modern, purely percussive music, he composed beguiling works that draw heavily on early music and Native American and Asian styles and emphasize melody and rhythm, and often avoid harmony altogether. An outspoken pacifist and gay rights advocate, Harrison lived a maverick life mirrored by his inventive and endlessly surprising opuses, three of which will be performed on October 15 at Bard College in a program co-sponsored by New Albion Records and succinctly titled “Works by Lou Harrison.” Harrison was born in Portland, Oregon, and as a child moved with his family to the San Francisco Bay Area, where he was exposed to such major and diverse influences as classical music, jazz, Cantonese opera, Gregorian chant, and Native American, Mexican, and Indonesian music. After taking proto-world music trailblazer Henry Cowell’s “Music of the Peoples of the World” course, he enrolled in the University of California at Los Angeles’s dance department as a dancer and accompanist. At UCLA he also studied under Arnold Schoenberg, which sparked an interest in the Viennese icon’s pivotal 12-tone technique. This period, however, soon also saw Harrison move away from traditional notation and begin composing extended works utilizing mainly found percussive objects, such as car brake drums. Although Harrison was an early practitioner of this approach, he wasn’t alone: John Cage was also writing similar pieces, and the two often worked together. In 1943 Harrison relocated to New York, where he worked as a critic for the Herald Tribune and befriended Charles Ives, whose then largely ignored work he championed; he even conducted the premiere of Ives’s Symphony No. 3. An out-front

booster of Edgard Varèse, Carl Ruggles, and other cutting-edge American composers, Harrison took a teaching position at North Carolina’s Black Mountain College, but after suffering a nervous breakdown moved back to California. To support himself Harrison worked as a record salesman, a florist, an animal nurse, and a forest firefighter, and it was in his later California years that he began writing in the Balinese- and Javanese-influenced gamelan style for which he’s perhaps best known. With his partner of 33 years, William Colvig, he fabricated instruments such as the “American gamelan,” a tuned percussion ensemble using resonated aluminum keys and tubes, oxygen tanks, and other “junk” percussion devices. After another composer-mentor, Virgil Thomson, gave him a copy of Harry Partch’s influential book on tuning, Genesis of a Music, Harrison entered into another fecund period, which saw him composing music in just intonation—intervals of notes related by small whole numbers—rather than the prevailing equal temperament. In the 1960s Harrison became a composer-in-residence at San Jose State University and wrote and performed music for guzheng (Chinese zither). He and Colvig built and lived in a straw-bale house in the California desert until Harrison suffered a fatal heart attack en route to a concert of his music in Ohio. “Works by Lou Harrison” presents Solo to Anthony Cirone, a work for tenor bells; Suite for Violin and American Gamelan; and La Koro Sutro, for large-scale chorus, gamelan, harp, and organ. The concert will take place on October 15 at 8pm in the Fisher Center’s Sosnoff Hall on Bard College’s Annandale-on-Hudson campus. Tickets are $15-45. (845) 758-7900; www.fishercenter.bard.edu. —Peter Aaron

10/11 ChronograM forecast 119


Community Book Discussion 7:30pm. Rhonda Shary, English Dept, SUNY NP will lead the discussion. War Dances will be the primary focus. Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org.

Workshops Euro Dance for Seniors & Others 1:30pm-2:30pm. $5/$8 couples. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. Paper Mache Halloween Mask Making 7pm-9pm. White Barn Farm, New Paltz. (914) 456-6040. Ascending into 2012 Consciousness 7pm-9pm. $25/$20. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

FRIDAY 28 Body / Mind / Spirit Individual Readings with White Eagle 11am-6pm. Channeled Readings and/or Energy Healing via James Philip. $110/hour. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100. Prenatal Yoga 6pm-7:15pm. The Yoga Way, Wappingers Falls. 227-3223. Bright Shadows and Dark Radiance: The Chod Practice 7pm-9pm. Dr. Craig Lennon, accompanied by Jim Davis on Celtic Harp, will guide you to uncover the hidden brilliance of your soul. $20. Sage Center For the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

SATURDAY 29 Art Glens and Gardens 5pm-8pm. 15-artist watercolor show. Duck Pond Gallery, Port Ewen. 338-5580. New Works by Stephen Brook, Shira Toren, and Brooke Larsen 6pm-8pm. Hudson & Laight Gallery, Hudson, New York. (518) 828-1700. Rob Penner Opening Reception + Birthday Party 6pm-11pm. Man-about-Beacon Penner shoots food, portrait, lifestyle and fine art photography. Beahive, Beacon.

Body / Mind / Spirit Qi Gong 9am-10am. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998. EFT and Power of Attraction Healing Circle 2pm-4pm. $5. Inner Light Health Spa, Hyde Park. 229-9998.

Dance Swing Dance Event with the Boilermaker Jazz Band. 8pm-10:30pm. Lesson at 7:30pm. $15. Reformed Church of Port Ewen, Port Ewen. 236-3939.

Events Meet the Animals Tour Call for times. 90-minute tour and talk. Catskill Animal Sanctuary, Saugerties. 336-8447.

Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase Attention guitar geeks of the Hudson Valley: Come discuss custom options and one-of-a-kind creations and buy or order a dream guitar from dozens of master builders gathered at the Woodstock Invitational Luthiers Showcase. This alternative guitar show features handmade stringed instruments exhibited by over 50 makers, both to try and to buy. Friday’s Tonewood Festival features some of the most exotic woods for sale. The Bearsville Theater offers continuous live music throughout Saturday and Sunday featuring folk, flamenco, fingerstyle blues, celtic, jazz, bluegrass, Middle Eastern, African, Latin American, and Classical to name just a few. The Bear Café brings a number of instructional clinics and workshops including David Temple’s “Classical & Brazilian Melodic Techniques” on Saturday and Sunday. The Colony Café hosts a “String Sampler” Concert including the Frank Vignola & Vinny Raniolo Guitar Duo on Friday night and an aftershow concert including Kinloch Nelson, Sharon Klein, and George Worthmore on Sunday night. Friday-Sunday, October 21-23. (845) 679-9025; www.woodstockinvitational.com.

