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APRIL 2018

SHEAR

FACTS

News from Sheet Metal Workers Local 19

39th Annual Dinner Dance Comcast ITC rises high on Philly skyline

New Central PA training center

Local 19’s first female shop foreman 1


SHEET METAL WORKERS’ INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION LOCAL UNION NO.19 1301 SOUTH COLUMBUS BOULEVARD, PHILADELPHIA PA 19147 215.952.1999 GARY J. MASINO SHEET METAL WORKERS’ INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION LOCAL UNION NO.19 PRESIDENT/BUSINESS MANAGER 1301 SOUTH COLUMBUS BOULEVARD, PHILADELPHIA PA 19147 BRYAN J. BUSH 215.952.1999

ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER/FINANCIAL SECRETARY-TREASURER GARY J. MASINO PRESIDENT/BUSINESS MANAGER

JOSEPH S. FRICK RECORDING SECRETARY

JAMES HARDING, JR VICE PRESIDENT

BRYAN J. BUSH ASSISTANT BUSINESS MANAGER/FINANCIAL SECRETARY-TREASURER

BUSINESS AGENTS

JOSEPH S. FRICK HARDING, JR FRED N. BRAKER CHARLES J. BURKERTJAMESLOUIS J. COPPOLINO, SR. RECORDING SECRETARY VICE PRESIDENT PATRICK F. DOYLE WALTER FRIEDRICH MICHAEL P. GUINAN BUSINESS AGENTSIII GERARD E. GONTZ ANTHONY IANNUCCI, KENNETH R. WOODS FRED N. BRAKER CHARLES J. BURKERT LOUIS J. COPPOLINO, SR. LUKE GORDON PATRICK F. DOYLE GERARD E. GONTZMasino Gary

President/ Business Manager

WALTER FRIEDRICH ANTHONY IANNUCCI, III LUKE GORDON ORGANIZERS

MICHAEL P. GUINAN KENNETH Bryan R. J.WOODS Bush

Financial Secretary Treasurer/

BRYON A. BLUM Assistant Business Manager ORGANIZERS THOMAS BUSH BRYON A. BLUM WILLIAM C. DORWARD THOMAS BUSH MICHAEL FORD WILLIAM C.J.DORWARD HOWARD VANBUREN, MICHAEL J. FORD III

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HOWARD VANBUREN, III Joseph S. Frick Michael Sullivan Organizers Recording Secretary Joshua Turner Bryon A. Blum EXECUTIVE BOARD TRUSTEES EXECUTIVE BOARD TRUSTEES BRIAN CUMMISKEY ROBERT KLINGENBERG, JR. Gerald William C. DorwardROBERT KLINGENBERG, BRIAN CUMMISKEY JR. Zimmerman TODD FARALLY DENNIS SIRAVO TODD FARALLY DENNIS SIRAVO James Harding, Jr. Robert Gadsby JADE FLADGER GERALD ZIMMERMAN, JR. JADE FLADGER GERALD ZIMMERMAN, JR. Vice President Trustees ROBERT GADSBY Michael J. Ford ROBERT GADSBY JEREMY HUNSICKER Jeffrey P. Block James Keenan, III DISPATCHER JEREMY JAMES HUNSICKER DISPATCHER KEENAN, III JOSEPH D. RISPO Business Agents James McGroarty ERIK KOSZALINSKI JAMES KEENAN, III Howard VanBuren, IIIJOSEPH D. RISPO KEITH MEYER CONDUCTOR Robert Klingenberg Fred N. Braker ERIK KOSZALINSKI WILLIAM J. PFEIFFER P. BLOCK MEYER Thomas Bush KEITHJAMES Board JEFFREY CONDUCTOR SEXTON, Executive JR WILLIAM J. PFEIFFER SULLIVAN JEFFREY P. BLOCK Dispatcher Louis J. Coppolino, Sr. MICHAEL Brian Cummiskey WARDEN JOSHUA TURNER JAMES SEXTON, JR JOHN SILCOX, III Patrick F. Doyle Joseph D. Rispo Todd Farally MICHAEL SULLIVAN WARDEN Walter Friedrich Jade Fladger JOSHUA TURNER JOHN SILCOX, III Conductor Michael P. Guinan Jeremy Hunsicker Nikolas Lankelis Gerard E. Gontz Erik Koszalinski Luke Gordon Keith Meyer Warden Anthony Iannucci, III William J. Pfeiffer Michael Crim Kenneth R. Woods James Sexton, Jr. John Silcox, III


Table of Contents Message from the President & Business Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page

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Message from the Assistant Business Manager & Financial Secretary/Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page

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Comcast ITC rises high on the Philly skyline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page

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Building trades honored by historical society. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 10 Historic restoration in Philadelphia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 11 New Central PA training facility. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 12 Local 19 Happenings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 16 Renee Cahill: First female shop foreman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 17 Be engaged in upcoming elections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 18 Retirees: Stay connected to Local 19. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 19 Recently retired members. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 19 Local 19 Annual Dinner Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 20 2018 Honorees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 24 Joe Lowry does it again . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 25 A tribute to John J. Bush. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 26 Right to Work defeated in Delaware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 27 Making the Cut: Jobsite photos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 28 Local 19 celebrates Eagles’ Super Bowl Victory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 30 Boycott these companies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 32 Know your member benefits. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 33 Apprentices win in regional competition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 34 In Memorium. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 35 Helicopters aid in up-blast fan installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 36 Local 19’s heating and air conditioning technicians. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 37 Signs tell the story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 38 Business Agent & Area Marketing Representative maps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 40 Calendar of events: April, May & June . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Page 41

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Message from the President & Business Manager

It’s not just a job, we’re a family Becoming a memat Local 19 and ber of Sheet Metal some, like me, Workers Local 19 have been memshould be one of bers for many the proudest moyears. And others ments in your life. are retired memWhen we think of bers of Local 19 the long history of who are receiving Local 19 and the retirement benfact that in 1887, efits. So, when 12 former union you think about members got toit, from the beginGary Masino gether and formed ning of your career this organization. to the end of your One can only imagine how diflife, you’ll always be a part of ficult that was for the workers Local 19. back then being that it was It’s amazing when you repractically illegal to organize. flect on being part of all of But they persevered and this and what our local has formed a union that has stood provided. Negotiated family strong through the best of sustaining wages and health economic times and the deepbenefits, safe working conest depressions. The sacrificditions, and representation if es that have been made over those standards aren’t met. the last 130 years by men and Have you ever thought about women who came before us where you’d be if you weren’t has brought Local 19 to the a member of Local 19? For forefront of Organized Labor. many of us, this union has When you think about it, it’s been in our families for generamazing that we’re all part of ations; yet some of us are just something that started with beginning that journey. No an idea and, in my opinion, matter where you fall in this has grown to be one of the conversation, I want you to greatest member associaremember that in this union, tions around. we’re family who always looks out for each other. Life Some members reading this is full of uncertainty and you are just starting your career never know what personal 4

emergency may be around the corner. But rest assured, our union family will always be there to help. When one of us falls, we’ll be there to pick them up. That’s something to be proud of. We’re union strong and proud! So, the next time you’re thinking about your job, I want you to remember that it’s so much more than just a job. This is a career and it’s your family. Local 19 is anything and everything you want it to be. And to be a part of this great organization and all it represents is the proudest time of my life. -Gary Masino

To be a part of this great organization and all it represents is the proudest time of my life.


Message from the Financial Secretary Treasurer/Assistant Business Manager

Don’t Snooze Paying Your Dues I remember the days when members took great pride in having a current dues receipt in their wallets. Now, many members no longer carry them which had better change because we’re really going to crack down.

you fines, terminate your membership or service, or throw you and your family out in the street. Our union dues are what keep this union moving forward. Without them, we would eventually close our doors and nonunion workers would run rampant throughout our area.

