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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Disclaimer For the purposes of this disclaimer notice “Discovery Owners Club” and “Club” are interchangeable and assumed to mean the same thing. Advice Given Any and all advice given in this publication or elsewhere is done so in good faith. Whilst every effort is taken to ensure that any and all advice is accurate and correct the Discovery Owners Club and those acting on it’s behalf cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of advice given and anyone acting on such advice does so at their own risk. Club Events Any activities, in particular (but not exclusively) off-roading and green laning, are undertaken purely at the participants own risk. All vehicles are to be suitably insured and prepared for the activity undertaken. Participation in any club organised event is on the understanding that safety is the responsibility of the individual concerned. Public Liability Insurance The Club carries Public Liability Insurance for registered club events of a non-competitive nature. Cover is provided for the full club member, his/her spouse or partner and children all residing at the same address. Family members (see club rules for definition of family member) travelling in a separate vehicle are also included in the cover. Road traffic accident risks are not covered by this insurance and all members attending club events must ensure that they are legally insured from the time they leave home until the time when they return home again. Green Lane Events Green lane driving events require the same degree of insurance, road tax, MOT and drivers license as normal road driving as all green lanes are highways, as defined by the Highways Act 1980.

Yahoo! Club List: This is an Internet chat room area where members can ask questions, raise topics and generally communicate with each other. If you want to be registered as a member of the list then please email Andy Smith on andy@cameltrophy.org.uk with your name and membership number and he'll sort it out for you. Club Internet Web Site: The URL for the club web site is www.discoveryownersclub.com. The site is still developing and those of you with Internet access are asked to keep an eye on it and pass on suggestions, comments and details of any technical problems or suggestions to Andy Smith at andy@cameltrophy.org.uk. Back Issues Of Discourse: Members can get back issues of the club newsletter in two ways. 1. order printed copies at £2.00 each plus an A4 sae with 41p stamp 2. order them on a CD-ROM which covers all issues to date for £2.00 (incl. postage) Send cheques for 2 and 3 above made payable to "Discovery Owners Club" to Steve Clive (address on Page 2)

“Discourse” contact details: Please forward any articles, advertisements, comments and suggestions for the newsletter to Steve Goodfellow using the contact details on Page 2.


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

Contents:

Editors Comments: Well here we are; less than two years after launching the club we've reached the critical mass needed to enable us to have the club newsletter commercially printed. I can hear the whoops! of delight from at least four other committee members from here☺ I would like to take this opportunity to thank John, Mike, Andy and James for their assistance in printing the last four editions of Discourse. We are committed to filling at least 28 pages in each edition from now on … so I'm making a plea for material - articles and photographs would be much appreciated.

Editors Comments Committee Members

2

Abingdon All Makes Off Road Day

3

Book Review

5

Association of Rover Clubs

6

Bonnet Flutter ~ The Cure?

8

The Advanced Driving Test

8

Pyrenees Adventure Offer

9

Corrosion Treatment (Part 1)

10

Salisbury Plain Day Out

12

August Bank Holiday Weekend

14

While Away Those Winter Nights

15

ARC Newsletter ~ November 2001

16

Insurance

20

Regional Meets

22

The Club Shop

23

Members Ads

23

Cure For Wet Feet

23

BORDA Training Courses

24

Land Rover Marque Day 2002

25

More Abingdon Photographs

26

Events List 2002

28

Discovery Sticker

28

Assistance Register

28

Quiz Answers Abingdon At Sunset

This will be the last Discourse before our second Annual General Meeting, which will be held at the Gaydon Heritage Centre on Saturday 23rd March 2002. This is an important event in the club calendar and represents your chance to have a say in how the club is run … so pencil it into your diary and make the effort to be there. The club continues to get good media coverage with events and news items being used by all the major UK Land Rover magazines. Most recent of these was the reports from our fun day at Abingdon, organised by Garry Tredwell and Kim Hollings on behalf of the local Rotary Club. Entrance fees to the event raised several thousands of pounds for charity and we can feel justifiably proud of our contribution. Not only that but it was damned good fun too! So successful was it that we plan to make it an annual event - a sort of end of the season bash. Check out the club diary for the dates.

Inside back cover Back Cover

Regional meetings are growing in number all the time and the local reps are now co-opted onto the club committee. This is another avenue for members to have an input into the running of the club, so get along to your nearest meet and get involved. Many thanks to all those IAM members who responded to my plea in D6. As I sit here bashing hell into the keyboard I'm waiting for a date for my test … I'll keep you posted!

Copy date for the Spring 2002 edition of Discourse is Sunday 17th March … so get writing and send me your photos too!!

Steve Goodfellow ~1~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

Committee Members: The following people were duly elected at the AGM in 2001 and are proud to serve you: Chairman - John Capewell Seasons, Porth-y-Green Close, Llanblethian, Vale of Glamorgan, CF71 7JR Contact details: Work Tel.: 01446 752400 Mobile Tel.: 07850 405389 Email: john.capewell@tesco.net Vice Chairman - Andy Smith 31 Stanley Street, Brighouse, West Yorkshire, HD6 1SX Contact details: Home Tel.: 01484 384883 Mobile Tel.: 07970 506215 Email: andy@cameltrophy.org.uk Secretary - Mike Duncalf Beetham Cottage, Over Kellet, Carnforth, LA6 1BS Contact Details: Home Tel.: 01524 732128 (and fax) Email: mduncalf@ukonline.co.uk Treasurer - Ros Palmer 31 Stanley Street, Brighouse, West Yorkshire, HD6 1SX Contact details: Home Tel.: 01484 384883 Mobile Tel.: 07966 259828 Email: ros@cameltrophy.f9.co.uk Events Co-ordinator - Toni Armitage 11 Aireworth Grove, Keighley, West Yorkshire, Contact details: Home Tel.: 01535 677490 Mobile Tel.: 07958 376933 Membership Secretary - Steve Clive 77 Northfield Road, Thatcham, Berkshire, RG18 3ER Contact details: Email: sclive@bciplc.com Newsletter Editor - Steve Goodfellow 87 Gloucester Road, Patchway, Bristol, S. Gloucs., BS34 5JQ Contact Details: Home Tel.: 0117 904 2526 Mobile Tel.: 07801 096880 Email: steve@imjin.demon.co.uk Club Shop Officer - Gerry Summerfield Glenholme, Whitecroft Road, Bream, Gloucestershire, GL15 6LY Contact details: Work Tel.: 01446 737470 Email: info@thebikerack.co.uk History Officer - Alan Smart The Bales, Cow Lane, Kimpton, Andover, Hants., SP11 8NY Contact details: Home Tel.: 01264 772851 Home Fax.: 01264 773300 Email: alan_smart@compuserve.com Ordinary Member - James Law 15 Macbeth Close, Woodlands, Bilton, Rugby, Warwickshire, CV22 6LP Contact details: Home Tel.: 01788 814516 Mobile Tel.: 07944 836177 Email: jwlaw90@hotmail.com

~2~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

Abingdon All Makes Off-Road Day: Back at the beginning of 2001 Garry Tredwell approached the club committee with the idea for an off-road day with a difference. His local Rotary Club - Abingdon and District - were organising a weekend of events at Dalton Barracks (just off the A34 near Abingdon) and wanted us to organise and run an off-road event for them, making use of the Army's driver training course on the site. Many months of headaches, uncertainty and sheer hard work by both Garry and Kim Hollings, who foolishly volunteered to assist - ensued. The end I am just writing to thank all of the members who result was, though, superb and a credit to Garry helped at Abingdon airfield off-road day. I am a new member who has never been off road and came to and Kim's hard work - well done guys! Abingdon to try it for the first time.

My brother and myself were met by Teresa who briefed us on what to do before we got in my vehicle. She then came round with us and gave us the experience of her knowledge (she did panic though when my brother took his hands of the wheel half way around the course), the experience has made me want to do more events with the club. Everybody at the event where very helpful and made it an enjoyable day, many thanks to you all.

