Page 1

The magazine for families in the quad-state area!

www.childguidemagazine.com

Back to School and bi-annual

Special Needs section

Heads Up calendar of events features the area’s best in family-friendly fun for Fall!

September/October 2018 Frederick & Washington counties, MD Eastern Panhandle, WV Frederick & Clarke counties, VA Franklin County, PA


Premier Children’ s Consignment Sale Make Money & Save Money at

Kid’ s Closet Connection

Washington Co., MD • September 14-16 Baymont Inn & Suites, 431 Dual Hwy., Hagerstown

Loudoun Co., VA • September 27-29

Busch Tabernacle, 250 South Nursery Ave., Purcellville

www.kidscloset.biz Small Group Lessons

KIDS FIRST®/ KICK FIRST® Learn to Swim System

Because every child should know how to swim ...

Homeschoolers Program

Mommy & Me (infants & toddlers)

THE WORLD'S LARGEST PROVIDER OF CHILDREN'S SWIMMING INSTRUCTION

New Customers Only. Present Coupon.

FREDERICK HAGERSTOWN WINCHESTER SOUTHEND SHOPPING CENTER WINCHESTER GATEWAY

FRANCIS SCOTT KEY MALL 301-682-SWIM

www.childguidemagazine.com

301-766-SWIM

540-678-8800

www.kidsfirstswimschools.com Child Guide

September/October 2018

Page 1


Child Guide is pleased to be available in schools in nine school districts. County boards of education, their agents and employees neither sponsor nor endorse this publication. The views expressed might or might not reflect those of the county boards of education or school administrations, and are neither approved nor disapproved by them.

www.childguidemagazine.com

In this issue of

301-665-2817

Back to School

WENDY C. KEDZIERSKI Founder/Editorial Consultant

p g. 4

CECILIA “CIS” RHYNE Editor

Cis@childguidemagazine.com

Dear Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 How to Have a Healthy School Year The Secrets of Safe School Lunches

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Peggy Gisler and Marge Eberts Marina Gafanovich, MD

Recognizing Signs of Bullying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Suzanne Hovermale Jan Pierce

The Ten Commandments of Back to School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4

Beth Vollmer

Special Needs:

Jeanne-Marie Williams Sharon Zoumbaris

Lesser Known Facts about Autism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12

Special Needs Resources . . . . .12, 14

Departments:

Follow My Adventure . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Appaloosa Music Festival

Heads Up Calendar of Events . . . . .15 Living Healthier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11 Back to School Impacts Behavior

Resources:

Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Special Needs Resources . . . . .12, 14

From the cover Featured on Child Guide’s Back to School cover

for September/October 2018

is Ava from Chambersburg, PA. Photos by Amanda Hann

Hann’s On Portraits See ad on page 20.

Page 2

September/October 2018

Our editorial mission: Child Guide strives to provide families and educators with a free publication packed with good ideas and local resources for raising happy, healthy children – because we believe that being a loving guide for your child is the most important job in the world.

Child Guide

ADVERTISING Mary Anne Sanders 540-327-2881 maryanne@childguidemagazine.com Office: 301-665-2817 cis@childguidemagazine.com Child Guide, September/October 2018, Volume XVIII, Issue No. 5; headquartered in Hagerstown, MD, published by Child Guide Publishing, Inc. PO Box 3529 Hagerstown, MD 21742-3529 The design and contents are fully protected by copyright, and except as permitted by law must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. Manuscripts must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Child Guide is not responsible for unsolicited material. Child Guide does not necessarily endorse businesses or organizations contained herein and reserves the right to reject any advertising that we feel is not in keeping with the philosophy and spirit of the publication.

www.childguidemagazine.com

D

D


m

Shepherdstown School of Dance

Yo u n g D a n c e r P r o g r a m s Pre-Ballet 1, 2, & 3

www.shepherdstownschoolofdance.com

ADA Recognized Specialists in Pediatric Dentistry & Orthodontics WINNER! Best of the Best Frederick News Post

Frederick

Pediatric

Dentistry LLC

Pediatric Dentists: Dr. Joseph Camacho Dr. Joanne Amigo Dr. Ester Kim Dr. Vani Takiar Orthodontist: Dr. Robin Choi

www.childguidemagazine.com

Serving the Frederick Area for 20 Years!

Now Offering Compassionate Care in Frederick & Hagerstown! Parents Always Welcome in Treatment Rooms No Restraints Used • In-Office Sedation Available On Staff at Frederick Memorial Hospital Many PPO Insurance Plans Accepted Complimentary Exams for Babies Under 18 Months! Patients with Special Needs • Laser Lip and Tongue Tie Release Children and Adults Braces in our Frederick Office

Frederick Office

Hagerstown Office

77 Thomas Johnson Dr., Suite A

1150 Omega Drive, Suite 102

301-682-3887

240-513-6161

www.fpdentistry.com Child Guide

September/October 2018

Page 3


The Ten Commandments of Back to School (How to Build Rapport with Your Child’s New Teacher) BY JAN

ant to get off on the right foot with your child’s new teacher this fall? Want to have smooth sailing in the transition from summer to fall? I’ll tell you what you need to know. I taught school, mostly first and second grades, from 1967 to 2007, and then retired. I had a few years off (for good behavior) while I raised my own two children. I loved teaching. I loved fall especially when everything in the classroom was fresh and new. Crayons had sharp points, paste jars and later glue containers were full. Desks were scrubbed and boasted beautifully printed nametags atop each one. Children arrived that first morning of school all put together, wearing smiles of anticipation. That first day of school I often met a few parents as well. They were the ones who couldn’t quite allow their children to ride the bus the first day—they needed to see them safe and sound to the classroom. I understood. I cried the day my eldest boarded the bus for first grade, later telling me it was like “a ride at Disneyland.” The first few days of a new school year are important ones. Meet and greets, new rules and expectations, a few queasy tummies, making new friends—they’re all part of getting a new year underway. For parents it’s a time of fresh starts, moving back into school routines and, sometimes, it’s burdened with a few doubts and fears. Did he get the right teacher? Will she learn to read? Relax, parents. I can help you get this new school year off to a great start. Just read and follow the ten commandments of back to school and you’ll be well on your way to a wonderful school year.

W

Thou shalt set a proper bedtime.

It can be difficult to transition from the long, funfilled days of summer to the more rigid schedule of fall. Start a week or two early. Get back into the habit of going to bed early and rising at the appropriate time. Maybe even add fifteen or twenty minutes to the morning scramble time to ease the pressure. Select clothing the night before. Eat breakfast together. Your children will arrive at school ready to begin their day.

Thou shalt do the dreaded paperwork.

Teachers and administrators take advantage of the first week of school to get all their ducks in a row. They want current address and telephone information. They need to know who to call in case of illness or emergency. And teachers want to get a handle on the children in their room. They want to know which parents will be available to help them, who has special health conditions, etc. Even though the sea of papers coming home threatens to spill over into the trash can, Page 4

September/October 2018

PIERCE

don’t let that happen. Take the time to complete the paperwork and find a safe way to transport them into the teacher’s waiting hands. The teacher will love you for this.

Thou shalt wait a week or two before making changes.

The one and only time I intervened in selecting the teacher for my son, I was dead wrong. I got him the older, more experienced teacher and we were both bored for the rest of the year. (My son and I, not the teacherJ) Trust the system. A lot of work goes into creating the balance of any given classroom. Children are placed with a certain teacher based on the needs of both the child and for balance in the classroom. The ratio of boys to girls, the number of special needs children, or English language learners, for example, have been taken into consideration. If you suspect that a change may be necessary, wait a bit and see how your child adjusts. You may be surprised. (Of course in any situation that has potential for serious problems, you as the parent must act in your child’s best interests.)

Thou shalt volunteer.

I can’t emphasize enough the value of giving something to your child’s classroom experience. If you work during the day you can still send in cupcakes or take one day off to chaperone a field trip. If you have young children at home, arrange child care trades and volunteer to listen to children read, play reading and math games or offer any other help the teacher needs. One on one attention is very valuable in the classroom and you can offer that with no training in education. Children are very aware of their parents’ attitude toward school and learning in general. Be the parent who shows up, supports and gives.

Thou shall attend Open Houses and Performances. See commandment number four. Show up. It matters.

Thou shalt make an appointment for imparting important information.

Open houses and other large school gatherings are wonderful for a positive group experience. But if you have a question about what happens in the classroom, your child’s successes or needs, behavior issues and the like, please make an appointment to visit with the teacher before or after the school day. Teachers are encouraged by parents’ concern and interest in their child’s performance. They want to give you their full attention to discuss important topics.

Thou shall be part of a team effort.

The school, the family and the child make up a

Child Guide

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

learning team. There may be other teaching specialists involved in your child’s learning experience—speech therapists, social workers, reading specialists, etc. Speak positively about your child’s teachers and the school program. While no system is perfect, most educational professionals want to cooperate with parents and address their concerns. Your child will know if you’re unhappy with the school and it will reflect in his or her attitudes and behaviors. Keep it positive.

Thou shalt pay attention to changes in attitude and behavior. If your child displays changes in behavior or attitude, pay close attention. The problem may be as simple as illness or mild discouragement, but it could be something bigger such as bullying incidents or fears of failure. Talk it out and take appropriate action.

Thou shall feel free to communicate with the teacher.

Teachers are busy and they may give the impression they don’t have time to talk with you. That’s wrong. They have time before the bell rings in the morning, after school, and even in the evenings. With the advent of computers they often like to e-mail back and forth. Teachers care about their students and they’re usually eager to hear what you have to say.

Thou shall do thy best to “let go” in appropriate measure.

It’s hard to entrust your child to anyone but yourself. But growing up is a series of letting go experiences. They go off to pre-school, kindergarten, first grade and before you know it they’re ready for high school. The time flies by and you can’t stop it. Further, you don’t want to. Let your children become strong and independent one step at a time. It’s hard to let go, but it’s necessary. As you know by now, children don’t come with a user’s manual. Parenting is a tough job and each child is unique. You’ve done your best to prepare your child for school and the world, and now you have to entrust him to another adult’s care. You have to allow her to fend for herself for a large chunk of each day. You have to trust he’ll make good choices. It’s hard. On the other hand, most teachers are not doing their extremely complicated and demanding job for the pay they receive. They’re in the classroom because they love children and the learning process. There’s nothing more rewarding to us teacher types than to see a little face light up during a read aloud, or when a new concept is grasped. It’s pure gold. Your child’s teacher is probably one of those. Here’s wishing you and your child a most successful school year. Jan Pierce is a retired teacher and the author of Homegrown Readers and Homegrown Family Fun: Unplugged. Find Jan at www.janpierce.net.

www.childguidemagazine.com

Friday, November 16, 2018 4:30 pm and 7:30 pm

Sesame Street Live! C is for Celebration

Excitement, laughter and music with your friends Elmo, Abby, Cookie Monster, Grover and Rosita.

