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Kololi beach, near Banjul, The Gambia

Sin Fronteras/ Sans Frontières/ Without Borders: AADS Fall 2011 Newsletter


CONTENTS 3

Statement of Director: Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier

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Statement of Director of Graduate Programs: Dr. Heather Russell

32

Karell Travel Grant Laurel Burchfield

6

Staff

33

Call for Grant Applications

7

AADS Faculty

34

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Faculty Achievements

What We‘ve Done, What We‘re Doing, What We‘re Going to Do: Spring 2010-Fall 2011 Spring 2012

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New Affiliate Faculty: Percy Hintzen Phillip Carter Eric JB von Wettberg

37

Event Listing

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Dr. Carolina Faria

40

AADS Programs

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2011-2012 AADS Courses

44

Give Back

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Alumni Accomplishments: Amy Wolfson

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AADS 2011-2012 Students

24

AADS Graduate Student Association

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AADS Study Abroad Programs Summer 2012A Senegal/The Gambia; Summer 2012B Ecuador/Brazil

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STATEMENT OF DIRECTOR When I first came to FIU, in the fall of 1998, joining both what were then called the Department of Sociology & Anthropology (now called the Department of Global & Sociocultural Studies or GSS) and the African-New World Studies Program (ANWS), it was quite clear that the mission of ANWS was, in support of the Florida Mandate 1) to organize a number of educative and informative events (lectures, symposia, conferences, workshops, etc.) for the benefit of the university community and the communities we serve in South Florida; and 2) to function as an area studies academic program. At that time, ANWS offered undergraduate and graduate certificates. Under the leadership of Carole Boyce Davies, we designed the curriculum of an MA program, which was finally approved by the Board of Trustees in the year 2000. I served as the first ANWS graduate program director. At this very point in the life of our Program, which is now called African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS), and which exists in the College of Arts & Sciences‘ School of International & Public Affairs (SIPA), we are still at work with our dual mission. One of the sections of this newsletter informs the readers about the events we have organized last academic year, as well as about those that are already lined up for the current one. On the academic side, we now have undergraduate and graduate certificates in AADS, an MA program in AADS, and three combined MA/Ph.D. programs—one with History, one with Global & Sociocultural Studies (which regroup the disciplines of anthropology, geography and sociology), and one with International Relations. Since its creation in the early 1990s, our

Program has been traditionally stronger in African Diaspora studies than in African studies. Since I became director of ANWS in July 2008, just before we decided to change our name to AADS, I have been preoccupied to continue to nurture our traditional strength, concurrently developing the Africanist component of our research and course offerings, so that we can become the renown African AND African Diaspora Studies Program we aspire to be. We can list here a few of our accomplishments following our efforts to develop African studies at FIU. We now offer a summer study abroad program in Senegal & The Gambia since 2010 (―Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa‖).We have developed a partnership with the Université Cheikh Anta Diop in Dakar, Senegal and with the University of The Gambia (UTG), in Banjul for the holding of the study abroad program and for the conduct of research on the development of the tourism industry in West Africa. Beginning in the fall 2012 we will be offering an entirely online new undergraduate certificate in African studies. We invite everyone interested to check our website for information about that new certificate in the late spring 2012. We are developing exciting new courses, among which are: Latin America and the Caribbean in Africa; Women and Human Rights in Sub-Saharan Africa; Gender and Sexualities in Sub-Saharan African Contexts. The offering of the new certificate in African studies, which will be both in face-to-face and online delivery, will bring us to rename, beginning in the fall 2012 as well, our current certificate in AADS as ―Certificate in Global Black Studies.‖ The latter will be mostly focused on the African diaspora globally.

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STATEMENT OF DIRECTOR We have initiated a campaign to increase the enrollment in all our academic programs, undergraduate and graduate certificates, MA and combined MA/Ph.D. programs, and study abroad programs. About the latter, in the summer 2012 we are offering a second exciting study abroad program in Afro Latin America that will bring students to two contrasting national contexts: the Andean region of Ecuador, and Brazil (check our website for more information). Increasing enrollment in our academic programs is of the utmost importance in this time of budget cuts and decreasing state support for higher education. Increased enrollment will allow us to demonstrate our relevance to our institution‘s upper administration and to state decision makers. This is why I ask all faculty colleagues, and concerned undergraduate and graduate students to join us in this effort. --Jean Muteba Rahier, Director

Dr. Rahier with Mamyrah Prosper, current GSS graduate student and former AADS Graduate Certificate student, at AADS Afro Latino Conference Saturday Session with the Presenters 2011 (February)

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STATEMENT OF DIRECTOR OF AADS GRADUATE PROGRAMS I am elated and humbled to have been appointed Director of Graduate Programs for African & African Diaspora Studies (AADS). I have big shoes to fill for Dr. Alex Lichtenstein was, as many of you know, a tireless advocate for the AADS program, and a great mentor, supporter, and educator for our AADS graduate students. It was under his direction that the MA/PhD program in AADS/History was conceived and inaugurated. I am pleased to announce, thanks to the tireless efforts of our Director, Professor Jean Rahier, that the third combined program, which offers an MA in AADS and Ph.D. in Global and Sociocultural Studies (GSS) has been approved for this academic year. I have every confidence that we will continue to pursue excellence in AADS scholarship, and continue to make a tremendous impact within the FIU community. Please join with me in congratulating Christina Bazzaroni, one of our latest graduates, whose successful research paper defense was by all accounts stellar. She continues, in the vein of our other distinguished alumni to pursue further graduate study; she is currently enrolled in the PhD program in FIU‘s department of Global and Sociocultural Studies (GSS). Join me as well in offering hearty congratulations to Roberto Fernandez (Spr ‘11) and Sarah Labbe (Sum ‘11) who completed their MA degrees in AADS this year. I want to warmly welcome to our program Jheanell Haynes and Charles May II, who are the most recent additions to our AADS family. Jheanell completed her Bachelor‘s Degree from FIU, and Charles comes to us from Kent State University in Ohio. This year, Fiacre Bienvenu, is completing his second year with us, will be interning with FACES International, an NGO working with the Tuareg in Mali, West Africa. Felix Jean-Louis will serve as President of our AADS-GSA, and we are anticipating an exciting, productive, and intellectually stimulating year as we work together in support of each other. Our 2010-2011 Karell Travel

Grant recipient, Laurel Burchfield traveled to Ethiopia and will present her research in the Spring. Finally, I am pleased to welcome another new face to our AADS FIU family, Kevin Fair, who is newly admitted to the International Relations program, is pursuing an AADS Graduate certificate, and joins our other graduate students who are completing AADS certification. AADS warmly welcomes renowned Caribbeanist scholar Percy Hintzen, who has recently joined Global and Sociocultural Studies (GSS), beginning in the Spring 2011, and who will, I know, be an important resource to all of us in the graduate program. The department of History continues its search for an AfroBrazilianist, and remains a vital partner program to us in AADS. I want to remind students and faculty to attend to all of the deadlines regarding MA-Thesis submissions, Graduation requirements, and of course, the Karell Travel Grant (2011-2012) which supports research, conferences, and/or teaching in Africa. Please keep abreast of AADS graduate program information by regularly checking our web-site and making note of announcements in this newsletter. Finally, I want to extend my sincere gratitude to Jean Rahier, Director of AADS, for so warmly and supportively welcoming me to the AADS family. In addition, I am extremely grateful to Rosa Henriquez for her continued excellent work and support. Last but by no means least I am indebted to Cheryl Johnson whose professionalism, continued support, and guidance have helped ease my transition. I am anticipating an extremely productive and fulfilling year as I work with our current students, faculty, and staff to help bring our graduate program to even greater heights of success. My very best, Heather Russell, Graduate Director and Assoc. Professor of English 5


STAFF Rosa Henriquez Office Assistant

Rosa has been with African and African Diaspora Studies since 2001. She coordinates all the events for the program, including conferences, lecture series and meetings. She manages the office and assists the Graduate Director in overseeing the Graduate Program in African & African Diaspora Studies. Rosa serves as a liaison between students, faculty and administrators and is always available to help. She grew up in the Dominican Republic and is the mother of three children. She is currently enrolled in the Event and Meeting Planning Certificate in the School of Hospitality Management. Cheryl Johnson Program Assistant

Cheryl coordinates with, and assists the AADS Director and the AADS Graduate Director on all academic projects and issues, including admissions, enrollment, curriculum management, student development and marketing communications. Prior to her arrival at FIU, Cheryl worked with the Ontario Ministry of Citizenship and Immigration, in Toronto, where she lived for 10 years. She is a graduate of the University of Toronto and Ryerson University, Toronto.

Christina Bazzaroni Graduate Assistant

Christina began her graduate assistantship with AADS in August 2011. She holds two Bachelor of Arts degrees in Psychology, and Sociology with emphasis in Law and Society, and an English Literature minor, from the University of California, Davis. Christina has obtained a language certificate from Florida International University's (FIU) Haitian Summer Institute. She also received a Master of Arts degree in African & African Diaspora Studies from FIU. Christina studies and performs African Diasporic dance, is a writer of creative non fiction and poetry, and is developing her technical skills as a photographer. Her current research is focused on spirituality in Hip Hop, looking at how spirituality within the context of Hip Hop impacts identities, communities, 6 and cultures.