Classes Tango New Paltz Beginners 6pm, intermediate 7pm, practica 8pm. $15/$50 4-part series. The Living Seed Yoga & Holistic Center, New Paltz. 256-0114. Writing Your Spiritual Memoir Call for times. Mark Matousek. $295/$250 early reg. Miriam's Well, Saugerties. 246-5805.

Dance Swing Dance to The Paul Tillotson Trio 8:15pm-11pm. Beginners' lesson: 8-8:30; intermediate workshop 6:30-8 ($15); performance by the Hudson Valley Community Dances Performance Team. $15/$10 FT students. Poughkeepsie Tennis Club, Poughkeepsie. 454-2571.

Events On Earth 'Tis a Heaven: Shaker Spiritual Life Tour 2pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. Rhinecliff Halloween Party 6pm-8pm. Rhinecliff Fire Co, Rhinecliff. 876-5738. Ghost Walk 7pm-9pm. $10. Hurley Heritage Museum, Hurley. 338-5253. Haunted Huguenot Street: Sometimes the Dark Side Shines 7pm-11pm. Story-filled guided tour. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Film Nosferatu 7:30pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

Music Ricardo Gautrea, Doug Munro, Ariel De La Portilla 7:30pm. Latin. BeanRunner Café, Peekskill. (914) 737-1701. American Symphony Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 6:45pm. $25/$35/$40. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. George Winston 8pm. $29.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. Joseph Bertolozzi 8pm. $30/$15 students/children free. All Saints Chapel, Pawling. www.pawlingconcertseries.org. St. James & The Apostles + Old Friend 8pm. $5. The Spotty Dog Books and Ale, Hudson. (518) 671-6006. Francis and the Lights 8pm. Pop spectacle from the reclusive pianist. EMPAC, Troy. http://empac.rpi.edu. King Of The Forest Rock Band 8pm. Peint o Gwrw Tavern, Chatham. (518) 392-2943. Dangling Success 8:30pm-11pm. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Spottiswoode & His Enemies 9pm. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800.

The Outdoors Invasive Insect Training and Poughkeepsie Survey Call for times. Vassar College, Poughkeepsie. 437-7414.

Spoken Word Community Book Discussion 3pm. This discussion will focus on The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. New Paltz Village Hall, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org. An Evening of Native American Music & Story-Telling 8pm. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Theater Ragtime: The Musical 8pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111. Dracula 8pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

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Grass Fed 3pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. The Pedro Giraudo Jazz Orchestra 7pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Mamalama Halloween Show 7:30pm. Original music for harp, cello, violin, dulcimer, ethereal choral voices. $10. The Living Room, Cold Spring. 270-8210. Wooden Nickel 7:30pm. Acoustic. $5. Northeast-Millerton Library, Millerton. (518) 789-3340. Peter Wolf 7:30pm. Blend of rock, R&B, blues, folk and country. $34.50. The Egg, Albany. (518) 473-1845. The John Herald Fund Meets Again 8pm. Raising money for the John Herald Fund supported by Family of Woodstock to help raise money for artists in dire need. Harmony, Woodstock. 679-7760. The Australian Pink Floyd Show 8pm. $25/$35/$45/$55. Palace Theater, Albany. (518) 465-3334. Susan Werner 8pm. Folk, country, blues. $24/$19 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559. The Antioch Chamber Ensemble 8pm. Skinner Hall, Poughkeepsie. 437-7294.

Kingston Farmers' Market 9am-2pm. Kingston Farmers' Market, Uptown Kingston. 853-8512. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Second Annual Service Sprint 11am. 5 mile run sponsored by UlsterCorps, with kids run and fitness run. $10-$20. Williams Lake, Rosendale. www.ulstercorps.com. Trick or Treat 4:30pm. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. Haunted Huguenot Street: Sometimes the Dark Side Shines 7pm-11pm. Story-filled guided tour. $15/$10. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660. Halloween Costume Party and Breakaway with Robin Baker 9pm. High Falls Café, High Falls. 687-2699.

Kids Saturday Children's Art Workshops 11am-1pm. Ages 5-12. $12. The Fields Sculpture Park, Ghent. (518) 392-4568. Kids' Dream Box Workshop 11am-1pm. For young artists aged 4-12 years. Kingston Library, Kingston. 331-0507. Predators of the Wild with Bill Robinson 11am. $9/$7 children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080. Reptile Encounter 11am. Wild life program with Mark Perpetua. $10/$7 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Music Mozart's Don Giovanni 1am. Lecture and Metropolitan Opera: live in HD. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Marilyn Miller 1pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Met Live in HD: Don Giovanni 1pm. Bardavon Opera House, Poughkeepsie. 473-2072.

American Symphony Orchestra 8pm. Pre-concert talk at 6:45pm. $25/$35/$40. Fisher Center, Annandale-on-Hudson. 758-7900. Celtic Halloween with MacTallamor 8:30pm. Towne Crier Café, Pawling. 855-1300. Halloween Celebration 8:30pm-11pm. PJ the DJ. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Keith Newman 8:30pm. Playing Crosby, Stills, Nash, Stevens, Taylor & Young. Aroma Thyme Bistro, Ellenville. 647-3000. Alpha Male Gorillas 9pm. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240. Shannon McNally 9pm. Country soul. Club Helsinki Hudson, Hudson. (518) 828-4800. Creation 9:30pm. Pop, soft rock. Copperfield's, Millbrook. 677-8188.