If you don’t have your Bryan Bush dues receipt to show the union official, the steward or any I’m telling you this because maybe other card-carrying member, you will you don’t realize what’s at risk. Our be asked to leave the workplace, esConstitution states that any member pecially if you are delinquent! Some who falls delinquent 60 days or more members seem to be under the false will be suspended. If that happens, belief that they don’t have to pay until everything you get from the union they’re one to two months behind -goes away. Health care, prescripthat they don’t need to stay current. tions, sub fund, holiday fund, death benefits, etc. How do you think your It used to be if you were a week bewife will react when she goes to the hind, you’d have to go to the hall afdoctor and learns that your health ter work, pay your dues and show coverage was cut off? Then you’re a current receipt first thing the next really in the doghouse. On top of that, day. Well, guess what? Those days you must reinitiate, pay fines and are back! What would happen if you back dues and miss time until you go didn’t pay your gym membership, through the reinitiating process. your cell phone bill or even your mortgage payment? They would charge We understand hard times and have

always worked with any member who had hardships and we’ll continue to do so. We get it, life happens, talk to us about it. But also remember that we keep a very close eye on constant offenders and have heard every excuse out there. There are a lot of positive changes, or upgrades, to our current dues system. We are now able to communicate through email and texts. We will be sending out reminders if you fall behind on your dues or for any other types of emergent last-minute communications. With the new system, all members must opt-in to receive these emails or texts. One of the key options members are always asking about that is now available is to pay by credit card in person or over the phone. We will be sending out more information on the benefits of our new system. Keep in mind, our union officials should be out securing more work for our members instead of chasing them down for dues. - Bryan Bush

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Comcast ITC rises high into the Philadelphia skyline By Todd Farally When driving through Philadelphia, you may have noticed new buildings rising on the skyline with a new tower crane popping up every day. One of those is the Comcast ITC, the second highrise in the city to bear the telecom giant’s name. With the impressive lantern (spire) topping off at 1,121 feet, the building is the ninth largest in the United States and the tallest outside of New York City and Chicago as well as being the tallest LEED® Platinum certified building in the country. I recently had the opportunity to visit the job-site with Business Agent Jerry Gontz, who has been involved with the project since the very start, and Organizer Jim Keenan who, until the beginning of 2018, was the on-site Local 19 Steward working for SSM. We were met by Steward Joe Downing of ADS and Steward Bob McFadden of SSM. After making our way through security, we headed to the fifth floor where we were joined by Steward Natasha Scott, working for Wm J. Donovan, and members of the Thomas Company.

Cladding a five-story escalator

The specialty work being performed by Local 19 members employed by Thomas Company was the cladding on the escalators. This pair of escalators, while currently surrounded by scaffolding, will be a sight to behold when finished – they will gleam in the light stretching five stories high to the Four Seasons’ Ballroom. Elevator Constructors Local 5 had the metal package, but this was a system out of the ordinary for them, and the skilled sheet metal workers of Local 6

A view of the lantern (Comcast’s spire) from the roof level with chillers on either side that feed the chill beam system.


(L – R) – Jim Keenan, Pete Jablonowski, Jerry Gontz, Brian King, Natasha Scott, Bill Hagan, Jamal Spivey, Bob McFadden, Mo Shuster and Eric Stang.

19 were happy to work with them on the project, installing the panels after the escalators were built. To ensure that the job was finished correctly, on time and on budget, Local 5 knew the skilled sheet metal workers were the best trade partner for this project. We spoke with Job Foreman Harry Leibreict and Steward Jim Sexton, both of whom explained the steps of installation. The panels were 14-gauge stainless steel and 10 feet long. The process for installation was precarious since the escalators were very close to each other and walls were on either side. Brothers Leibreict and Sexton along with member Mike Trainor and Apprentice Ed Henderson carried the panels to the work area where they had to then flip them over and lower

them to Brother Paul Border below who screwed them to the substrate. These panels extend down the sides and over framing that our members installed, and then along the bottom of the escalators to give it a clean finish. Although this part of the project was difficult and tedious, it was all in a day’s work for Local 19 members. Our next stop was the 11th floor where Steward Bob McFadden gave us a tour of the office spaces that comprise most of the building. The open floor plan surrounds multiple small enclosed rooms in the center to be used for breakout sessions and group work. Every third floor contains “Sky Gardens,” open areas where artwork and foliage will be available for employees and visitors as a contrast to the Continued on page 8

Local 19 Foreman James Quarles of RVD in the building’s cafeteria overseeing the installation of hoods, appliances, stainless counter tops, shelving, cold storage racks and glass surrounds.

(L – R) Brothers Jim Sexton, Harry Leibreicht, Mike Trainor and Ed Henderson lower a 10-foot-long 14-guage stainless steel panel down to Brother Paul Border.

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cityscape in the background.

Installing a chill beam system

McFadden explained how the chill beam system functioned, expertly installed by Local 19 Members working for SSM. Chill beams work as a temperature recovery system providing the same results as a traditional system but with less cubic feet per minute used. These chill beams are filled with cold water that is conditioned using massive chillers on the roof. As the warmer air rises, the chill beams recondition the ambient air and then recirculate it back into the air stream.

This makes it a higher energy efficient system, with less wear and tear on HVAC equipment, translating into more savings in energy costs.

Cafeterias, fitness centers, TV studios & signs

Another feature of the system is called “Roaming Air.” This term refers to sensors throughout each floor that are always reading for movement. When no movement is detected, the system shuts off air and lights in that area of the floor. The HVAC system is one of the most air tight systems for office space. There is only an allowable leakage of 123 cfm per floor at 3in wc, so the system had to be completely sealed and tested. These are just a few of the many energy efficient features of the 1,566-millionsquare-foot building.

After saying our goodbyes, we made a quick stop to see SSM’s crew on the 30th floor and then took the elevator to

Next, we took an elevator ride to the 27th floor where the cafeteria will be located. There, Local 19 Foreman James Quarles and Apprentice Brian Keenan, working for Restaurant Ventilation Design (RVD), showed us the work members performed on both the 27th and 28th floors. They installed stainless steel tables, ventilation hoods, and a pizza oven among other food service equipment. Like the rest of the work by Local 19 members on the job, the craftsmanship is unsurpassed.

(Left) The Comcast Tower lantern from a distance. (Top Right) An example of the chill beam system in the Comcast office space. (Bottom Right) Brothers Bobby Wurz and Dimitri Yelantsev of Wurz Signs planning the next step for sign installation throughout the building.

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the 44th floor, one of the locations where members employed by Wm J. Donovan were working. This will be the future home of the building’s fitness center. There, we had a moment to speak with Keith Porter and Steward Natasha Scott. Included in the work Donovan was performing throughout the building was the new NBC 10 and Telemundo 62 studios, the cafeteria levels on 27 and 28, and on floors 18 through 20, showcase floors with mock ups and an auditorium. In our travels, we encountered Bobby Wurz and Dimitri Yelantsev, members working for Wurz Sign Systems, Pennsauken, NJ. Along with City Signs, they have the task of installing signs for every office, bathroom, stairwell, janitor closet, and other spaces throughout the building. We then headed to the 60th floor, the future home to a restaurant with magnificent 360-degree views unlike any other in the entire tri-state area. There we met with Brothers Jeff Worsfold and Rob Saul who work for ADS and who were installing what is known as an “air floor.” Similar to an electric or hydronic heated floor, it uses air that is blown into air pockets under the poured concrete floor. ADS has been on-site the longest of all Local 19 contractors, starting with the core of the building, fabricating and installing the massive risers, and then the top floors that will house the Four Seasons Hotel, restaurant space on the first floor, and the exhaust for two massive chillers that sit at the base of the lantern on the roof.

A view from the top

Finally, our trip was complete when we headed up to the roof and peered out over the entire region. The views from there are amazing. It really is a privilege that our members have the opportunity to take in such sights on a daily basis. As we look back on this job, Business Agent Jerry Gontz remarked: “It’s astonishing to really quantify how much planning, coordination, skill, and determination it takes to tackle this sort of project. And while all this is going on, with well over 250,000 working hours for the sheet metal worker, safety was held to the highest standard, with no major injuries and zero stop loss.” This project demonstrates that when you have contractors with workers that possess skills and safety training unmatched by the competition, no job is too big and Local 19 will always be up for the challenge.

(Top) Brother Brian Keenan installing kitchen equipment in the 27th floor cafeteria. (Middle) Local 19 Steward Bob McFadden, SSM, right, explains the chill beam system to Business Agent Jerry Gontz. (Bottom) Discussing how the air floor will function are (L-R): Organizer Jim Keenan, Rob Saul (ADS), Steward Natasha Scott (Wm. J. Donovan), and Jim Worsfold (ADS).

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Building trades honored by Delaware County Historical Society

L – R: Business Agents Tony Ianucci, Michael Guinan and Luke Gordon; Organizers Howard Van Buren, Bryon Blum and Bob Gadsby; Political Director Todd Farally and Organizer Jim Keenan.