Just a quick note to say how much I enjoyed the driving day at Dalton Barracks on Saturday, being a life long fan of Land Rovers and have recently purchased my first Discovery. I was very impressed with the organisation and the friendliness of the other members and the advice afforded to a new member. The only thing I didn't really enjoy was being informed that I'd blown my head gasket! Thanks again for a very enjoyable day Chris Lear (member no 629) via email

Neil Rowe (member no.676) via email

About 40 members gave up varying amounts of time on the Friday before the event to assist with the setting out of the course and then spent all day Saturday marshalling or sitting in with novice drivers to provide guidance and encouragement. To all of those people the committee would like to pass on a huge thank you ‌ it's commitment of this kind that makes this club what it is and ensures that it will thrive long into the future. Friday evening was extremely sociable, with a beer tent on-site, but only after a full briefing for all the marshals, recovery teams and fire crews in attendance. Saturday morning dawned wet and dreary and Garry was beginning to get

worried again He needn't have though. A drive around the course showed that with the exception of a couple of side slopes it was quite safe even with my road biased tyres, so we prepared for business. Each driver had to register with event control before moving on to scrutineering, where we checked basic things like battery clamps being in place and no large heavy objects lying loose in the ~3~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 vehicle. Several drivers were requested to sort things out before being allowed on to the course - noone complained as this was being done for their own safety. After about an hour we were starting to get a bit of a bottle neck at the one big hill on the course and drivers were patiently queuing up to take their turn at it. With about a 50% success rate the obstacle was attracting quite a crowd of onlookers. Each attempt was greeted with encouragement from all sides and success at toping the hill resulted in loud cheers and whoops of delight from spectators and drivers alike. As the day wore on and the ground dried out it became progressively easier to conquer the hill, but it never lost the thrill of success in getting up and over it. With the ground drying out it was time to put our friends with the fire tenders

to work creating some mud. I mean, what good is a day off-roading without a little bit of mud to clean off afterwards? They didn't let us down and drivers took to the man-made waterhole with some relish; trying to out-do each other with the size of the splash being made. There were one or two that wished they'd closed the windows firstâ˜ş The recovery teams had a pretty easy day of it with only a handful of vehicles getting stuck and needing rescue. Most spectacular incident of the day was a Range Rover which the owner decided to park on it's roof; thankfully without serious damage to either the vehicle or (more importantly) the occupant. One unfortunate lady Discovery driver found out that letting the vehicle run backwards downhill without any engine braking can be disastrous - she reversed into a brick block-house and removed the near side rear light cluster . It's due to the friendly but firm marshalling throughout the day that we escaped without more minor dents. Once the paying public had departed for the day we all set about dismantling the course again before retiring to the beer tent for some well earned refreshments. As dusk was falling we were then treated to an excellent barbecue laid on by Tim ~4~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Arnold and his good lady … nice one guys; really appreciated! Several brown beverages were consumed before we retired to bed, eagerly anticipating a day of unfettered off-road fun on the Sunday. And what a day we had! With the freedom to roam around the site wherever we wanted there were soon vehicles going in all directions. We managed to get everyone together for a group photograph which was taken by Steve Goodfellow who was precariously perched on the roof of a Defender [well there's got to be some use for a Defender hasn't there? - Ed]. Unfortunately the first picture in the sequence - it took 7 individual frames to get everyone in - didn't turn out so apologies for that. Anyway, enough prattling on - just take a look at the photo's to see what you missed.

Book Review:

Alan Smart

Land Rover Discovery 1989-1998 (by James Taylor) This book is a must for anyone interested in the development history of our vehicles and is one of those books you can either read from cover to cover, or just dip into for a bit of Discovery history. The book starts back in the seventies and charts the woeful lack of investment in Land Rover that caused the competition to move in their offerings. It’s interesting to see the concept sketches and the first clay models and see how many of those features were carried through into production. The most staggering fact is that the vehicle was developed for a mere £45 million and how at the announcement at the Frankfurt motor show an extra £100 million was added to the bill, people still didn’t believe it! The book charts the success of Discovery from Jay through the Romulus and Tempest projects but also tells of the appalling quality problems that the vehicle suffered particularly the 1995/6 models when demand outstripped supply and the factory discovered that mass-producing a Meccano set vehicle was not easy! There are also an interesting sections on Discovery derivatives and a buyers guide of what to look for in a used Discovery. Lots of facts and figures to bore all your friends with and, if you buy it from LRE you can get a discount as a DOC member. Verdict: must have! ~5~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Chris Savidge Snr. The Association of Rover Clubs Ltd. Short History And Benefits Of Affiliation Back in the mid-1950's the Rover Company were asked by a group of Land Rover enthusiasts to consider forming a club for Land Rover owners. The company then formed the Land Rover Owners Club Ltd. This was wholly owned by the company, based at Solihull and both funded and staffed by the company. Area branches were set up but although self-governing all abided by a common set of rules. In 1966, with the Rover P6 (Rover 2000) then well established and Rover's image as a car maker greatly enhanced by that model's appeal to much younger drivers, there was a demand amongst these new owners for a company backed club to which they could belong. Thus it was that a new body was formed by the Rover Company - The Rover Owners Association (ROA). The former area branches of the Land Rover Owners Club were made into self-funding bodies and asked to rename as "Rover Owners Clubs". Each and every member of these area clubs could, upon payment of a nominal fee, become a member of the headquarters club - ROA. Indeed, every new vehicle leaving Solihull then, be it Rover car or a Land Rover, had in its handbook an invitation to join the ROA. It was at this time that the National Rally was first held too. Organised by the ROA this was open to all members of the area Rovers Owners Clubs. By 1978 the dark days of British Leyland's (BL) ownership of the Rover Company were upon us and (BL) decided to withdraw from organising the Owners Club. Those clubs then affiliated to ROA were encouraged by BL to form a new association and thus it was that the Association of Rover Clubs Ltd (ARC) came into being. This was, and still is today, an association of clubs. Individual members of the area clubs automatically became members of the ARC by virtue of their club becoming affiliated. Originally most clubs in the ARC were local based Rover Owners Clubs, catering for both Rover car and Land Rover owning members. These clubs still continue today, but more recently there has been an upsurge in 'single marque' clubs, such as the P6 Rover Owners Club, the Range Rover Register, the 101 Forward Control Club and Register and - most recently the Discovery Owners Club. Currently the ARC has a total of 38 UK based clubs (of which 12 are classed as non-competitive) and 14 overseas clubs affiliated to it. This represents a total membership approaching 10,000 souls in the UK alone! Now that you know the background to the ARC, I want to take a little more of your time to explain the current benefits of your club being affiliated to the Association. Obviously, the better know facet of the ARC is regulation, within its competitive member clubs, of off-road motor sport. Whilst this will not directly benefit the majority of Discovery Owners Club members there are several others aspects of the ARC that can benefit you as members through your membership of DOC. These are briefly summarised below: Camping/Caravan Permits: Unless a club uses only recognised commercial caravan/camping sites when holding a meet or event where members stay overnight in caravans and/or tents the only fully legal way to do this - unless the club holds its own excemption certificate - is to apply well in advance for planning permission. This is very costly and time consuming! The ARC holds, for the benefit of its members, two such excemption certificates which cover both England and Wales and Scotland. Using these certificates the ARC's caravan officer can issue permits for rallies of up to 5 days duration. Longer rallies may be permitted through ARC's membership of ACCEO (Association of Caravan and Camping Excempting Organisations), subject to certain conditions being met. ~6~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Cross-Country Motor Sport Association Permits: The 1992 Road Traffic Act extended the law relating to the highway to all other areas, including private grounds to which the public have access. In order to permit controlled recreational activities where participants would otherwise be liable to prosecution under the act, several organisations including the ARC and Motor Sports Association (MSA) were given power to issue excemption certificates to approved event organisers. ARC member clubs may use the ARC's excemption certificates, for example, when organising an off-road driving day. However, it must be noted that, unlike the MSA event permit, the ARC's permits do not include insurance cover for the event and this must be arranged by the organising club. Comments On Draft Legislation: The ARC is on the consultation list of the DETR and is thereby able to comment on proposed legislation likely to affect motorists. The Land Access Recreation Association (LARA): ARC's countryside officer represents the Association in LARA, dealing with such diverse matters as venues for off-road motor sport events, other off-road driving events and all vehicle based recreational access to the countryside. In this time when public opinion often appears to run against the use of motor vehicles LARA continues to make strong representations to both government and land management agencies on our behalf. The ARC is one of 11 full members of the LARA steering committee. ARC News: The newsletter of the ARC, published approximately monthly during the events/rallies season, is available to all members via the Association web site (www.the-arc.co.uk). Each issue is emailed to member club newsletter editors for possible reproduction, either in part or in full, in club newsletters. It contains items of interest to both competitive and non-competitive Land Rover owners and, occasionally, items of interest to Rover car owners. [Okay Chris I can take a hint, I'll include it in Discourse from now on - Ed] The National Trailer and Towing Association: The ARC has recently been accepted as a member of this body and information relating to legislative issues as well as practical information on the subject of trailers themselves and the towing thereof will be circulated to member clubs when available. NFU Mutual: The Association has a sponsorship agreement with this company and, in addition to NFU vehicle insurance (they appear to understand Land Rover products better than most) ARC member clubs can often obtain assistance with events (e.g. help with the provision of a marquee) from NFU Mutual. Annual Events: As well as being welcomed at events held by other ARC member clubs, ARC members currently benefit exclusively from two annual events organised by the Association for it's members. Theses are, firstly, the International Rally (successor to the National Rally held in the 1960's by ROA) which takes place at varying venues, but always on the late-Spring Bank Holiday weekend. The 2002 event is to be at Newnham Park, near Plymouth, hosted by Cornwall and Devon Land Rover Club. Here there will be concours d'elegance competitions and scenic drives as well as a full programme of trials, etc.. the second annual event is the All-Rover Weekend, currently held as part f the motoring section of the Town and Country Festival at Stoneleigh Park (near Coventry) over the August Bank Holiday weekend.