The Outdoors Geology Walk 10am. Join hydrogeologist Bill Prehoda for a tour of Denning's Point as he “tells all” about the geology of this peninsula. CEIE, Beacon. 838-1600. Farm & Forest Trail and South Family Hike 3pm. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137.

Spoken Word Author Amos Oz 7pm. $36/$18 students. Temple Emanuel, Kingston. 338-8131.

Theater Ragtime: The Musical 8pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111. Dracula 8pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

SUNDAY 30 Body / Mind / Spirit The Metaphysical Center Interfaith Worship Service 11:30am. Cunneen-Hackett Arts Center, Poughkeepsie. 471-4993. Akashic Records Revealed 2pm-4pm. With June Brought. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. The Woodstock Psychic Wisdom Meetup 4:30pm-6:30pm. Adam F. Bernstein. $20/$10 members. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650.

Events Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary: A Day at the Farm 11am-4pm. Learn more about the animals who have been given a second chance at life. $10/$5 children. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, Willow. 679-5955. Young Artist Talent Search 12:30pm. Hudson Valley Mall, Kingston. (607) 229-6087. Attic Access Tour 2pm. From basements to attics, the All Access Tour offers the chance peek into the rarely seen areas of the Village. $27/$24 members. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (800) 817-1137. The Woodstock Chess Club 2pm-4pm. Woodstock Golf Course Pub & Restaurant, Woodstock. 679-2914. Haunted Huguenot Street: Sometimes the Dark Side Shines 6:30pm-9pm. Story-filled guided tour. Historic Huguenot Street, New Paltz. 255-1660.

Film The Cat and the Canary 9pm. Silent film screening. The Wherehouse Restaurant, Newburgh. 561-7240.

Music Brunch with Akie Bermiss 10am-2pm. Live @ The Falcon, Marlboro. Doug Marcus 11:30am-2:30pm. Jazz. Rhinecliff Hotel, Rhinecliff. 876-0590. Wandering Willow 1pm. Acoustic. Taste Budd's Chocolate and Coffee Café, Red Hook. 758-6500. Chamber Orchestra Kremlin 2pm. $38/$28. Mahaiwe Performing Arts Center, Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (413) 528-0100. Franz Liszt: A Hungarian Rhapsodie 2pm. Gail Archer, organ. A recital celebrating the 200th anniversary of the composer's birth. Vassar Chapel, Poughkeepsie. 437-5370.

Spoken Word Hudson Valley Ya Society: Jennifer Castle, Marianna Baer, & Matt Blackstone 4pm. Oblong Books & Music, Rhinebeck. 876-0500. Interactive Book and Program Discussion 4pm. Members of the community are invited to a discussion about the Sherman Alexie books and the 2011 program. Elting Memorial Library, New Paltz. www.onebookonenewpaltz.org.

Theater Ragtime: The Musical 3pm. $18/$14 students and seniors/$12 families and groups. Hudson High School, Hudson. (866) 811-4111. Dracula 3pm. $24/$22 seniors and children. Center for Performing Arts, Rhinebeck. 876-3080.

Workshops Intro to EFT (Emotional Freedom Techniques) 2pm-4pm. Jeff Schneider, LCSW. $20/$15. Mirabai Books, Woodstock. 679-2100.

MONDAY 31 Body / Mind / Spirit Annual Woodstock Psychic Fair 12pm-9pm. $20. Sage Center for the Healing Arts, Woodstock. 679-5650. Learn to Meditate: Raja Yoga Meditation 6:30pm-7:30pm. Peace Village Learning and Retreat, Haines Falls. (518) 589-5000. Being Within the Spirit World 7pm-10pm. Bliss Yoga Center, Woodstock. 679-8700. Qigong with Zach Baker 7:30pm-8:30pm. $15/$13 members. Unison Arts & Learning Center, New Paltz. 255-1559.

Classes Argentine Tango Tango basics: 6pm-7pm, Intermediate: 7pm-8pm. Hudson. (518) 537-2589. Swing Dance Class Beginner at 6pm, intermediate at 7pm, and advanced at 8pm. ASK Arts Center, Kingston. 338-0331.

Music Zumbi Zumbi 9pm. Latin. Harmony, Woodstock. 679-7760.

Workshops

Spoken Word

Return & Learn: Shakers and the Spirit World 2pm. $17/$8/$4. Hancock Shaker Village, Pittsfield, MA. (800) 817-1137.

Dante and African American Culture 4:45pm. Dennis Looney. Bard College, Annandale-onHudson. 758-7900.


books gary shteyngart at artswalk literary 2011 in hudson image provided Gary Shteyngart will read at the Hudson Opera House on October 9, part of the ArtsWalk Literary 2011 event in Hudson.