The Delaware County Historical Society Museum has mounted a display that celebrates the charitable and volunteer work of unions in Delaware County. It is not only an act of celebration but one of appreciation for the role union members played in rehabilitating the building that became the museum. Sheet metal workers joined electricians, brick layers, painters, operating engineers and others by donating their time so the museum could become a reality. Local 19 is one of 15 unions being honored. The display features photos and Local 19’s 100-year history book that details our union’s first century from 1887 to 1987. Tools of our trade on display include a copper conductor head, a dust col10

lector, various fittings and signage. Also displayed are hand tools our predecessors used such as old style snips and a soldering iron. It also celebrates the contributions of union members to community programs as volunteer firefighters, coaches, school programs and the like. “It’s great exposure for the building trades,” said Howard Van Buren III, Organizer for Local 19. “Far too often, we’re in the shadows. People don’t understand what we do, who we are, how we give back to the community and the livings that unions provide.” The display will be available for viewing throughout the year at 408 Avenue of the States, Chester, PA 19013. To check when displays are available for viewing, call 610-359-0826.

On display – Local 19 historical artifacts and tools of the trade.


Restoration of historic Philadelphia building in the capable hands of Local 19

Repairs being made on the Hale Building should last another 100 years.

Members of Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 are actively restoring the exterior of the Hale Building at the corner of Juniper and Chestnut Streets, Philadelphia. The work is being performed by Premier Architectural Sheet Metal of Pennsauken, NJ. Members on hand when visiting the job site were Owner Member Jason Pacetti, Company Steward Jim Harding, and Foreman Michael Pacetti.

and 60s, it was used as a bath house and health club. In the early 2000s, the ground floor was used for retail space while the upper floors were vacant and deteriorating. In 2016, it was recognized as a Philadelphia landmark and the restoration on the original building and extension (built in the 1920’s) had begun.

Brother Michael Pacetti explained that the project involves fabricating and installing new copper on the windows, repairing cornices and replacing gutters that will be reinforced with stainless steel, water shield rosin paper and copper. It’s a repair that should last for at least another 100 years. The original building was constructed in 1887 and designed for offices by Willis G. Hale, a few years before he would go on to design the Divine Lorraine on North Broad. By the early 1900s, it had become a theatre and in the 50s

(Above) The Hale Building was constucted in 1887. (Left) This copper was crimped by the only known machine in existence that dates to the time the building was constructed and may very well be the one used on the original building.

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A State of the Art Training Facility in Ce In Local 19’s Central Pennsylvania territory, a cutting-edge training facility that could serve the needs of apprentices, journeypersons and signatory contractors had seemed like a dream for the past eighty years. But what was once a far-off vision will soon become a reality. In 1938, Local 19’s jurisdiction was increased by the International Union to include twenty counties in Pennsylvania and three in New Jersey. A large portion of those were Central PA territories; in the 1960’s, Easton and Allentown merged to form the Lehigh Valley section of Central PA branch Locals. It wasn’t until 1967 that a Joint Apprenticeship and Training Committee was formed to serve the members and signatory contractors of Local 19 Central. It took a little over a decade to set up an adequate training center in Shoemakersville, PA.

Since the building is designed to educate sheet metal workers, the committee felt it was necessary to use as much sheet metal in the design as possible. The building will act as a life-size educational experience utilizing sheet metal products that Local 19 will use in everyday job activities. The roof of the building will be 4-inch thick Centria roof panels. These allow for open space below and provide a clean look for the interior and exterior, as well as have a 32.3 R-value. The siding of the building will utilize two different Centria products: a vertical panel system in the shop areas and a horizontal panel in the classrooms. Both types of wall panel systems carry an R-value of 25.83. The committee chose to use Centria due to its exceptional R-values and because their products are made with 60% recycled materials.

The building was originally the local firehouse, converted to suit our needs to train the future sheet metal mechanics from Easton to Altoona well into the 2000s. However, changing technology in the trade, job growth, and lack of adequate space had become an issue. Something had to be done so that our apprentices and journeypersons could receive the highest standards of training anywhere in the nation.

The design will also incorporate several “ribbon” style windows that allow sunlight into the classrooms and shop areas of the building. The high east-facing windows will light the shop in the morning hours. Two accent walls were added to incorporate different types of metal wall panels that Local 19 members will learn how to install. The overall building envelope will create a state-of-the-art facility with excellent energy efficiency.

The Long Road

In 2016, Local 19 Central PA put together a building committee that would design a new training center to meet the needs of our members and, at the same time, address changing technology and the market. After a 15-month design phase, Local 19 Central had a building design that would meet our needs. 12

The Exterior

Interior Office and Classrooms

The interior design is very simple. It was decided that an open concept would achieve the desired effect for the building. The classrooms, hallways, and vestibule will all be without ceilings so that the sheet metal duct and components will be visible. Aspects such as diffuser design, fire damper installation and in-

The new training facility will incorporate as much

spection, duct design, proper duct and accessory installation, and various other learning experiences can be achieved using this open concept. The CAD / Sketching room will consist of twelve stations which will utilize Autodesk products for duct design, estimation, fabrication and BIM. The idea is that students will become well rounded since CAD is a vital part of the learning experience. In addition to CAD stations, the CAD room will be used to teach Plans and Specifications and basic drafting skills.


entral PA: Eight Decades in the Making

sheet metal as possible in its design.

Sheet Metal Shop

The sheet metal shop will utilize much of the equipment from the Shoemakersville facility with the addition of heavier equipment. The sheet metal trade takes pride in its long history of old methods of layout, fabrication, and assembly. The new shop will enable students to appreciate the old methods while utilizing more modern industrial equipment and techniques. New equipment including a power shear, power brake, iron worker, power rotary machine, and automated plasma table will teach students skills

needed to be productive in the modern sheet metal shop.

Welding Shop

Local 19 Central PA has been an American Welding Society Accredited Test Facility (ATF) for many years. This allows members to become certified welders in several various welding procedures. The new facility will have 12 weld booths that will be equipped to weld using many different weld procedures and materials. The design of the weld booths will utilize a larger space for one-on-one instructor involvement.

The booths are also designed with an exhaust system that operates on Variable air volume to help with energy efficiency. During the design process, the committee decided that adding 50% more booths, as well as making the booths larger, would create an improved program to teach skills necessary to weld in the sheet metal industry.

Service Shop

The service area is located on the mezzanine of the shop. This area is a simple design that will allow students to install and service spit and package Continued on page 15

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3 4

5 6

1. Steve Daniels 2. Mike Hersh giving instructions on panel layout. 3. Ed Kurtz 4. Jay Maihle signaling. 5. Keith Swartz (L) and Ed Kurtz rigging a panel. 6. Frank Frankenfield on the job.

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air conditioning and heating systems. The service area will include several manufacturers’ equipment and will help make students as well-rounded as possible.

Testing, Adjusting, and Balancing

Because Testing, Adjusting, and Balancing (TAB) is an important sector in the sheet metal industry, the new training center will incorporate many aspects of TAB work. The HVAC systems are designed to allow students to use the entire building as a TAB learning experience. This, coupled with a Hydronic water testing wall and two separate TAB air handling systems, will give students a comprehensive experience in the TAB sector.

Lighting

The entire building will be lit with LED fixtures. Due to the open concept, the lighting system will utilize pendant style lights as well as dimmable strip lighting in the CAD room for better visibility. Motion sensors/occupancy sensors in the shop area will be used to conserve as much energy as possible.

HVAC

Heating and air conditioning will consist of two main air handlers: one for the shop area and one for the office and classroom areas. The classrooms and offices will be served by a Variable Air Volume system which will enable the system to run as efficiently as possible while providing temperature control in every zone. In addition, the shop will incorporate a large slow-moving ceiling fan manufactured by Big Ass Fan Company, preventing air stratification and help keep the shop areas comfortable.

Cleanroom / Biosafety Cabinets / Fume Hoods

As the industry changes, so do the needs of Local 19 contractors. A small portion of the building will be utilized as a cleanroom so students can learn HEPA filter testing and Cleanroom setup. The area will also include two Biosafety Cabinets and three fume hoods.

This equipment will allow for training in ASHRAE 110 fume hood testing as well as Biosafety Cabinet decontamination. This area of the sheet metal industry is growing substantially in the region and the ability to provide this training is key to growth.

A promising Future

Eighty years after merging with Local 19, Central PA apprentices and mechanics will have one of the best training centers around. None of it could have happened without the many tireless hours put in by Local 19 staff and members. Nearly every weekend, and even on some weekdays, members volunteered to build our new ‘house of learning’ which will become the foundation of Local 19 Central Pennsylvania’s bright future. (Below) Steve Merryman (L) and Jay Maihle.