Thursday, February 1, 2019 7:00pm

American Girl Live!

All-new musical, featuring all-original songs and unforgettable experiences.

21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown, MD 21740 For tickets call 301-790-2000 or visit www.mdtheatre.org

Child Guide

September/October 2018

Page 5


Follow Our Adventure by

J eanne - marie W illiams

Labor Day Weekend at

Appaloosa

here are instinctive responses to music that we all have from the time of birth, and medical studies confirm that music can impact your health and mental well-being. Knowing that, as well as always having an interest in providing Gabriel with enriching educational opportunities, I have given him access to many types of music, both recorded and in concert. Over the years, one of our favorite musical acts has become Scythian, a group founded by brothers Alex and Dan Fedoryka. With Celtic, Eastern European, and Appalachian folk roots, Scythian has a broad appeal and is known for their familyfriendly shows. Hailing from the Shenandoah Valley, Scythian performs a lot of concerts close to home and, in the past few years, have created an annual Appaloosa Festival at the Skyline Ranch Resort in Front Royal, VA, a little over an hour away from Hagerstown. Since Scythian has stressed their desire that the festival welcome families, children under age 12 are able to attend for free. Last year, Gabriel and I traveled to Appaloosa for the first time with my father. While campsites are available at the Skyline Ranch Resort, we

T

Cake for Dinner plays interactive tunes with a youthful appeal

Page 6

September/October 2018

Child Guide

picked one day of the festival to attend based on the performers that we were most interested in seeing. The skies were gloomy, but we were still optimistic that it would be a great day. After breakfast along the highway, we wound our way up side roads to the festival and found places to park our vehicle and our chairs for the day. While crew and volunteers continued to set up for the concerts, Gabriel and I listened to a bagpiper on the main stage kick off the day and then spent time visiting with the animals in the petting zoo. Always amused by the antics of animals, Gabriel spent considerable time running around the perimeter of the fence and chatting with me about the hens, pigs, and goats. The first musical act of the day was the Cake for Dinner performance on the kids’ stage. Cake for Dinner is Scythian’s educational music project for children initially created for Dan and Alex’s nieces and nephews, and it is comprised of the members of Scythian playing interactive tunes with a youthful appeal. As it grew close to the start time, Gabriel and I wandered to the kids’ area where Gabriel spent time jumping and www.childguidemagazine.com


m

sliding in the bouncy house. Other kid-friendly activities, such as face-painting, were available, but once we saw Cake for Dinner setting up on the stage, we ran to join the crowd of young-uns. Cake for Dinner introduced themselves and explained that if you are at the kids’ stage, you are a kid, regardless of age. They encouraged all children to participate during the performance. Gabriel loved jumping, clapping, and dancing with the other children while they listened to whimsical songs about things such as eating so much candy that the dentist took some away or dancing the Klondike polka with grizzlies and moose in the Yukon. Before another song, “Hound Dogs,” Dan and Alex urged the children to join in howling or yelping like dogs throughout the song. Cake for Dinner continued to interact with the children such as pretending to spray them with bug spray during a song about fleas or asking them to guess how many flutes Nolan had in his instrument case or telling them to hop like bunnies. As I listened to the fun music and watched Gabriel enjoy the show, his face told me how truly delighted he was with it. After Cake for Dinner’s performance, Gabriel spent more time in the bouncy house until we wandered back to the main Appaloosa stage to see the other musical acts such as the Gothard Sisters, Runa, and Six-String Soldiers. There was a large place for people to dance in front of the stage, and Gabriel enjoyed burning off energy running around and making friends with other children. He kept finding more kids to befriend, and then they were off: jumping, running, and enjoying the music. As the day wore on, Gabriel and I found a lot of delicious food choices from the various food trucks stationed around the festival. We also enjoyed visiting the

vendors who sold local crafts such as jewelry and decorative items. Gabriel spent time browsing the Appaloosa mall with me, deciding which CDs to purchase, as well as other branded merchandise that supports the festival and its musicians. Backed by the Appaloosa Blue Ridge Arts Foundation, free musical and dance workshops were available at the kids’ stage, such as learning Irish step dance from the Gothard Sisters. Gabriel and I ended up not participating in any workshops because we were so happy watching the shows near the two large performance stages, but I thought it was a great idea that they were available for anyone who wanted to participate. The fun time drew to a close later in the evening with Scythian performing at the end of the day. These engaging musicians have a way of enchanting and befriending the crowd. In fact, the theme of the festival was “Music Among Friends,” and that is exactly how it felt. Gabriel was excited to jump and dance with me and some new friends he had made during the Scythian concert, and we stayed until Scythian’s encores were finished. Gabriel and I look forward to repeating this adventure in 2018. The festival is scheduled for August 31, 2018 – September 2, 2018, and Cake for Dinner and Scythian will perform on both Saturday and Sunday. The entertainment lineup welcomes some new artists to the festival this year including Gaelic Storm and Mandolin Orange as headliners. See www.appaloosafestival.com for info. Jeanne-Marie Williams is an analyst and a single mom who delights in homeschooling her son and taking him on adventures. She has too many hobbies and too little free time. Jeanne-Marie enjoys finding humor in every day life and serving as her family's historian.

Muscular Skeletal Therapies, Inc. 295 Rock Cliff Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 Peter J. Juergensen, NCLMT, CKTP Adam Drake, MS, ACT, LMT Kaela A. Lamon, LMT Vickie L. Bechtol, NCLMT Alyssa K. Keener, LMT Erin Outten, LMT Jeff Edwards, LMT Bryttani Adams, LMT

304-901-4265

Clinical Orthopedic Massage Sports Massage Pregnancy Massage • Infant Massage Laser Therapy Active Isolated Stretching CranioSacral Therapy Workers Comp • Personal Injury

www.muscularskeletaltherapys.com Gift Certificates Available

www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

September/October 2018

Page 7


Recognizing Signs of

Bullying

BY

BETH VOLLMER

child being bullied is one of the worst things for them to endure. It can have effects that could last decades. The A feeling of “not being good enough” is detrimental to selfesteem, when all children want to do is fit in, be liked and accepted. Every child deserves the right to an education without being harassed. A child that is picked on repeatedly will often show signs of depression and sadness. Without intervention, help may arrive too late. Parents and educators should be aware of a child’s normal moods and behaviors, in order to react if anything starts to negatively change. A child might be nervous, anxious or scared to open up to those that care. Love, kindness, care and empathy from trusted adults definitely go a long way for a child that needs help and support. Stacy Einfalt, a children's book author and illustrator, focuses her stories on bullying. Her views formed from what she observed watching her older brother being bullied and the effects it had on him. She also witnessed her good friend Jennifer and her husband raise their son, Logan, who struggled with a speech delay. He was picked on, but eventually became comfortable in his skin and proud of who he is. Logan was the inspiration for Stacy’s third book, “Logan & The Lonesome Moose,” which is available on Amazon, along with her other children’s books. Parents should watch for a change in their child’s attitude and demeanor, which are signs of bullying. A child may become sad, withdrawn, depressed, quiet and not want to talk and engage in conversation. They may verbally lash out and yell if being questioned, while losing self-confidence and exhibiting low self-esteem. Eating habits may change – resulting in a loss or gain in appetite because of stress. Loss of interest in participating in activities and deterioration in grades are also signals that a child is being bullied. When a parent notices any of these signs, talk to your child about the change you see in them. Ask them what they are struggling with and to express how they are feeling. Try to determine what they are going through, and make sure to tell them that you love them and you are there for them. Let them know if they need to talk they can come to you, judgement free. Tell the child how you and other important people in their life feel about them, and make them feel special to help build their confidence. Reassure them a peaceful solution to resolve the situation will happen. Contact the teacher and the principal immediately and begin communication to voice your concerns. Ask if they have witnessed a conflict between your child and another student and if they've noticed a change in your child. Ask Page 8

September/October 2018

Child Guide

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

what the plans are to resolve the situation and offer your suggestions. If you feel the school isn’t taking appropriae action, contact the school board, while continuing to call and meet with the teacher and principal. Don’t give up! Be an advocate, and show your child that you will stand up for them. If they don’t feel supported by family, they may feel even more alone. Thinking they have no one to go to could lead them to feel helpless and hopeless, and consider or commit suicide. Counseling, which the school may offer, is one option – both students and parents should have individual counseling. When that is completed, they should meet with the counselor together. Parents should continue to keep open communication with the teacher and principal after the incident is resolved. Make sure interactions with other students are peaceful and that things are going better. The student being bullied most likely isn’t the only one who is struggling with issues . Many times the bully has their own problems, such as low self-esteem. Other triggers for bullying are the parents of the bully are going through a divorce or maybe a parent has lost their job and money is an issue. Maybe the parents don’t spend time with them and they feel hurt and alone, so they take their aggressions out on someone else. The parents of the bully could be emotionally or physically abusive to their child, causing him to act aggressively toward others. It could also be something simple like the bully not liking or agreeing with your child about a certain topic, losing a sports game or continually having negative interactions due to personality conflicts. No matter the cause, the bully needs to be taught that while it is fine not to agree with someone, they need to show respect. Bullying can be prevented by children being taught values, morals and how to treat others. Parents should teach their children to be kind, respectful and empathic at an early age. By instilling those values, it will help to avoid anger, hate and resentment taking over in difficult situations. Bud Collier, the Director of Imbullyfree.org, has been supporting families around the world since 2012. I’m Bully Free‘s mission is to provide continued on page 10

www.childguidemagazine.com

Dear Teacher BY

PEGGY GISLER AND MARGE EBERTS

How to Have a Healthy School Year

Question: I am concerned about the new school year because my children missed so many days last year due to illnesses. How can I make this year a healthier one? -- Missed too much Answer: Schools are definitely germ centers! And being absent from school can definitely hinder children's academic success. One of the best germ fighters is to teach your children healthy habits at home to take to school with them. •They should be regularly washing their hands at home and at school because germs and bacteria are everywhere. This is an absolute must. •To avoid spreading anything to other children they should cough or sneeze into their upper arm by bending it at the elbow and raising it to cover their mouths. •Healthy eating is essential to good health. Help your children acquire good eating habits that include fresh fruit and vegetables at every meal. Pack lunches for them if they don’t like or eat school lunches. •Schedule doctor and dental visits before the school year starts.

The Secrets of Safe School Lunches

Question: What are the basics for kids having a safe school lunch? What should parents be doing as well as kids? -- For Good Health Answer: September is National Food Safety Education Month. According to STOP Foodborne Illness, a national nonprofit public health organization dedicated to the prevention of illness and death, you should follow these suggestions: 1. Keep in mind the bacteria danger zone. Bacteria grow rapidly in the zone of 40-140 F. 2. Wash your hands. When preparing lunches, STOP Foodborne Illness stresses the importance of washing your hands thoroughly and keeping all surfaces clean. 3. Use an insulated lunch box. Whether hard-sided or soft, this helps keep your child’s food out of the “danger zone.” 4. Use ice packs. This is another inexpensive “must have” item, according to STOP Foodborne Illness, that is vital for keeping cold foods cold. 5. Use an insulated thermos.