From Russia with Funny Hailed as “a droll Kafka” by the Portland Oregonian and favorably compared to sliced bread by the usual suspects, Gary Shteyngart was born in Leningrad in 1972. When he was seven, his family of “small furry immigrants” came to America, settling in Little Neck, Queens. Shteyngart’s novels include The Russian Debutante’s Handbook (Riverhead, 2002), Absurdistan (Random House, 2006), and Super Sad True Love Story (Random House, 2010), an instant New York Times bestseller that appeared on more than 40 “Best Books of the Year” lists and probably caused a great deal of food to come out of readers’ noses. Winner of the Stephen Crane Award and National Jewish Book Award for Fiction, Shteyngart was also named a New Yorker Best Writer Under 40, an honor he finds rather ominous at age 39. Super Sad True Love Story’s hero, Lenny Abramov, is the book-loving son of Russian expats who “literally immigrated to the United States with one pair of underwear between them.” Now 39—stop me if this is sounding familiar—Lenny meets Eunice Park, a “nano-sized” Korean-American Valley Girl, at a party. She calls him a nerd, rebuttons his shirt cuff, and tells him how to brush his teeth. Of course he falls in love with her. Their mismatched romance unfolds in an all-tooforeseeable future in which a stumbling America, governed with a rusting iron fist by the Bipartisan Party, owes its soul to the Chinese company store. Personal privacy is extinct—everything from credit ratings to cholesterol counts and “fuckability” rankings is displayed on handheld communication devices called äppäräti; the Village Voice called the novel “the finest piece of anti-iPhone propaganda ever written.” So it seems entirely appropriate to interview Shteyngart by e-mail. Though he lives on Manhattan’s Gramercy Park with his fiancée and an unspecified number of dachshunds, he’s been spending a lot of time in Germantown lately— except when book touring and researching magazine features in Europe. —Nina Shengold Where are you now and what kind of electronic device are you using? i am in madrid eating tapas for a travel story and promoting my last book in spanish. My iphone broke down in denmark. i now have a truly awful spanish phone which is

just a glorified alarm clock. all I want to do is get back to germantown and buy sardines at otto’s. How was the airport security? i’m always stopped at security because i look so explosive. i just ate a barnacle.   I’m always curious about how writers start. What was your first idea or image for Super Sad True Love Story? a very young television repairman came to my apt, saw the wall of books and said, “oh, man, why you got so many books, and such a small TV?” i realized that many youths find books kind of gross.   What’s your own relationship to books? i like to burn them when it gets cold in germantown, but otherwise I like them very much.   In SSTLS, they’re called “doorstops,” and Eunice is freaked out that Lenny can spend as much as half an hour looking at one. Their 15-year age difference is a technological generation gap—she’s a digital native, and he has an immigrant’s nostalgia for the outmoded. Did you always plan to alternate Lenny’s diary entries and Eunice’s chat posts, or did that evolve as you worked on the book? always planned it that way. writing eunice was totes fun. i (heart) her character.   You’ve said it was hard to satirize political and economic events when your dire predictions—bank failures and American auto manufacturers collapsing—kept coming true. Which of the new developments in your novel would you least like to see in real life? the fuckability ratings in bars. i know i wouldn’t do so well. How do you think the Bipartisan Party would fare in the current election scrimmage? i think they’re winning already.   The cover of the paperback Super Sad True Love Story cites kinships with Nabokov, Orwell, Chekhov, and Judd Apatow. That’s quite a quartet. thank god andy rooney’s not on the list.   Your (hilarious!) YouTube book trailer features cameos by Edmund White, Mary Gaitskill, Jeffrey Eugenides, and

Jay McInerney, not to mention your former Columbia student James Franco. You play a heavily accented, cheerfully ignorant Gary Shteyngart clone, kind of a literary Borat. How did this come about? during a drunken night at yaddo I jotted down some notes about my being illiterate. in the bleak light of a saratoga winter morning, the notes seemed to make sense. several thousand dollars later, we had a video. You also appear on YouTube skewering the ubiquitous author blurb. But you wrote one for Paul LaFarge’s Luminous Airplanes. i blurbed luminous airplanes because it’s amazing. and amazing books aren’t written very often. so buy it. What can local audiences expect from your reading with Paul LaFarge at the Hudson ArtsWalk on October 9? i’ll probably have a cold and sneeze a lot. then I’ll pass out. paul will carry me from the artswalk and into a waiting subaru forester.   What are you working on now? i’m working on a memoir, which is hard cause i don’t remember anything that’s ever happened to me. if anyone has any ideas, please send them to gary@writemygoddamnmemoirforme.org.   Is it ever a burden being funny in interviews? (That’s a serious question.) You’ve said that the satire came first in your novels, that your teacher Chang-rae Lee challenged you to go deeper with The Russian Debutante’s Handbook, and your editor on Super Sad True Love Story urged you to explore the love story. Should I be making more of an effort to dig beneath the funny? beneath the funny is more funny.   The multilayered Gary Shteyngart and Paul LaFarge will read on Sunday, October 9, at 6pm at the Hudson Opera House. Admission is free. This event is part of ArtsWalk Literary 2011, which also includes appearances by L. S. Asekoff, Helen Benedict, Sarah Falkner, Mary Johnson, Dara Lurie, Carole Maso, Stephen O’Connor, Melissa Holbrook Pierson, Francine Prose, Suzanne Snider, Dana Spiotta, and Mark Wunderlich. (518) 671-6213; www.artscolumbia.org. 10/11 ChronograM forecast 121


Photo by Eric Francis / Book of Blue Studio

Planet Waves by eric francis coppolino

In Search of the Soul of America

T

he Sun recently entered Libra, but through this year there has been some unusual astrology happening two signs away, in Sagittarius. It involves several of the recently discovered small planets that orbit our Sun, aligned with a strange body called the Great Attractor. The alignment is precise to the degree right now. I associate it with a kind of toxic spirituality that is on the loose lately. Taken one way, it can manifest as the desire for healing, or if taken unconsciously, as some inflamed, weird ideas and behavior. The grouping involves a little Pluto-like planet called Ixion, which I associate with the lack of moral or ethical consciousness. We’re seeing this blatantly in modern politics. The campaign of 2012 is well underway, and so far it’s all about who you can screw over the worst. I know you may not watch the news, and if that is true, I can tell you that the political environment would qualify as unconscious, inflamed, and weird lately. I am as disgusted by politics as anyone right now. But as I was watching one of these “jobs creation” discussions recently, peering through the language and the deception, it occurred to me that politicians get away with what they do because most people don’t understand politics—that is, how the game is played, and who influences it from backstage.
 Most people don’t even know that it’s a show. Usually, you have to participate directly or watch from the first few rows to notice. It requires some experience to see the Democrat/Republican game for what it really is, and what it has become. Though the parties have different outward positions, most of the time those differences are about as meaningful as dividing the summer camp into the Blue and Gold teams for the mock Olympics. 