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LOCAL 19

Happenings There have been even more personnel changes around the Local since the beginning of 2018. 2017 ended with the retirement of long-time Business Agent Charlie Burkert; the appointment of Tom Klingenberg as Funds Administrator after serving as Financial Secretary Treasurer (FST); the appointment of Bryan Bush as FST while still serving as Business Agent and Assistant Business Manager, and the appointment of Luke Gordon as Business Agent. As a result of these changes, two Organizer positions and one Business Agent position became available. Candidate interviews were conducted by President Masino and the Business Agents at the end of 2017. As of January 1, 2018, Local 19 appointed Tom Bush to Business Agent, and Jim Keenan and Bob Gadsby as Organizers.

Tom Bush becomes Business Agent

Executive Board from 2014 until he was hired as a full-time Local 19 Organizer for Philadelphia and Bucks County.

Bob Gadsby becomes Organizer

Bob Gadsby has been with the Local for 13 years, starting as an apprentice in 2005 and graduating in 2010. For several years, Bob worked as company New officers, L – R: Warden Mike Crim, Conductor Nick Lankelis, Executive Board Member Jerry Zimmerman, Business Steward for Restaurant VentilaAgent Tom Bush, Organizer Bob Gadsby, Trustee Jim McGroar- tion Design (RVD) and travelled ty, and Organizer Jim Keenan. Not pictured: Executive Board the country working in the kitchMember John Silcox. en equipment side of our trade. He also served as Warden from 2011 to 2014 when he became a member of the Executive Board and served the membership in that capacity until being hired as a full-time Organizer for Local 19’s New Jersey territory.

New Business Agent Tom Bush is a second-generation Local 19 member with over twenty years in our union, having worked in many capacities within the trade and Local 19. After completing his apprenticeship, Tom worked as a Journeyperson, Steward and Foreman for various signatory contractors. He also served as an Executive Board Member from 2012 until 2014 when he was hired as a full-time Organizer for Local 19, serving with great distinction.

Jim Keenan hired as Organizer

Jim Keenan is a third-generation Local 19 member with over 14 years in our union. Jim started his sheet metal career in the residential side of the trade before starting his apprenticeship in 2006. After graduating, he worked as a Journeyperson and Steward for several years. Jim served on the 16

With brothers Keenan and Gadsby vacating their positions on the Executive Board, President Masino has appointed Warden John “BJ” Silcox and Trustee Jerry Zimmerman to fill those positions. This resulted in an opening on the Board of Trustees with Jerry Zimmerman moving up to Executive Board. Conductor Jeff Block has been tapped to take on that task. A second seat on the Board of Trustees has opened with Local 19 Assistant Funds Administrator Dennis Siravo stepping down from his Trustee duties. This spot is being filled by brother Jim McGroarty. Finally, with a vacancy in both Warden and Conductor positions, President Masino has appointed Michael Crim to Warden and Nickolas Lankelis as Conductor.

President Masino swears in new officers (L – R): Organizer Bob Gadsby, Organizer Jim Keenan, Trustee Jeff Block, Executive Board Member John Silcox, Business Agent Tom Bush, Conductor Nick Lankelis, and Warden Mike Crim. Not pictured: Executive Board Member Jerry Zimmerman and Trustee Jim McGroarty.

Congratulations on your appointments, brothers. The membership and leadership have faith in your abilities and know that you will serve our Local with the utmost honor and distinction now and for years to come.


Local 19 proud of first female shop foreman History was made in the summer of 2017 when Sister Renee Cahill was named Shop Foreman for Bonland Industries in Bensalem, PA. She is the first woman to hold that position in Local 19’s 130-year-old history. Renee has been a member of Local 19 for 17 years and is a second- generation member with plenty of family in our local including her father, uncle, two brothers, a cousin, husband and two step sons. For her, Local 19 is both figuratively and literally family.

She served her apprenticeship at Ernest D. Menold before reaching the rank of Journeyperson. When asked what advice she has for other women who are starting out in the trade, she said: “Just work your tail off and you have to realize that this isn’t going to be easy. It’s very important to get yourself into the proper frame of mind to succeed in this trade. Like with anything, you’re going to have your ups and downs, but stick with it and never give up on yourself or the trade.

When asked what made her want to join the Local, Renee replied: “There were several reasons really. I was a bit of a tomboy growing up. I never minded getting my hands dirty or hard work. Knowing the money and benefits were good and that I didn’t see college as an option, I felt this was the best choice for me and my future.”

“I was a leasing agent for an apartment building before I started this work,” she said, “so I never had done anything like this before my apprenticeship, like weekend handbills. And when you’re a single mom like I was at the time, it can get really tough, but you work through it and you do what needs to be done to complete your

schooling and work.” According to President Masino, “Local 19 is making a concerted effort to recruit more female members and provide them with opportunities that union membership offers. The last apprentice class alone brought five women into the union and we welcome them as sisters in the trade.” Sister Cahill is certainly a Local 19 success story and we are very proud of the work she continues to do in her role as shop foreman for Bondland. According to Shop Steward Rob Mawson, she is great to work with, never acts as though she’s above anyone, and makes everyone feel like they are together for a common goal. And that is what being part of a union is all about, working together to achieve great things for each other.

(L - R) Darrell Hendrix, Carlo Tocci, Jim Smolen, Renee Chaill, Rob Mawson, Bill Frank, Bill Dougherty, Kevin Eliason, Matt Quenzer, Tom Bush, Jim Keenan, John Howells, Don “Antman” Marchionese, Mike Nelon, Lyle Kaighn, Darrell Richardson and Robert Crossley.

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The importance of being engaged in every election Every election is important, but this year, there is so much at stake when it comes to working families in Pennsylvania. This November, the voting citizens of the Commonwealth will decide whether they want to live in a place where working people’s wages and standards stagnate or diminish, safety on the job is skirted for higher profits, and our Unions are hamstringed with ridiculous regulations to weaken the voices of workers. Or do we want to live in a State where Unions bargain freely in good faith and are not forced to represent freeloaders who refuse to pay their fair share; workers’ pay and standards improve, and safety is held to a higher standard. This is the primary reason why the general election this year and defending Governor Wolf is so critical. He is our last line of defense against Right to Work coming to PA. An unfriendly State House and Senate will guarantee this re-

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Sean Kilkenny is running to represent the citizens in the 177th legislative district.

sult if his adversary is elected. Also, we have a major opportunity to flip seats to Labor-friendly candidates to defend and expand our rights as workers.

Former Philadelphia Deputy Mayor of Labor Rich Lazer is running in the 5th Congressional District.

One such seat is the 177th legislative district in Philadelphia. Long held by John Taylor who has been a friend to Unions for many years, this seat will be open with Representative Taylor’s retirement. This gives us an opportunity to not just have a friend of labor in that seat, but rather a card-carrying union member elected to that position. Our Local, along with all the Building Trades and a united coalition of Labor Unions from both private and public sectors, are endorsing and getting out the vote for Sean Kilkenny in the Democratic Primary on May 16th. Kilkenny is a Plasterer by Trade who knows working peoples’ issues better than any other candidate in that race. He is a blue-collar worker with a focus on rejuvenating our neighborhoods and bringing businesses back to the district. Sean is the best person to do this because he has taken on many such roles already throughout his working life. He has owned


a business in the district, so he understands the challenges small business people face. He has worked in the construction industry in the field and office, negotiating contracts around the country. So he knows how to put in a hard day’s work and how to reach fair agreements with other parties across the table. Another race that Local 19 is getting involved in this primary season is the ultra-competitive Democratic primary in the newly redrawn Pennsylvania 5th Congressional District which consists of all of Delaware County, a sliver of Montgomery County along route 30, Southwest Philadelphia, and a portion of South Philadelphia. Here is another instance where an enormous cross-section of Labor is getting behind one candidate because

we realize that when we’re all moving in the same direction, we are ultimately stronger. The person we’re endorsing in that race is former Philadelphia Deputy Mayor of Labor Rich Lazer. Mr. Lazer has a strong track record of working with Labor to reach fair and equitable agreements. He oversaw the negotiations with city worker unions and was crucial in settling a labor dispute that could have crippled the Philadelphia International Airport. And it doesn’t hurt that Rich is the son of a former Sheet Metal Worker either. It’s quite evident that of all the contenders throwing their hat in the ring, Rich is the one that knows how to fight effectively for working people in Pennsylvania. That’s why Local 19 is proud to stand shoulder to shoulder with our other brothers and sisters in the Labor

Stay connected

to Local 19 after retiring After a career with Local 19, what next? For some, it’s more time for golfing, fishing or hunting. For others, it’s time for family or travel. But maintaining a connection to Local 19 is an opportunity for retirees to enjoy a bond with others who have had long careers in the trade. Retiree Club members meet nine times a year over breakfast or lunch and catch up on a range of topics, but that’s not all. Day trips to places like Gettysburg Battlefield, a cruise on the Spirit of Philadelphia or a day to watch the Phillies at Citizens Bank Park are typical of the outings planned during the year. Aside from brotherhood and companionship, the club also reaches out to retirees in need and provides a support system to our brothers and sisters. The club’s officers meet with President Gary Masino quarterly to discuss concerns. “We can never forget where we came from,” said President Masino, “and where we’re going. That’s why it’s vital that our retirees are in the room when discussing issues that impact their lives and have a voice that is heard. We take care of our own and we’ll all be there one day.” Membership dues are only $10 a year, down from an original $35 a year, thanks to an unanimously approved supplement from Local 19. For more information and to join, contact the Business Office at 215-952-1999.