~7~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Another event, in which the ARC assists the Gaydon Heritage Motor Centre, is the now annual "Heritage Run" from Lode Lane to Gaydon. Held on the May Day Bank Holiday it coincides with the Heritage Centre's 'Land Rover Marque Day' event. Whilst this latter event is restricted to Land Rover products both the former events cater for both Rover car and Land Rover vehicles and their owners. Finally, please do not think of the ARC as 'them' - we are all The Association. Indeed any member may attend the quarterly meetings, held at the Lode Lane factory in March, June, September and December, and take part in the discussions. Only the official club representative from each affiliated club may vote, however. Chris Savidge (Senior) is the Non-Competitive Clubs Co-ordinator for the Association of Rover Clubs and the committee would like to thank him for taking the time out of his busy schedule to write this article - cheers, Chris☺ A short while ago I posted a message regarding the bonnet flutter on my Disco 300tdi when I reached 60mph +. I had various suggestions as how to fix it. Together with that advice and some fiddling about this is what worked for me. Open the bonnet and you can see the bonnet catch has a notch in it for a flat headed screwdriver. If you look carefully behind the bonnet catch spring you will see a nut. With two spanners, one to hold down the spring, release the nut 'hidden' under the spring. With a screw driver tighten the bonnet catch pin, only slightly, this shortens the length of the pin. Pulling the bonnet down tighter in effect. Retighten the holding nut under the spring. Adjust the two bonnet adjusters on either side of the bonnet if necessary and hey pretso done... Anon - via alt.fan.landrover newsgroup

The Advanced Driving Test:

Simon Westcott Everyone thinks they’re a pretty good driver. I’m no exception. I passed my driving test just two weeks after my seventeenth birthday, and in what must be at least three-quarters of a million miles of motoring I’ve been involved in just one accident. But hang on, I took my driving test thirty-three years ago! Since then, road use has increased enormously. Drivers now much more aggressive, and more likely to do ‘unexpected’ things. Had my driving skills kept up with the changing driving environment? Was I really concentrating on driving or just going through the motions? Was I an accident waiting to happen? Reading a magazine one Institute of Advanced the them, but had never their test. Maybe now was recieved all the ‘bumf’ in contacted the local IAM one of their courses. I was candidates one Sunday The meeting place was a appointed time I went up and into a parking space. I’d driven the wrong way flow! Oops! I still blame the

day, I saw an article about Motorists. I’d already heard of really wanted to risk failing the time to try it. Having return for a £75 cheque, I representative who put me on to told to meet up with other morning to start my training. local car park, so at the the entrance ramp, straight on, Not a good start, it turned out. into the car park against marked poor road markings.

Once the training started, it was obvious that I did have a number of consistent problems to correct. I tended to hold the steering wheel with my hands too close together and I was in the habit of not ~8~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 noticing road signs. My speed just kept creeping over the speed limit, as well. But after four training sessions, I was told that I was ready to take the dreaded test. Once the Examiner had introduced himself and said his bit, I explained to him the "intricacies" of the Discovery. In particular I wanted him to be aware of the 'rock' from the transmission brake when the foot brake is released on a slope; the rapidity with which ABS kicks in on a poor surface; the large turning circle; and poor rear visibility. Also one of my Advisors had told me to start the Discovery in Neutral rather than Park. Having tried once, with the vehicle on a slight incline, I refused to comply. The gearbox just didn’t like it. I also told the Examiner that I didn't use any manual override of the auto box unless in extreme conditions. The Examiner said 'no problems'. He said it was 'just like being at work' - he was a Metropolitan Police traffic officer and regularly drove a V8 Auto Discovery Series II. Brilliant! Even though he wasn’t used to the noise of a TD5 under the bonnet, I had a fellow Discovery driver with me. So off we went. The weather was foul. Headlights on, and wipers at full speed.. It was bucketing down with rain, and the storms of the previous night had bought tons of leaves and bits of tree down onto the single-lane roads. There were lots of deep puddles on both sides of the carriageway, and of course plenty of drivers going too fast for the conditions. Just perfect for the Advanced Driving Test. Hazards everywhere that had to be noticed and acted upon. At one point a huge low-loader and construction truck had an argument on a roundabout (they both wanted the same lane) and the truck swung very rapidly into the lane I was occupying. Thankfully, I'd anticipated it. After 90 minutes of driving that took in urban congestion, motorways, fast single carriageways and narrow country lanes we arrived back at our starting point. I parked up and the examiner said 'Congratulations, you've passed'. What a good feeling. The fact that you’re reading Discourse means you probably drive a complex vehicle that handles very differently from the average family saloon. It requires real care and attention to drive over two tonnes of Solihull metalwork safely. So why not prove how safely you do it by passing the Advance Driving Test? It’s well worth it. Since I passed, neither my wife nor children have criticised my driving! Now that alone is worth the effort. If you want to know more, then visit the Institute of Advanced Motorists web site on http://www.iam.org.uk or call them on 020 8994 4403. Exclusive Offer For Discovery Owners Club Members Fabulous, fantastic, challenging, exhilarating and great fun: - all this in your own Discovery in the Pyrenees. Following the outstanding success of the ‘Pyrenean Jaunt 2001’, Richard Towell is organising some more superb off-roading in 2002. May 12 – 18 Sept 15 – 22 Sept 21 – 28

French and Spanish tracks near Pau. Pyrenees coast to coast. Special offer to 10 Discovery Owners Club Members.

The budget for 2002 includes: Ferry crossing, (possibly Portsmouth / Le Havre), accommodation, most meals, off-road guides and access permits. Vehicle with two adults: £1,250 Purpose: - Sponsorship to raise funds for the Conquest Riding for the Disabled Centre at Taunton. And to have fun all the way. Members, Wyn and Jim, went in their Series 2 Discovery TD5 in September and experienced some of the best offroading they have ever enjoyed. It was challenging, exhilarating and hugely enjoyable as well as non-damaging. Good food, brilliant scenery and great company ensured that it was the holiday of a life time. Initial enquiries to Wyn and Jim Ballance. E-mail wjf.ballance@ntlworld.com