AADS FACULTY AND COMMITTEES Core Faculty: Jean Muteba Rahier, Associate Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies and AADS; Director, AADS Jean-Robert Cadely, Associate Professor, Modern Languages and AADS Véronique Helenon, Assistant Professor, History and AADS

Alexandra Cornelius-Diallo, Assistant Professor, History and AADS Andrea Queeley, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies and AADS

Affiliate Faculty: Pascale Becel, Chair and Associate Professor, Modern Languages Steven R. Blevins, Assistant Professor, English Maya Boutaghou, Assistant Professor, Modern Languages and Women’s Studies Phillip Carter, Assistant professor of English and Linguistics John Clark, Professor, Politics & International Relations Carolina Faria, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Jenna Gibbs, Assistant Professor, History and AADS Percy Hintzen, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies (January 2012) Tometro Hopkins, Associate Professor, English Andrea Mantell-Seidel, Associate Professor Dance and Religious Studies Assefa Melesse, Associate Professor, Environmental Studies April Merleaux, Assistant Professor, History Aurora Morcillo, Associate Professor, History Roderick Paul Neumann, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies

Ulrich Oslender, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Vrushali Patil, Assistant Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies and Women's Studies Valerie Patterson, Clinical Associate Professor, Public Administration Joyce Peterson, Associate Professor, History; Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences Heather Russell, Associate Professor, English; Director of Graduate Studies, AADS Vicky Silvera, Head, Special Collection, Library Linda Spears-Bunton, Associate Professor, College of Education Dionne Stephens, Assistant Professor, Psychology Alex Stepick III, Professor, Global & Sociocultural Studies Chantalle Verna, Assistant Professor, History and Politics & International Relations Eric JB von Wettberg, Assistant Professor of Biology Donna Weir-Soley, Associate Professor, English Kirsten Wood, Associate Professor, History Albert Wuaku, Assistant Professor, Religious Studies

Adjunct Faculty: Mariama Jaiteh, Adjunct Instructor, AADS Noelle Theard, Adjunct Instructor, AADS

Ida Tafari, Adjunct Instructor, Global & Sociocultural Studies & AADS

Steering Committee: Jean-Robert Cadély Alexandra Cornelius-Diallo Carolina Faria Véronique Helenon Percy Hintzen Tometro Hopkins

Valérie Patterson Andrea Queeley Jean Rahier Dionne Stephens Albert Wuaku 7


FACULTY ACHIEVEMENTS Book Publications (Published) Rahier, Jean Muteba, Percy Hintzen, and Felipe Smith (Editors) 2010 Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora. UrbanaChampaign: The University of Illinois Press. Books (in Press) Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming Kings for Three Days: The Afro-Esmeraldian Catholic Epiphany, Ecuador. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press. Rahier, Jean Muteba (Ed.) Forthcoming Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. New York: Palgrave. Book Chapters (Published) Clark, John F. 2010 ―The International Community and Congo‘s Recent Crisis,‖ in Jacques Mangala, ed., New Security Threats and Crises in Africa: Regional and International Perspectives, New York: Palgrave: 171-190. Hintzen, Percy C. and Jean Muteba Rahier 2010 ―Introduction: Theorizing the African Diaspora: Metaphor, Miscognition, and SelfRecognition.‖ In Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora. Edited by J. M. Rahier, P. C. Hintzen and F. Smith. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press: xi-xxvi. Rahier, Jean Muteba 2010 ―The Microphysics of Colonial Power: Violence, Intimacy, and Sexuality in Belgian Colonial Literature.‖ In La Présence africaine en Europe et au-Delà / African Presence in Europe and Beyond. Edited by Kathleen Gyssels and Bénédicte Ledent. Paris‖ L‘Harmattan: 41-64. 2010 ―Het contractuele raamwerk van de aanwezigheid van Belgische kolonialen in de Congo.‖ In De bastaards van onze kolonie: Verzwegen verhalen van Belgische metissen. Edited by Kathleen Ghequière and Sibo Kanobana. Roeselare, Belgium: Roularta Books: 189-190. 2010 ―Het kruispunt van seks, ras en macht in koloniaal Belgisch Congo.‖ In De bastaards van onze kolonie: Verzwegen verhalen van Belgische metissen. Edited by Kathleen Ghequière and Sibo Kanobana. Roeselare, Belgium: Roularta Books: 120-121.

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Rahier, Jean Muteba 2010 ―The Survival of Colonial Categories in a Post-Colonial Time.‖ In GEO-graphics: a map of art practices in Africa, past and present. Edited by Anne-Marie Bouttiaux, Nicola Setari, Koyo Kouoh and David Adjaye. Milan: Silvana Editoriale: 86-89. 2010 ―The Ecuadorian Victories in the 2006 FIFA World Cup and the Ideological Biology of (Non-)Citizenship.‖ In Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora. Edited by J. M. Rahier, P. C. Hintzen and F. Smith. Urbana-Champaign: The University of Illinois Press: 29-45. Wood, Kirsten 2010 "Gender and Slavery," in Mark Smith and Robert Paquette, eds., Oxford Handbook of Slavery in the Americas. London: Oxford University Press: 513-534. Book Chapters (in Press) Gibbs, Jenna Marie Forthcoming ―Toussaint, Gabriel, and Three Finger‘d Jack: ‗Courageous Chiefs‘ and the ‗Sacred Standard of Liberty‘ on the London and Philadelphia Stage,‖ in Richard Newman, Ed., Atlantic Emancipations, Race in the Atlantic World series (University of Georgia Press). Forthcoming ―Susanna Rowson‘s Anti-slavery and Pro-Feminism in Transatlantic Translation,‖ In Saree Makdisi and Michael Meranze, eds. The British Atlantic in the Age of Revolution and Reaction (University of Toronto Press). Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming "Introduction--Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje and "Invisibility" to Multiculturalism and State Corporatism/ Cooptation" In Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. Ed. by J. M. Rahier. New York: Palgrave. Forthcoming ―Afro-Ecuadorian Community Organizing and Political Struggle: Influences on, and Participation in, Constitutional Processes.‖ In Human Rights and Afro-Latin America: Beyond Citizenship edited by Kwame Dixon and John Burdick. Gainesville: University Press of Florida. Stephens, D.P. Forthcoming ―The influence of mainstream Hip Hop‘s female sexual scripts on African American women‘s dating relationship experiences.‖ In M. Paludi (Ed.) The Psychology of Love. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Publishing. Wuaku, Albert Forthcoming ―From South to South: An analysis of the Origins of Ghana‘s Hinduism.‖ in New Dynamics of Religious Globalization, Afe Adogame, and Shanker, eds. (in press, Brill 2012).

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Wuaku, Albert Forthcoming ―Folk Beliefs about Spiritual Power and Hinduism in Ghana,‖ in Essays in Honor of Jacob Olopuna, Afe Adogame, and Bateye, and Ezra Chitando, eds. (in press, Ashgate 2012). Forthcoming ―Who Cares about Haiti Anyway,‖ in Christian Ethics: A Case Method Approach. Stivers, Gudorf, Frazer, Evans, eds. (in press, Orbis 2012) Journal Publications (Published) Stephens, D. P., Patil, V., & Thomas, T. L. Forthcoming ―STI prevention & control for women globally: A reproductive justice approach to understanding women‘s experiences.‖ In J. Chrisler (Ed.) Reproductive Justice: A Global Concern (Joint project of APA Division 52's International Committee for Women and APA Division 35's Global Issues Committee.). Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Publishing. Cadely, Jean Robert 2010 "Phonologie des Pronoms Personnels du Créole haïtien: Le Constituant Prosodique GROUPE CLITIQUE." in The Journal of Haitian Studies, University of California Santa Barbara, (Fall) 16 (2): 91-117. 2009 Review of HAITIAN CREOLE-ENGLISH DICTIONARY by Albert Valdman and Iskra Iskrova in Anthropological Linguistics, Indiana University, (Fall and Winter) 51(3 -4): 350. Gibbs, Jenna Marie 2011 ―Columbia the Goddess of Liberty and Slave-Trade Abolition,‖ Special Issue, ―Staging the Enlightenment,‖ Sjuttonhundratel (The Eighteenth Century), published by the Swedish Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, Uppsala (May): 156-168. Queeley, Andrea 2011 "'She Jus' Gets Hold of Us Dataway': the Blues and Greens of Neighborhood Recovery in Post-Katrina New Orleans". Transforming Anthropology 19(1): 21-32. Thomas, T., Stephens D. P. & Blanchard, B. 2010 Hip Hop, Health and HPV: Using wireless technology to increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Uptake. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners (6): 464-470. Journal Publications (in Press and Submitted) Clark, John F. Forthcoming 2011 ―A Constructivist Account of the Congo Wars.‖ African Security 4, no.3 Queeley, Andrea Forthcoming 2012 "El Puente: Transnationalism among Cubans of English-Speaking Caribbean Descent.‖ Journal of African and Black Diaspora Studies.

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Queeley, Andrea Forthcoming 2011 "Remembering the Wretched: Narratives of Return as a Practice of Freedom.‖ Journal of Pan-African Studies. Rahier, Jean Muteba Forthcoming ―Hypersexual Black Women in the Ecuadorian ‗Common Sense‘: An Examination of Visual and Other Representations.‖ Civilisations, Revue Internationale d’Anthropologie et de Sciences Humaines. Volume 60(1). Forthcoming ―From Invisibilidad to Participation in State Corporatism: Afro-Ecuadorians and the Constitutional Processes of 1998 and 2008.‖ Identities: Global Studies in Culture and Power. Volume 18. Stephens, D. P., & Thomas, T. Forthcoming ―Hispanic women‘s expectations of campus- based health clinics addressing sexual health concerns.‖ American Journal of Sexuality Education, 6. Stephens, D. P., Fernandez, P., & Richman, E. Forthcoming ―Ni pardo, ni prieto: The influence of parental skin color messaging on emerging adult Hispanic women‘s dating beliefs.‖ Women & Therapy: Special Issue on Latinas and Latin America. Stephens, D. P., & Fernandez, P. Accepted for publication ― ‗The sun is free, go find some‘: Skin color‘s influence on emerging adult Hispanic women‘s perceptions of physical and sexual attractiveness.‖ Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. Stephens, D. P. & Thomas, T. Under review ―Hispanic female college students‘ preferred sources of HPV vaccination information.‖ Journal of Adolescent Research. Thomas, T. & Stephens, D. P. Under review ―Taking The Shot: Hispanic males‘ perceptions of HPV infection and HPV vaccination.‖ Health Psychology. Wuaku, Albert Forthcoming ―Selling Krishna in Ghana‘s Religious Market: Proselytizing Strategies of the Sri Radha Govinda Temple Community of Ghana‖ Journal of Contemporary African Studies. Forthcoming ―Witches and Juju Men in Toronto: Trans-locating West African Witchcraft Modernities and Occult Economies into Canada.‖ Numen: the International Review for the History of Religions. Forthcoming ―Using Mata Durga in Ghana: Religious in-flows from the Global South and Local Appropriations in Ghana.‖ Nova Religio-Journal of New Religious Movements. 11