The summer camp is capitalism itself. Wall Street sets the most basic terms of our society, which you can tell (in part) because there is a stock ticker on every TV station’s news ticker rather than, say, the voting record of our representatives. Political campaigns are now all about the money invested by people who purchase influence, and the supposed issues we debate are a ruse. The flow of cash, lots of cash, determines nearly every decision. The ongoing debate over eliminating Social Security—I cannot believe I’m even typing those words—is about who gets their hands on that huge fund (Wall Street wants it desperately). 
 In order to convince us that we need to take away benefits that people have paid for their whole lives, and that every employer pours money into every week, we have to be convinced that it’s a bad thing, and to do that, we need to chill down the emotional 122 planet waves ChronograM 10/11

temperature of society. We all have to be desensitized to one another’s needs. Usually this is done indirectly. You may have seen a video of the discussion during one of the recent debates when eternal presidential hopeful Rep. Ron Paul was asked what society should do if someone who was healthy and didn’t think he needed health insurance (and didn’t want to pay the $300 a month) ended up in a coma. Should society keep him alive? The audience cheered at the possibility that he should be allowed to die. 

This was not at some homespun backwater political rally—it was at a Politico/CNN event, and the questioner was Wolf Blitzer. At the prior debate, something even weirder happened. Brian Williams, the anchor of NBC News, asked candidate Texas Gov. Rick Perry: “Your state has executed 234 death row inmates, more than any governor in modern times. Have you struggled to sleep at night with the idea that any one of those might have been innocent?” At the mention of the executions, the audience sent up a cheer, during which Williams paused— then he finished his sentence. I guess I shouldn’t be so surprised, but the little kid in me feels nauseous that people would cheer about executions. Of course, we’ve all seen the “pro death” rallies in prison parking lots as someone receives the lethal injection, and throughout history executions have often been public spectacles. Perry replied, “No sir. I’ve never struggled with that at all. The state of Texas has a very thoughtful, very clear process in place of which when someone commits the most heinous of crimes against our citizens, they get a fair hearing, they go through an appellate process, they go up to the Supreme Court of the United States if that’s required. But in the state of Texas, if you come into our state and you kill one of our children, you kill a police officer, you’re involved with another crime and you kill one of our citizens, you will face the ultimate justice in the state of Texas, and that is you will be executed.” A thoughtful, clear process? That would be the same one, mandated nationally by the Supreme Court’s famous 1972 Furman decision. That process resulted in at least 13 false convictions in Illinois, which as a result stopped its death penalty in 2003. I cannot imagine not struggling with something like the potential execution of an innocent person at all. If he’s appeasing himself that there is Supreme Court review of each case, he’s kidding himself. That review is strictly at the court’s option. It is he who has the power of executive clemency; he signs the death warrant. He cannot, or will not, admit that he’s struggled even a little bit.


For the population, the death penalty is about blood lust. For politicians, it’s about demonstrating who is boss, and I believe that it’s a form of modern-day human sacrifice. Note that if economic conditions persist and the unemployment rate stays where it is or gets worse, Rick Perry is the person we’re most likely to have as our next president. This does not worry me as much as the spiritually vapid social environment we’re living in, evidenced not only by all those people who raise a cheer about lethal injection or letting a patient die, but by everyone who makes a point of being cold to the needs of others. It does not worry me as much as the people who consider themselves spiritual who think they are going to meditate away the bad people—that’s as ridiculous as Perry’s plan to pray for the federal budget deficit to go away, and I think we need to recognize that fact. I don’t think the solution to the problems we face will be a political one. But I think that along the way we will have to understand politics. That is not the final destination. The final destination is understanding ourselves. And we might start with understanding the disconnect that is allowing all of this to happen, and the way it’s being exploited by a kind of opportunistic infection. Choosing not to participate in politics does not make one immune. This is particularly true given that we’re experiencing an artificially created economic crisis concurrently with the same forces wanting to remove the social safety net that is the only thing between what we have right now and an actual depression. Most working people curse the poor and not the wealthy for their problems, but they have a lot more in common with the people they look down on. And this whole mental complex has developed into a kind of sadistic mania. We have to ask ourselves how this can be happening. I think we need to cultivate an understanding of what is happening within humanity, and I mean that on an individual level (you and me), then multiplied out by however many people there are. What we think of as “the media” is prohibited from discussing this issue as a matter of personal ethics, and it’s not a small matter. Politics is currently all pumped full of religious rhetoric, which is a ruse for something that’s essentially a spiritual problem. Let’s consider the conjunction happening in Sagittarius for a picture of how that looks. Sagittarius is the sign associated with the spiritual quest, or quests of any kind for that matter. I like Alice A. Bailey’s description of that sign the best: the arrow represents the onepointed direction of the soul determined to be conscious, free, and most importantly, determined to travel on its path of initiation or discipleship. Sagittarius is on one level about the centaur (who shows up there in some representations of the sign, because it’s in the constellation Centaurus), and this describes the spiritual question of, ‘Am I a man, or am I an animal?’ The whole war against sex that politics is currently so drunk on plays off of that very conflict, and it’s a septic conflict at the moment: it’s infected. If we take Sagittarius on what you might think of as a more evolved level, it’s about the quest of making contact with one’s soul. And here, our society and many people in it have a little problem. The way most people are trying to handle the infection factor, and many other attributes of the issue, is with painkillers. This is represented by Pholus, which is about intoxicants; those include everything from alcohol to video games. One of the mental states of Pholus is being so drugged that you’re out of contact with yourself, and as a result, out of control. Hylonome is the next factor—a planet about grief and how we deal with it, extending from the most personal response to mass eruptions in society. It’s about “the cry of the poor” (a cry growing louder by the day) and how we respond to it. Hylonome can have a suicidal or “senseless” quality. We must suppress an enormous amount of grief just to get through the day. We do so every time we turn away from pain and suffering, every time we walk past someone we could afford to help, every time we train ourselves to be insensitive. We might dress this up as “having boundaries,” or we could say that to be alive right now, many think it’s necessary to live behind walls. You can think of people who cheer about a patient dying, or inmates dying, as a wall. What is behind that wall? The answer is a world of pain. This would be better served in a therapy room, and is safe enough in one’s living room, but when it becomes expressed as public policy, we all have to be concerned. I have also mentioned Ixion, the small planet hanging out in this neighborhood, the one that’s about lack of morals and ethics; in a word, depravity, disguised as religion (nothing new, I know). Ixion has been working over the Great Attractor for several recent years, evangelizing the weak with the idea that there is no difference between right and wrong. As for the Great Attractor itself. What we know is that it’s a supermassive, pumped-up, radioactive deep-space point that even astronomers have a hard time understanding. It’s not what you would call human. Nobody has ever seen it. Its existence is inferred by many clues, such as all the galaxies rushing in its direction—more than a million of them. But it’s rushing away at the same time. If Sagittarius has anything to do with our soul’s quest, this is an extremely tense situation—and to some degree we are all in it. We might start to work out our situation with a basic understanding of cause and effect. Every effect has a cause, every cause has an effect, and the two cannot be separated, no matter how fast we run, or how blotto we try to make our awareness. In a word, this is the law of karma. Much of what we seem to struggle with is free will: we can choose to be compassionate or not, for example. If we have free will, then we need karma as a governing agency. We currently live as if cause and effect have no relationship. We don’t need to prove the point one way or the other—we just need to look at what is so.