~9~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Ken Windsor Corrosion Treatment: RUST! The curse of all ferrous metals. You can’t stop it, you can’t cure it, BUT you can give it a darned good run for it’s money and I certainly do. It is really satisfying when you see the reddish brown stuff turn to dust as you rub it, scrape it and brush it into oblivion. Lets start at the beginning. What is rust? Basically it is the process of oxidisation, a chemical reaction brought about in the presence of oxygen and moisture. It’s all to do with atoms and electrons but we don’t want to go into anymore detail than that, do we? But I will use just one more very technical term. Blooming nuisance! That’s the technical stuff over with and now down to business. The only way to stop steel rusting is to coat it well enough to prevent our moisture laden atmosphere getting a it. This can be done in several ways. It could be painted and this works until you scratch the surface and expose the metal beneath. It can be galvanised, which involves dipping a piece of steel into a vat of molten zinc. This works great, its tougher than paint, lasts longer but can still be scratched. Alternatively you can coat the whole thing in wax or grease - great but, as before these coatings can be compromised. So what can you do to keep your pride and joy free from the dreaded red stuff, well quite a lot really but it takes time, vigilance and of course money. I think the most important areas to watch on a Land Rover are the chassis and front bulkhead. Of these I would say the chassis gets the worst end of the stick. It gets blasted by grit thrown up from the wheels, drenched when its raining, coated and nibbled at by salt in the winter, coated in mud and left to fester. No wonder the poor things don’t last long. Every other September after I have done the BIG service I bung up all the drain holes I can find in the chassis. Then I pump in as much of the waste engine and gearbox oil as I can and let it soak for as long as possible before draining it out. I have often thought of driving around for a while with the oil still in the chassis, but I would most likely leave a flipping great oil slick behind me where ever I went and I do not recommend that anyone else should try it either. Yeah! Its messy and reported as being bad for one, so wear as much protective gear as you can and wash well after. Messy it might be but it certainly works, I mean, have you ever seen a rusty engine compartment. I also give the entire underside a good blasting with the old oil, after first making sure the brakes are well and truly protected to stop any oil getting on or in them. If the chassis and under body is coated with a layer of dust or dirt, the oil will seep into it and spread whilst forming an emulsion that will shrug off water. The oil in the dust and dirt wont allow water to stay around long enough to get to the paint work and it takes a while before the oil is finally washed off. I also make sure that plenty of oil gets into both ends of the chassis as these are higher than the centre section. I recommend you carry out this little operation every two years. This should prove helpful in keeping the underside of your Landie safe from the ravages of rust. If you use a power washer you would be best advised to use Hammerite and a thick coating of underseal which has to be checked and any loose paint or under seal scraped off and replaced every year. Next lets consider the bulkhead. Well that just sits there looking pretty darned good until the day you notice a small paint blister. Ah that’s nothing you say. The heck it is! Once you can see it on the outside its too late. The only hope is to slow it down as much as possible. For this you need to drill a few holes in the thing and – yes that’s right I said drill a few holes. Well how else are you going to get the Waxoyl in! Don't worry, it will be all right. What you need is a 10mm drill bit, about half a dozen 10mm blank rubber grommets, a large tin of Waxoyl and one of their applicators. You know, the one with the long tube with the nail shoved in one end. No, don’t laugh, it works. Now before I go any further I suppose I should make a disclaimer. OK, if anyone does this and it fails to slow down the rusting process or totally destroys their Landie or damages any property ~ 10 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 whatsoever in anyway whatsoever or they injure them selves or anyone else whom so ever in any way shape or form, I accept no responsibility what so ever. If you do it, it is done entirely at your own risk. OK, that is a nasty thing to have to do, but in this day and age, you can’t be to careful. Right, next drill two holes at the top of the bulkhead one on each side. If you remove some of the interior trim you can do it inside the vehicle. Then insert the tube and bend it down first pushing it right to the bottom of the bulkhead and slowly draw it back up spraying as you do so. When the business end of the tube is at the hole, carefully turn the tube so that it now faces up and, without spraying, push it all the way up to the top of the bulkhead. Again spray as you gently pull it back down again. Now for the next bit, which to be honest I haven’t done myself yet. It involves drilling three holes in the front face of the bulkhead one at each end and one in the middle between the vent flaps. The idea is to get the Waxoyl above and below the vents from each side and then again from the middle. When that’s done pop in the grommets and all there is to show for it are three little black grommets in a line in the front face of the bulkhead. As my bulkhead has a few nasty holes I think I will do this before too much longer. Got to make it last a few more years. The doors are next on my hit list because they are made from two different metals and when you have two dissimilar metals, like the steel of the door frame and the aluminium of the door skin in contact with each other - oh boy! You get a reaction that will eat away at both at an advanced rate. The aluminium being the softer metal will be eaten away first although the steel frame won’t be far behind it. When the vehicles are put together in the factory a neutral mastic tape or paste should be inserted between the door frame and skin. However, this doesn’t always seem to be effective and the results can be identified as bubbling on the outside of the door, usually at the bottom. This will be accelerated by moisture, so if the drain holes are blocked just watch it go. Once again Waxoyl comes to the rescue. To rust proof your doors you will have to drill a few more holes, one near the bottom of the rear frame, another in the front vertical section and one more along the top of the frame above the window. From these vantage points you can treat the whole of the door frame. Remember, don’t inject the Waxoyl until you are withdrawing the tube don’t rush it and make sure you get plenty of this wonderful stuff in there. Do it when the weather is dry and warm and has been for a few days so that all of the moisture has evaporated. Not too easy in this country, but it can be done. Whatever you do, don’t carry out this work when the vehicle is wet or it won’t work. In fact you will probably make matters worse as the oil and Waxoyl will just hold the moisture close to the corroded parts and exacerbate an already bad situation. Then treat all other hollow sections in the same way, if possible using existing holes. If you have to drill fresh holes take care with the sitting of them. Try to get them inside the vehicle if at all possible and fit blank plugs after. Be careful and aware of your brakes, making sure you stop any oil or Waxoyl getting onto them. To protect your car is good. To kill yourself or someone else is NOT! I have found that the black Waxoyl seems to resist being washed off by the spray from the wheels better than the clear. So I am continually coating all underbody areas (being careful to avoid the disc brakes) as often as I can. It looks good too and if it keeps the creeping death at bay so much the better. Well that will do for this time. I will have to make this a two part article, so tune in same time same channel for another exciting episode in the fight against ferrous degradation (rust to thee and I but certain death to good steel). So bye bye from me till next time and remember, be safe be careful and be happy

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 John Batchelor Salisbury Plain Day Out: I’d been looking forward to this ever since Steve Goodfellow first suggested it on the email group a couple of months ago. But I must admit the anticipation was tinged with some worry that my inexperience would leave me (literally) floundering. Also at the last minute my daughter and sonin-law, who were to have provided moral support, had to drop out. So it was with relief that I linked up by email with Matthew and Roz, members who unknown to me were just up the road in Llantrisant. We set off in our two 300 Tdi’s heading for Leigh Delamere services, collecting another member with much flashing on the way. At the services we joined Steve G and four other members and the convoy headed down to the lay-by South of Tilshead. What a sight!!! Over 30 other Discoveries surrounding (paying homage to?) the

shiny Piglet!!! General greetings and ribaldry over, Steve distributed route information to the volunteer leaders and offered a few words of advice to all. This was along the lines of “Don’t go off the tracks for a pee and keep your dogs on a lead; they may be obedient but you don’t want your obedient dog coming back and dropping a live mortar bomb at your feet!!” We then formed into groups and followed any leader. I tagged onto one group, followed by Matthew & Roz, and off we went to the First Route. Along to the village of Orcheston and off onto the MOD range. Off the tarmac, stop, into low box and away up a nice easy clay / chalk track. Great stuff, confidence building, hanging back from the V8 in front and watching where he puts his wheels, all very nice. Up we go, lovely open views, climbing slowly to a peak by some trees. Pause briefly and our leader takes us on down into the valley beyond, across a stream and starts to climb the other side. Stop part way up, discussions at the front then reverse down and turn right along beside the stream. On my own, I’m not even trying to follow the map, just enjoying myself. Back up near the top of the valley we rejoin the track we should have been on but find a range gate closed ~ 12 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 across it. Decide to go along another track about a mile further East that roughly parallels the closed one and still ends up at the exit of the range. During this fairly prolonged discussion we hear the distant sound of artillery. “Strange” says someone, “they don’t do live firing on Sundays” All get under way again and half an hour later we come in sight of the range exit. Consternation!!! Red Flags flying and two rather upset Range Safety Officers. “Where the xxxxxx have you come from?” After much noting of number plates and quoting Steve G’s name (didn’t know there are seven of you, did you Steve?) [I found out on the Monday - Ed] we exit the range and trundle along the Wessex Ridgeway and down to the pub for a “Facilities stop” aka a quick pint of shandy, meeting up with another of our group's en route. Comfort restored, it's off to a very nice wooded climb through a game bird breeding reserve. Driving is interesting, firstly to balance over some fairly deep ruts and secondly to avoid running over tame pheasant and partridge. At the top it's through a gateway and onto an open track where everyone is back in high box. On the next route the driving becomes a bit more challenging, at least for a beginner like me. As we drop gently down from a tarmac road we can see ahead about a hundred yards of well churned up bog with two Range Rovers stationary in the middle and a group of Series and Hybrid L. Rovers charging through the bog and round a loop to do it again. We pull up to one side and watch this example of “Tread Lightly” NOT until the one Rangie has been extracted by the other. Then, with in my case considerable trepidation, we set off across this section. Get rolling, stay in low box third and keep it going!! Yippee!! Much slewing sideways but I’m through. Away we all go up the other side and soon find some shallow water to splash through and remove the worst of the mud from the sides. It may have been easy for the others, but for me it was an achievement and gives me even more confidence in what the Discovery can do. By the time we complete that route, the rest of which was very pretty but easy driving, it's getting dusk. By common consent we skip the final route and head for the Bustard Inn. It’s CLOSED. Ah well, you can’t have everything. One of the other members leads Matthew and I across country to the M4 and we head our happy way home. My thanks to Steve Goodfellow for his planning and organisation, to the group leaders for their navigation and to all the members for a very enjoyable day out. When can we do it again? [Watch this space - Ed]

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Anon August Bank Holiday Weekend: It was John Capewell's idea, honest guvâ˜ş and what a great idea it was too. A club camping and caravanning weekend in Staffordshire, within striking distance of Alton Towers, The Peak District, Buxton and Leek - brilliant, something for everyone! The Friday saw a motley collection of caravans arriving and tents being put up by a group that didn't know each other from Adam. By Friday evening everyone was getting the hang of everyone else's name and friendships were beginning to form - just like John planned [aren't we lucky to have such a clever Chairman? - Ed]. As always the "furthest distance

travelled" award went to Holger who was in the UK on holiday with his wife and kids (sorry Frau und kinder) and just happened to be in the area. Steve Goodfellow [that name again - Ed] had planned some green lanes for Saturday and Sunday and John had used his local contacts to get us invites to a local mega-barbque. In view of the foot and mouth situation John had arranged for us to use the facilities at Blue Circle's Cauldon site to wash the vehicles down before and after the day's drive. Actually, with the lanes as dry as they were the Discoverys probably got dirtier in the yard than they had all day. The site and size of some of the quarries smaller vehicles was pretty impressive though! All in all this was a great weekend with members doing whatever they wanted to do rather than follow a set schedule and I for one hope that we do it again next year.