Published Commentary Rahier, Jean Muteba 2010 ‗‗The Diversity of Diasporic Subjectivities: Different and Separate Ontologies?‘‘ A Response To Kamari Clarke‘s ‗New Spheres Of Transnational Formations: Mobilizations Of Humanitarian Diasporas‘.‖ Transforming Anthropology 18(1): 66-69. Book Reviews and Other Publications Clark, John Forthcoming The Trouble with the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peacebuilding, by Severine Autesserre, in Perspectives on Politics. 2011 Museveni's Uganda: paradoxes of power in a hybrid regime, by Aili Mari Tripp, in Choice, 48 (6): 3528. 2010 The Great African War: Congo and Regional Geopolitics, 1996-2006 by Filip Reyntjens, in International Journal of African Historical Studies 43 (3): 121. 2010 République démocratique du Congo: De la guerre aux elections, by Gauthier de Villers, in International Journal of African Historical Studies 43 (1): 177-179. Stephens, D. P. 2010 ―Examining global youth development through a camera‘s eye [Review of the book Youth Culture in Global Cinema].‖ Journal of Adolescent Research, 25, 885- 888. 2010 ―Reviewing the research on Black women‘s mentoring experiences.‖ Psychology of Black Women, (Fall) 4: 12. 2010 ―Enjoying your colleagues, enjoying your job.‖ Psychology of Black Women, (Summer) 3: 11- 12. 2010 ―Grant information at your fingertips.‖ Psychology of Black Women, (Winter) 2: 912. Recognition Stephens, D. P. 2011 FIU Online Exemplary Course Award for Instructional Development 2011 Department of Psychology nominee for FIU Excellence in Teaching Award 2011 Andrew Mellon Teaching Gallery Award, Wolfsonian Museum, Frost Museum and Andrew W. Mellon Foundation 2010 Advanced Training Institute in Health Behavior Theory Fellowship, National Cancer Institute and the National Institute on Drug Abuse. 12


Stephens, D. P. 2010 Faculty Development Award- College of Arts & Sciences, Florida International University. Project: Haitian parental attitudes and beliefs toward daughters‘ HPV vaccination uptake. Conference Presentations Cadely, Jean Robert 2010 "The Langauage of Instruction in Haiti: Competing Visions of Class Structures and Power." EDULEARN10 (International Conference on Education and New Technologies). Barcelona, Spain (July). 2010 "Challenging the Boundaries Between the Use of French and Creole in Haiti's Educational System." 40th Congress of The Canadian Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Concordia University, Montreal, Canada (May). Gibbs, Jenna Marie 2011 International Society of Eighteenth-Century Studies (Graz, Austria), ―Susanna Rowson and William Cobbett: Transatlantic Migrations and Contested National Identities‖ (July). 2011 Society for Caribbean Studies (Liverpool, UK), ―Toussaint L‘Ouverture: Workingclass hero of the East End London Theater‖ (June). 2011 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies, ―The Blackface Slave, Melodrama, and the Anti-Jacobin Backlash in 1790s London‖ (March). 2011 American Historical Association, panel organizer and chair, ―Religion, War, and Nation: Philadelphian Quakers in the Revolutionary Atlantic‖ (January). 2010 American Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies; organized panel, ―Staging the Atlantic Revolutions in the Long Eighteenth Century‖ and presented paper, ―The Blackface Rebel Slave as an Icon of Universal Resistance‖ (March). 2010 FIU-University of Miami jointly sponsored Atlantic Narratives conference, panel moderator (February). Queeley, Andrea 2011 ―‘Somos Iguales…Pero No Somos Iguales‘: Contradictory Narratives and Narrating Contradiction in Revolutionary Cuba,‖ Paper presented at Equity, Justice, Development: People of African Descent in Latin America in Comparative Perspective, a conferences sponsored by SEPHIS, La Universidad de Cartagena, and The University of the West Indies, Cartagena, Colombia (March 21st). 2010 ―Diasporic Dialogues: What‘s Cuban Internationalism in the Caribbean (and Africa) Got to Do With It?‖, Paper presented at the American Anthropological Association Annual Conference, New Orleans, LA. (November 20th).

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Queeley, Andrea 2010 ―Neighborhood Revitalization and Recovery: A View from Post-Katrina New Orleans‖, Paper Presented at the 5th Annual Conference on Social Science Research, New Orleans, LA. (September 24th). Rahier, Jean Muteba October 8, 2010 Paper presentation in the session ―Race, Gender, and Sexuality in Ecuador.‖ Title of paper presented: ―Hypersexual Black Women in the Ecuadorian Press and Other Media: An Examination of Visual Representations from the Late 1950s through the Late 2000s.‖ Latin American Studies Association Meeting 2010 in the Hilton and Sheraton Hotels, Toronto, Canada. September 10, 2010 Organizer and Chair of session ―‗The Revelation,‘ Re-Affirmation, and Re-Invention of Self Thought the ‗Discovery,‘ Consumption, and Experiencing of Others: Globalization and Interactions in Senegambian Tourism Formations.‖ The session took place at the International Conference entitled ―Tourism and Seductions of Difference,‖ which took place from September 8-11, 2010 at the Universidade Nova de Lisboa, in Lisbon, Portugal. FIU graduate students presented papers. Paper I presented: ―Globalization and the Emergence of ‗Academic Tourism‘ in U.S. Higher Education Curricula: Africa as Exotic Destination and the Prevalence of American Categories.‖ September 3, 2010 Organizer and Chair of the session ――The Revelation, Re-Affirmation, and Re-Invention of Self Thought the ―Discovery,‖ Consumption, and Experiencing of Others: Globalization and Interactions in Senegambian Tourism Formations.‖ The session took place at Florida International University, during the AADS & GSS Graduate Students Colloquium. FIU graduate students presented papers. Papers I presented: ―On the Relevance of the Concept of Tourism Formation,‖ and ―Globalization and the Emergence of ‗Academic Tourism‘ in U.S. Higher Education Curricula: Africa as Exotic Destination and the Prevalence of American Categories.‖ Thomas, T., Stephens, D. & *Higgins, M. 2011 Taking the Shot: Hispanic males‘ perceptions of HPV infection and HPV Vaccination. Presented at Emory University Research Day (April). Stephens, D. P. 2011 African American adolescent female identity development in Hip Hop cultural contexts. Innovative Session presentation for The Annual meeting of the Society for Research on Identity Formation. Daytona, FL (February). Stephens, D., & Fernandez, P. 2011 Examining the influence of skin color values on Hispanic women's identity beliefs. Paper presentation for The Qualitative Report Annual Conference, Fort Lauderdale, FL (January). **Sanchez, J., Stephens, D.P., & Thomas, T.L. 2010 Hispanic college men‘s HPV knowledge and self perceptions of risk. Poster Presentation for the 10th Annual Women, Gender, and Sexuality Student Conference. Florida International University Women‘s Studies Program, Miami, FL (November). 14


**Garcia, D., **Gonzalez, R., Stephens, D.P., & Thomas, T.L. 2010 Hispanic college women‘s HPV vaccination beliefs. Poster Presentation for the 10th Annual Women, Gender and Sexuality Student Conference. Florida International University Women‘s Studies Program, Miami, FL (November). Stephens, D.P. 2010 Cultivating a Sister Circle: Developing and maintaining healthy relationships among Black Women. Invited presentation in G. Nicols (Symposium Chair), Promoting the Mental Health and Physical Health of Black Women. Annual meeting of the American Psychological Association- Division 35, Section 1: The Psychology of Black Women. San Diego, CA (August). 2010 Selling Sexy: Mainstream Hip Hop culture's commodification of Black female sexuality. Invited presentation in V. LaPoint (Chair), Marketing to Diverse Youth: Problems and Solutions. Annual Summit for the Campaign for Commercial Free Childhood and the Judge Baker Children‘s Center of Harvard University. Cambridge, MA (April). 2010 Developing a fully online class in the social sciences. Presentation in M. Whiddon (Symposium Chair), Online Learning: A New Generation of Learning. Annual School of Education Pedagogy Conference, Miami, FL (April). 2010 African American female adolescents: Perceptions of maternal messages about sexualized imagery in mainstream Hip Hop music videos. Symposium paper presented in M. Ward (Chair), Sexualized and Shapely: Media myths, models, and messages among African American youth. Bi-annual meeting of the Society for Research on Adolescence. Philadelphia, PA (March). Stephens, D. P., Few, A. L., & *Jex, A.M. 2010 Chris & Rihanna: A Hip Hop informed dating violence intervention. Poster presentation for the National Summit on Interpersonal Violence and Abuse Across the Lifespan- American Psychological Association, Dallas, TX (February). * Graduate Student Author ** Undergraduate Student Author

Wood, Kirsten 2010 "Musical Crossroads: Tavern Music in Jefferson's America," Jefferson's Soundscapes, University of Virginia (April). 2010 "Gender and the Jacksonians," Roundtable on Andrew Jackson, Organization of American Historians, Washington, D.C. (April 10). 2010 "Locating Politics in Early Nineteenth-Century Taverns," Southern Historical Association, Charlotte, N.C. (November 7). Wood, Kirsten 2011 "The Sounds of Partisanship: Political Music in the Early Republic," Society for Historians of the Early Republic, Philadelphia (July 17).