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10/11 ChronograM planet waves 123


Planet Waves Horoscopes ARIES (March 20-April 19) In every relationship where the parties are opposite sex and anywhere close to reproductive age, there will be reproductive politics involved. The relationship does not have to be an overtly sexual one; pheromones know no boundaries. By politics I mean there will be some negotiation or struggle for power that is based on biological instructions that tell us to reproduce, and how those are activated by the presence of people who might help us do that. Within relationships, part of the struggle involves the question of whether the “real” purpose of sex is to make babies or to make love. I don’t mean to set up a dichotomy, or worse, a false dichotomy. The actual purpose is not necessarily one or the other—but the truth is that relatively few people explore their sexuality in order to have children. That happens without much exploration at all; in fact it usually happens unconsciously, leading to all kinds of adventures and misadventures. This is the time to take control of your creative power, in whatever form it takes. It’s the time to look for your wholeness not in relationships but within yourself. It’s been that time for a while, but as the next month or two develops, you may discover that you have no choice. Your relationships will remain important; they will provide the necessary reflection that your self-discovery and healing process are your business. Yet beyond a certain point, they can no longer be the main focus of your life.

TAURUS

(April 19-May 20)

You’re about to reach a limit in your relationship to your mother or to her legacy. The days of deep therapy where we looked honestly at the influence of our parents seem to be a relic of history, supplanted by prescriptions and distractions. Yet there is wisdom in understanding how these previously all-powerful, all-knowing people shaped us, taught us how to feel about ourselves, and influenced our concept of the world. This month you will have the opportunity to see something involving your parents that has been impossible to observe, perhaps ever. Factors that operate “subconsciously” can have a profound influence on our lives, often being point sources of the psychic chaos that we don’t seem to understand. These are the same internal wave machines that keep us running in circles or searching obsessively for who we are. They are often invisible; we have to infer their existence, and that can seem like a clairvoyant feat. Yet a kind of clairvoyance is exactly what you get now: the ability to see into the dark, into the world of your ancestors, and in particular, into the psyche of your mother. I can describe what I am seeing in your solar chart: There seemed to be something strong about her, which was a mask over something that was missing. It’s not just this fact that you can observe, but also the results. Once you understand the ways you’ve been turned against yourself, you may find it a lot easier to be your own friend.

GEMINI (May 20-June 21)

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undo everyday Susanstress. DeStefano

Creativity is serious business. I agree with Julia Cameron, author of The Artist’s Way: Actually expressing your creativity is more about focus and discipline than it is about inspiration. Yes, it’s wonderful when work seems “truly inspired,” but that says nothing of the 15 drafts that went into an article or novel you love. It’s a little like the feeling you get sitting inside a cathedral, responding to the architecture—then you realize it took a century to build, requiring a mix of inspiration, engineering and persistence. Your chart is strong with all three right now. Gemini is famous for its challenges focusing; in order to harness your creative (or other) talents, what seems like an extreme kind of discipline is necessary. It’s not really extreme, though. It’s more about guiding your work process into a container. This might be about anything from a job search to a project you’ve wanted to do for a long time. The container is primarily about time and space. Define the time and set aside the space and you will make a lot more progress. I suggest you work with limits, such as “one hour on this project every day,” until whatever you’re doing has a life of its own. You will feel a threshold shift at that point. I would add a word of caution about the influence of friends. They are only your friends if they have the same basic agenda as you.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22)