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

Something To While Away Those Long Winter Nights: These are all clues for pop bands; both past and present It is infuriating but addictive - you'll spend ages doing it once you start ~ so beware. You need to think laterally. To get you going the answer to the first clue is filled in for you. 1

Nun Toboggan

2

Get paste from tube

3

Elizabeth, Victoria, Mary

4

B.A, B.Sc, B.Eng

5

Desert waterhole

6

Treacherous vicar

7

Aircraft data recording unit

8

Blokes grafting

9

Pale Serpent

10

Merlin

11

Disturbed vision

12

Rub out Midge

13

Gender arms

14

Silhouettes

15

Years quarters

16

Hard of hearing wildcat

17

Raincoat bought near Blackpool

18

Unemployment card

19

Throttlers

20

Revolvers and flowers

21

First man and insect

22

In Wonderland - Just like that

23

Williams vacation

24

Ol' blue eyes off to make a movie

25

Funpark, magnetic effect

26

Parents

27

Moist, soaked, saturated

Sister Sledge

See inside the back cover for the answers ... no cheating (yet) â˜ş

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

ARC Newsletter - November 2001: At the request of the ARC we will, whenever space permits, include extracts from their regular newsletters. If you would like your own copy of the newsletter via email then please log on to arcnews@tesco.net. CHAIRMANS CHAT At last, we have had a whole month without a new case of foot and mouth disease and perhaps we can now start to believe that an end to restrictions is in sight. A.R.C. Council will be reviewing the FMD position at the next Council Meeting in November. The next Extraordinary General Meeting of the Association of Rover Clubs will be held on Saturday 8th December 2001 at the Presentation Suite, Lode Lane, Solihull. Denis Bourne A.R.C. Chairman. LAND ROVER NEWS - LAND ROVER LAUNCHES NEW MOTOR INSURANCE PRODUCT (UK) Gaydon, Warwickshire, Tuesday 16th October, 2001: Land Rover, in conjunction with Royal & Sun Alliance has announced the launch of a brand new Land Rover Motor Insurance scheme, which is set to benefit Land Rover owners across the UK. Designed to suit Freelander, Discovery, Defender and Range Rover owners, Land Rover Motor Insurance, which is underwritten and administered by Royal & Sun Alliance, includes a number of special features. These include “off-road” cover at no extra cost, windscreen and other glass breakage with no excess, £275 personal effects cover and trailer liability cover included as standard*. Furthermore, all damage repairs will be carried out by approved Land Rover repairers using genuine Land Rover parts. If required, a courtesy car with a minimum of a 1600cc engine will be provided for the duration of the repairs. In addition, customers who buy a new Land Rover which is registered before 31 December 2001 will receive 14 days complimentary comprehensive insurance cover. Robert Brady, Brand Director, Land Rover Financial Services comments: "Land Rover Motor Insurance has been developed to support all current and future Land Rover drivers. It is not only highly competitive in terms of cost but is the most innovative motor insurance product available in the 4x4 sector today. Early indications show that our customers welcome this exciting new product." Land Rover Motor Insurance will recognise the No Claims Bonus history of previous company car drivers, and will provide customers with a dedicated Land Rover claims team, available 24 hours a day. A number of flexible payment options will also be available including credit card, cheque or a monthly direct debit plan. For further information on this exclusive motor insurance package, or for a quotation guaranteed for 90 days, contact any Land Rover dealer or call free on 0800 072 4450. * Applicable whilst the trailer is attached to a Land Rover vehicle. STUCK FOR A CHRISTMAS PRESENT? Something shiny for Christmas sir? Now that I have your undivided attention, I will tell you what all this talk of Christmas is all about. Why not buy yourself a little extra present, or, your wives/husbands/partners, why not buy your “other-half” one? I can post out to you, a new type of stainless steel A.R.C. Radiator Badge for the miserly sum of £8.50 including post and packing (U.K.) - £9.00 Europe and £9.20 elsewhere – both these later by air mail. Overseas orders in Sterling please by either International Money Order, International Giro Cheque or a cheque drawn on a British Bank. Orders received here by the following dates will be posted prior to the relevant “Last Posting dates for Christmas”. I will even send out badges in plain envelopes, provided you ask nicely, so you can surprise your other half on Christmas Morning! Please order from: Chris Savidge (Snr) 86,Spring Lane, Lambley, Nottingham, NG4 4PG

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 ALL ROVER WEEKEND AT THE TOWN AND COUNTRY FESTIVAL, STONELEIGH, WARWICKSHIRE Saturday Saturday dawned clear, warm, and bright, and at 6:30 am I was later getting up than I wanted to be. After some rushing about I managed to set off at 7:15 and (as much as you can in a Series I) pushed the vehicle quite hard. Some hard cornering or braking was met by a little green light and a clattering from the engine, but I got to the showground without mishap. Once there I hoisted the Union Jack on the LR’s flagpole (having made sure it was the right way up), and received instructions from Chris Savidge on what he wanted me to do. A short while later the vehicles started to roll up - both cars and Land Rovers, and the ARC ‘marshals’ organised them into a display. As usual with these events the RRR was out in force. They always put on a good show and this year was no exception. As in previous years they had organised the charity rides on the off-road course there so many were in use showing the public that a Range Rover is not just a status symbol! There were several different LR’s from the Midland ROC, and the Discovery OC made a good show as well. Some other Series LR’s, lightweights, 101’s and Camel Trophy vehicles completed the LR line-up. Ironically, a Series II from Tallyllyn was there - it’s driver with the Tallyllyn display in the Model Engineering section of the show, while many Series 1’s were having a good time at Tallyllyn! The last of the Land Rover collection was filled with a fine collection of radio controlled models, which were displayed in action as well as statically throughout the weekend. On the car side was a superb early P5, which stayed for all three days supported by a range of P2’s covering both hard and open-top versions. All were in a lovely condition. A tidy but unrestored black Rover 10 which had recently been bought arrived with a delighted couple who were amazed that the car had brought them a hundred miles without a problem. Much of their day was spent comparing their pride & joy with the other vehicles, discussing how to make repairs, and talking about what was missing on the vehicle. Their enthusiasm and excitement was infectious. It was a shame they couldn’t stay for the whole weekend. The ARC stand was ably “manned” at all times with the willing helpers taking turns to go off to see other displays at the show, with those on ‘duty’ welcoming many enquirers and giving out advice on who to contact for membership as well as answering a wide variety of other questions. Sunday Sunday is usually the busiest day. The LR’s found their own spots, but the cars were out in force, soon outnumbering the “Series” Land Rovers. Every type from P1 to P6 were represented except for the P3, and to complete the set was a Marauder which proved to have less ground clearance that a Series I LR! Some of us LR types got quite concerned about being outnumbered, but decided that if we included the coil sprung types and Lightweights (but not discos etc) we still had numbers on our side!!! One member persuaded the St. John’s Ambulance crew to put their 110 on the stand for a while just to make sure! The Rover Sports Register put up their club stand and as usual there were a lot of conversations catching up on the latest bits done to the cars, and looking at differences. As a LR chap I spent much of the day with the car owners gaining some knowledge of the vehicles, how to tell the difference between them, and some of the changes that came in during the production of the vehicles - I just hope I don’t forget too much before I next see them. It was quite a revelation to find that so many of the owners lived within a 20-mile radius of me. The cars certainly generated as much interest as the LR’s, with the Marauder taking the lions share of the interest. We were entertained all weekend by the owner of the early P5 with tales of some of his antics with his vehicles - including towing a Scammel with the P5! Monday It was a lazy kind of day which ended quietly and goodbyes were said, along with many, many a “See you next year if not before.” The All Rover Weekend has become a fixed calendar event with many ARC members, and that doesn’t surprise me at all. If you’re only in the ARC for competitive eventing then perhaps it wouldn’t suit you (though I’d be surprised). If you’re in the ARC because you are enthusiastic about the Rover Company