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Invited Addresses Cadely, Jean Robert July 2011 "Haiti: Language, Education and Globalization." Haiti Education Forum. Lynn University, Boca Raton, Florida. Clark, John May 2011 ―Understanding Mass Violence During and After the Congo Wars: Continuities of a Culture of Violent Repression.‖ Presented as a lecture in the Holocaust memorial Week lecture Series, Oregon State University, 5. July 2010 ―The Failure of the Democratic Experiment in Congo,‖ U.S. Ambassador‘s Residence, 19 July 2010, and ―Improving the Political Culture of Congo.‖ United States Embassy, Brazzaville, Congo, 20. Gibbs, Jenna Marie Forthcoming February 2012 Southern Intellectual History Circle, William and Mary College at Omohundro, respondent to key note addressee, Laurent Dubois (Duke, History). Forthcoming October 2011 Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study at Uppsala University. ―Neo-classical Imagery and Blackface Burlesque in the Performances of Antislavery, Race, and Citizenship in the Early American Republic 17702-1820s). July 2011 Amerika-Institut, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, ―Performing the Temple of Liberty in the Early American Republic (1770s-1820s). April 2010 ―Transatlantic Antislavery in the British Atlantic,‖ University of Miami, Atlantic Studies Seminar. Queeley, Andrea April 16, 2011 Invited Panelist, ―Black in Latin America: A Film By Henry Louis Gates, Jr.‖ Film Screening and Discussion for Episode Two: ―Cuba: The Next Revolution‖, sponsored by the African American Research Library & Cultural Center. January 23rd, 2010 Invited Panelist, ―The Caribbean: A Region in Motion‖, Integrating Technology and Area Studies: Discovering Caribbean Diversity, Professional Development Workshop for middle and high school foreign language, social studies and language arts teachers, sponsored by Florida International University, University of Florida, Digital Library of the Caribbean and the Foreign Language Educators of Northeast Florida, Orange Park, FL. Queeley, Andrea October 15th, 2010 Introduction of Keynote Speaker, Honorable P.J. Patterson, Former Prime Minister of Jamaica, Eric Williams Memorial Lecture.

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Stephens, D. P. 2011 Woman‘s Body: Contemporary images of women in sport. Frost Museum and Florida International University Women‘s Studies Program. 2010 Hip Hop in Miami: The role of Hip Hop in Miami‘s youth cultures. Historical Museum of Southern Florida Teen Miami Project. 2010 Michelle, Melyssa & Madea: The impact of mainstream popular culture imagery on perceptions of Black women. Black History Month Lecture Series of the Miami Dade College, Kendall Campus. 2010 Platanos & Collard Greens: Discussing interracial relationships in the new millennium. Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts of Miami-Dade County. Films/Media Stephens, D. P. 2011 Let‘s talk about it [live radio program] broadcast on WZAB 880 AM. Topic: Ethnic differences in beauty standards and plastic surgery decision making. 2011 And the Women Gather [television program] broadcast on Channel 8 Miami. Topic: Cultural representations of women‘s bodies in sports and physical activities. 2010 The Root Magazine. Topic: Video Vixens‘ influence on Black women over the age of thirty‘s engagement in plastic surgery. 2010 AntiVideoGirl.org. Topic: Resource Spotlight- Researchers making a difference. 2010 FIU Magazine. Topic: Worlds Ahead- Outstanding Faculty at Florida International University. 2010 News @ FIU. Faculty perspectives on support for research in at FIU. Community Service Queeley, Andrea Associate Editor, Transforming Anthropology. Spring 2010-present Stephens, D. P. 2011 The influence of Hip Hop on Black dating processes. African American Explorers Club and South Florida Black Consciousness Program. 2010 Facilitator- River Rock: A Discussion on Mental Health, Sexuality and the Suffragist Movement. The Wolfsonian Museum Community Book Group.

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NEW AFFILIATE FACULTY Percy C. Hintzen Percy C. Hintzen will be joining FIU in January 2012 as a Professor in the Department of Global and Sociocultural Studies in the School of International and Public Affairs. He will be coming from the University of California, Berkeley where he is currently a Professor in the African American Studies Department, Director of the Center for African Studies, and Co-Director of the Multi Campus Research Group on Africa (that serves all of the ten campuses of the University of California. He has served in a number of administrative positions at Berkeley including Chair of African American Studies (a position he held for a period of eight years), Director of Peace and Conflict Studies, and Acting Director of the Center for Race and Gender. Professor Hintzen‘s formal training is in comparative political sociology with a particular focus on political economy and in urbanization and public policy. His scholarship reflects his concern with the fraught conditions of upheaval brought about by globalized modern social formations, (including modern forms of consciousness), their material manifestations, and their distortions. This is the focus of his current work in a manuscript titled The Black Modern Subject: Disapora, Modernity, Foreclosure, and Misrecognition. His substantive engagements are with i) the Caribbean, which he sees as the formative emplacement of modern social formations, or at least its conditions; ii) migration, which he sees as the condition out of which modern formations were forged through the ―entanglements‖ that they necessitated; iii) Africa, blackness and the African Disaspora as the spaces from which he chooses to engage with modern social formations and forms of consciousness; and iv) coloniality or colonial and post-colonial forms of commandment around which modernity has been formalized, legitimized, institutionalized, and normalized. His work reflects his concern with the entire global enterprise of colonialism that includes Europe and North America. Professor Hintzen‘s research, scholarship, and scholarly practice is ―trans-disciplinary more than multi-disciplinary. It takes into account ways in which culture and institutions permeate, define, produce, and fashion every aspect of reality. He has authored what is considered to be one of the most significant and authoritative books on the racial politics in Guyana and Trinidad titled The Costs of Regime Survival: Racial mobilization, elite domination and control of the state in Guyana and Trinidad. He has also authored a book on West Indian immigrants to the United States titled West Indians in the West: Self-representations in an immigrant community. He has co-edited with Professor Jean Rahier of FIU edited a volume on black immigrants to the United States titled Problematizing Blackness: Self ethnographies by Black immigrants to the United States and a recent volume, Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora, also with Jean Rahier and Professor Filipe smith of Tulane University. He has published over fifty articles in journals and chapters in edited volumes on the political economy 18


of the Caribbean, on West Indian immigration to the United States, and on issues of race and ethnicity in the Caribbean, Africa, and the United States. He has presented his esearch in over one hundred papers at conferences and other forums. Professor Hintzen has been involved in a number of efforts at capacity building and at development of fields of scholarship. These include the organization and development of first Ph.D. Program in African Diaspora Studies nationally and internationally at Berkeley while Chair of African American Studies. During his terms as President, Vice President, and Board Member of Caribbean Studies Association he was involved in efforts that resulted in significant restructuring of the association and in redefining the scope of Caribbean Studies. During his tenure as Chair of Peace and Conflict Studies at Berkeley he inserted the program into the arena of International and Area studies. He also contributed significantly to African Studies at Berkeley and at the University of California during service as Director of Berkeley‘s Center for African Studies and Co-Director of the 10 campus Multi-Campus Research Group on Africa (MRG)). He secured Title VI NRC and FLAS funding for Berkeley‘s Center for African Studies and for the MRG. He has been heavily involved in work on the intersection of race and gender and served as Acting Director of Berkeley‘s Center for Race and Gender. Likewise, his work as a member of the Education Committee of Berkeley‘s Blum Center for Global Poverty and Practice highlights his profound and deep scholarly commitment to poverty as a global crisis. Professor Hintzen has also committed himself to policy and practice. His concern that education should be consistent with the development needs of the global south and the needs of those located in the lower socio-economic strata globally is signaled by the role he played as founding member and President of the non-profit NGO, Global Education Partnership. The NGO established divisions in the inner city communities of the San Francisco Bay Area in California and in rural communities in Kenya, Tanzania, Indonesia, and Guatemala. His concern with urban education led him to develop an Urban Teachers‘ Education Apprenticeship Project in Richmond, California as Principal Investigator. The project was aimed at developing a model for preparing teachers for effective service at schools in diverse low-income urban communities. He has used his expertise on immigration to serve as an expert on issues related to criminal deportees from the United States and on the potential contribution of immigrants in the Global North to development efforts in their countries of origin. He has also served as an expert and consultant on race and public policy in the Caribbean. Professor Hintzen has raised significant amounts of funding to support and finance the work that he has done. Professor Hintzen has served in several professional and leadership positions. These include President, Guyanese Association of Northern California; Advisor, Guyanese Community Council, U.S.A.; Expert Member, North American Consortium for the University of Namibia; Member of Board, National Council for Black Studies; Member, Executive Council, Cultural Studies Association; External Examiner, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Guyana; External Examiner, University of the West Indies. He has provided expert advice to Ford Foundation‘s effort to support African American Studies; and to Inter-American Dialogue in Washington D.C. in collaboration with the United States Agency for International Development (Guyana) on Guyanese Immigrant Remittances. And he has assessed proposals for the U.S. State Department Educational Partnership Program‘s Academy for Educational Development. Professor Hintzen has been the recipient of numerous Awards, Scholarships, and Fellowships. 19


ALUMNI ACCOMPLISHMENTS Amy Wolfson, MA '10

Amy Wolfson has begun her second year at UC Berkeley in African Diaspora Studies. This past summer she was selected to go to Amsterdam to participate in a three-week seminar that analyzed the multiple dimensions of "othering" experienced by African diaspora communities in Europe. As a research assistant she traveled throughout the United Kingdom investigating representations (and the lack of) Britain's slave trade history. She is the co-organizer of the annual St. Clair Drake symposium and co-founder of the newly formed African Diaspora Studies Student Collective. She continues to travel to Haiti to support several community activist groups located in Port-au-Prince and Aux Cayes. Her research focuses on the racialization of poverty, social inequality, and the international development system. Her review of Global Circuits of Blackness: Interrogating the African Diaspora is forthcoming.