Child Guide

• This is the opportunity to expose your child to a life long appreciation of music. • Playing an instrument builds self-esteem, confidence and gives a sense of accomplishment. • Numerous studies show that children who are learning an instrument excel in many different areas of academics and improve their problem solving, cognitive skills and social skills. • We know that everybody has the capacity to learn and enjoy the playing of a musical instrument. • Physical challenges or special needs should not be a roadblock for anyone that desires to learn and play. • Channeling energy constructively, improving focus and developing better fine motor skills are some of the benefits. Ellsworth Music embraces all students.

Our teachers are certified trained professional instructors and musicians well qualified to teach the advanced music student. Please visit EllsworthMusicSupply.com for more information regarding our current faculty, their biographies and qualifications.

6. Freeze drinks before packing. Frozen milk, juice boxes and water bottles keep the drinks cold, along with other cold foods you’ve packed. Frozen items put in the lunch box will be drinkable by lunch time. 7. Pack hot foods while hot. Don't wait for hot foods to cool down before pouring into an insulated thermos. Preheat your thermos by filling it with boiling water and letting it sit for a few minutes, then pour out the water and add your hot food. 8. Wash and separate fresh fruits and veggies. 9. Use individual snack packs. 10. Add room-temperature-safe foods.

Parents should send questions and comments to dearteacher@dearteacher.com or ask them on the columnists’ website at www.dearteacher.com.

©Compass Syndicate Corporation, 2017 • Distributed by King Features Syndicate

September/October 2018

Page 9


Signs of Bullying,

cont from page 9

support and raise awareness to schools that have declared a commitment to creating and maintaining a Bully-Free, Safe and Secure environment. Collier’s goal is to inform parents and children on rules about suicide that may save your child. Why do kids become suicidal? Children are under all sorts of pressures: academics, popularity, social media and home life stresses. Bullying and cyber bullying are major reasons why a child decides to end their life. Children who commit suicide are sometimes suffering from untreated or poorly treated depression. The following factors may influence the risk of suicide or attempted suicide. * Depression and other mental disorders, or a substanceabuse issue (often combined with other mental disorders) * Feeling hopeless and worthless * Previous suicide attempt(s) * Physical illness * Feeling detached and isolated from friends, peers and family * Family history of suicide, mental illness, or depression * Family violence, including physical or sexual abuse * Access to a weapon in the home * Knowing someone with suicidal behavior, such as a family member, friend, or celebrity * Coping with being gay (homosexuality) in an unsupportive family, community, or hostile school environment What are some warning signs of suicide? Suicide usually

occurs after a stressful life event in the family, an argument with a friend, or negative events at school. A child who is considering suicide might be exhibiting one or more of these behaviors: * Thinking, writing, drawing or talking about suicide * Withdrawal from family or friends * Drop in grades * Afraid to attend, skipping or increase in school absences * Lack of interest in favorite activities * Increase in violent behavior * Changed eating or sleeping patterns * Reckless or risk-taking behaviors * Dependence on alcohol or drugs The signs that a child has a plan for a suicide can be seen in more than one way, such as threatening to hurt or kill themselves; creating suicide notes; expressing odd or troubling thoughts; showing a dramatic change in personality or appearance; throwing away, giving away or promising to give away valued possessions; talking about not being around in the future; or “going away” and trying to obtain weapons, pills, or other ways to kill him/herself. There are many ways to help a child who is thinking about suicide, and it is imperative not to ignore the warning signs. Have an open, honest conversation with your child expressing concern, support, and love. Never make your child feel guilty. Do not leave your child alone and remove objects in the home they might use to harm themselves. Seek help immediately from mental health services at the school, hospital, the nearest emergency room or a suicide hotline. Beth Vollmer lives in Hagerstown, with her two-year-old son, Micah. Beth is passionate about writing, photography, animals, nutrition and exercise.

LET’S GET ONE THING STRAIGHT. YOUR TEETH. HAYLEE | HAGERSTOWN

toothmanorthodontics.com Hagerstown 301.791.1770 Frederick 301.662.3366

Celebrating

years of healthy smiles. From our family to yours.

Page 10

September/October 2018

Child Guide

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

Living Healthier BY

T

S HARON Z OUMBARIS

he new school year traditionally ushers in a mix of excitement and anxiety for many families. Unfortunately, those feelings can also bring with them increased behavioral issues. For many children, adjusting to new surroundings, new people, new routines, or the challenge of the new school year means they need extra attention, guidance and comfort. Parents have great tools at their disposal to help their children adjust and thrive in the school environment. First, parents should recognize their child is not alone, behavior issues are common for many children during this adjustment period. It is also important that adults get their questions or concerns answered so they can be a calming influence rather than another source of anxiety for an already nervous child. A common stressor for families is when a child is already shy. Parents who worry about the child making friends can increase the student’s own fears. It is fine to acknowledge they are not outgoing, but more helpful to encourage them after they successfully navigate a new experience. The summer before school began was the time to try new activities, like a library story time or swimming lessons or playdates with other neighborhood children. Better to have already set up situations where your child felt confident, like ordering their own food at a restaurant, or joining a sports team. Parents who wait for the first day of school to introduce the idea of being independent may be met with a crying, reluctant child. Once school has started it can be tough for the whole family to adjust to the new school schedule, bedtimes are an important part of school success. Everyone needs enough sleep to be refreshed and ready in the morning. Avoid sending a tired child to school, this can quickly trigger feelings of homesickness and anxiety during the school day. “If a child doesn’t get enough sleep or good quality sleep, they may not appear sleepy at all,” said Dr. Jacqueline Genova, a Pennsylvania pediatric sleep specialist at Abington Memorial Hospital. “In fact, they may look hyperactive or have difficulty focusing.” Dr. Genova and other sleep specialists recommend children in elementary and middle school, ages 6 to 12, should get between 9 and 12 hours of sleep at night. For teens, ages 13 to 18, the recommendation is 8 to 10 hours of sleep each night. The school day will include a new amount of sitting, listening and following rules. Keep in mind routines at home like family meals or bedtime stories reinforce those skills in a different way. For children who struggle with listening, the intimacy of a bedtime story starts a discussion about listening in school. Bike rides, hikes, a game of tag in the yard are all great for family time and send a positive message about being active. Once school starts, provide aerobic exercise options for when your child first gets home. Aerobic exercise is a better choice than video or computer games, exercise invigorates the brain and releases stored up anxiety left over from the school day.

Healthcare for the WHOLE family FAMILY PRACTICE • DENTAL CARE MENTAL HEALTH TREATMENT So much more than a single medical practice, we also offer...

✔ On site lab services NEW PEDIATRICIAN ✔ On site pharmacy COMING IN ✔ Extended hours: SEPTEMBER! early morning and evening hours ✔ Free health and wellness classes ✔ A sliding fee scale to those who qualify ✔ Much more!

We ARE accepting new patients! We accept most private insurances, Medicare and Medicaid. Don’t forget about our sliding fee discount!

201 S. Cleveland Ave., Hagerstown MD 21740

301-745-3777 • familyhch.org

Sharon Zoumbaris is a librarian, freelance writer and author of several books dealing with health and nutrition. She lives with her family in Staunton, VA where they also run Geezer Farm, a small farm that produces organically-grown fruits and vegetables to sell at the Staunton Farmers Market.

www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

Mark your calendars!

THE WASHINGTON COUNTY HEALTHY FAMILIES FESTIVAL is September 20th! Giveaways and prizes! Health Screenings! Cooking Demos! Fun Activities! Learn more on our website or Facebook page September/October 2018

Page 11


Special Needs Resources Autism Spectrum/Asperger’s

Kaleidoscope Family Solution Inc. – providing services in MD in PA and MD. 600 North Bell Ave., Bldg. 2, Suite 240, Carnegie, PA 15106 • 412506-8030. 10632 Little Patuxent Pkwy, Suite 230, Columbia, MD 21044 • 267-295-2222 Pathfinders for Autism, 303 International Circle, Suite 110, Hunt Valley, MD 21030 • 443-330-5341 (local helpline) • www.pathfindersforautism.org Providing Relief for Autistic Youth Inc. Washington County, MD • Find us on FB at www.facebook.com/PRAY.in.Western.MD Washington County Infants and Toddlers Early Intervention Washington County Public Schools, 10435 Downsville Pike, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-766-2800 • www.wcpsmd.com/special-education/earlyintervention-services Washington County Chapter of the Autism Society of America, 1801 Elizabeth Court, Hagerstown MD • 240-420-3692 • www.autismspeaks.org

Blind/Vision Impaired, Eye Therapy

Tod R. Davis & Amy E. Carlyle, Developmental Optometry & Vision Therapy 3031 Valley Ave., #105A, Winchester, VA 22601 • Additional locations in Manassas, Fredericksburg and Springfield • 703-753-9777 • www.VirginiaVisionTherapyCenter.com WV Schools for the Deaf & Blind, 301 East Main Street, Romney, WV 26757 • 304-822-4800 • wvsdb2.state.k12.wv.us Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind, 104 VSDB Drive (street), P.O. Box 2069 (mail), Staunton, Virginia 24402 • 540-332-9000 • vsdb.k12.va.us

Child Care

Children’s Services of Virginia (CSV), 311 Airport Rd., P.O. Box 2867, Winchester, VA 22604 • 540-667-0116 • www.childrensservicesofva.com Maryland Family Network: Children With Special Needs 1001 Eastern Avenue, 2nd Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202-4325 • 410-659-7701 • www.marylandfamilynetwork.org/special-needs-service/

Deaf/Hard of Hearing

WV Schools for the Deaf & Blind, 301 East Main Street, Romney, WV 26757 • 304-822-4800 • wvsdb2.state.k12.wv.us Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind, 104 VSDB Drive (street), P.O. Box 2069 (mail), Staunton, Virginia 24402 • 540-332-9000 • vsdb.k12.va.us Maryland School for the Deaf, P.O. Box 250, 101 Clarke Place, Frederick, MD 21705-0250 • 301-360-2000 • www.msd.edu PennCares, 788 Cherry Tree Court, Hanover, PA 17331 • 800-333-3873 • penncares.org The Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, 100 West School House Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19144-3404 • 215-951-4700 • www.psd.org The Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf, 300 East Swissvale Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15218-1469 • 800-624-3323 • www.wpsd.org