Movement to push Lazer through the finish line to victory! With these three important races running full steam and Local 19 fully committed, we want to remind our members why it’s so important to be registered to vote. Over the years, people often become jaded and feel that their vote doesn’t matter. That is the exact opposite. Our vote is one of the most important rights we have as Americans. Men and women have bled and died for that right because only the voice of the people can truly push policy. No matter how much money is infused in an election, the peoples’ vote is the deciding factor. Through your vote, you can tell your elected officials where you stand on an engaged electorate that participates, shapes the laws of the world where we live, play, and work.

r co n g

atulations !

Retirees

Our best wishes to these new retirees. We hope you are catching fish, sitting on a beach, seeing the world, enjoying grandchildren and families, or doing absolutely nothing at all.

Anthony Dragan Brian P. Master Bryan L. Gordon Charles J. Burkert Darren Riley Emil Brandt Jr. Harold Slawter Henry Lomas John E. Eichenberg John E. Wiegner

John J. Ivers Kevin M. Neibauer Louis D. Sparco Mark E. Collins Michael A. Tertel Pasquale Truscia Robert J. Grodzicki Robert Spitz Stanley J. Tomczak Thomas Toth

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Sheet Me 39th Annual

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etal Workers Dinner Dance

Saturday, March 24, 2018

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50 & 25-year members honored at 39th Annual Dinner Dance

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2018 Honorees 50 Year Members Allyn L. Swavely Arthur C. Smith Charles P. Ilconich David L. Moore David. L. Shiavi David R. Webb Donald R.Mealey Earl L. Shoemaker Edward E. Haines Edward K. Hall Elmer M. Knapp Eugene Samero Eugene P. Austin Francis Caltagirone

Fred J. Krug George P. Maar Glenn E. Fry James C. Entwistle James H. Kehm James J. McWhorter James O. Putt James W. Atwell Joseph Nuzzi John F. Begley John W. Ludolph Joseph D. Mealey Joseph J. Donato Joseph W. Hartman

Kenneth R. Piree Larry E. Stewart Larry L. Sanno Leon L. Angstadt Michael L. Ilconich Raymond C. Tomczak Richard F. Keiser Richard D. Fadeley Richard W. Irle Robert A. Hollinger Robert C. Knauss Robert F. Simon Robert J. Larkin Ross Failor, Sr.

Salvatore L. Macaro Terry M. Valore Thomas J. Foley Thomas L. Runkle Thomas C. Leese Vincent F. DeAbgelis William J. Wilczynski Michael A. Muller Barry Rosenberg Robert Wealand Kenneth G. Geding

25 Year Members Allen W. Eck Anthony Rispo Billy Joe Ressler Brian W. Angstadt Brian Cavanaugh Christopher R. Yabor Craig S. Ropars Daniel F. Horne

Dwain T. Mills David Halikman Gerald J. Doyle Glenn A. Reidnauer Henry J. Hilt James M. Kheen Jerry Sheridan Joseph Cichello

Graduated Journeypersons Philadelphia

Andrew Hartman

Kevin Bayers

Brent Ford

Kirk McLean

Brian Reis

Leonard Cusack

David Lyons

Michael Hensel

Douglas Walsh

Phillip Hunter

Edward Tertel

Joseph Dolan

Ezequiel Rivera

Robert Coates, Jr.

John McManus

Shamus Cahill

John Selser

Vincent Strengari

Kenneth Getsinger

Vincenzo Taormina

Keith W. Leach Keith A. Pauley Kenneth Hassinger Kenneth B. Lynch Kevin Little Mark C. Collins Judge Budd Patrick B. Barrett

Graduated Journeypersons Central PA Adriana Robinson Jason Baughman Joshua Lantz Joshua Mackes Kevin Smith Lorne Hess, III Matthew Beichey Matthew Hicks Matthew Hileman Matthew Marrero Matthew Phillips

Richard C. Fagan Robert J. Atwell Robert J. Ellis Timothy Matthews Thomas J. McGonagle Todd C. Shirk Steven Williams

Academic Scholarship Winners Jazzlyn Mae Casula

(Related to Joseph Casula)

Madison Rose Coppolino (Related to Michael Coppolino)

Emily Claire Kirchner

(Related to Robert Kirchner)

Preston Patrick Mahoney (Related to James McGroarty)

Random Scholarship Winners Jacqueline Rose Kolifrath (Related to John Kolifrath)

Nicole Marisa Phillips

(Related to Claybourne Phillips)

Jenny Megan Miller (Related to Mike Sava)

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Joe Lowry, CFFC lightweight champion, is a dedicated Local 19 member As he continues to train seven days a week, four hours a day, Joe Lowry can’t help but think of the ultimate opportunity that he soon may be presented. Lowry is the reigning Cage Fury Fighting Championships (CFFC) lightweight champion. He is undefeated in seven professional bouts and is the No. 1 ranked lightweight in New Jersey, No. 4 in Pennsylvania and No. 8 in northeast United States. That’s among all professional fighters. What that resume may get him is an opportunity to fight on the biggest stage – the Ultimate Fighting Championships (UFC), the largest MMA promotion in the world and obviously the most prestigious. His shot could come soon. “I’d be glad to step up,” Lowry said. “It’s what I’ve been training for, this opportunity. I’ve been training seven days a week, working five days a week. I have a management team working on it, Sucker Punch (Entertainment). They manage Max Holloway. He’s the UFC 145 champion.”

my parents raised me.”

pleasure to call them my brothers.

Lowry calls Local 19 his union. He refers to it as a brotherhood and its members as his brothers and sisters. Twice he experienced firsthand how members come together to support each other. The first time was when his brother, Thomas IV, a decorated Marine veteran, died in an automobile accident in December, 2013 at the age of 32, and in January of this year, when his brother Daniel, an Air Force veteran, died suddenly at the age of 34. His union brothers and sisters were there for him and his family.

“I love the work I do. I work in the architectural division and someday, if I have kids, I can take them around and show them and say, ‘I did that’.

“When my brothers passed away I had to stay strong for my family, but my union brothers were there to support me,” Lowry said. “I love working in the union. I love the brotherhood. Local 19 is a strong group. Everyone is tight. It is a

“The union has been great. They have supported my fighting career. If I fight in the UFC, I might take some time off, but I will always go back. I’ll always be a Local 19 member. You can’t fight forever. After I’m done fighting and even if make some money at it, I’m still going to need something to go back to and that will be the union. I like the brotherhood and I have a lot of respect for it.” It is why he has the logo of the Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 on his trunks when he enters the cage and why he will wear it proudly in the UFC when he gets that opportunity.

Whether it comes now or down the road, Lowry will continue to train and work toward that goal. He has boxing in his blood. His father, Tom, was an amateur Golden Gloves champion and his grandfather, also Tom, and his brother Jim, were boxers and are members of the Pennsylvania Boxing Hall of Fame. And Joe Lowry will also continue to work as a Local 19 member with Robert Ganter Contractors. He is now a fourthyear apprentice. That’s in his blood too. “My dad was a roofer, Local 30,” Lowry said. “I was raised in a union family. I saw how they take care of one another, how they watch over each other and I’ve always been respectful of that. That’s how 25


A tribute to Jack Bush

a man who looked out for everyone When one joins a union, we call each other brother or sister. These are terms that bring us closer together because, through the union, we are family. That is exactly how Jack Bush felt about the members of Local 19, and as his family, we were saddened to say goodbye to him on January 7, 2018.