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AADS 2011-2012 M.A. STUDENTS Fiacre Bienvenu fbien001@fiu.edu Fiacre Bienvenu is a second year-graduate student. Fiacre‘s research is centered on the ‗civil society – good governance‘ binary. He attempts to understand to what extent good governance can be premised on the ideals of 'civil society vibrancy' in post-conflict African societies. Rwanda is his case study. He seeks to understand what variables de facto bring about the vibrancy of civil society that is key in propeling good governance. He primarily seeks to understand and possibly challenge the contemporary dogma and the layers of civil society as often constructed from 'wholesale' international standards across Africa. Felix Jean Louis fjean025@fiu.edu My research lies in the history of the African Diaspora in the West. Currently my interests include the displaced Africans in the Caribbean and the United States. My Thesis is focusing on an immigration of Haitians to the United States during the Harlem Renaissance and U.S. occupation, 1915-1934. It will explore not only the movement of these people but of definitions of blackness, issues of transnationalism, and it will seek to place Haitians in the Pan Diaspora Pan African moment that we have come to know Harlem during the renaissance to be. Neftali Mora nmora001@fiu.edu My research interests include looking at race and racism in Brazil within the context of Capoeira

AADS 2011-2012 M.A. STUDENTS Continuing Students– M.A Jameel Barnes Sabrina Collins Scott Morella

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AADS 2011-2012 M.A. STUDENTS New Students- M.A. Jheanell Haynes jheanell.haynes@yahoo.com Research interests: The brain drain and its impact on the development and governance in underdeveloped countries.

Charles May II cmay004@fiu.edu I would like to investigate the intellectual developments of various African independence movements, and within the African American community during the civil rights era. I am interested in the global and domestic factors which shaped the social, political, and economic dynamics faced by prominent leaders of these movements to discover patterns and parallels between their responses.

AADS 2011-2012 M.A. STUDENTS New Students- M.A Kevin Fair

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AADS 2011-2012 CERTIFICATE STUDENTS Marilyn Baez mbaez001@fiu.edu My focus as an undergraduate student has been on post-colonial literature.

Janet M. Lopez jlope151@fiu.edu My research interest concerns international aid and how it affects African economies, cultures, and societies.

Dior Oliver Boliv008@fiu.edu My interest include African American History during the 19th Century and the progression African Americans have made since slavery has ended.

Mamyrah A. Dougé-Prosper mprosper@fiu.edu My research is focused on the post-earthquake Haitian Popular Movement and its relationship to the State, the Private Sector, and the International Community. Synatra Smith ssmit029@fiu.edu I am working on an ethnographic demonstration of Black transgendered individuals living in Atlanta that are critically engaging discourses of the politics of identity construction and re-constructing ―Blackness‖ as a method to redress the modern project of subjugation and normalization. AADS 2011-2012 CERTIFICATE STUDENTS Lis Alvarado Carry Antenor Karina Barra Camila Davis Sarah Giles Sashay Goodletty David Jones Kemisa Hernandez David Jones

Keara Morris Daloumy Nemorin Barbara Pierre Linda Smith Walter Smith Keiron Stewart Nataqcha St. Fort Richard Vazquez Danielle Veit

Charlotte Schultz cschu001@fiu.edu I'm specifically interested in ways to reach, teach, and serve those in need through effective means that create self-sufficiency, growth and prosperity.

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AADS GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION Greetings! The African and African Diaspora Graduate Student Association is dedicated to heightening the awareness of and promoting the interests of Africa and the African Diaspora. We seek to promote discussion, enliven debate, and present performances which speak to the complexities and richness of these communities. As the Graduate Student Association for the program we seek to be the student‘s voice and aim to represent their needs in the course of their studies. In addition to the cornerstone events of the program we have added two events to the calendar. We have added a conference which seeks to unveil student‘s works in progress in the field. The aim of this conference is to expose the students to positive, constructive input designed to enrich their yet completed works. This conference will be held February 2-3, 2012. Secondly, we will present Talitha Anyabwele‘s Black Girl Speaks spoken word performance to campus. The dates have yet to be determined as the logistics are still being finalized. Stay tuned! Finally, our monthly meetings will be held the first Monday of each month at 12 pm in the Labor Center graduate study room. The meetings will generally range from thirty minutes to an hour depending on the agenda.

Fall Semester General Meetings (Located in LC 325): October 3rd 12:00-1:00 November 7th 12:00-1:00 December 5th 12:00-1:00

AADSGSA 2011-2012 Officers: President - Felix Jean Louis Treasurer - Charles May II CSO Representative/Secretary Fiacre Bienvenue 24


AADS GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION AADS GSA 2011-2012 Events Volunteers are needed for all this year’s events. Please contact Felix Jean Louis fjean025@fiu.edu, or Rosa Henriquez henriqur@fiu.edu for more information Fall Semester Events September 29, 330pm-530pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus GSS Graduate Colloquium (co-sponsored by AADS) ―Masculinity and the Mic: The creative place of women in the creative space of rap music‖ Dr. Rashad Shabazz, University of Vermont October 28, 1pm-3pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus AADS and GSS Graduate Colloquium " De cierta manera (One way or another): Social Erotics in Cuba." Dr. Jafari Sinclaire Allen, Yale University October 28, 6pm-10pm, PCA 135, Modesto Maidique Campus 13th Annual Eric Williams Memorial Lecture ―Drugs and Crime as Problems without Passports in the Caribbean: How Secure is Security and How Sovereign is Sovereignty?" Dr. Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith, York College – CUNY November 18, 1pm-5pm, Room TBA 2nd Annual AADS Humanities Afternoon "Crossing The Sahara and Back: African Feminisms in Dialogue" Spring Semester Events February 2 & 3, 9am-5pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus AADS GSA Symposium - Works in Progress conference February 2, 7pm-9pm, GC 140, Modesto Maidique Campus Embodied Spirituality in Three Dance Traditions Dances of the African Diaspora (Afro-Haitian) Lecture and interview: Dr. Kate Ramsey, Assoc. Prof. History, University of Miami. Performance by Louines Louinis, Afro-Haitian Dance Theatre. Co-sponsored by AADS and ASP. March 2, 4pm-6pm, Room TBA Chris Gray Memorial Lecture ―South Sudan and the Burden of Independence‖ Dr. Jok Madut Jok J. Randolph Senior Fellow, United States Institute of Peace Loyola Marymount University

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AADS STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS Reporting on 2011 Senegal/The Gambia By Karina Barra (Major in Criminal Justice) My defining college experience has been so far when I decided to study abroad in Senegal and The Gambia during the summer of 2011. This experience has changed my life in many aspects. Since I had never travelled outside of the United States before, I was not sure where to start in my preparation for the trip. I started by going to the Miami Dade Health Department to get preventive vaccines. However, I quickly found out that no vaccine could have prepared me for what West Africa had to offer. There was no doubt that studying abroad was a completely different feeling than being in a classroom. During With friends from the “Smiling Coast� the first days in Dakar, class took place in the living room of a warm welcoming guesthouse, which was called the Baobab Guest House. Then, in St.Louis, class was on the rooftop of a hotel, where the beautiful island was the backdrop. When in Sally, the wonderful resort and the shoreline of the beach surrounded the classroom by the poolside. The topics studied in class were brought to life by the excursions that we took. The topics in class were not only complemented by the entire experience; they will always remain in my memory with vivid real life examples. Throughout this study abroad trip I had to make personal adjustments that allowed me to learn about personal qualities that I never knew I had. The first were superficial adjustments like having to live without electricity or internet for a couple of hours at a time. I learned how fortunate I was and more importantly that I had great adaptability to situations outside of my comfort zone. The process of learning to become familiar with another culture left the biggest impressions in me. Having to communicate with others with little knowledge of the local language was difficult at first. An excellent example of this was at a beach in Senegal. I was in the water with another FIU student trying to make conversation with local students. We created a bigger mix of languages than the Spanglish in Miami: English, Wolof, French and Spanish in one sentence. I was more impressed by the patience and interest the locals had in getting to know us. The fact that the people of the Senegambian region were tolerant of different religions was fascinating to me. I admired the fact that the Christian business-owners would close their shops on the Islamic days of worship and the Muslim business-owners would do the same on Christian worship days. Also, many families were mixed with brothers and sisters sometimes belonging to different religions. I could not help but compare this respect and flexibility between religions to the rigid and discriminatory behaviors all too common in the United States between and within religions. Cuisine was another great experience from the trip. Not only was I able to try different dishes, spices, and drinks, but I became immersed in the culture of eating. While in Gambia I ate my meals at a restaurant. Eventually the other FIU students and I became close to the waitresses and cooks. One day we were invited to eat lunch with them in the back. This moment brought us closer together because we created a circle of women where we shared the food and also shared conversation about our lives, relationships, and experiences. In short, having the opportunity to study abroad in the In the Gambia with friends at a restaurant Senegambian region of West Africa was amazing. I made friendships and had moments I will treasure forever. I strongly encourage all college students to make any study abroad trip part of their college experience, particularly this one to Senegal and The Gambia. 26


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STUDY ABROAD 2012: SUMMER A—SENEGAL AND THE GAMBIA

May 14-June 18, 2012

Senegal & The Gambia: Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa 2012 Senegal & The Gambia: Traditions, Globalization, and Tourism in West Africa is a five-week program designed to provide students with an introduction to West African cultures and traditions. The program explores the growing centrality of tourism—particularly ―cultural and heritage tourism‖— as an increasingly significant sector of the global economy. Students will be introduced to West Africa‘s largest ethnic groups (including the Wolof, Mandinka, and Fulani), and will gain rudimentary understanding of the Wolof language and culture, as they explore questions related to the politics and aesthetics of constructing difference in globalized tourism. While in Senegal, students will visit Gorée Island and its Maison des Esclaves (slave house). Gorée is a poignant reminder of the region‘s role as the center of the West African slave trade to the Americas. Students will also visit the Petite Côte, mostly known for its beautiful beaches, and SaintLouis, the capital of the French colony of Senegal located 320 km north of Dakar. In The Gambia, students will visit the Abuko Nature Reserve, Kanilai Village, and the village of Juffureh, which was identified by Alex Haley as the place of origin of his ancestors. Students will also visit James Island and the ruins of Fort James, from where slaves were shipped to the Americas. In addition, students will engage in ethnographic work in Kololi Beach near Banjul. Saint-Louis and Gorée Island in Senegal, and James Island in The Gambia, are UNESCO World Heritage Sites. At the end of the program, students will have earned 6 credits. View the 2011 Program and the 2012 Program Details at the AADS website. AADS has organized this program in collaboration with the University of the Gambia (UTG) in Banjul and the Université Cheikh Anta Diop (UCAD) in Dakar. 28