~ 17 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 vehicles then it is an ideal show. As well as the company of other ARC members there is the rest of the Town & Country show with everything from traditional crafts and sports to Formula One engineering. You can learn about some of the country pastimes through watching demonstrations; the Pony Club are eventing for the whole of the three days. The steam people let you see how their machines were used in past times, baling hay and cutting wood for example. There is a large military presence there - both the Army and the collectors of vehicles and memorabilia! There are the pets, and working animal sections; the fairground; the miniature railway; helicopter rides; arena displays; hundreds of stalls selling a huge variety of things; the model engineering and hi-tech engineering sections; many other vehicle clubs…The list goes on, or it would If I could remember everything! The RRR spent all three days running the off-road course, taking people around and then asking for a donation to the Air Ambulance Service. Over the three days they raised £3,710, and the ARC extends thanks to the drivers who give of their time and vehicles for this cause. Their dedication to the cause goes as far as even refusing some money to cover their fuel costs, and on top of this the person at the show who is in charge of the off-road course said how pleased he was with the responsible way in which the RRR were doing their driving. Because of his or her refusal of any reimbursement, the RRR organised a raffle, giving each off-road driver a ticket. The A.R.C. ‘s thanks go to Alan Baldwin of Southam Tyres who donated a set of tyres to the raffle, in recognition of the work done by the chaps from the RRR. Their are many others who should be thanked, whose names have disappeared from my mind in the numbers of people met during the three days, so I’ll only mention two by name. These are Chris and Bonny Savidge. Bonny spent much of her time assisting visitors to tea, coffee, biscuits and cake (mostly home made too). Chris organised the event and without him it would not be the good time that it is. Despite having had some recent operations he was looking fit and insisted in making his presence known throughout the ARC area and clubs present. It was hard to get him to take the necessary rest which he needs to help recover from the latest of the operations. Whatever your interest, the All Rover Weekend event is a must for any member who can make it. You do not have to be tied to your vehicle for the whole time (or even any of it) if you don’t want to be - the rest of the Town & Country Festival sees to that. There is something for everyone, no matter what sized kid you are, and while you may get tired, you won’t be bored. And remember, it is an event for all ARC members, both cars and Land Rovers (oh, and their owners & families!), so let’s meet you there next year. Nick Chinery (ARC Press, Publicity & Sponsorship, & Webmaster) FORTHCOMING A.R.C. CLUB EVENTS SOUTHERN ROVER OWNERS CLUB CHARITY COMPETITIVE SAFARI, MEREWORTH WOODS, SEVEN MILE LANE, WROTHAM, NR. MAIDSTONE. KENT – Sunday 24th February 2001 Booking forms for this event are now available from Tony Howland 01622 745461. Event opens to all A.R.C. Clubs, Entry £20. Clerk of the Course is Tony Howland and the grid reference is 188 643 554. SCRUTINEERING NEWS Eligibility Scrutineer. An Eligibility Scrutineer should be appointed at open or inter-club events. He / she could be called in to help when there is a specific problem. He / she will assist in the adjudication on the issue. Safety issues come first - eligibility issues can come after the event. Organisers of large events will need to nominate an ARC Eligibility Scrutineer. The competitors should be advised on the SRs or at sign-on that this official is available. ============================================= Chassis alterations. On a Standard Class vehicle, the chassis SECTION must not be cut away; i.e. the rectangular cross-section of the chassis must be retained throughout its length above and between the axles. A “cut-and-shut” chassis is still permitted but again, the rectangular chassis section must be continuous throughout its length. The PROFILE above and between the axles must also remain as per the original design.

~ 18 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Consequently, the Scrutineering & Off Road Committee have agreed upon the following definition pending a change to the rules:“The use of a Land Rover design chassis is permitted on condition that the profile and rectangular crosssection above and between the axles remains as per the original design. Rules A.12.5 and C.6. still apply” This replaces the previously published clarification in ARC News 23 in November 98. ============================================= Handbrakes:- The Handbrake must be independent. MSA regulation:- “H.36.13.2. Comply with all Statutory Regulations as to Construction and Use and lighting of vehicles (especially regarding brakes, lighting, tyres, warning devices, rear view mirror, silencer, speedometer, wings and windscreen) unless the SRs specify otherwise.” Road Vehicles Construction & Use Regulations clearly require the handbrake to be independent. It may be hydraulically operated by a separate master cylinder with a line-lock, but must not share system components with the footbrake system. ============================================= Drilled radius arms This matter was discussed at length in 1996 / 7 and the outcome was a decision that any radius arms that have been welded to, drilled or cut into, deliberately notched or bent up / down / sideways will not be allowed in ARC events. This was not publicised further at the time but we are publicising it now as a safety issue. ============================================= Recommendations for Petrol Injection fuel system installations. 1) Standard Class Vehicles:90, 110, Range Rover. Discovery. All vehicles must use original fit fuelling systems, or better. 2) Special Class Vehicles:Any flexible hoses used must be steel-braided fuel lines to BSAU/108 and quality hose finishers to connect tank, fuel pump, filters and fuel rail. Fuel pump, filters, ECU etc are free. ============================================= Drivers’ briefings. Blue Book See:E.5.1.3. Competitors must attend any meeting or briefing where this is required by the SRs.... C 5.4.10. Impose a fine of not more than £100 on any competitor who fails to attend, or who reports late at, a scheduled drivers' briefing, or on any driver who has not raced at the circuit before, and who fails to report for a pre-practice briefing [J 4.2.1.]. So drivers must attend a scheduled meeting. If it isn’t scheduled, then drivers cannot be penalised for not attending! Should drivers sign on when they attend the meeting? This is at the discretion of the club. If they choose to do so, then this should be mentioned in the SRs. ============================================= Guidelines For Retirements This is in the Blue Book:H.2.7.2. To be classified as a finisher, a competitor must have attempted at least three quarters of the total number of Observed Sections and arrive at the finish within 20 minutes of the preceding vehicle. The MSA Regs for Comp Safaris, Time Trials, etc all refer back to this so we have a clear ready-made definition. So to qualify as a finisher, you must complete 75% of the runs. In a comp, 3 out of 4 runs started need to be attempted. If there are 12 sections in a trial, you need to attempt 9 of them. The definition of how much effort constitutes an “attempt” will be a matter of judgement by the organisers! .= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Log Book second sheet update. The spaces in the Log Book are for failures on log-bookable items only, i.e. anything that takes the vehicle outside the log-booking specifications. These spaces are not to be used for general wear-and-tear items. If these spaces are filled up with failures on log-bookable items, then the vehicle must have had a very hard life and should be investigated to see what’s going on! It’s highly probable that the vehicle will need a full recheck if it gets this far! If this is a the case, then a new Log Book must be applied for. ============================================= Exhaust wraps. MSA Safety Committee currently looking at this. The ARC has issued a clarification banning the used of fabric exhaust wrap heat-proofing on the grounds that the oil-soaked material can act as a wick in the event

~ 19 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 of a fire. However, the MSA feel it’s a safety item to have, as it keeps the engine bay temperatures down. If you have this material fitted you should keep it clean and oil-free and read the manufacturer’s conditions. If a sealing spray is required then to do it under their recommendations. ============================================= Handbrakes:Any road-legal vehicles must also comply with the Road Vehicles Construction and Use Regulations, of course. The current status within the ARC is :Standard Class vehicles. The Handbrake must be independent iaw Road Vehicles Construction and Use Regulations. Special class vehicles; Road legal - The Handbrake must comply with the Statutory Road Vehicles Construction and Use Regulations, i.e. it must be independent. It must be a mechanical system, not a hydraulic one. Not Road legal - The braking system is free and so a system using an auxiliary master cylinder or a line-lock in the footbrake system is OK. ============================================= Scrutineering issues from the 2000 ARC Rally: Security of rear mounted tanks and batteries. These are often bolted to the floor of the load area but on more than one vehicle, the floor was cut away around the roll-cage feet severely weakening it and reducing its ability to carry the tank and battery if the vehicle were to be inverted. Scrutineers should watch out for this and reject vehicles if they feel that the level of security is inadequate. Sharp edges. There were numerous vehicles with unacceptable amounts of cut and jagged edges on bodywork. Finger-size holes are lethal but many vehicles did not have them covered. Don’t the owners get their clothes snagged on their own cars? This really isn’t safe for marshals and other helpers to have to handle such hazardous metalwork. The rules are quite clear about sharp edges. Scrutineers should watch out for sharp edges and holes and reject vehicles if they feel that the level of protection is inadequate. Drivers are advised to equip themselves with Gaffer tape or Tank tape to cover sharp edges that occur as a result of damage during an event. ============================================= Steve Kirby - Chairman ARC Scrutineering Committee. IMPORTANT – Participation at any competitive event or show is at your own risk or that of the organisers. Although the A.R.C. is happy to publicise such events it does not act as an agent for the organisers. Statements or opinions expressed in A.R.C. News are not necessarily those of the A.R.C. Council. You are advised to obtain independent advice on matters involving safety, finance or legislation. This Newsletter is compiled and edited by Paul Barton, ARC Newsletter Editor, for the Association of Rover Clubs Contact Editor at 26 Summerhill Grange, Summerhill Lane, Lindfield, Haywards Heath, West Sussex, RH16 1RQ e-mail: PaulBarton.home@ukgateway.net ARC Secretary: Caroline Flanders, 124 Crescent Drive, Petts Wood, Orpington, Kent. BR5 1BE. Telephone: 01689 878105 e-mail: arcsec@ledburn253.freeserve.co.uk. Association of Rover Clubs Ltd. Limited by Guarantee Registered in England No. 1806788 Registered Office, 124 Crescent Drive, Petts Wood, Orpington, Kent, BR5 1BE