Developmental Delays & Disabilities/ Special Education Programs

Berkeley County, WV Parent Educator Resource Center 515 W. Martin St., Martinsburg, WV 25401 • 304-263-5717 Broadfording Christian Academy HOPE Program, 13535 Broadfording Church Rd., Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-797-8886 • www.broadfording.com The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) - Western Maryland Regional Office, 1360 Marshall Street, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-791-4670 Family Service Foundation, Inc., 6910 Bowers Road, Suite A, Frederick, MD 21702 • 240-490-7101 • www.fsfinc.org Frederick County Infants and Toddlers Program, 350 Montevue Lane, Frederick, MD 21702 • 301-600-1611• http://health.frederickcountymd.gov/269/Infants-Toddlers-Program Grafton Berryville (Boys with learning disabilities), P.O. Box 112, Berryville, VA 22611 • 540-955-2400 • www.grafton.org Infant & Toddler Connection of Shenandoah Valley, 621 South Royal Ave., P.O. Box 547, Front Royal, VA 22630 • 540-635-2452 • www.itcshenvalley.org Infant & Toddler Connection of Virginia, 1-800-234-1448 • www.infantva.org Kennedy Krieger School-Montgomery County (autism and related disorders) 12301 Academy Way, Rockville, MD 20852 • 443-923-4170 • www.kennedykrieger.org RESA VIII WV Birth to Three, 109 S. College Street, Martinsburg, WV 25401• 304-267-3595 • 800/367-3728 • www.resa8.org • Serves: Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, Morgan, Pendleton

Page 12

September/October 2018

continued on page 14

Lesser-Known Facts about Autism

N

By Dr. Marina Gafanovich MD – www.MynycDoctor.coM

early everyone has heard something about autism and related disorders, and many people have encountered autism in a family member or the child of a friend. the public perception of autism is sometimes tinged with stereotypes and misunderstanding. although autism still accounts for a small percentage of public and private funds spent on neurological and psychiatric research, there is a growing body of information concerning the incidence, causes, symptoms and treatment of this spectrum of disorders, and some of these facts may not be as well known as the aforementioned beliefs and perceptions. here are a few of these facts, which may be of interest and encouragement to people with the disorder and those who care for them. 1. Autism is not a single condition but a spectrum of disorders. autism or “infantile autism” was described by child psychiatrist Leo Kanner in 1943, although feral children with severe impairments of language and social behavior were reported in the 18th century and in some cases treated with behavioral programs, and an encounter with a potentially autistic child in the 15th century figures in the reminiscences of Martin Luther. we now know that, although the initial descriptions of its clinical features were quite accurate, the attribution of autism to the infant’s response to cold and distant parents by Bruno Bettelheim and other analysts was not, and that autism is actually part of a continuum of disorders of brain development. recent revisions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders of the american Psychiatric association have recognized an “autistic spectrum disorder”. for several editions of the Manual, autistic individuals were divided into four categories: autistic disorder, the generally high-functioning asperger’s syndrome, individuals with very low function labeled childhood disintegrative disorder and people with pervasive developmental disorder who did not fit into other diagnostic categories. these subcategories have been replaced in the fifth edition (DSM-5) by a single diagnosis of autism, classified according to severity of communication difficulty and repetitive behavior, and whether or not intellectual impairment in present. 2. Autism spectrum disorders affect 1 per cent of children aged 3 to 17. when initially described autism was thought to be an unusual or infrequent disorder, but it is now recognized to be a fairly common developmental disorder. one percent of children aged 3 to 17 have an autistic spectrum disorder, which affects about 1 in 88 children and 1 in 42 boys. Boys with autism predominate over girls by 5 to 1. the risk of autism is also increased by having a sibling or parent with the disorder. this confirms the biological rather than psychological origin of the condition, and in fact autism is one of the most clearly inheritable of the psychiatric disorders. the gene or genes responsible for autism and related disorders are now the subject of much research. 3. The incidence of autism is increasing. autism is the fastest-growing serious developmental disability in the

Child Guide

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

United States, and the prevalence, the number of people who have autism, is increasing. This may in part be due to more precise diagnosis, with the replacement of such diagnoses as Asperger’s syndrome and childhood disintegrative disorder with a single spectrum of autistic symptoms. Clearer distinctions have also been made between autism and psychiatric conditions such as schizophrenia as well as to neurological illnesses involving brain injury and intellectual impairment, such that people with these disorders are less likely to be labeled autistic even if they have some autistic features of communication, language or behavior. Many types of developmental difficulty caused by neurological injury or disorder are now more easily prevented or diagnosed and treated. Most importantly, the advocacy of parents and families has substantially reduced the stigma attached to autism, and there may be less reluctance to make or to accept the diagnosis. 4. Autistic people do not always want to be alone. The disorder was originally named after the selfabsorption and self-preoccupation noted among people with schizophrenia by Emil Kraepelin at the beginning of the 20th century. Kraepelin observed of schizophrenics that “any influence from outside becomes an intolerable disturbance”, and both Kanner and Hans Asperger, whose syndrome is now considered a part of the autistic disorders, noted the intense “aloneness” of autistic individuals. Recent studies indicate that people with autism do not really want to be alone all the time, and in fact experience particularly intense loneliness. Behavioral scientist, writer and autism spokesperson Temple Grandin has written that “the part of people that forms emotional attachments is not part of me”, but has lamented this and sought social engagement in many forms. This observation underscores the importance of emotional outreach by families and friends and as part of any treatment program. 5. Not all people with autism are the same. As mentioned, autism is now a spectrum disorder, with a range of symptoms and problems as well as abilities. Like people generally, www.childguidemagazine.com

individuals with autism can be highly intelligent or mentally deficient, verbal or taciturn, outgoing or withdrawn and cheerful or melancholy. They generally share difficulties in social communication, such as making eye contact, making conversation, responding to verbal and nonverbal cues in such conversation and attempting to see a situation from the perspective of the other person in a conversation. Many people with autism have a strong desire for sameness and a resistance to change in routine, and some people with autism have habits involving repetitive kinds of behavior and a greater tendency than usual toward limited activities and interests. Slower than usual development of speech and motor skills is also common, as is an undue sensitivity to sensory stimulation, sleep problems and digestive disturbances. 6. People with autism do not outgrow the disorder, but it changes its appearance in adult life. It is rare for the difficulties of social communication and sensory hypersensitivity to remit as children grow up, but some of the behavior problems that attend the spectrum of autism in childhood are less severe in adulthood. Some of this may be due to better psychological and educational management of behavior problems, and also to more effective treatment of problem behaviors, as described below.This is also in part because most people with autism make some adjustment to it, either living alone or finding social situations that meet their needs, and also because some aspects of modern technology, particularly the internet, have made it easier for people to work, study and communicate even if they have problems with communication, language and social interaction. All too many people with autism are still disabled by their symptoms and difficulties, but recent research has suggested that the number of people with autism living and working independently is increasing. 7. Autism can often be addressed and managed in the educational system. The old beliefs that people with autism are incapable of relationships and cannot work or learn successfully have been clearly disproven. Sensory integration therapy is often given by occupational or physi-

Child Guide

cal therapists and can help people with autism deal with increased or decreased sensitivity to sensory stimulation, and applied behavior analysis, sometimes called the Lovaas method, has been used to help autistic individuals learn social and behavioral skills. An Individualized Educational Program (IEP) and a teacher or school with interest and expertise in the teaching of autistic children is key to applying these techniques successfully. 8. Autism is not curable, but it is treatable. As the cause or causes of the disorder remain unknown and sometimes controversial, no specific diagnostic tool or treatment method has been identified. Early intervention with applied behavior analysis, sensory integration therapy, play therapy, therapeutic use of drama , learning to communicate through picture exchange and behavioral teaching with social stories have been found to be effective. Drug treatment should not be the primary answer, but several types of medications have been shown to help with problem behaviors: anticonvulsants may increase the “reflective delay” before impulsive actions are carried out, antidepressants that inhibit the reuptake and therefore increase the levels or effects of the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine will diminish obsessions and compulsions and the second-generation or atypical neuroleptic drugs, chiefly respiridone (Risperdal) have become the first pharmaceuticals approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of autism. There is much controversy surrounding the use of chelation to remove toxic heavy metals from the body, as well as nutritional regimens such as the GFCF diet, which is free of gluten from wheat and casein from dairy products, but the Autism Research Institute, founded in 1967 by Bernard Rimland, has developed the aggressive and reportedly effective Defeat Autism Now (DAN!) program of dietary restriction and nutritional supplementation. Dr. Marina Gafanovich is a Manhattan Physician and Internal Medicine Specialist. Her website, www.mynycdoctor.com, offers a wide variety of articles on health. September/October 2018

Page 13


“Your Place For Birthday Fun!” www.cluggys.com

Outdoor Fun continues in Fall, weather permitting, includes mini golf, laser tag, go karts

393 Bedington Blvd, Chambersburg 717-267-3772

Easy to get to Family Fun. • Exit 16 Off I-81. Turn onto Walker Road.

(301) 662-0133

Main (301) 662-1930 Billing • (301) 662-5399 Referrals

Mon-Thurs 12 noon-9 pm•Fri 11 am-10 pm•Sat 11 am-10 pm•Sun 12 noon-9pm

Special Needs Resources

continued from page 12

Washington County Human Development Council, Inc., 433 Brewer Avenue, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-791-5421 • www.wchdc.org Washington County Infants and Toddlers Early Intervention, Washington County Public Schools, 10435 Downsville Pike, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301766-2800 • www.wcpsmd.com/specialeducation/early-intervention-services West Virginia Birth to Three, 350 Capitol Street, Room 427, Charleston, WV 25301-3714 • 304-5585388 • www.wvdhhr.org/birth23/

Mental Health/Behavioral Counseling

Brook Lane Health Services, 13121 Brook Lane Drive, (P.O. Box 1945), Hagerstown, MD 21742 • 301733-0330 • www.brooklane.org IBMP - Intensive Behavior Management Program, The ARC of Washington County, 820 Florida Ave., Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 888-374-3276 • 240215-0416 • http://bss4md.com The Mental Health Center of Western MD, Inc. 1180 Professional Court, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-791-3045 • www.thementalhealthcenter.net

Pediatric and Adolescent Therapy – Physical, Occupational & Speech

Amber Hill Physical Therapy, 187 Thomas Johnson Dr., Suite 6, Frederick, MD 21702 • Additional locations in Urbana, Damascus, Jefferson, Thurmont & New Market 301-663-1157 • www.amberhillpt.com Mid-Maryland Musculoskeletal Institute – Pediatric Physical & Occupational Therapy in three locations: 86 Thomas Johnson Court, Frederick, MD 21702; 1829 Howell Road, Suite 4, Hagerstown, MD 21740; 3280 Urbana Pike, Suite 105, Urbana, MD 21754 • 304-694-8311 • 800-349-9386 • www.mmidocs.com

Page 14

September/October 2018

Muscular Skeletal Therapies, Inc. – Clinical Orthopedic Massage and other massage therapies, 295 Rock Cliff Dr., Martinsburg, WV 25401 • 304-2646092 • www.muscularskeletaltherapys.com Pediatric Rehabilitation – Speech, Occupational & Physical Therapy at Berkeley Medical Center’s Dorothy McCormack Center, 2000 Foundation Way, Martinsburg, WV 25401 • 304-264-1214