2012 STUDY ABROAD COURSES: SUMMER A 2012 SENEGAL AND THE GAMBIA WOL 1170 Introduction to Wolof Language & Culture (3 credits) This is an introductory course to Wolof language and culture. Its goal is to provide students with rudimentary understanding of the language and the ability to use it in daily life situations during the summer program in Senegal and The Gambia. The course will also make the students culturally aware of Wolof cultural particularities and cultural history

―cultural or heritage tourism‖ in the Senegambian region from the perspective of the multi-disciplinary field of inquiry called ―tourism studies.‖

ANT 4473 Anthropology of Globalization (Undergraduate Section) (3 credits) This course provides an examination of the global economic, political, and cultural processes including the movements of people, commodities, and capital; and a study of the formation of identities, consumption practices, and gender dynamics. Offered at the undergraduate level, this course will be mostly taught during a summer abroad in Senegal and in The Gambia, West Africa, where tourism is a major national industry. The course‘s focus will mostly be on the practice/performance of ―cultural or heritage tourism‖ in the Senegambian region from the perspective of the multi-disciplinary field of inquiry called ―tourism studies.‖ Four students during the 2011 summer in Banjul, The Gambia

ANG 6472 Anthropology of Globalization (graduate section) (3 credits) This graduate section provides an examination of the global economic, political, and cultural processes including the movements of people, commodities, and capital; and a study of formation of identities, consumption practices, and gender dynamics. The course will be mostly taught during a summer abroad in Senegal and in The Gambia, West Africa, where tourism is a major national industry. The course‘s focus will mostly be on the practice/performance of

AFA 6905 Special Independent Study / Directed Readings in AADS (3 credits) The main objectives of the course is to familiarize enrolled students to the scholarly preoccupations, research and literary methods and writing styles and publications of West African, and mostly Senegalese and Gambian, scholars/intellectuals

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STUDY ABROAD 2012: SUMMER B 2012 AFRO LATIN-AMERICA: BRAZIL AND ECUADOR July 5—August 15, 2012

African & African Diaspora Studies(AADS) in collaboration with the Latin American and Caribbean Center (LACC) at Florida International University proudly present Afro Latin America: Identities, Cultures, and Social Movements. The summer study abroad program in Brazil and Ecuador is an intensive five-week program designed to enrich students' understanding of the diverse identities, cultures, and activist movements that characterize Afro-Latin American experiences in Ecuador and Brazil. This innovative program features a oneweek orientation in Miami followed by two weeks in Ecuador and two weeks in Brazil and provides students with the unique opportunity to witness and appreciate the richness and diversity of the African and African descendant experience in Latin America while gaining knowledge about the social movements that have emerged from Afro-Latin American communities. Open to both undergraduate and graduate students, the program highlights a comparative and interdisciplinary approach to the study of the region and topic. In addition to engaging with local scholars, community leaders, activists, and cultural workers in Quito, students enhance their academic coursework through excursions to the Chota-Mira Valley and the province of Esmeraldas in Ecuador as well as to various cultural centers, neighborhoods, and sites central to the black movement in Rio. Excursions are designed to complement in-class instruction and bring course content to life. Students register for two courses: The African Diaspora in Latin America and Readings in Afro-Ecuador and Afro-Brazil for a total of 6 credits. Course requirements for undergraduate and graduate students vary accordingly. The program brings students to two very different, but equally exciting cities in South America: Quito and Rio de Janeiro, offering students a wide variety of experiences and broad exposure to various issues related to Afro Latin American realities. Students enjoy a variety of site visits and activities, including tours of colonial Quito, visits to local markets and artesian workshops, cultural performances, and samba and capoeira classes. AADS Scholarships: AADS will sponsor at least 4 scholarships of $500 each for eligible applicants to the Study Abroad Program in Brazil & Ecuador. To apply for an AADS scholarship - Brazil & Ecuador 2012 - please visit the website. 30


2012 STUDY ABROAD COURSES: SUMMER B 2012 BRAZIL AND ECUADOR AFA 4241 The African Diaspora in Latin America (3 credits) The course adopts an interdisciplinary approach in examining processes of identity formation, cultural transformation, and social activism among Afro-Latin Americans across national boundaries and specifically in Ecuador and Brazil. Taught during two weeks in Ecuador and three weeks in Brazil, it provides classroom instruction by experts in the field and local activists, trips to historical sites and centers of cultural production, and excursions that illustrate the diversity not only between Afro-Ecuadorians and Afro-Brazilians but among these groups.

AFA 4509 Readings in Afro-Ecuador and Afro-Brazil (3 credits) This course is will provide students with the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of the history and cultures of Afro-Ecuadorians and Afro-Brazilians through discussing specific texts with local scholars. Students will read a total of five texts (or series of articles by the same author), two that focus on Ecuador and three that focus on Brazil, and develop their analytical skills through presenting a critique of the work in class.

AFA 6905 Readings in Afro-Ecuador and Afro-Brazil (3 credits) This graduate section will provide students with AFA 6245 The African Diaspora in Latin the opportunity to deepen their knowledge of the America (3 credits) history and cultures of Afro-Ecuadorians and The graduate section provides an in-depth examination of processes of identity formation, Afro-Brazilians through discussing specific texts with local scholars. Students will read a total of cultural transformation, and social activism five texts (or series of articles by the same among Afro-Latin Americans across national author), two that focus on Ecuador and three that boundaries and specifically in Ecuador and focus on Brazil, and develop their analytical Brazil. It provides classroom instruction by skills through presenting a critique of the work in experts in the field and local activists, trips to historical sites and centers of cultural production, class. Students in this section will have the opportunity to conduct an informal ethnographic and excursions that illustrate the diversity not interview and use this to complement the only between Afro-Ecuadorians and Afroanalysis of the required texts. Brazilians but among these groups.

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KARELL TRAVEL GRANT Karell Travel Grant recipient recently conducted field research in Ethiopia Laurel Burchfield, recipient of the generous Karell Travel Grant, recently returned from Addis Ababa, Ethiopia where she conducted early research for her Ph.D. Between the months of MayJuly, Burchfield interned with CEWARN, part of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD). CEWARN is an early warning system that monitors cross-border pastoralist conflict between the seven member states in the Horn of Africa. The central office in Addis Ababa shares findings, predictions and recommended courses of action with the governing bodies of the involved states with the hope of decreasing or preventing the outbreak of violent conflict. Burchfield spent her time as an intern meeting with relevant staff to understand the data collection process, analysis and resources available to CEWARN in the hopes of designing a proposal for future research. Her specific interest involves the ways in which CEWARN and other early warning systems in Africa utilize indigenous or informal methods of conflict prevention, management and resolution. She hopes to return to Addis for further field research next summer to conduct interviews with community leaders, women and youth on this issue.

The date of Laurel Burchfield‘s presentation on her internship observations and future research plans will be announced during the fall semester. 32


KARELL TRAVEL GRANT TO AFRICA: DEADLINE, OCTOBER 31, 2011 AADS invites graduate students, core and affiliated AADS faculty wishing to travel to Africa to apply for a Karell Travel Grant. The grant provides a round-trip ticket from Miami to any point in Africa, courtesy of Karell African Dream Vacations.

Eligibility Students enrolled in the MA Program in AADS or in the Combined MA in AADS/Ph.D in History or IR may apply, as may core and affiliated AADS faculty. Proposed travel objectives can include: Research in archives based in an African country Fieldwork in an African country Attendance and paper presentation (or any other contribution) at a conference or workshop relevant to AADS in an African country Teaching at an African university To spend two weeks or more at an African university or research institute as a visiting scholar

A two-page c.v. A letter of support from an advisor (for students) or from the relevant department chair (for faculty) Any appropriate invitation or supplemental material, e.g. conference program, letter of invitation, archival descriptions. Applicants planning to conduct fieldwork should supply the appropriate IRB documentation. Obligations Upon return from Africa, the grant recipient will be expected to give a public presentation about his or her work. Publications resulting from this travel should acknowledge the support of Karell Travel and of AADS.