Insurance:

Rambling Syd Well, what do you think of the Editor bloke then, leaving me out of the last edition of Discourse. And to think I call(ed) him a friend [Yeah, right; but only when you think it's my round - Ed]. Anyway, now that he's seen the light and reinstated me to my rightful place among the literary great I just have to decide what to ramble on about this time. Of course, he did suggest that "Rambling" ~ 20 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 Syd might not be the best pen-name to use in a magazine devoted to the motor vehicle ... it apparently has some kind of overtones. Dunno what he's talking about personally. Okay, well I think it's time we had a little chat about insurance. Next to the purchase of a vehicle getting it insured (or more strictly speaking getting yourself insured) is the most expensive element of car ownership. A friend of mine has a son of twenty-four years, a good driver with an unblemished record, who was looking forward to being able to have a protected no-claims next year. Some chance! He was driving along minding his own business recently when another car came out of a side turning and rammed straight into the side of his car - wham! The other driver was unable to produce his documents at the scene but they exchanged names, addresses and telephone numbers and my mates son reported the incident to the Police to get a crime number. Despite the obviousness of the situation the other driver refused to accept responsibility and claimed my mates son (let's call him Dave) was driving too fast … never mind that he pulled out of a side street onto the wrong side of the road! Fortunately for Dave he has fully comprehensive insurance and a couple of days later the local garage turned up to take his car away for repair and a hire car was delivered so he could get to work. Turns out the other bloke was driving his wife's car on her insurance and was, as a consequence, only covered third party. Rumour has it she was a bit miffed about all this and took it out on him big style … but that's another story☺. Anyway about a week later Dave's got his car back all ship shape and Bristol fashion and he's looking forward to getting on with life - then the insurance company contact him to say the other bloke's insurers won't accept liability so he's gonna loose his no claims. Where's the justice in that, I ask you? Turns out that the only way Dave can save his no claims bonus is to take out a private prosecution against the other driver to claim his excess and expenses (including the cost of the hire car) back. Well Dave's got legal assistance as part of his insurance so he says "what the hell?" and gives the go-ahead for them to start proceedings in his name. Then, just to show that every silver lining has a dark cloud attached he finds out that he can only go forward with this prosecution if he can guarantee to appear in court if needed. Normally that wouldn't be a problem but Dave's just about to go into the Army and they won't release him for a court appearance; indeed they may delay his joining until after the case is completed. So here we are in catch 22 land … he loses his no-claims bonus and has to pay for the hire car unless he prosecutes, but if he does it means delaying his entry into the Army by (maybe) six months. What does he do? Well this is where my faith in human nature gets revived. Just as he is about to decide to call of the case his insurers call him to say that the other bloke's insurance company have agreed to cough up. Apparently the threat of court action in what was a pretty open and shut case was enough to frighten them into submission. End result; everything is rosy in the garden and my mate gets rid of his son into the Army in mid-January, as planned - a win-win situation. This does bring up the point though of how well we understand our insurance policies. Does fully comprehensive really mean that? That is, does it cover all eventualities? Perhaps not, and it might be a good idea for us all to check the small print of our policy documents for the little get-out clauses that have been built in. When our esteemed editor was renewing his insurance earlier this year he decided to shop around a bit (finally fed up with getting ripped off by his existing insurer) and was amazed at the range of prices he was quoted. He spoke to thirteen insurance companies and gave each of them exactly the same information. The cheapest was just £325 and the most expensive one £765 - needless to say the most expensive didn't get his business, but neither did the cheapest either. And why not, you may well ask? Let's face it Steve is many things (a mug being one of them) [oy! I heard that; you're fired again Ed] but he knows his apples from his pears - or should it be lemons? He was quite clear when ~ 21 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2 speaking to them that he liked to go green laning and (for the uninitiated) even explained what he meant by a green lane (i.e. BOAT or RUPP). No problem, they're legally part of the highway system so you're automatically covered ... 100% response even if some did have to refer back to their underwriters first. What about off-road sites then? NO WAY! Don't even go there. Get some separate cover for that ... pretty well common responses. Once Steve had decided on the insurer and policy he liked he got a copy of the actual policy document to read before confirming his business with them. A-ha! What's this then - not covered whist driving on an airfield. Hang on, at Heathrow there's a main road through the middle of the maintenance area; excuse me Mr Insurer am I covered there? Of course you are stupid [now look here Syd, they never actually called me stupid and well you know it - Ed] the policy just doesn't cover you when you're "airside". Now I'm not from Barcelona but "I no understand Mr Fawlty". Airside (apparently) is the technical term for being on the wrong side of the customs line (i.e. runway side instead of passenger side). Great! Hang on though, I know a place where there are two grass runways with a byway crossing them - uh, am I covered here? Half an hour later Steve gets a call back from Mr (actually it was Mrs) Insurer who says she is pleased to inform him that he is covered because legally the surface of the byway is a highway even though the land underneath is a runway. Now there's a reason to tread lightly if I've ever heard one. Food for thought? I thought so ‌ now where did I put that policy document? Until next time [what next time - Ed] â˜ş

Regional Meets: Sussex Area Location When Time Contact

: : : :

The Sportsman PH, Rackham Road, Amberley, W. Sussex 3rd Wednesday of each month from 8 p.m. onwards Grant Jobson (01903 531425)

West Of England Area Location When Time Contact

; : : :

The Wheatsheaf PH, High Street, Winterbourne, S. Gloucs. Last Friday of each month from 8 p.m. onwards Steve Goodfellow (0117 904 2526)

Northampton Area Location When Time Contact

: : : :

Billing Quays, Northampton (near Billing Aquadrome). First Thursday of each month 7.30 onwards Neil Brownlee (07768 366157)

: : : :

Can somebody please let me know where? When?? And at what time??? Damian Bunn (01474 834258)

Kent Area Location When Time Contact

Central Southern Area: Location When Time Contact

: : : :

Langdale Hall Inn, Worlds End, Beedon, Newbury Third Wednesday 7.30 onwards Garry Tredwell (01235 520240 or 07802 495658 ) ~ 22 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

North Worcs / South Midlands Area: Location When Time Contact

: : : :

The Gate Hangs Well ph, Evesham Road, Headless Cross, Redditch, Worcs 2nd Tuesday of each month 8.00pm onwards Paul (07939 411995)

If there are any other regular gatherings that are not listed here then please let me know - Ed.

The Club Shop: We have stocks of sweat shirts, pole shirts and baseball caps plus window stickers and lots of other goodies. For full details contact Gerry Summerfield on 01446 737470 during work hours.

Contact - Tony Hardman on 01827 873774

Discount Discovery Spares Martin Motors of Martin Hussingtree, near Worcester offer a discount to DOC members, although it may not apply to special purchase items. They started as Range Rover specialists but a Discovery isn't that different. They source many of their parts from Land Rover's suppliers and although they are 'original' parts they can't call them 'genuine'! Their web site is very informative www.martinmotors-4x4.co.uk and you can order online or call 01905 451506 and ask for Chris Hammett for advice. Chris really knows his stuff!. They also have workshop facilities, a selection of used spares and carry many accessory items. Their advert can normally be found in LRO. Discount available is 10% for club members,

For sale Rubber mat set for Series 11 Genuine LR STC 50048 Footwell set. Brand new ÂŁ50

Discovery for sale: 1991/J, Black Discovery V8i 3 Dr. Private Plate or can change back if required. 68000 miles only. (Past MOT's,) 12 months MOT, serviced, good condition, PAS, 6*CD player, 7 seats, 5 speed manual, 2 * FFSR's, roof bars. Toad, Cat 1/2 alarm/immobiliser. R/R Tri-Alloys fitted with 205 * 16 new tyres 1000 miles ago. Has been HPI. checked, ÂŁ4350 ono. Company car forces sale. Contact Bob Cook on 07980/484894 or 0151/512/2539. PS: This one's a Plain Jane, with no fancy electricals to go bang. What a great heater though, I will miss her dearly.