Products

1-2-3 Just PLAY With Me. Milestones and Miracles • www.milestonesandmiracles.com • Email milestonesandmiracles@gmail.com

Recreation

Dance Dimensions of Hedgesville. Rhythm Works Integrative Dance, a clinically based hip hop dance program that utilizes sensory processing, kinesiology, and behavioral analysis. 304-671-3688 • www.dancewv.com Flip Over Gymnastics, Open gym for special needs families on Fri. 4:30-5:30 p.m. $6/child & $4/siblings. Martinsburg-Berkeley Co. Parks & Recreation, 273 Woodbury Ave., Martinsburg, WV 25404 • 304-2644842 ext. 22 • www.mbcparks-rec.org Martinsburg-Berkeley Co. Parks & Recreation 273 Woodbury Ave., Martinsburg, WV 25404 • 304264-4842 • www.mbcparks-rec.org Monkey Joe’s – Hagerstown, 1113 Maryland Ave., Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-797-7716 • www.monkeyjoes.com/Hagerstown Sky Zone, Sensory Hours provides a quieter, toneddown jumping experience for those with special needs. Last Monday of the month from 3 p.m.-6 p.m. $9.50 for 1 hour. 12114 Insurance Way, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-420-5867 • www.skyzone.com/hagerstown

Service Facilitation/Case Mgmt Moms in Motion Serving all of Virginia • 844-8285591 • info@momsinmotion.net • www.MomsInMotion.net

Child Guide

Support Groups

Eastern Panhandle Parents of Special Needs Children Support Group, Call for meeting information. Sponsored by WV Birth to Three. Find on Facebook or call Laura Turman at 304/267-3593. www.wvdhhr.org/birth23/ Pennsylvania Family Support Alliance, 2000 Linglestown Rd., Suite 301, Harrisburg, PA 17110 • 717-238-0937 • 1-800-448-4906 • www.pa-fsa.org PA Playgroup meets for activities once or twice midweek and two Saturdays per month at community locations in Greencastle, PA and surrounding areas. We welcome special needs children and teens! Contact Erin Betts: ebetts@pa.net, 717/597-7572. Find us on FB www.facebook.com/groups/168641103198620/

Therapeutic Riding

Blue Ridge Center for Therapeutic Horsemanship, Marley Grange Farm, 644 Lime Marl Lane, Millwood, VA 22611 • 540/533-2777 • www.brcth.org Franklin County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Center, 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, PA 17202 • 717-263-0443 • Find us on Facebook. Frederick County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program, Silverado Stables, 11515 Angleberger Road, Thurmont, MD 21788 • 301-898-3587 • www.fc4htrp.org Horses with Hearts, P.O. Box 2186, Files Cross Road, Martinsburg, WV 25402 • 304-283-8071 • www.horseswithhearts.com • Find us on Facebook Saddles and Smiles and Ponies and Promises Therapeutic Riding Programs Held at Shotwell Farm Indoor Arena in Charles Town, WV during winter months and Jefferson County Fairgrounds in warmer months • 304/676-4642 • saddlesandsmiles.com Star Community, Inc., 13757 Broadfording Church Rd., Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-791-0011 • www.starcommunityinc.org

www.childguidemagazine.com


Heads Up

September/October 2018

September

Pride Day, Maugansville 1MD.Maugansville Community Center, Maugans Ave., Maugansville, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Community picnic that includes

A look at what’s happening in the region

3 Park Exploration Weekend, Fort 1BigtoFrederick State Park, 11115 Fort Frederick Rd., Pool, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Special night hike Sat.

8 p.m. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. Hagerstown Suns Home Baseball Games, homemade food, crafts and entertainment. Hagerstown (MD) Municipal Stadium, 274 East 301/739-6742. www.visithagerstown.com. Memorial Boulevard. Sat., 6:05 p.m.; Sun. & Mon., Keedysville Creative Kids Corner, Keedysville 2:05 p.m. Suns vs. Kannapolis Intimidators. (MD) Library, 22 Taylor Dr. 9:15 a.m.-12 Admission. 301/791-6266. noon.301/432-6641. www.washcolibrary.org. www.hagerstownsuns.com. Explore and Create, The Children’s Museum of & 11 Weinberg Center Behind the Scenes Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. Tour, Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick 10-11 a.m. “Pie Around the World.” Advance St., Frederick. 11 a.m. (9/1) and 2 p.m. (9/11). registration recommended. Ages 4-5 and their adult. Experience the backstage magic of the Weinberg. No $8 per adult/child pair. 301/600-2936. reservations required. Free. 301/698-8118. www.recreater.com. www.visitfrederick.org. Family Playtime, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly & 15 “SOAR” Bird Walks, Renfrew Park, 1010 St., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Socialize with other E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 7:30-10 a.m. families. All materials provided. 540/662-9041. “Studying Ornithology at Renfrew.” Free. www.handleyregional.org. www.renfrewinstitute.org. “Monarch Craft Activity,” Discovery Station, 101 , 15 & 29 Pumpkin Bowling, Miller House W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Fun craft Museum, 135 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 activity for children 7 & up. Monarch tagging a.m.-2 p.m. Pumpkin bowling held open-house style. demonstration will follow. Program free with price of 301/797-8782. www.visithagerstown.com. admission to museum. 301/790-0076. and Oct. 6 Civil War Walking Tour, www.discoverystation.org. Heritage Frederick, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. Sky Pop! Sky Stage, 59 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 11 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $7-$10. 301/663-1188. a.m.-3 p.m. Artists, makers, bakers and craftspeople. www.visitfrederick.org. 301/662-4190. www.visitfrederick.org. to Oct. 28 Hagerstown Corn Maze, Family Film, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Celebration Farm, 17638 Garden View Rd., Winchester. 12 noon-2 p.m. “Pinocchio.” Family Hagerstown. Fri., 5-10 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon-10 p.m.; picnic and movie event. All ages. 540/662-9041. Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. 8-acre corn maze and pickwww.handleyregional.org. your-own pumpkin patch. Moonlight mazes on Fri. & Renn Fest in the City, Everedy Square & Shab Row, Sat. nights. Proceeds benefit local Faith Based NonEast and Church Sts., Antique Imports, Frederick. 12 profits. 301/393-4377. noon-5 p.m. Entertainment, food and games from www.hagerstowncornmaze.org. the Rennaisance era. 301/662-4140. & 16 Art in the Park, Berkeley Springs (WV) www.visitfrederick.org. State Park, across the street from the Berkeley West Virginia BBQ Festival, Hollywood Casino, Springs Farmers Market and shops on Fairfax St. 10 Charles Town, WV. 12 noon-6 p.m. $25, VIP a.m.-4 p.m. Juried monthly outdoor art fair for local admission; $5, general admission. Ages 12 & under and regional artists to show and sell their work. are free. www.wvbbqfestival.com. 304/258-6419. Family Movie, Washington County Free Library, 100 , 9, 15, 16, 22 & 29 Historic S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. “Sherlock Downtown Frederick Walking Tour, Heritage Gnomes.” Popcorn and drinks are provided. Frederick, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. 3rd, 4th & 5th 301/739-3250. www.washcolibrary.org. Sat., 11 a.m.; 1st, 2nd & 3rd Sun., 1:30 p.m.301/663-1188. www.visitfrederick.org. Ice Cream Social, Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. 2-5 p.m. Family , 9, 16, 23 & 30 The Fay & Jim Powers event to thank long-term friends and welcome new 2018 Outdoor Music Series at Pen Mar residents and visitors. Choose your ice cream in a Park, 14600 Pen Mar-High Rock Rd., Cascade, MD. cone, dish or root beer float. Free. 301/663-1188. Every Sun., 2-5 p.m. through September 30. “Connie Guy Band” (9/2), “Bill Krantz Combo” (9/9), “Rocky Creative Outlet at The Delaplaine Arts Center, Birely Combo” (9/16), “The Holders” (9/23), & 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. “Zimbabwe – Lion Mask.” Family-friendly event that offers drop-in “Spectrum” (9/30). Free summer music series. 240/313-2807. art activities for all ages. $2 per artist. 301/6980656. www.delaplaine.org. , 9, 23 & 30 Red Run Park Summer Concerts, Red Run Park, Rt. 16, Rouzerville, PA. First Saturday: Get it Downtown! downtown 1-4 p.m. Entertainment: “The Back Roads Band” Frederick. 5-9 p.m. 301/698-8118. (9/2), “Tall in The Saddle” (9/9), “Mason Dixon www.visitfrederick.org. Country” (9/23), and “Mountain Ride” (9/30). Free. Red, White & Blue Summer Concert Series, Hagerstown (MD) Community College Amphitheater, 717/762-3128. www.washtwp-franklin.org. Labor Day Breakfast, War Memorial Park, 11400 Robinwood Dr. 6:15 p.m. “The United States Main Pavilion, Martinsburg. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Be Navy Commodores.” Free. 240/500-2346. part of a long-standing tradition. Enjoy a grilled steak www.hagerstowncc.edu. or country ham breakfast with friends and Welcome Campfire, Sky Meadows State Park, Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. neighbors. $30-$35. www.travelwv.com/events/ Intro to Cloth Diapering, Handley Library, 7 p.m. 540/592-3566. Children’s Room, 100 E. Piccadilly St., & 2 Nature Walk, Greenbrier State Park, Winchester. 11 a.m.-12 noon. 540/662-9041. 21843 National Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 2-3 p.m. www.handleyregional.org. Family-friendly walk. http://dnr.maryland.gov/ Homeschool Day, Shenandoah Valley Discovery publiclands/pages/western/greenbrier.aspx. Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 9 a.m.-