Tom Kelly to a group of the very first fulltime Organizers for Local 19. While he was still looking out for the union, he was also looking out for workers who were exploited by their employ-

John J. “Jack” Bush, Jr., was born April 7, 1943 in Philadelphia, the oldest son of 10 siblings. Growing up, he looked after everyone, and he did that throughout his entire life. You could always count on Jack whether you were blood or not. He was there when help was needed. This drive to help people is what drew him to serve our Local and the membership for so many years. When Jack was young, like many men during the early 1960s, he joined the military and served in the Army for four years, stationed in Germany for a time. After an honorable discharge, he worked as a Coppersmith with Local 82 and was known as one of the best welders around. Right before Local 82 merged with Local 19, Jack transferred to our Local. As his sheet metal career developed, Jack was still looking out for people on the job site. His brothers and sisters in the union could count on him to always speak up when conditions were inadequate or unsafe. He would not stand for Injustice. For this and so many other reasons, in 1980 Jack was the first named by then President & Business Manager 26

bers in those duties with great honor and distinction. And because of his representation and leadership, in the early 1990s, Jack was appointed by President Kelly to the newly created position of Assistant Business Manager where he brought the same dedication and commitment to our members he had always displayed in everything he did. Jack finally decided it was time to head into the next chapter of life, so in 2000, he was able to begin enjoying his retirement with joyous days spent with his grand and great grandchildren. But even when he was retired, he still made it to many Local 19 events and meetings. He continued to be active in our local and was always there to give advice and guidance to all that needed it.

John “Jack” Bush, Jr. ers. As an organizer, Jack signed many companies and assisted in raising the standard of living for many working families in the region. He has helped many find their own American dream. In 1986, Jack ran for Business Agent and was elected by the membership in a special election. Just like everything he did in life, as New Jersey Business Agent, he served our mem-

Throughout his life there were two constants for Jack -- family and Local 19. These are very much one in the same in so many ways. Jack and his wife Carolyn were married 46 years and had five children together, and with his large extended family, there was always enough love to go around. Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 thanks Jack for all his hard work throughout the years and for forging a trail that is still traveled today. You, brother, have left an imprint on this world and in the hearts of everyone you touched. We all miss you but take solace in the fact that you’re always with us, still looking out for everyone.


Right to work defeated in Delaware

Local 19 made it clear that the proposed law would put a stranglehold on workers’ rights to earn a fair wage.

On January 9 this year, Local 19 protested a move in Sussex County, DE, to pass a county-wide Right to Work (for less) law proposed by Councilman Rob Arlett. Arlett was Trump’s point man in the State of Delaware during the 2016 Presidential Campaign. And the Sussex County Council is comprised of five members, all of whom are Republicans.

Woods, and Organizers Howard Van Buren, Bob Gadsby, and Jim Keenan. Members who came out to fight the proposal were Randy Evans, Rick King, and Eugene Gove. Thank you, brothers. Through the dedication of our members, we’ll continue to keep our union strong.

State law clearly doesn’t permit Right to Work laws to be passed by local governments.

The Building and Construction Trades of Delaware kept the pressure on the Council on three separate occasions as the law was being discussed and finally voted on. State law clearly doesn’t permit Right to Work laws to be passed by local governments. Nevertheless, Arlett persisted with this toxic bill that would hurt working people in Sussex County. Thankfully, with the steadfast actions taken by the Building Trades, the measure was struck down in a 4 to 1 vote. Working families won! In attendance at the protests were Local 19’s DE Business Agent, Kem

(L – R) – Business Agent Ken Woods, Eugene Gove, Rick King, Organizer Howard Van Buren, Organizer Bob Gadsby, Randy Evans, and Organizer Jim Keenan kept up the pressure on the Sussex County Council.

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Making the 1

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1. Brad Vinglish and Matt Phillips load a massive elbow at Penn State Hershey Medical Center CHP working for McCarl. 2. Rod Lewis, working for McCarl at Penn State, cranes a large section of duct into place on the roof. 3. Member Joe Newcomb is steady at it on the bang-bang table. 4. Bob Gadsby at Houston Airport for RVD.

5. On the job at A.I. DuPont: (L – R) Erik Koszalinski, Kyle Owsiany, Roy Downward, Jason Brown, Lauren Hill, Frank Boyle, Bill Phillips, Joe Casulla, Bob Pontius, Dave Ondinch, Dan Mazzarelli, George Kauffman, Tom McCullin, Richard Reed, Alex Farmer, Dustin Mecke, Johnathan Conway, Blane Beeson and Dave Cernos. 6. Jeff Rastetter, Jr., and Bill Stone on site for Bonland at the Penn Science Center.

7. Local 19 members Dave Pusey, Bob Kirchner and Rodger Arnold secure a fitting that wraps around a steel column for Bonland Industries at Bryn Mawr Hospital. 8. At Bryn Mawr Hospital: Jack Sealey, Ron Thompson, Andy Ballak and Will Rivera use duct jacks to raise a portion of an operating room ceiling. 9. RVD Company Steward John B.J. Silcox at Citizens Bank Park.

10. Working for Camden Mechanical at American Water, Camden, NJ, are: (Front L – R) Keith Oakley, Bill McCoog, Greg Martyn, Keith Finken and Chris Lipenta. (Middle L – R) Mike Macool, Chip Blackshear, Scott Stintsman and Rich Kraus. (Back L – R) Jim Cloke, Aaron and Tim Maguire. 11. Kahlil Dorn, working for Bonland, prepares a connection at the Penn Science Center in Philadelphia

12. Carmen Bonnocci working for Progressive Sheet Metal at the new Target Express on Callowhill Street in Philadelphia.

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13. Bill Wilson and Bob Furey at work.


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Local 19 in action 4

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Eagles Super Bowl 1

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Victory Excitement 3

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1. Brother Steve Amato in the Underdog mask and a friend head to the Eagles Victory Parade. 2.Celebrating the Eagles’ victory at Bonland Industries are (L – R): Rob Mawson, Bud Dougherty, Renee Cahill, Darrell Richardson, and Don “Antman” Marchionese. 3. Enjoying Local 19’s Super Bowl Party are: (L - R) Gary Masino, Bryan Bush, B. J. Silcox and Tommy Bush. 4. Brother Bob McFadden and his son Cole enjoy the Super Bowl with friends. 5. Philadelphia lights up in green for the Eagles. Photo by Brother Kevin Ryan. 6. The crowd on the field in Minnesota following the Eagles’ victory. Photo by Brother Eric Defeo. 7. Brother Mike Wysocki took his son Michael and daughter Taylor to the Eagles Victory Parade.

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8. Members gather to watch the game at Local 19’s Super Bowl party. 9. Organizer Jim Keenan, Jackie Kinkade and Carolyn Bush manage the Basket Auction at the Super Bowl party. 10. Business Agent Tom Bush, left, and Organizer Howard Van Buren enjoy the festivities. 11. (L – R) Retired Local 19 member Ed Tertel, Jr., Ed Tertell, III, and Megan Tertel celebrate in the cold. 12. President Gary Masino draws a raffle winner at the Super Bowl party.

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SHAME!

Boycott these companies!

Unfair to labor!

These businesses have continued to hurt working families by not paying fair wages or not hiring contractors that pay the proper area wages and standards, weakening the communities in which we all live and work. Aldi Autozone Bassett Furniture Bonesaw Grill Cheltenham Mall CVS Edge Fitness Family Dollar Five Guys Burgers and Fries Giant Supermarkets Honey Grow I Fly Launch Trampoline Park Lidl Patient First Planet Fitness Republic Bank Royal Farms Steve Prince of Steaks TJ Maxx Walgreens WaWa Wendy’s Yuengling Beer

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The benefits of being a Local 19 member With all the things that concern us – work, family, and just the daily challenges of life – you might not be aware of all the benefits available to members and their families covered under our plan. Here we highlight two that are available to active and retired members.

When you have a healthcare issue Guardian Nurses is a healthcare consulting company that guides our members through the healthcare system. A team of registered nurses will quickly respond whenever a Local 19 member has a healthcare issue. Guardian Nurses ensure that members receive the proper testing and care they might otherwise not get. Their nurses will visit you at home or in the hospital, help you make informed decisions regarding your healthcare, assist in making appointments and go to the doctor with you if needed, and will ask the right questions. They can also explain a new diagnosis, resolve problems with billing and health insurance, and assist in obtaining healthcare equipment. Guardian Nurses are true advocates for our members and retirees and are committed to continuing the same level of exemplary care and service

for many years to come. If you or someone in your family covered under the Local 19 Health and Welfare Plan needs assistance, call Guardian Nurses at 484-800-5626 or 484-800-2932 and one of their Mobile Care Coordinators will be there for all your healthcare needs. All services provided by Guardian Nurses are confidential and not shared with the union.