Hello Steve, We really enjoyed Abingdon getting our Disco muddy this was where we joined the club. I have read and enjoyed our first edition of Discourse, and feel I can contribute a suggestion to the two people whose Disco passenger footwells were filling up with water. Our new cars passenger footwell was saturated the day we first saw it and bought it, the guy suggested the pressure washer caught it....yeeeer. I thought it might be the Aircon evaporation tray leaking and was pleased to discover the drain plugs filled with grit and the feeder pipe detached under the carpets. I confidently put it all back to together and a few days later noticed it was wet through again pints of fresh water in the sound proofing foam and carpets! My attention turned to the sun roof and windscreen but every thing looked okay. I eventually solved the mystery. it was the windscreen washer fluid bottle, in its previous life, someone had reversed the one-way valve to the rear wiper nozzle, its diaphragm was split and fluid was jetting out straight onto the main electrical wiring loom and running down into the front of the car, by the time the fluid reached the interior the chemical smell of washer had evaporated and what looked and smelt like clean water filling the floor. I have removed the afore-mentioned valve and prefer to wait a second or two when operating the rear wiper washer. Best wishes Andrew Wilkinson and Family (via email)

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Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

British Off Road Driving Association NATIONALLY ACCREDITED 4X4 DRIVER TRAINING

B.O.R.D.A Stage 1 Driver training course • Aimed at the general public • Training for recreational driving • A common syllabus offered by B.O.R.D.A members • Qualified instructors • Includes a formal assessment at course end • Trainees receive a B.O.R.D.A certificate Course duration 1 full day Course attendance maximum of 2 trainees Course fee £300

B.O.R.D.A Stage 2 Driver training course • Aimed at professional drivers & the general public •

Training for the work place considerably more detailed than Stage 1 • A common syllabus offered by B.O.R.D.A members • Covering Health & Safety and risk awareness • Includes a formal assessment at the course end Course duration 2 full days (may be on consecutive days or 2 separate visits allowing practical experience between stage 1&2 ) Course attendance maximum of 2 trainees Course fee £600

Prices exclude v.a.t & accommodation

~ 24 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

THE LAND ROVER MARQUE DAY INCORPORATING

THE HERITAGE MOTOR CENTRE RUN TO BE HELD AT

THE HERITAGE MOTOR CENTRE, GAYDON, 5th MAY 2002

On Sunday 5th May 2002 we shall celebrate Land Rover's 54th birthday in our now well establishe way, at the Land Rover Marque Day and Heritage Motor Centre Run. The usual format will apply; * A full day of Land Rover nostalgia and Marque Day activities at HMC, * The Heritage Motor Centre Run will assemble at Lode Lane by 09.30 am, with the Series 1 vehicles leading off at 10.00 am, and arriving at HMC at approx. 11.00 am. * Camping will be available on the HMC campsite on Saturday and Sunday nights. Entry into the HMC Run will be charged on a 'per-vehicle' basis, which will include entry to both the event, and the Museum, for the driver and one passenger, plus a rally plate for the vehicle, a limited edition rally plaque, and "fast track" entry into the Centre on the Sunday. Additional passengers in Run vehicles will need to pre-book their entry tickets with their Run entry, at 'Club Dismunt' rates. Entry forms will shortly be available from the ARC website at: www.the-arc.co.uk or from Chris Savidge (Snr.) on 0115 926 7716, or from Geoff Miller on 01789 731669 ( e-mail - png.miller@virgin.net) Please make phone calls before 9.00 pm. For non-Run participants attending the Land Rover Marque Day in a Land Rover product, the driver will get free entry, but all passengers must pay the Club Discount admission rates at the paybooths. It is best to arrive before 11.00 am, in order to witness the arrival of the 150-vehicle cavalcade from Solihull --- one of the highlights of the day. In addition, there are to be superb displays by the Land Rover Company. We are also looking forward to Club Stands, Trade and Autojumble stands, possible Land Rover Dealer support, and Land Rover 'Gear' on sale in the HMC shop together with their normal comprehensive range of models, books, and memorabilia. The usual family and children's entertainments will also be there, together with the excellent on-site cafe. Basic camping and caravanning will be available for Saturday and Sunday nights (4th and 5th) , on the meadow within the HMC grounds. In past years the attendance on Friday night and Monday night has not justified the extra security costs of manning the entrance, we have therefore decided to offer camping on Saturday and Sunday nights only. The site will open at 10.00 am on Saturday and will close at 4.00 pm on Monday. Booking forms will shortly be available direct from Chris Savidge, Geof Miller or from the ARC website (as above), and will need to be returned to Geoff Miller by Thursday 25th April

For booking either Club, Trade, or Autojumble stands, please contact: Jane Roche, HMC's Events Manager, on 01926 645120 or fax 01926 641555, or e-mail at janer@ heritagemotorcentre.org.uk A Heritage Motor Centre Event supported by The Association of Rover Clubs

~ 25 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

More Abingdon Photographs: If you recognise yourself in any of these photographs and would like a copy then please give the editor a call. His contact details are on Page 2.

~ 26 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

~ 27 ~


Discourse No. 7 ~ Winter 2001/2

2002 Events List: This list is correct at the time of going to print. Anyone planning a club event should inform Toni Armitage as soon as possible. Please note that only events notified to the editor by Toni can be added to this list. February: Sunday 10th ~ National Indoor 4x4 Show (Castle Donnington) March: Saturday 23rd ~ Annual General Meeting (Gaydon Heritage Centre) April: Sunday 7th ~ Marlborough Lanes (Marlborough/Swindon area) May: Sunday 5th ~ Land Rover Marque Day / Heritage Run (Gaydon Heritage Centre) Saturday 25th & Sunday 26th ~ Ridgeway camping weekend (Ridgeway) June: Saturday 1st to Monday 3rd ~ ARC International Rally (Plymouth) Saturday 22nd & Sunday 23rd ~ LRW Show (Eastnor Castle) July: Sunday 14th ~ Beaulieu 4x4 Show (National Motor Museum, Beaulieu) Friday 19th to Sunday 21st ~ LRE Show (Billing) August: Sunday 4th ~ Exmoor Lanes (Exmoor) 24th to Monday 26th ~ Annual Camping and Caravanning Weekend (Venue TBA) September: Friday 27th to Sunday 29th ~ Abingdon Off-road & camping weekend (Abingdon) Come on people! With 650 members we can do better than this … let's have your ideas.

DISCOVERY sticker: External fitting above the windscreen. 5cm x 62cm, Black lettering with LR logos either side on a clear background. £10.00 + p&p (£2.00) Andy Smith, Tel: 01484 384 883 or 07970 506 215, Email: andy@cameltrophy.org.uk

Assistance Register: Andy Smith is compiling a list of club members who are prepared to provide assistance to other members who run into trouble in their locality. The degree of assistance offered can range from tea and sympathy to full blown recovery ~ whatever you feel able to provide. This service will be offered strictly to other club members and on the basis that any expense incurred by the person giving assistance will be reimbursed by the person receiving it. If you feel that you would like to have your name added to the register, which will be circulated to all members, then please contact Andy using any of the methods shown on Page 2.

~ 28 ~


Quiz Answers: So, how may did you get right? 28

Nun Toboggan

Sister Sledge

29

Get paste from tube

Squeeze

30

Elizabeth, Victoria, Mary

Queen

31

B.A, B.Sc, B.Eng

The Batchelors

32

Desert waterhole

Oasis

33

Treacherous vicar

Judas Priest

34

Aircraft data recording unit

Black Box

35

Blokes grafting

Men At Work

36

Pale Serpent

White Snake

37

Merlin

Wizzard

38

Disturbed vision

Blurr

39

Rub out Midge

Erasure

40

Gender arms

Sex Pistols

41

Silhouettes

The Shadows

42

Years quarters

Four Seasons

43

Hard of hearing wildcat

Deaf Leppard

44

Raincoat bought near Blackpool

Fleetwood Mac

45

Unemployment card

UB40

46

Throttlers

The Stranglers

47

Revolvers and flowers

Guns and Roses

48

First man and insect

Adam Ant

49

In Wonderland - Just like that

Alice Cooper

50

Williams vacation

Billy Holliday

51

Ol' blue eyes off to make a movie

Frankie Goes To Hollywood

52

Funpark, magnetic effect

Fairground Attraction

53

Parents

Mommas and the Pappas

54

Moist, soaked, saturated

Wet, Wet, Wet

If you have any stupid quizzes like this one or Land Rover orientated humour you'd like to share with us then send them to the editor at the usual address.



Discourse 7