Deadlines All application materials should be received by October 31, 2011, and should be sent to: Application Procedure Dr. Jean Rahier Applicants for the grant should supply the Director, AADS following: Florida International University A proposal outlining the work to be 11200 S.W. 8th Street, LC 308 conducted and its connection to the student‘s Miami, Florida 33199 or faculty‘s research agenda and/or academic career. The proposal should be limited to two single-spaced pages, and should include proposed dates of travel and itinerary. Announcement of the award will be made by November 24, 2011. 33


WHAT WE’VE DONE, WHAT WE’RE DOING, & WHAT WE’RE GOING TO DO Last year‘s AADS events were a resounding success! There was much on the agenda and many opportunities to engage in a wide range of topics and events. The African & African Diaspora Studies Program is proud of the continued successes of our annual events as well as those events that are new and unique each year. The AADS & GSS Graduate Colloquium presented, The Revelation, Re-Affirmation, and Re-Invention of Self Thought the “Discovery,” Consumption, and Experiencing of Others: Globalization and Interactions in Senegambian Tourism Formations. This was an exciting session and many of the students and faculty who attended were enriched by the discussions. Additionally, each year AADS, thanks to a generous gift from the Karell Travel Agency, awards the Karell Travel grant to a graduate student or faculty doing research in sub-Saharan Africa. At his or her return, the awardee gives a presentation about his or her work. The MA student in AADS, Sarah Labbé, the first recipient of the Karell Travel Grant, gave a lecture on her research in Madagascar entitled: Negotiating Language in the Postcolonial Classroom: A Case Study in Coastal Madagascar. Sarah defended her thesis in MA student Sarah Labbé and Karell African Dream Vacation’s Craig Pieters, sponsor of the summer 2011 and is now one proud alumni of AADS. the Karell Travel Grant The 12th Annual Eric Williams Memorial Lecture featured The Most Hon. P.J. Patterson, Former Prime Minister of Jamaica. The Organic Hip Hop event hosted artists, educators, and students interested in using Hip Hop as a pedagogical tool. We also held the 1st AADS Humanities Afternoon, which in the Fall 2010 was entitled: Haiti and her Dyaspora: The Politics of Aesthetics and the Aesthetics of Politics. The afternoon provided a forum for students and faculty to discuss current Haitian literary productions by Marie-Célie Agnant and Lyonel Trouillot, as well as discuss the current situation in Haiti and the effects of national policy on Haitians abroad. We also changed the format of the AADS Faculty Works-in-Progress Series, Jasiri X, Jeff Carrol, and Tony Muhammad which is now a seminar. Prior at the Organic Hip Hop event to the day of the seminar faculty circulate a draft of the paper they have been working on. In that way the seminar provides intense feedback. The first seminar in that series was entitled: Launching the Movement On-line: Cyber Surveillance, Solidarity and State Engagement in South Sudanese Diasporic Medias, by Dr. Caroline Faria of the Department of Global and Sociocultural Laurel Burchfield, Angela Gapa, and Dr. Carolina Faria at the AADS Faculty Works in Progress Studies. The second paper was presented by Dr. Jean Muteba Rahier and was entitled: The Bulletin de l'Union des Femmes Coloniales (BUFC): Early Feminism at the Service of the Belgian Colonial Ordering of Things in the Congo. The third and last seminar of that series last academic year took place around a paper by Dr. Rod Neumann entitled: Churchill and Roosevelt in Africa: Writing and Performing Landscapes of Race, Nature, and Nation. 34


WHAT WE’VE DONE, WHAT WE’RE DOING, & WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO A major event AADS hosted last year was a two day conference entitled Afro Latino Social Movements from “Monocultural Mestizaje” and “Invisibility” to Multiculturalism and State Corporatism/Cooptation. This event took place at FIU and hosted scholars and students from around the globe. This event helped to pave the way for understanding black social movements in Latin America, and their impact upon the political and social realities of Afro Latinos. Dr. Rahier has edited a volume that will be published in June 2012 by Palgrave with the title Black Social Movements in Latin America: From Monocultural Mestizaje to Multiculturalism. The 4th Annual Chris Gray Memorial Lecture The Impact of Social and Political Violence on Congo's Children was combined with the conference organized by Dr. John Clark, which was entitled The Wars of the Democratic Republic of Congo Conference. The 4th Annual Chris Gray Memorial Lecture featured the speaker Solange Ghonda, Congo's Ambassador for Children. THIS ACADEMIC YEAR 2011-2012 This academic year is off to a tremendous start! We began the year by hosting Senegalese rising star of Mbalax music Pape Ndiaye Thiopet Live in Concert. The concert was held at a location off campus for the wider community to attend. It was an amazing evening of music and dance and we were happy to be able to have hosted this incomparable performer. This year‘s graduate colloquiums are being developed and hosted by the AADS Graduate Student Association, sometimes in conjunction with SAGSA, the Global & Sociocultural Studies Department Graduate Student Association. The first talk in the colloquium series was Masculinity and the Mic: The Creative Place of Women in the Creative Space of Rap Music with Dr. Rashad Shabazz of the University of Vermont. At the end of October AADS and GSS Graduate colloquium has presented, De cierta manera (One way or another): Social Erotics in Cuba, on Friday, October 28, 2011 on the Modesto Maidique Campus. The AADS Faculty Works-in-Progress Series was off to another wonderful start Dr. April Merleaux, Assistant Professor of History and AADS Affiliate Faculty presented Spectacles of Sweetness: Race, Taste, and the Material Culture of Eating Sugar, Friday, October 14, 2011. In November, FIU‘s Dr. Andrea Queeley will present Somos Iguales... Pero No Somos Iguales: Contradictory Narratives and Narrating Contradiction in Contemporary Cuba, on Thursday, November 10, 2011 at 01:00 PM LC 110. The recurring annual events this year promise to provide exciting and stimulating scholarly discourses over a wide range of African Diasporic topics. The 13th Annual Eric Williams Memorial Lecture presented Drugs and Crime as Problems Without Passports in the Caribbean: How Secure is Security and How Sovereign is Sovereignty? This year‘s guest speaker will be Dr. Ivelaw Griffith, York College – CUNY. The event will be held on Friday, October 28, 2011 at 06:30 PM in the Paul L. Cejas School of Architecture, PCA 135, at the Modesto Dr. Ivelaw Griffith, York College Maidique Campus. CUNY 35


WHAT WE’VE DONE, WHAT WE’RE DOING, & WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO The 2nd Annual AADS Humanities Afternoon features three engaging sessions and keynote speakers. Crossing the Sahara and Back: African Feminisms in Dialogue will take place on Friday, November 18, 2011 at 01:00 PM in GL 100B. The sessions will critically engage with Western Feminist conceptualizations from the perspective of continental African women: Session I Sources of Power for Feminisms in the African North; Session II The Women Writing Africa Project: African Women, Feminism, and the Production of Knowledge; and Session III Captured in Translation: Africa and Feminisms in the Age of Globalization. The invited keynote speakers are Professor Fatima Sadiqi, Linguistics and Gender Studies, University of Fez, Morocco; Prof. Obioma N. Nnaemeka, Chancellor's Professor of French and Women's Studies, Indiana University, Indianapolis; Prof Abena P.A. Busia, English and African Studies, Rutgers University, New Jersey; and Aziza Chaouni, Architect and Artist, Bureau E.A.S.T., Ontario, Canada. And once again, AADS is proud to present the 5th Annual Chris Gray Memorial Lecture. This year‘s topic, South Sudan and the Burden of Independence, will be presented by guest speaker Dr. Jok Madut Jok, J. Randolph, Senior Fellow of the United States Institute of Peace at Loyola Marymount University, on Friday, March 2, 2012 at 04:00 PM. The venue is yet to be determined. The AADS GSA will be hosting their first annual Student Works in Progress Conference on Thursday, February 2-3, 2012 at 09:00 AM in LC 110 on the Modesto Maidique Campus. This conference will provide a unique forum for students to exercise their presenting skills with in-progress research. This two-day event will include seminar panels as well as professional development Dr. Jok Madut Jok, J. Randolph Senior workshops, and an evening networking event where students will Fellow, United States Institute of Peace, Loyola Marymount University be able to mingle with faculty and students from a wide array of disciplines. The Program in the Study of Spirituality presents Embodied Spirituality in Three Dance Traditions: Dances of the African Diaspora (Afro-Haitian). This will be an evening that includes a lecture and interview by Dr. Kate Ramsey, Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami. There will also be a special performance by Louines Louinis of the Afro-Haitian Dance Theatre. This event is co-sponsored by AADS and ASP, and held on Thursday, February 2, 2012 at 07:00 PM in GC 140 on the Modesto Maidique Campus. Please, consult the ―Events‖ page on our website for more information on past and forthcoming events (http://Africana.fiu.edu). LOOKING TOWARD THE FUTURE: BEYOND 2012 For more information or additional details about past or upcoming events, please check the AADS website. 36


African & African Diaspora Studies Schedule of Events Fall 2011 September 2, 4pm-6pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus

Welcome Back Reception September 4, 11pm-5am, Knights of Columbus, Hialeah, FL

Pape Thiopet – Live in Concert September 29, 330pm-530pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus GSS Graduate Colloquium (co-sponsored by AADS)

―Masculinity and the Mic: The creative place of women in the creative space of rap music‖ Dr. Rashad Shabazz, University of Vermont October 14, 1pm-3pm, SIPA 502-503, Modesto Maidique Campus Faculty Works-in-Progress Seminar

―Spectacles of Sweetness: Race, Taste, and the Material Culture of Eating Sugar‖ Dr. April Merleaux, Florida International University October 28, 1pm-3pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus AADS and GSS Graduate Colloquium

" De cierta manera (One way or another): Social Erotics in Cuba." Dr. Jafari Sinclaire Allen, Yale University October 28, 6pm-10pm, PCA 135, Modesto Maidique Campus 13th Annual Eric Williams Memorial Lecture

―Drugs and Crime as Problems without Passports in the Caribbean: How Secure is Security and How Sovereign is Sovereignty?" Dr. Ivelaw Lloyd Griffith, York College – CUNY November 10, 1pm-3pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus Faculty Works-in-Progress Seminar

―Somos Iguales…Pero No Somos Iguales: Contradictory Narratives and Narrating Contradiction in Contemporary Cuba‖. Dr. Andrea Queeley, Florida International University November 18, 1pm-5pm, Room GL 100B, Modesto Maidique Campus 2nd Annual AADS Humanities Afternoon

"Crossing The Sahara and Back: African Feminisms in Dialogue" Invited speakers: Dr. Fatima Sadiqi, Linguistics and Gender Studies, University of Fez, Morocco Dr. Obioma N. Nnaemeka, Chancellor's Professor of French and Women's Studies, Indiana University Dr. Abena P. A. Busia, English and African Studies, Rutgers University, New Jersey Aziza Chaouni, Architect and Artist, Bureau E.A.S.T., Ontario, Canada with responses by: Dr. Edmund Abaka, University of Miami Dr. Maya Boutaghou, Florida International University Dr. Donna Aza Weir-Soley, Florida International University