1 1 1 1 1

2 2 2 2

1

www.childguidemagazine.com

3

4 5

COMPILED BY SUZANNE HOVERMALE

5 p.m. Admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Meet a Sheriff, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 4 p.m. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Shepherd Youth Chorus Auditions, The Frank Center at Shepherd University, 301 N. King St., Shepherdstown. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Auditions for students in grades 3 to 8. To sign up for an audition, contact sykes@shepherd.edu or 304/876-5248. Pooch Plunge, Potterfield Pool, 730 Frederick St., Hagerstown. 6-8 p.m. Support the Humane Society of Washington County. $5 admission for dogs. Donation for people. 301/733-2060. www.hswcmd.org. Teacher Appreciation Night, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 68 p.m. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. STEM Night – Geometric Art, Washington County Free Library, 100 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 6:307:30 p.m. Students can do fun projects and experiments that relate to Science, Technology, Engineering or Math. Open to children ages 8-12. No registration required. Class size limited. 301/7393250. www.washcolibrary.org. , 12, 19 & 26 Homeschool Hub, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 1 p.m. Homeschooling families of all ages are encouraged to use our meeting room space to do work, research, and socialize. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Continuing Improvement Art Studio, Berkeley Art Works Gallery, 116 N. Queen Street, Martinsburg. 14 p.m. Unstructured workshop for art students who want to continue working on their art projects under the guidance of art instructor, Judith Becker. $90 for four week course. Pre-registration required. www.berkeleyartswv.org. to October 6 Eastern WV Juried Art Exhibit, Berkeley Art Works Gallery, 116 N. Queen Street, Martinsburg. Wed.-Thurs., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Fri., 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-4 p.m. www.berkeleyartswv.org. La Leche League Meeting, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 10-11 a.m. All pregnant and breastfeeding mothers and children are welcome. Free. 540/869-9000, x220. www.handleyregional.org. Family BINGO Night, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 6:30-7 p.m. BINGO Night for the whole family. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. to 8 Two Times Around Consignment Sale, Blue Heron Events Center, 407 S. Washington St., Greencastle, PA. Thurs. & Fri., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-12 noon. Fall/winter children’s & maternity consignment evet. New and gently used items for infants to teens. 717/580-8318. www.twotimesaround.net. to 11 Sts. Peter & Paul Greek Fall Festival, 920 W. 7th St., Frederick. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Festival celebrates Greek customs, food and culture. 301/663-0663. www.visitfrederick.org. , 7, 13, 14, 20, 21, 27 & 28 Indoor Playground, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $5 for first child, $3 for siblings. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. , 13, 20 & 27 Yoga on the Creek, Carroll Creek Amphitheater, Frederick. 7-8 a.m. All skill levels are welcome. Free. Donations encouraged. 301/698-8118. www.visitfrederick.org. First Friday Fun, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St.,

5

5

6

6 6 6 6

7

Child Guide

Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Little Bear.” Story with art exploration, activities, and craft. Pre-registration recommended. Ages 3-4. $5. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. First Fridays Celebration of the Arts, Old Town Winchester. 3 p.m. Special gallery events, musicians playing in restaurants and cafes, and many shops stay open late. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. First Friday in Funkstown, Funkstown, MD. 5-9 p.m. Night of shopping, live music, food, wine tastings, special sales, giveaways and fun. www.funkstown.com. Drum Circle at Sky Stage, 59 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 6:30-8 p.m. Interactive drum circle. Inclusive activity for all ages and developmental levels. Free. 301/662-4190. www.visitfrederick.org. Movie Night in the Park, Middletown (MD) Park, 7628 Coblentz Rd. 7 p.m. “Finding Dory” on a giant blow-up movie screen. Free. www.visitfrederick.org. to 9 Giant Book Sale, Community Show at Catoctin High School, Thurmont, MD. Fri., 6-9 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun. Bag Sale, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Proceeds support Thurmont Library activities & initiatives. All ages. 301/600-7212. www.fcpl.org. , 14, 21 & 28 Dance Party, Handley Regional Library Children’s Room, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. For toddlers, preschoolers and their grown-ups. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Martinsburg Farmers Market, Downtown Martinsburg. 4:30-7 p.m. Find great local products including meat, eggs, fruits, veggies, baked goods and more. www.martinsburgfarmersmarket.com. , 14, 22 & 28 Beginning Pastels, Berkeley Art Works Gallery, 116 N. Queen Street, Martinsburg. 1-4 p.m. Class introduces beginners to the process of creating paintings with pastels. $90 for four-week course. Pre-registration required. http://www.berkeleyartswv.org. to November 4 Fall Fun Festival, Gaver Tree Farm & Pumpkin Patch, 5501 Detrick Rd., Mt. Airy, MD. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 301/865-3515. Market Street Mile, Race Day Registration and starting line at YMCA, 1000 N. Market St., Frederick. 8:45 a.m. Designed for beginners and experts alike. 301/600-2844. www.visitfrederick.org. Hagerstown Model Rail Road Train Sale, Washington Co. Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Sale of model trains and accessories to benefit Antietam Station in Sharpsburg, MD. 301/800-9829. www.antietamstation.com. Artillery Day, Monocacy National Battlefield, 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Day of demonstration and living history. 301/662-3515. www.heartofthecivilwar.org. Wings & Wheels Expo 2018, Hagerstown Regional Airport Terminal, 18434 Showalter Rd., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. See military & civilian aircraft, cars, trucks, fire trucks, military vehicles, food and exhibits. www.wingsandwheelsexpo.com. www.hagerstownaviationmuseum.org. Learn to Ride, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-12 noon. JCPRC staff will be outside with your child to help them learn to ride a bike. Child must have a helmet. Ages 4-10. $18-$23. 304/7283207. www.jcprc.org. Conococheague Faire, Conococheague Institute, 12995 Bain Rd., Mercersburg, PA. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 300 years of American History. Music, artisans, education and more. $10, general admission; $20,

7 7 7 7 8

September/October 2018

Page 15


Heads Up

September/October 2018

Sept. cont. from page 15

A look at what’s happening in the region

Art Works Gallery, 116 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn to paint with acrylics. Pre-registration required. $135 for 6-week course. carload; free, ages 10 & under. 717/328-3467. www.berkeleyartswv.org. www.cimlg.org. to Oct. 28 “Elves and the Shoemaker,” Story Time, Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington Wonderment Puppet Theater, 412 W. King St., St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Special story time in our Martinsburg. Sat. & Sun., 1 p.m. $6. Free admission Imagination Station for ages 5 & up. Program is free for children under age 2. 304/258-4074. with the price of admission to the museum. www.wondermentpuppets.com. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. to Nov. 4 Stoner’s Dairy Fall Corn Maze Kids Discover Science: Deep Blue Sea, Weekends, 7678 Oellig Rd., Mercersburg, PA. Washington County Free Library, 100 S. Potomac St., Sat., 12 noon-10 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. 5-acre Hagerstown. 11 a.m.-12 noon. For children ages 5-9. corn maze & more. Admission. 717/328-3617. Registration required. 301/739-3250. www.stonersdairyfarm.com. www.washcolibrary.org. Thorpewood 10K Run & 5K Trail Walk In the Street, Downtown Frederick & Carroll Creek Event, 12805-A Mink Farm Rd., Thurmont, MD. Park, Frederick. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Outdoor festival 8 a.m. Event helps raise money to offset the costs of includes nine blocks of themed fun. Presented by the Frederick County YMCA and Head Start Celebrate Frederick. 301/600-2844. programs at Thorpewood. Fee. 301/271-2823. www.visitfrederick.org. https://runsignup.com/thorpewoodstrailevent. Princesses in the Kitchen – Snow White, Hub Label CX Challenge, Washington County Ballenger Creek Community Building, 5420 Technical High School & Doubs Woods Park, Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 1-3 p.m. Ages 4-6. Maryland Ave., Hagerstown. 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. An off$32. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. road cycling event. Register online at bikereg.com. The make-IT place: Robot Races, C. Burr Artz Woodmont: Lodge Open House & Guided Hike, Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 2-3 p.m. Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Race Sphero robots through an obstacle course we’ll Big Pool, MD. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Ranger guided hike at 1 create. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. p.m. 301/842-2155. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. My Grandparent and Me Cooking, Ballenger Teddy Bear & Grandparent Day, The Children’s Creek Community Building, 5420 Ballenger Creek Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market Pike, Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Ages 5-10. $54 for pair. St., Frederick. 2-3:30 p.m. Advance registration 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. recommended. Ages 4-7. $10 per grandparent/child Red, White & Blue Summer Concert Series, pair. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Hagerstown (MD) Community College Amphitheater, Acrylic Painting, Jim Barnett Park, Arts & Crafts 11400 Robinwood Dr. 6:15 p.m. “United States Air Room, 1001 E. Cork St., Winchester. 2-4 p.m. Force Airmen of Note.” Free. 240/500-2346. “Dreamcatcher.”Perfect class for young artists. Ages www.hagerstowncc.edu. 6-13. $17, resident; $20, non-resident; $5, materials Second Saturday Movies in the Park, Chambers fee. 540/662-4946. www.winchesterva.gov/parks. Fort Park, North Main St., Chambersburg. 6:30-9 American Girl Book Club, Boonsboro (MD) p.m. “Despicable Me 3.” Library, 401 Potomac St. 6 p.m. Learn about www.explorefranklincountypa.com. an American Girl character and her lifetime. Join us Hangarfest, Rider Jet Center, 18539 Henson Blvd., for a discussion with activities, games, or crafts and Hagerstown. 7-10:30 p.m. Benefit fundraiser for a snack. 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. Discovery Station. Live music by The Reagan Years. , 17 & 24 Parent and Me Little Artists, Dancing, food, cash bar, 50/50s and tip jars. Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 9:15-9:45 a.m. “Painting Astronomy for Everyone, Sky Meadows State Park, Up Perfect Piet Mondrian Squares” (9/10), “Apple Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. Prints” (9/17), and “Coffee Filter Tree Silhouettes” 7:30-10:30 p.m. $5 per vehicle. 540/592-3566. (9/24). Ages 2-5. $7. 540/955-5140. & Oct. 13 Jesse James Day Train www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Excursion, Walkersville Southern Railroad, 34 , 18 & 25 Under the Sea, The Stillness W. Pennsylvania Ave., Walkersville, MD. 11 a.m. & 2 Studio, 28 S. Potomac St., #307, Hagerstown. p.m. Old West raid on the train. $10-$12. Under age 10:30-11:30 a.m. All ages and abilities welcome. A 2 ride free if on a lap. 301/898-0899. www.wsrr.org. Pathways Homeschool Co-Op event. Classes are & 9 47th Annual Boonesborough Days, donation based. jenleighwellness@gmail.com. Shafter Park, 37 Park Dr., Boonsboro, MD. 9 240/446-2690. a.m.-5 p.m. Craft and food vendors, antiques and Tiny Tales, Museum of the Shenandoah collectibles, demos, trolley rides, entertainment and Valley, 901 Amherst St., Winchester. 11 a.m. more. http://town.boonsboro.md.us. 301/432Enjoy stories with the Youth Services staff of Handley 7030. Library. Ages 2-5. 540/662-9041, x11. & 22 Create a Corn Husk Doll, Miller House Toddler Play Date – Make Your Own Playdough, Museum, 135 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Learn about colonial toys and games Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 1-2:30 and make a corn husk doll to take home with you. p.m. Arts, crafts, play and socialization. Ages 2-5. Family workshops are held open-house style. Free. $12-$17. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. www.eventbrite.com/e/family-workshop-create-aMontessori-Inspired Meet Up, The Stillness corn-husk-doll-tickets-46892564924. Studio, 28 S. Potomac St., #307, Hagerstown. 2-4:30 , 15, 22 & 29 Art Journals: Creating p.m. Learn how to create simple engaging materials, Visual Diaries, Berkeley Art Works Gallery, 116 your youngest homeschoolers will use over and over, N. Queen Street, Martinsburg. 1-4 p.m. $90 for four- that are Montessori-inspired. Grades PreK-3. $25. week course. Pre-registration required. jenleighwellness@gmail.com. 240/446-2690. http://www.berkeleyartswv.org. Family Game Night, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 , 15, 22, 29 and Oct. 6 & 13 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 6-7 p.m. Explore Beginning Acrylic Painting Class, Berkeley