What exactly are you exerting yourself against? Let’s say you want to be more confident, so to do that you wage a campaign against insecurity. How well is that going to work? Another approach would be to masTake time for yourself — at our Aveda Concept Salon and Spa. Experience the soothing nature of our plant-derived products for skin,ter the elements of confidence, while gradually understanding your insecurity. In that case you hair, body and life style. Enjoy the calming moment of stress relief would not be waging a campaign against anything, but rather reaching into another way of being before every service and our makeup touch-up afterward. Feel inner more suited to your goals. I suggest you keep your efforts proactive, rather than attempting to fix something about you or about the world that is “wrong.” There is a fine line, I know. But rather peace. Call us today for a hair cut, color, facial or spa treatment. than being about something you can see, it’s about something you can feel. Fixing something feels different than creating something new. Of course, to switch from one to the other, you would need to shift your orientation from the past to the present/future. Your primary goal would be Find other Aveda locations at 800.328.0849 or aveda.com. different as well, and by that I mean your concept for what you want to accomplish. It’s both easier to focus on the past, and easier to get stuck there. What you might call the key to the future is a vision; that is the difference between fixing and creating. Gradually you are strengthening the part of your mind that allows you to visualize what does not exist. This is going to take some time, but you are about to receive an energy boost. This month, I can sum up the key to discerning the past from the present in one word—passion.

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Planet Waves Horoscopes

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LEO (July 22-Aug. 23) You are working with a lot of energy right now, and you need to direct it consciously. It would help if you figured out just how much you are working with, a fact that may be concealed by the odd sense that your energy is suppressed. In truth it is not; that is merely a thought, but it’s a powerful one. You may be concerned that if you tap into your energy, you’ll go out of control. I can assure you this will not happen; the more you make contact with your sense of presence, your will, and your clear desires, the more you’re likely to direct them in a constructive way. I would caution you that in the angle of your solar chart that addresses matters of a spiritual or religious nature, there is quite a bit of chaos—as if you’re not sure what you believe. For this reason, I suggest you explore your beliefs in the form of practical actions: making things, exploring places you’ve never seen, business activities, and even sex. I think you may be sensing the potential for harming others, or for being perceived as selfish—or worse, actually discounting the needs of others and being self-centered. The astrology has some builtin safeguards that will pretty much ensure that you take the needs of others and indeed your whole environment into account, though until you dare to do something different, you might not notice they are in place.

VIRGO

(August 23-September 22) You would do well to ask yourself just what happened to you the past month, and where those events leave you right now. For a few years, you’ve been addressing a situation with roots deep in the past. Each year around your birthday there is flare-up of what you might think of as emotional activity, or family issues, or karma. Then it tends to sink below the surface for a while, only to arise again in a new form. You may think that you’re not making any progress but I can assure you that if you compare the past three birthday seasons, you will see signs of movement, maturity and increasing emotional clarity. One thing to bear in mind (I will repeat this later in the year) is the relationship between emotional wellbeing and your sense of being spiritually grounded. These may be connected for everyone, but for you, the contact point is especially vivid. There is a deeper connection to your ancestral past that you may have noticed during these phases, if you look beyond family-related dramas—they go much deeper. As for where that leaves you today, having been through this? I would suggest that you’ve never been closer to who you are. The opinions of relationship partners, business partners, or those who would seek to influence your life, are now in their correct place. Feel the sensation of being solid in who you are, your own authority, your own source of trust.

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LIBRA (September 22-October 23) Relationships as we practice them are not set up for the partners to keep individuating. They tend to be designed for conformity, which in theory is the easier of the two ways to go—unless, of course, ongoing growth is your desire and your intention. There’s also something else going on. Much of the struggle we see in relationships is between the desire of people to be free and their desire to have companionship. The phase of life you’re in right now is about working through that seeming contradiction. It’s actually possible to resolve this one, but you need a lot of maturity and determination to do it. It comes down to understanding the purpose of your existence, which is secondary to the purpose of your relationships. This is the big one; this is the thing. Those who focus on existence first and relationships second can highlight or evoke the insecurity of those around them. Yet what you may be discovering is the simple and necessary truth that you are the most significant point of continuity in your life. Your path through the universe is consistent; the people around you will come and go. To get to this spot, you may have to pass through a sense of loneliness or isolation (or the fear of this potential). But something is waiting for you on the other side. I believe this will be a crucial step in transitioning toward your authentic personhood and independence.

SCORPIO

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(October 23-November 22)

As a perpetual gender studies major, one thing I’ve noticed about the world in recent years is women openly expressing their desire to be in contact with their male side. This used to be expressed as (clearly misnamed) feminism. These days, it is something more basic and not attached to much ideology—nor to being lesbian. I believe that men have been openly pushing the envelope on expressing their feminine side for a lot longer, even risking arrest, prosecution and clobbering to do so. The astrology of Scorpio this month is all about exploring sexual identity. I mean that from the inside out—the emotional and hormonal experience of sex and gender rather than any kind of affect or show of style. For a while you may feel like you’re two different people, one who likes to dominate and conquer, and one who thirsts for submission and craves allowing your more vulnerable side out of its usual hiding places. You may have the illusion that this is building to some kind of a crisis, particularly if it’s causing any consternation in your relationships. It could just as easily be a fun place to explore, if you put your desires face-up on the table. But I don’t really see a crisis at all—what I see is a direct experience of resolving some long-held tension, which will allow you to clear up important elements of the past and move on to a new agenda in life and in love.