Help when you have a personal or relationship problem There are times in our lives when we all need help. When things are too much for us to handle ourselves, it’s time to turn to a trained professional. If you are having trouble with substance abuse, stress, anxiety, depression, gambling, marital/family relationships, or a job-related problem, you have somewhere to turn. Help is just a phone call away at 1-800-2982299 or 215-425-8140. Total Care Network provides counselors to help you through a variety of issues with total confidentially. This network of counselors located throughout the region provides the services for Local 19’s Member Assistance Program (MAP) and is a free service for all union

members, apprentices, and their dependents that are eligible for benefits through the Local. Even if things look bleak, remember that you aren’t alone. Just reach out and call. All matters discussed with them are completely confidential and no union officials, funds staff or members have access to your records or knowledge of your discussions with them.

For questions about benefits One of the greatest benefits that our members enjoy is the Funds Office itself. Local 19 is one of the few local unions that has its very own Funds Office. In many cases, this work is either handled through an International Union or outsourced to faceless companies that have no stake in the union and no accountability to the membership. Local 19 has a team of employees that work every day for its members. Local 19’s Funds Office is overseen by our own members. Led by Tom Klingenberg, Funds Administrator, and Dennis Siravo, Assistant Administrator, we can be confident that these are people we know and trust. If there’s a question about insurance billing, a pension issue, the SUB, vacation fund or just a general question, members can call during regular business hours and speak with qualified benefit administrators who will solve any problem or answer any question quickly and with the utmost efficiency.

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Local 19 apprentices among regional winners Highlights of 2018 Mid-Atlantic Regional Apprentice Competition

L-R: Philadelphia Training Coordinator Joe Frick, Philadelphia Instructor Ron Deichert, Jim Woods, Kevin Taylor, Ian Muth, Gregg Riggs, Mike Smith, Philadelphia Instructor Donnie Smith, Central PA Training Coordinator Pat Edmonds and Justin Wolfe.

by Joseph Frick

Philadelphia Training Coordinator

There were spectators, food, drink, invited guests and even an awards ceremony, but for the event participants, the atmosphere was anything but festive. Twenty-four apprentices representing Sheet Metal Workers Locals 12 Pittsburgh, 19 Central PA, 19 Philadelphia, 22 Cranford, NJ, 25 Carlstadt, NJ, 27 Farmingdale, NJ, 44 Wilkes-Barre and 100 Washington, D.C., were focused intently on their projects and worked diligently over the course of two days to earn a vic34

tory in the Mid-Atlantic Regional Apprentice Competition, hosted by Local 100 Washington, D.C. The level of skills that these young apprentices displayed was at a superior productivity and skill level. That is the standard we demand of our veteran members, so these apprentices are in a great place to help solve the labor shortage in this region now and for years to come. “Local 100’s 18,000-square-foot training facility, like Local 19’s, is state of the art,” said Norbert Klusmann, Training Coordinator for Lo-

cal 100 Washington D.C. “We’re continually changing and being proactive to meet the needs of our industry. We have to because of the non-union climate. Contractors and others that we have brought through here have always told us they are super impressed with our facility. It’s a great facility, and as for the training aspect, we rely on that to make sure that we put people on the job who are skilled and ready to work.” Donny Smith, Instructor for Local 19 Philadelphia, said: “The training makes a difference, it helps change


the perspectives that people have of this industry. There is obviously a lot of pride in what all these apprentices do.” The apprentices displayed their knowledge and skills and were judged in areas such as welding, layout/shop fabrication, detailing, reading plans and specs, and theory. Of course, the 12hour contest gives the winners bragging rights – but evaluating their work also gives apprenticeship coordinators the opportunity to see where they need to refocus their curricula or change their training methods. “I think the biggest thing for the training coordinators is that it gives us an opportunity to see our strengths, where our programs are lacking and improve on what we’re doing,” said Patrick Edmonds, Training Coordinator for Local 19 Central PA. “It’s an opportunity to see what each Local is doing, and it allows us to make our training more standardized.” “These apprentices display during the competition the craftsmanship, understanding of the trade, and safety knowledge that they have learned through-

out their apprenticeships in the classroom and on the job. It is these skills that will help ensure a successful and prosperous career for each of them,” said Ron Deichert, Instructor for Local 19 Philadelphia. The contestants from each local union competed in one of three divisions, 2nd year, 3rd year, and 4th year. Each phase of the competition was designed around the skills developed in their apprenticeship year, using both in-class and on-the-job education and craftsmanship, as they attempted to finish their projects within the time limit. New this year was a group competition in which each Local was in competition as a team. The apprentices from each team had to coordinate together to field measure a mock-up, layout, fabricate, and assemble a duct run that met the specifications. Proudly, Local 19 Central PA took the top honors and bragging rights. The trophy, which is a stainless-steel ogee manufactured by Stromberg Metal Works, Inc. in Beltsville MD, will be retained, engraved, and displayed by Central PA for the next year.

In Memoriam These Local 19 members left us in recent months. Our deepest sympathies to their families. They will be missed. Scott A. Mengel on 12/01/2017, 61 years old, 37 years good standing. Donald R. Spangler on 12/04/2017, 85 years old, 61 years good standing. Robert G. Bobo on 12/21/2017, 85 years old, 61 years good standing. Robert E. Jones on 12/27/2017, 86 years old, 36 years good standing. Louis Dinatale on 12/29/2017, 87 years old, 65 years good standing. Jerome M. Cooper on 12/30/2017, 85 years old, 39 years good standing. H. Bruce Conover on 01/01/2018, 82 years old, 63 years good standing. William Atkinson on 01/07/2018, 54 years old, 16 years good standing. John J. “Jack” Bush, Jr. on 01/07/2018, 74 years old, 50 years good standing. Leon A. Hendrick on 01/07/2018, 87 years old, 65 years good standing. Joseph D. Lechner on 01/18/2018, 82 years old, 65 years good standing.

The results of the contest are as follows: 2nd Year

1st Place James Woods Local 19 PA 2nd place Joshua Morrill Local 25 3rd Place Joseph Di Flippo Local 100

3rd Year

1st Place Travis Buchanan Local 44 2nd Place Brandon Geible Local 12 3rd Place Mackenzie Cromer Local 27

4th Year

1st Place Paul Farkas Local 25 2nd Place (Tie) Ian Muth Local 19 Central & Kory Warner Local 12 3rd Place Timothy Woodlee Local 27

Frank J. Salladino on 01/21/2018, 70 years old, 44 years good standing. Robert May on 01/22/2018, 92 years old, 64 years good standing. David Stone on 02/02/2018, 48 years old, 25 years good standing. William Wagner on 02/04/2018, 80 years old, 52 years good standing. Timothy Lis on 02/09/2018, 53 years old, 4 months good standing.

35


1

Helicopters aid Local 19 members place up-blast fans It was a blistering cold Sunday in the dead of winter when Local 19 members -- working for HT Lyons at the site of the new FedEx Ground Hub near Allentown in Allen Township, PA -- performed a helicopter lift with Midwest Helicopter Airways Incorporated from Willowbrook, Illinois. The 80,000 CFM up-blast fans weighed 1,400 pounds a piece with 24 fans in total to be lifted. Even with 6 inches of snow on the ground and roof, Local 19 members, nine on the roof and 2 on the ground, used their skill and raw determination to work through the elements to land all 24 fans safely in less than an hour. The new Fed Ex facility will be approximately onemillion-square feet, sitting on 250 plus acres of land. This will be FedEx’s largest sorting facility in the United States, measured by volume of packages.

3

2

4

1. A helicopter delivers one of 24 fans to the Fed Ex construction site. 2. Each fan weighed 1,400 lbs. each. 3. The new Fed Ex facility measures in at about one-million square feet. 4.Local 19 members position a fan for placement.

36


Heating and air conditioning technicians serve residential and commercial customers When we think about our trade, what often comes to mind are things like fabrication and installation of commercial and residential duct, HVAC equipment, signage and architectural metal. Another Division that is also a part of our union are Heating and Air Conditioning Technicians working for two companies – Leffler Energy serving Central PA (Harrisburg/York/Lancaster areas) and Petro serving New Jersey from Hunterdon County to Vineland. Both companies provide heating oil and propane delivery in their service areas and our members’ responsibilities include residential service/ maintenance; boiler, furnace, & A/C installation, and in Leffler’s case, propane service and installation of hot water heaters and propane fireplace inserts. Leffler Energy can trace their roots back to 1876 and since then has continued to offer the highest level of service and commitment to their

years of experience keeping customers comfortable at home while saving on their energy costs. Local 19 has represented service technicians working for Petro since 2009.

customers and the communities they serve. Local 19 has proudly represented their employees and partnered with the company since 2006. Petro is one of the largest local home heating oil and heating/air service providers in America, with over 100

Both Leffler and Petro have multiple service plans and types of delivery so their customers can receive exactly the type of service to fit their needs. Local 19 members can rest assured that when they become customers of either of these companies (within the previously stated service areas), whether through a service plan or replacement of heating and air conditioning systems, other Local 19 members will be performing the work and providing the highest quality for you and your family. In addition to receiving expert service and unparalleled workmanship not found anywhere in the industry, you will also be supporting other Local 19 members and their families.