Spring 2012 February 2 & 3, 9am-5pm, LC 110, Modesto Maidique Campus

AADS GSA Symposium - Works in Progress conference February 2, 7pm-9pm, GC 140, Modesto Maidique Campus Embodied Spirituality in Three Dance Traditions

Dances of the African Diaspora (Afro-Haitian) Lecture and interview: Dr. Kate Ramsey, Assoc. Prof. History, University of Miami. Performance by Louines Louinis, Afro-Haitian Dance Theatre. Co-sponsored by AADS and ASP. March 2, 4pm-6pm, Room TBA, Modesto Maidique Campus Chris Gray Memorial Lecture

―South Sudan and the Burden of Independence‖ Dr. Jok Madut Jok J. Randolph Senior Fellow, United States Institute of Peace Loyola Marymount University

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DR. CAROLINA FARIA This summer I traveled to South Sudan to celebrate its independence. Having worked on nationalism in the region and with Southern Sudanese friends and colleagues since 2004, it was an amazing if somewhat overwhelming experience to witness that moment. Although I have spent much of my PhD and postdoctoral career thinking and writing about the South and its diaspora, it remains a place that I find complex, challenging to understand, and really fascinating in so many ways.

the ways that nationalism is fundamentally gendered and played out in everyday, often trivialized and overlooked, spaces. In my doctoral work, for example, I studied a popular SudaneseAmerican beauty pageant, noting how men and women‘s bodies and idealized notions of masculinity and femininity were put to use in the promotion of a new South Sudanese nation. This annual event is fraught with tension, contradiction and sometimes violence but is also filled with fun, energy, amazing talent and glamour – very much in contrast to the more popular stereotypes of the life of a refugee.

The first time I visited Sudan I accompanied a friend who had lived for many years as a refugee in the US. We traveled to her hometown in the My postdoctoral work has continued to explore southern state of Central Equatoria to see family the oft-elided nationalist significance of the and to explore together some of the tensions body. Researching and writing on the histories around memory and return. We had become of women‘s activism in the South during and close in Seattle during my graduate studies and following the long civil war has been an her stories of home, belonging and displacement important political project for me, and I have had long moved and fascinated me. In many begun to follow up this work by tracing the ways they resonated with my opportunities and challenges father‘s own stories of life in of the contemporary feministGuyana and his decision to nationalist movement. leave amidst political turmoil in Another new project for me in the early 1970s. Though rooted this vein is a study of the in different times and places, burgeoning beauty industry in and motivated by very different South Sudan. This summer circumstances, the my research assistant Sarah inbetweeness of my Sudanese Abeja and I spent time in friend‘s life resonated with my more than 50 hair father‘s. In part it is their ―saloons‖ (as they are experiences that have prompted colloquially known); my academic interest in interviewing stylists, clients, transnationalism, migration, owners, and cosmetic traders; and national belonging. watching, listening (and As a feminist political participating!) as hair was geographer I am interested, in treated, nails painted, and particular, in henna applied. Women civil society leaders explore the significance of networking. This research was conducted in collaboration with the South Sudan Women’s Empowerment Network (SSWEN)

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Since the signing of the 2005 peace agreement, stylists from Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia, Congo and further afield have flocked to the region to open salons, weave hair, and trade in beauty products purchased all over the world. Much in demand for their trade in international products and their cosmopolitan knowledge of new fashions, but at once the brunt of emerging xenophobia, the lives of these workers provide a rich and productive opportunity to study nationalism and transnationalism in a unique postcolonial setting. I‘ll be presenting a piece from this work called Styling the nation: Beauty Salons and the Politics of Hair in South Sudan at the University of Florida‘s Center for African Studies in October. My first year at FIU has offered me the time and intellectual engagement to continue to publish pieces from my doctoral dissertation and to begin these two new projects. I have two pieces on the Miss South Sudan-USA pageant published in Rakia, a Kenyan pedicurist in Juba’s busy Ministries district 2010 and 2012 respectively in The International shares stories of life in Juba. Feminist Journal of Politics and Gender, Place, Culture (this one on men and nationalist masculinities promoted through the event). producing, with my colleague Ryan Good, a mini Another piece, co-authored with a close friend -special issue and colleague Jennifer Erickson and based on fieldwork in South Sudan with women‘s civil society, was published this year in Signs: Journal of Women and Culture. Most recently I was invited to contribute to a special issue on the South Sudanese transition in the Association of Concerned Africa Scholars Bulletin and I‘ve had my first taste of editorial work

Levi, a young entrepreneur, shows off his impressive stock of hair weaves at Jebel market on the outskirts of Juba, South Sudan.

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AADS GRADUATE PROGRAMS Masters of Arts in African & African Diaspora Studies

intellectual environment. In tandem, these two programs can offer students an unusually close fit and remarkably beneficial synthesis in The M.A. degree in African & African Diaspora interdisciplinary approaches to both the Atlantic Studies provides interdisciplinary, graduate level world and the African diasporic experience. education that draws faculty whose scholarly expertise focuses on various aspects of the Combined MA in African & African Diaspora African continent and its diaspora. Its diverse Studies (AADS)/PhD in Global and Sociocultural faculty members include scholars in a variety of Studies disciplines including Global and Sociocultural Studies, Politics and International Relations, The combined African & African Diaspora History, Education, English, Modern Languages, Studies MA/Global & Sociocultural Studies PhD Law and others. The M.A. degree aims to program allows qualified graduate students to develops scholars with specific skills, research pursue both degrees at the same time. To be methodologies, principles, and knowledge which accepted into this program, students must simultaneously prepare graduates for simultaneously submit applications for the MA professional positions in a range of fields and for in African & African Diaspora Studies and for further study at the Ph.D. level. the PhD in Global & Sociocultural Studies by February 15 in the year in which they wish to Combined MA in African & African Diaspora begin their studies. Applicants must meet the Studies (AADS) /PhD in International Relations admission eligibility requirements and follow the admission procedures for both programs. This The combined African and African Diaspora new designation will appear in the menu of Studies MA/International Relations PhD programs in the graduate application, and program allows qualified graduate students to students must indicate their intention to apply for pursue both degrees at the same time. To be this combined program. accepted into this program, students must simultaneously submit applications for the MA African & African Diaspora Studies Graduate in African and African Diaspora Studies and the Certificate Program PhD in International Relations. The African & African Diaspora Studies Combined MA in African & African Diaspora (AADS) Graduate Certificate seeks to provide graduate-level multidisciplinary instruction in the Studies (AADS)/PhD in History diverse fields of African and African Diaspora Studies. Specifically, the Certificate seeks to This program will train doctoral students within provide students with an interdisciplinary the discipline of Atlantic History while giving approach to the study of the global, economic, them area studies expertise in African and cultural, and historical experiences of people of African Diaspora Studies in order to help them African descent, both in Africa and in the stay competitive in seeking careers with an Diaspora. international focus in today‘s global cultural and For more information, please visit our website at Africana@fiu.edu, look at our Graduate Program Brochure at http://issuu.com/fiupublications/docs/africanstudiesbrochure or contact the AADS Office at Africana@fiu.edu, or 305-348-6860 40


AADS UNDERGRADUATE PROGRAMS African & African Diaspora Studies Undergraduate Certificate Program African and African Diaspora Studies (AADS) encompass the study and research on peoples of Sub -Saharan Africa and their experiences, and on communities of the African diaspora both in continental Africa and elsewhere in the Americas, Europe, Asia, and Australia. It also involves the dissemination of knowledge about continental African peoples and diasporic Africans internationally. Housed within the College of Arts and Sciences, the African and African Diaspora Studies Certificate provides students with an interdisciplinary approach to the study of the global, economic, cultural, and historical experiences of people of African descent. The Certificate complements students‘ work in their major fields of study at the undergraduate level while fostering greater understanding of traditionally marginalized topics.

AADS offers an undergraduate certificate and a fully online undergraduate certificate. The Undergraduate Certificate in African & African Diaspora Studies provides grounding in Africana Studies and offers excellent preparation for graduate study and professional development. The program consists of 15 credit hours of coursework. Students must complete the core requirement AFA 2004 Black Popular Cultures: Global Dimensions. The remaining 12 credits are chosen from the AADS-compiled lists of Arts and Humanities, and Social Sciences courses. Courses not on the lists must be approved beforehand by the program director. Like the traditional AADS undergraduate certificate, the Online Undergraduate Certificate in African & African Diaspora Studies is designed to give students a background in Africana studies with the added flexibility of a fully online learning environment. Students must complete a total of 15 credit hours, including the core requirement AFA 2004 Black Popular Cultures: Global Dimensions. The remaining 12 credits are chosen from the AADS-compiled lists of Arts and Humanities, and Social Sciences courses. Courses not on the lists must be approved beforehand by the program director.

For more information, please visit our website at Africana@fiu.edu, look at our Graduate Program Brochure at http://issuu.com/fiupublications/docs/ africanstudiesbrochure or contact the AADS Office at Africana@fiu.edu, or 305-348-6860

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GIVE BACK Help support the AADS graduates of tomorrow by donating to FIU. Your money can go towards the many educational and cultural events throughout the year, such as our lecture series and conferences. You can also help sponsor a student‘s travel expenses for research conducted in Africa or any of the Diaspora areas. Your support can make a difference in the education of today‘s certificate and MA students. To make a contribution, make your check payable to ―FIU Foundation‖ with AADS in the memo line. Send checks to: African & African Diaspora Studies Florida International University Modesto A. Maidique Campus Labor Center, Room 304 11200 SW 8th Street Miami, FL 33199

Donate to FIU and join us in the pursuit of excellence for AADS!

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Sin Fronteras/Sans Frontieres/Without Borders: AADS Fall 2011 Newsletter  

African & African Diaspora Studies, as part of the School of International and Public Affairs, presents its annual newsletter

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