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10/11 ChronograM planet waves 125


Planet Waves Horoscopes Eric Francis Coppolino www.planetwaves.net

SAGITTARIUS

(November 22-December 22)

Ethics are always situational: they depend on the moment. As such they are flexible and useful. Morals pretend to be absolute, and as a result they are brittle and lack sensitivity to the actual circumstances involved in any question of right or wrong. You’re in the process of getting clear about all of this, and I reckon that it has been through personal experience and not by sitting in philosophy class. The world is in a state of moral decay (which is frightening enough), but in the midst of this extreme disorientation can arise the simple question of what is appropriate. I suggest you keep asking yourself that, from moment to moment. The word ethics has its root in the Greek word ethos, which was considered the highest ideal—and the true spirit of a person or a society. When we say, “This is a person of character,� we are talking about ethos. I think of it as the guiding ray within a person, something you can tune into that informs and enlightens everything else that you do. I suggest you allow all of your experiences to guide you toward making contact with this core experience of humanity: They certainly can right now, if that is what you want. The sensation is a distinct morph of that which is spiritual and that which is human. It’s the place where there is no difference; that well-tuned state of mind where life becomes art and art becomes life.

CAPRICORN (December 22-January 20)

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In what ways have you succeeded at doing things differently than your parents? I really mean it—truly, significantly differently? Humanity has a way of not making progress on this particular issue, partly because people are so enamored of their parents, and so many others aspire to their mediocrity. I have noticed that much of what we call selfimprovement, personal growth or having better relationships usually exists in contrast to our parents and how we think of them. In a sense, we’re always dancing with their limits—that is, until we stop. One of the most popular ways to go beyond those particular limits is to wage a revolt. However, where you are in life—that’s not only not an option: it’s just a tad adolescent, when your primary objective (so far as I can tell) is to be a dependable adult. There is certainly a rebellious streak that is stirring you up deep inside, but your expression of that impulse is designed to be all about solid, unflinching leadership. One thing about Capricorn is that it’s always a child inside, and that you tend to get younger as the years unfold. Let your desire to stir the pot entice you to be that much more fearless, that much bolder, but always taking a well-proportioned approach and giving the appearance of playing within the rules. In essence, the perfect revolt for this moment is to be unequivocally yourself.

AQUARIUS 53:063

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PISCES

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(January 20-February 19)

Religion is a supposedly simple way to cook down the complexities of who and what a person is. It takes many forms, but the one thing they all have in common is reducing many intricacies and subtle shades of meaning down to rules and a few rigid ideas. They paper over how much we have going on inside, how jumbled our minds can get, and how difficult it can be to have a clear sense of self. This is especially true now, due to two current, and rather extreme, trends: increasing limits placed on our options (all of us), and the deep restlessness of the human soul. You don’t need to impose an external ideology onto yourself, no matter where it comes from; that is not a solution. You also have a rare perspective on seeing the ways in which beliefs box you into your limitations, and know how questioning your beliefs can set you free. Over the next few weeks, you’re likely to encounter situations that compel you to challenge what you believe and why. The deeper issue is who has set the limits on your vision of yourself and of the world; who has set the limits on your happiness. You may be inclined to say that it’s you, but it actually goes back a lot longer than any memory of the “you� that you now know. I suggest you push back; your mind is vibrating with the need to express yourself, and though it seems chaotic in there, it’s the fertile, passionate kind of chaos. (February 19-March 20)

You are poised to make some truly innovative decisions about money, which will be disguised in the appearance of conventionality. By innovative I mean radical, based on your values and your willingness to dare. By appearance of conventionality, I mean through some kind of structure or agreement that seems, on its face, like it’s a normal thing: a contract, a company, a partnership of some kind. This is an opportunity to remember—and work with—the difference between content and form, which is another way of saying that appearances deceive. There are many forms of deception, and one of them is camouflage, which is precisely what you’re doing. In a similar way, your charts talk about working both ends of the polarity that seems to run from risk to discipline. It’s not really that linear; these are ingredients that you can and must blend artfully; you need the right proportion of each. As to do this, remember your purpose; focus on why you’re doing what you’re doing, and consider your ultimate goal. That goal is likely to change and evolve, which is a healthy sign: It means your values are in a state of evolution. If the people around you seem stuck or slow to pick up on what, to you, is obvious, don’t waste energy trying to convince people of anything. Your actions and their results will speak for themselves.


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Parting Shot

Kamil Vojnar, Attracted to Light, mixed media on paper, 2011

Kamil Vojnar’s photographs, with their diaphanous images that linger between dreams and waking, delicately juxtapose the four elements as well as the creatures of the real and fantastical realms.Vojnar’s black-and-white still-lifes emerge resplendently in full-fledged phosphorescence according to how he scratches, varnishes, and paints over them. Trained as a painter, Vojnar seeks to push the limits of reality through the tension of what exists first as it is displayed within photography. “In a painting, you can paint anything you want,” Vojnar explains. “In the photographic [medium], it must, on some level, exist first. That tension between what exists and what is made up is what interests me.” The self-taught Czech-born photographer studied as a graphic designer at the 128 ChronograM 10/11

School of Graphic Arts in Prague before finishing at the Art Institute of Philadelphia. Residing now in Los Angeles.,Vojnar has lived in a variety of settings from Vienna and Paris to St. Remy de Provence in the South of France. He expresses that the new exhibition reflects not so much the actual act of flying, but more an ungrounded sense of displacement from his immediate surroundings. Selections from Kamil Vojnar’s series “Flying Blind” will be exhibited at Galerie BMG in Woodstock October 15 through November 7. An artist’s reception will be held on Saturday, October 15 from 5pm to 7pm. (845) 679-0027; www.galeriebmg.com. Portfolio: www.flyingblindpictures.com. —Juliann Castelbuono


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October 2011 Chronogram  

The October 2011 issue of Chronogram.

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