For more information:

Sales & Service: 1-800-984-1411 Web: www.LefflerEnergy.com

Sales: 1-800-735-5651 Service: 1-800-645-4328 Web: www.Petro.com 37


Signs of the times 1

6

7

2

8

12 11

38


3

4

5

1.Working for Compass Sign, Local 19 members raised the Penn Medicine sign onto a new building. 2. Compass Sign created a distinctive sign for Nemours’ Pediatric Practice in Deptford, NJ. 3. Members working for Eastern Sign Tech installed this sign celebrating the Eagles’ Super Bowl victory at Lincoln Financial Field. 4. Eastern Sign Tech Steward Dean Elisio operates a fork lift to place a sign high above Citizens Bank Park. 5. Ken Keller and Nick Massinova in the basket install a new sign at Citizens Bank Park for Eastern Sign Tech.

9

10

6. Owner/member Steve Schulz of Schulz Sign Company fabricated and installed this sign at Citizens Bank Park. 7. Local 19 members working for Philadelphia Sign Company fabricated and installed these displays along Roosevelt Blvd. in Philadelphia. 8. Compass Sign Local 19 members created this sign for Philadelphia Mills. 9. Local 19 members Brian Bennett, Jr., Petro Gushpit and Jeff Joniac installed a sign at the Music Factory in Irving, TX, for NW Sign Industries. 10. This Chase sign was installed in Louisiana by Chris Kennedy and Brian Bennett, Jr., for NW Sign Industries.

13

11. Members Chris Buchner and Jamie Nelligan install a sign for Compass Sign in Maryland.

14

12. Local 19 members working for NW Sign Industries fabricated and installed this sign at M & T Bank Stadium, home of the Baltimore Ravens. 13. Members Chris Kennedy and Brian Bennett installed an M & T Bank sign in Syracuse, NY, for NW Sign Industries. 14. A mock suspension bridge was installed at Six Flags Great Adventure by members working for Eastern Sign Tech.

39


40

eton to Cape May and in Philadelphia east of Broad and south of Vine St

Bryon Blum: 215-771-1016 All of Local 19 NJ areas. Plus from Princ-

Sign Maker and Hangers:

Adams and York counties; Harrisburg Area: Bedford, Blair, Centre, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin, and Perry counties

Michael Ford: 267-357-1954 York Area: City of Lancaster and west,

and Warren (NJ) counties; Reading Area: Berks, Lebanon, and Lancaster counties

Bill Dorward: 610-633-6494 Allentown Area: Lehigh, Northampton,

Chester, Montgomery counties and the entire State of Delaware

Howard Van Buren: 215-275-2470 Delaware,

den, Gloucester, and Salem counties

Bob Gadsby: 267-693-6632 New Jersey: Cam-

Philadelphia counties

Jim Keenan: 215-760-2199 Bucks and all of

Area Marketing Representatives:

LOCAL 19 Representatives & Agents

Bryan Bush: 215-421-4706 Covering all areas of Local 19

Financial Secretary Treasurer/Assistant Business Manager :

Broad and north of Vine St

Fred Braker: 215-778-6093 All areas of Local 19 and in Philadelphia, west of

Sign Maker and Hangers Business Agent:

Michael Guinan: 215-669-0524 Montgomery County

Salem counties

Lou Coppolino: 215-416-0450 New Jersey: Camden, Gloucester, and

Ken Woods: The entire State of Delaware

Walt Friedrich: 267-357-1955 York Area: City of Lancaster and west, Adams & York Counties; Harrisburg Area: Bedford, Blair, Centre, Cumberland, Dauphin, Franklin, Fulton, Huntingdon, Juniata, Mifflin, and Perry counties

Pat Doyle: 610-633-5584 Allentown Area: Lehigh, Northampton & Warren (NJ) Counties; Reading Area: Berks, Lebanon, & Lancaster Counties

Counties

Luke Gordon: 215-275-5343 Delaware & Chester

Market Street)

Jerry Gontz: 215-519-4307 Philadelphia (south of

(south of Grant Ave & north of Market Street)

Anthony Iannucci: 215-669-2014 Philadelphia

(north of Grant Ave) Counties

Tom Bush: 215-275-1480 Bucks & Philadelphia

Business Agents


29

22

EARTH DAY

16

15

OTHER

CLASSES

MEETINGS

30

23

TAX DAY

24

Reading Union Meeting 5:30 pm

17

York Union Meeting 6:30 pm

10

Delaware Union Meeting 5 pm

3

TUES

25

Lehigh Valley Union Meeting 5:30 pm

18

Harrisburg Union Meeting 6:30 pm

11

4

WED

26

19

12

5

THUR

CHECK THE MEMBER PORTAL FOR COMPLETE COURSE INFORMATION.

Sign, Production & Coppersmith Meeting 5 pm

9

EASTER

MON

Philadelphia Area Union Meeting 7 pm

2

8

1

SUN

April 2018

PHILADELPHIA MEETINGS 1301 S. Christopher Columbus Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19147

DELAWARE MEETINGS 911 New Road Wilmington, DE 19805

LOCATIONS

HOURS

HARRISBURG MEETINGS 2163 Berryhill Street Harrisburg, PA 17104

28

21

14

7

SAT

ALLENTOWN MEETINGS 53 East Lehigh Street Bethlehem, PA 18018

27

20

13

6

FRI LOCATION

CREDIT UNION

YORK MEETINGS 555 Willow Springs Lane York, PA 17406

READING MEETINGS 539 Main Street Shoemakersville, PA 19555

HOURS PAID


27

20

OTHER

CLASSES

29

22

PA Primary Elections

30

23

16

All Areas Central PA Meeting 5:30 pm at The Holiday Inn, Grantville

Delaware Union Meeting 5 pm

15

9

2

WED

8

Philadelphia OSHA 30

1

TUES

31

24

17

10

3

THUR

CHECK THE MEMBER PORTAL FOR COMPLETE COURSE INFORMATION.

MEMORIAL DAY

28

Sign, Production & Coppersmith Meeting 5 pm

21

14

Philadelphia Area Union Meeting 7pm

7

MON

MEETINGS

MOTHER’S DAY

13

6

SUN

May 2018

HARRISBURG MEETINGS 2163 Berryhill Street Harrisburg, PA 17104

DELAWARE MEETINGS 911 New Road Wilmington, DE 19805

25

18

11

4

FRI

CREDIT UNION

YORK MEETINGS 555 Willow Springs Lane York, PA 17406

LOCATION

PHILADELPHIA MEETINGS 1301 S. Christopher Columbus Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19147

HOURS PAID

READING MEETINGS 539 Main Street Shoemakersville, PA 19555

LOCATIONS

HOURS

LEHIGH VALLEY MEETINGS 53 East Lehigh Street Bethlehem, PA 18018

26

19

12

CINCO DE MAYO

5

SAT


24

OTHER

CLASSES

MEETINGS

25

Reading Union Meeting 5:30 pm

Sign, Production & Coppersmith Meeting 5 pm

FATHER’S DAY

19

27

28

21

14

7

THUR

CHECK THE MEMBER PORTAL FOR COMPLETE COURSE INFORMATION.

26

Lehigh Valley Union Meeting 5:30 pm

20

Harrisburg Union Meeting 6:30 pm

York Union Meeting 6:30 pm

18

13

6

WED

12

17

NJ Primary Elections Delaware Union Meeting 5 pm

5

TUES

11

Philadelphia Area Union Meeting 7pm

4

MON

10

3

SUN

June 2018

PHILADELPHIA MEETINGS 1301 S. Christopher Columbus Blvd. Philadelphia, PA 19147

DELAWARE MEETINGS 911 New Road Wilmington, DE 19805

LOCATIONS

HOURS

HARRISBURG MEETINGS 2163 Berryhill Street Harrisburg, PA 17104

30

23

16

9

2

SAT

ALLENTOWN MEETINGS 53 East Lehigh Street Bethlehem, PA 18018

29

22

15

8

1

FRI LOCATION

CREDIT UNION

YORK MEETINGS 555 Willow Springs Lane York, PA 17406

READING MEETINGS 539 Main Street Shoemakersville, PA 19555

HOURS PAID


SHEAR

FACTS

Sheet Metal Workers Local 19 1301 S. Columbus Blvd. • Philadelphia, PA 19147 (215) 952-1999

Shear Facts April 2018  
Shear Facts April 2018