8 8

9

10

8 8 8

10 11

12

8 8

Page 16

September/October 2018

COMPILED BY SUZANNE HOVERMALE

educational, creative and mind-challenging games. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Teen Night: Game Night, Middletown (MD) Library, 101 Prospect St. 6:30-7:30 p.m. Play and learn about a variety of board and card games. Feel free to bring your own. For grades 6-12. 301/371-7560. www.fcpl.org. Living History Presentation of General D.H. Hill, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6:30-8 p.m. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Grandparents & Seniors Morning, For the Kids, By George Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.12 noon. Tickets are $4/person. 304/264-9977. www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. to 16 Kid’s Closet Connection Sale, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 1707 Old Leetown Pike, Kearneysville, WV. Thurs. to Sat., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., 8 a.m.-2 p.m.. Make money on your kids’ outgrown gently used clothing, toys and accessories. Free admission. www.kidscloset.biz. & 20 and Oct. 11 & 18 Fall Foliage Festival, The Star Theatre, 23 W. Seminary St., Mercersburg, PA. 2 p.m. Admission. www.paopry.com. Let’s Move, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Scurrying Squirrels.” Ages 2-3. $5. Pre-registration recommended. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Little Hands Cooking, Ballenger Creek Community Building, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 1011:30 a.m. Designed for the preschool attention span. Ages 2-1/2-5. $24. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Teen Theme Night, Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 6:308:30 p.m. “Paint Night.” Materials included. Ages 13-19. $40. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. to 16 Kid’s Closet Connection Sale, Baymont Inn & Suites, 431 Dual Highway, Hagerstown. Fri., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.. Make money on your kids’ outgrown gently used clothing, toys and accessories. Free admission. www.kidscloset.biz. to 22 The Great Frederick Fair, Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. Frederick County’s single largest event, featuring 18,000 competitive exhibits, entertainment, food, carnival rides and more $8. Children 10 & under are free. 301/663-5895. to Nov. 3 “Annie,” Way Off Broadway Dinner Theatre, 5 Willowdale Drive, Frederick. Performances every Fri. & Sat. evening, and matinees on select Sun. Admission. 301/662-6600. www.wayoffbroadway.com. Paint the Town Plein Air, Thurmont Main Street, 11 Water St., Thurmont, MD. 9:30 a.m.2 p.m. Artists will have their easels in the Main Street area painting the beautiful buildings and landscapes of historic downtown. Judging at 2:30 p.m. After judging, art lovers may purchase the artwork. 240/626-9980. www.visitfrederick.org. City Park Fall Festival & Porchfest, Hagerstown City Park, Museum of Fine Arts, Hager House, Mansion House, Train Museum, and Paddle Boats on the lake, 501 Virginia Ave., Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts, entertainment & history. Free activities. Porchfest features bands playing on porches on S. Prospect St. from 12 noon-4 p.m. 301/739-8577, x180. www.visithagerstown.com.

13

13 13

14

14 14 14

15

Child Guide

Volvo Group Power Day Open House, 13403 Volvo Way, Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Trucks, manufacturing tours, food, Kids Zone, live music by the Amish Outlaws, and more. www.facebook.com/powerdayopenhouse. “Monarch Tagging Demonstration,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Part of our participation in The Monarch Alliance’s Monarch Discovery Days. Educational program free with price of admission to museum. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. African American History Walking Tour, The Roger Brooke Taney House, 121 S. Bentz St., Frederick. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Learn about some of the county’s outstanding sites, people, and events through a tour of the local African American community’s historical cultural and civic center. $7$10. 301/663-1188. www.visitfrederick.org. All Paws on Deck Canine Swim, Jim Barnett Park, Outdoor Pool, Winchester. 1-3 p.m. Bring your furry friends out for an evening of swimming. Dogs must be at least 6 months old, have paper proof of rabies vaccination, and be non-aggressive. $2. 540/6624946. www.winchesterva.gov/parks. “The Tale of the Lion: Our Stories, Our Voices,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 2 p.m. The oldest African American citizens in Frederick County, MD share the memories, wit and wisdom that have shaped their lives. Reservations recommended. Free and open to all. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. Special Saturday, For the Kids, By George Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 2 p.m. “Feather Quill Pen and Ink Workshop.” Ages 6-12. 304/264-9977. www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. 40th Annual Band Spectacular, Martinsburg High School, Cobourn Field, 701 S. Queen St. 5 p.m. 11 bands from WV, VA and MD will participate in the adjudicated event. $10, adults; $5, students & ages 65 & older; free, ages 5 & younger. www.mhsbulldogsband.com/band-spectacular. Third Saturday Discovery Night at Sky Meadows State Park, Children’s Discovery Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Activities at each of the interactive discovery stations. 540/592-3566. Welcome Campfire, Sky Meadows State Park, Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 7 p.m. 540/592-3566. Exploring the Night Sky by Telescope, Foundation of the State Arboretum, Blandy Library and Grounds, Boyce, VA. 7-9 p.m. Reservations recommended. $10-$25. 540/837-1758, x224. www.blandy.virginia.edu. Town of Boonsboro Outdoor Movie Night, Shafer Park, Boonsboro, MD. 7:30 p.m. “Cars 3.” Free. 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. & 16 Battle Anniversary Weekend, Antietam National Battlefield, 5831 Dunker Church Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Commemorate the 156th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. Living history programs, demos, and more. $10 per car or $5 per person. 301/432-5124. www.heartofthecivilwar.org. Indian Village, 33846 Snickersville Turnpike, Bluemont, VA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 49th annual fair. www.harvestgathering.org. One Fort: Three Wars, Fort Frederick State Park, 11115 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Discover the part Fort Frederick played during the French & Indian War, American Revolution and Civil War. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155.

15

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. Shenandoah Valley Apple Harvest Festival, Frederick County Fairgrounds, Clear Brook, VA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Artisans & crafters, kidzone area with inflatables & face painting, antique car show, bingo, hard ciders & craft beers, apple pie eating contest, apple butter making, live entertainment, food concessions and more. www.visitwinchesterva.com. CVR&C Club Car Show, Red Run Park, Rt. 16, Rouzerville, PA. 1-4 p.m. 717/762-3128. www.washtwp-franklin.org. , 22 & 29 Sensory Sensitive Storytime, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 11:30 a.m.-12 noon. Program designed for children of all abilities in an inclusive environment of stories, rhymes, movement and song. Geared especially for children on the autism spectrum and those with sensory integration challenges. Registration required. All ages. 540/662-9041. Shape Up Sunday, Old Town Winchester, Taylor Pavilion. 9:15 a.m. Free exercise for the whole family. Pet-friendly. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. Northern Shenandoah Valley Master Gardeners Fall Roundup, Belle Grove, 336 Belle Grove Rd., Middletown, VA. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free, family-friendly, public event. Speakers, demonstrations, crafts, giveaways, and vendors. 540/869-2028. www.bellegrove.org. Meet the Beekeepers, Sky Meadows State Park, Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Discover the art of Apiculture (beekeeping). 540/592-3566. Family Fun-Day Sunday, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 1:30-3:30 p.m. Old-fasioned fun – classic indoor and outdoor games from cribbage to croquet. $10 per family. 301/600-1650. www.recreater.com. Unicorn Painting, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 2-4 p.m. Children ages 2-6 will be required to have a parent present for child assistance. $35. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. and Oct. 28 Greencastle Sports Card & Memorabilia Show, Blue Heron Events, 407 S. Washington St., Greencastle, PA. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Dealers from PA, MD, VA & WV. Lunch available for purchase from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free admission & door prizes. 717/903-3964. Do You Really Want a Pet? Walkersville (MD) Branch Library, 57 W. Frederick St. 6:307:30 p.m. Responsible pet ownership. For grades K-5. 301/845-8880. www.fcpl.org. Stargazing with the TriState Astronomers, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 8-10 p.m. Call to sign up. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. to Nov. 27 Shepherd University Early Childhood Music Classes, The Frank Center at Shepherd University, 301 King St., Shepherdstown, WV. 4:30-5:15 p.m. Music for preschoolers, ages 3-5 with caregiver. $140 per student for 10-week semester. To register, contact sykes@shepherd.edu or 304/876-5248. Bird Walk at Cool Spring Preserve, 1469 Lloyd Rd., Charles Town, WV. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free. www.potomacaudubon.org. Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11 a.m. Frederick County’s only nonsectarian, independent, coeducational day school for children in Preschool 3 through 8th grade. 301/695-9320. www.BannerSchool.org. Science Day, The Stillness Studio, 28 S. Potomac St., #307, Hagerstown. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. September theme “Under the Sea.” All ages and abilities welcome. A Pathways Homeschool Co-Op event. Classes are donation based. jenleighwellness@gmail.com. 240/446-2690. School’s Out! Movie Matinee, Urbana Library, 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 1:30-4 p.m. “Coco.” Movie and themed activity for grades K-6. 301/6007000. www.fcpl.org.

15 16

16

17

18

18

19

www.childguidemagazine.com

I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 20 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 1-2 p.m. A parent and child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair.

301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. 2018 Washington County Healthy Families Festival, 201 S. Cleveland Ave., Hagerstown. 4-7 p.m. Prizes and giveaways, food and food demonstrations, activities for all ages, health screenings & info, and more. Co-sponsored by Family Healthcare of Hagerstown and the United Way of Washington County on the Day of Caring. 301/745-3777, x1077. Make-it, Take-it Family Craft Night, Clear Spring Library, 12624 Broadfording Rd. 5-6:45 p.m. Make a seasonal craft with your family. All ages. 301/8422730. www.washcolibrary.org. Mommy & Me, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Little ones and their caregivers engage in activities that explore historic toys, colors, numbers, letters, nature and art. Ages 1 ½-2. $5. Advance registration recommended. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Game Night, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 5:30 p.m. For middle and high school students. 540/869-9000. Night Out on the Ranch, Full Moon Ranch, Berryville, VA. 6-8 p.m. Clarke County Parks & Rec has teamed up with Pony to Go/Full Moon Ranch. All ages. $30 per family. Children must be accompanied by parent/guardian. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. www.ponytogo.com. Wind Down Downtown, The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 6-9 p.m. “Back to School.” Fun vendors to make sure your kids are ready to head back to school. 301/790-2000. http://winddownhagerstown.com/ Pokemon, Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pokemon competition. Ages 6 & up. $2. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. to Nov. 30 Shepherd University Early Childhood Music Classes with Ms. Frauke Higgins, The Frank Center at Shepherd University, 301 N. King St., Shepherdstown. Fri., 9:15 a.m. is Musical Discoveries for ages 18 months to 3 years old, with caregiver. Fri., 10 a.m. is Music for Preschoolers, ages 3-5 with caregiver. $140 per student for 10 week semester. To register, contact sykes@shepherd.edu or 304/876-5248. Parent Education Conference, James Madison University, 800 S. Main St., Harrisonburg, VA. Conference will feature 16 experts sharing evidence-based tips for better parenting. Topics include: smartphone addiction, mental health, mindfulness, discipline, helicopter parenting, eating disorders and more. http://psyc.jmu.edu/parenteducation/index.html. 4th Annual Fall Duffield Fest, Hip Gypsy Emporium, 2168 Mont Alto Rd., Chambersburg. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Vendors, food, live music and more. 717/558-1840. www.explorefranklincountypa.com. “Hands On” Archeology on the Farm, Clermont Farm, 801 E. Main St., Berryville, VA. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Ages 16 & up. Free. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Fall Family Farm Festival, STAR Equestrian Center, 13674 Greencastle Pike, Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Wagon rides, craft & product vendors, horse demos, and petting farm. www.starcommunityinc.org. Allison-Antrim Classic Car Show, Allison-Antrim Museum, 365 S. Ridge Ave., Greencastle. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 1974 and older. 717-597-9010. www.explorefranklincountypa.com. Smithsonian Museum Day Live! Belle Grove, 336 Belle Grove Rd., Middletown, VA. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Belle Grove is partnering with Smithsonian and thousands of other museums by offering free admission. 540/869-2028. www.bellegrove.org. National Public Lands Day Historic House Tours, Monocacy National Battlefield, 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Each historic farm at

21

21

22

Monocacy National Battlefield has a unique history. To register, contact 301/662-3515. www.visitfrederick.org. “Candy Science,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Two hands-on science and STEM activities that involve skittles and candy corn. Program is free with the price of admission to the museum. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. National Public Lands Day, Sky Meadows State Park, Children’s Discovery Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Join a hike to refresh nests in bluebird boxes. Help build new boxes and learn how to establish a nesting box in your community. 540/592-3566. Cooking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Community Building, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Kids cook up a storm in the kitchen. Ages 5-8. $39. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Welcome Campfire, Sky Meadows State Park, Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 7 p.m. 540/592-3566. & 23 Fall Farm Fun Days at Orr’s Farm, 682 Orr Dr., Martinsburg. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. www.orrsfarmmarket.com.

parent and child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Signing Storytime, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Interactive program through American Sign Language designed for little ones who are learning with their hands, with stories, songs and more. All ages. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Slime Science, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 5 p.m. Put on your labcoat and goggles (provided) and let’s make slime. STEM. Ages 5-12. Registration requested. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. Family STEM Night, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 6-7 p.m. Explore STEM activities and games. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Preschool Fall Hike, Catoctin Creek Park, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-2 p.m. Hike on Catoctin Creek trails with activities along the way. Ages 3-5. $9. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Toddler Play Date – Science Fun, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 1:30-3 p.m. Arts, crafts, play and socialization. Ages 2-5. $12-$17. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. to 29 Kid’s Closet Connection Loudoun County, Busch Tabernacle, 250 S. Nursery Ave., Purcellville, VA. Thurs. Pre-sale, 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Fri., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Make money on your kids’ outgrown gently used clothing, toys and accessories. Free admission. www.kidscloset.biz. Princess Kids Party, Hagerstown Community College ARCC. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Children enjoy royal activity stations. $5, ages 1-12; $2, ages 13-adult spectator; free, ages 0-12 months. 240/313-2805. www.eventbrite.com. www.washcorecfit.com. Thunder in the Square, City Center, Hagerstown. 6-10 p.m. A car, truck, motorcycle, & tractor show with live music and activities for kids. www.mdtheatre.org. Movie Night in the Park, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 8:45 p.m. “Star Wars – The Last Jedi.” Bring blankets and chairs. Free. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. & 29 Frederick’s Oktoberfest, Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Fri., 6 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m. Admission. 240/5990660. www.visitfrederick.org. Celebrating Patsy Cline, Green Grove Gardens, 1032 Buchanan Trail East, Greencastle, PA. 6-9 p.m. $28.50. Includes dinner and concert. 717/5970800. www.greengrovegardens.com. to 30 Mountain Heritage Arts and Crafts Festival, Jefferson County Fairgrounds, 2005 Old Leetown Pike, Kearneysville, WV. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Quality juried artists and craftspeople, demos, children’s activities, WV wineries, WV craft beers, and more. Admission. www.travelwv.com/events/ to Nov. 3 Screamland Farms, Crumland Farms, 7612 Willow Rd., Frederick. Fri. & Sat., 7 p.m. Three haunted attractions and other scary fun like Zombie Paintball and the Escape Room experience. Not recommended for children under age 13. 301/8458099. 2018 Color Splash 5K, Fairgrounds Park, 580 Security Rd., Hagerstown. 9-11 a.m. HEAL’s Color Splash 5K Run/Walk. Participants get “splashed” with powdered colors throughout the fun run. Post-race festival with healthy food. Entrance fee. 301/739-8577. Race for Seizure Freedom 5K Run/Walk, Clark County Parks & Recreation Nature Trail, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 10 a.m. Guest speakers: Paul Lyons, M.D. & Lee Selznick, M.D.. Register online: www.raceentry.com/races/race-for-seizurefreedom-5k/2018/register. $25-$35. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks.

27

22 , 23, 29 & 30 and Oct. 6, 7, 13 & 14 “Click, Clack, Moo,” Maryland 22 Ensemble Theatre, 31 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 1:30 27 p.m. A musical adaptation of the Caldecott Honor & 29 and Oct. 6, 13, 20 & 27 22 “The Snow Queen,” Washington Co. Playhouse Dinner Theater and Children’s Theater,

Book by Doreen Cronin. Admission. 301/694-4744. www.marylandensemble.org.

44 N. Potomac St., Hagerstown. Sat., 11:30 a.m. Theater for Young Audiences. Adaptation of the fairy tale by Hans Christian Anderson. Admission. 301/ 739-7469. www.washingtoncountyplayhouse.com. to Oct. 31 Washington Nationals Corn Maze, Summer Farm Fall Festival, 5620 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. Sun., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs., 1-7 p.m.; Fri., 1-10 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Admission. 301/620-9316. www.summersfarm.com. to Nov. 4 Misty Meadow Farm Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch, 14325 Misty Meadow Rd., Smithsburg, MD. Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.dusk; Sun., 1-dusk. Haryide tour of the farm, petting farm, rope maze, corn maze, spider web maze, and more. 301/842-2112. www.mistymeadowfarmcreamery.com. Fall Festival at Winterbrook Farms, 13001 Creagerstown Rd., Thurmont, MD. Fri., 5-10 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Over 6 miles of trails. Pumpkins, hayrides, and more. Admisson. 301/465-3801. www.visitfrederick.org. 12th Annual Hispanic Festival, Hagerstown (MD) Fairgrounds Park, 420 N. Mulberry Street. 12 noon-6 p.m. Music, dance, authentic Hispanic food, fun and resource information. www.hagerstownhispanicfestival.org. Artifact Sneak Peek, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, 171 Shoreline Drive, Harpers Ferry, WV. 2-4 p.m. Experience a behindthe-scenes tour of objects in the archeology collection that rarely see the light of day. Entrance fees apply. 304/535-6029. Edible Banned Books Festival, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 5:30 p.m. Create a banned book masterpiece. Some materials provided. Local patrons will vote for noteworthy banned book delicacies and bid on their favorite cakes. Money raised donated to Literacy Volunteers of the Winchester Area. Registration required. 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. Full Moon Walk, Foundation of the State Arboretum, Blandy Farm, Boyce, VA. 7-8 p.m. Reservations required. $10-$25. 540/837-1758, x224. www.blandy.virginia.edu. I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 10-11 a.m. Explore a new nature theme each week. A

22 22

23

24

26

Child Guide

28

28 28 28 29

September/October 2018

Page 17


Heads Up

September/October 2018

Sept. cont. from page 17

A look at what’s happening in the region EMAIL CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

Walking Tour, Foundation of the 2p.m.Arboretum State Arboretum, Blandy Farm, Boyce, VA. 2-3:30 Reservations required. $10-$25. 540/837-

benefit their educational programs, and activities for children and families. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Family Archaeology Day and Concert Featuring EAA Fly-In, Drive-In Breakfasts, Hagerstown 1758, x224. www.blandy.virginia.edu. Bud’s Collective, Clermont Farm, 801 E. Main St., Berryville, VA. 10 a.m.-12 noon, archeology; 1-4 p.m., Sensory Friendly Hangout, Brunswick (MD) Branch Regional Airport Terminal, 18434 Showalter Rd., Hagerstown. 8 a.m.-1 p.m. All you can eat breakfast Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 4:30-5:15 p.m. Crafts, concert. Free. All ages. 540/955-5140. from 8-11:30 a.m. Lunch from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Young games, and hands-on activities designed for www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Eagle plane rides are free to ages 8-17. Hagerstown elementary children (K-5) with sensory integration Militia Muster, Fort Frederick State Park, 11115 Aviation Museum Large Aircraft will be open to the challenges or autism spectrum disorders, their Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. public. Breakfast $4-$7, children under 6 are free. families and friends.301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. Frederick County Militia’s annual muster. Park www.hagerstownaviationmuseum.org. Handley Library Behind-the-Scenes Tour, entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155. Market Day, Mainstreet Waynesboro, PA. 9 a.m.-4 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6-7:30 p.m. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. p.m. All-day entertainment, live music, dancing Free, reservations helpful. 540/662-9041, x11. Art at the Point Festival, Point of Rocks demonstrations, sidewalk sales, children’s activities, La Leche League Meeting, Bowman Library, Community Center, 1635 Ballenger Creek Pike, Point and dozens of craft, specialty and food vendors. 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 10 a.m. of Rocks, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 240/285-1647. www.mainstreetwaynesboro.org. 540/869-9000. www.visitfrederick.org. Washington Metro DachtoberFest, Frederick I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 Nature Middletown (MD) Heritage Festival, 31 W. Main Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 1-2 p.m. A parent and Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 9 a.m.St. 10 a.m-5 p.m. Parade, food, music, historical 4:30 p.m. Hundreds of dachshunds of all sizes, types events, children’s activities and vendors of all kinds. child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair. 301/600-2936. and colors. Vendors, raffles, wiener races, costume www.recreater.com. 301/371-6171. www.visitfrederick.org. parade, and more. www.visitfrederick.org. “Taste of the Arts,” Downtown Hagerstown. 5-8 Keedysville, MD 250th Birthday Celebration, Halloween Costume Swap, Brunswick (MD) p.m. Sample culinary treats at various downtown Taylor Park. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. 301/432-5342. Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. and Thurmont venues. www.mdtheatre.org. “Flextangles,” Discovery Station, 101 W. (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 10 a.m.-1 , 5, 18, 19, 25 & 26 Indoor Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Fun exercise in p.m. Donate your gently used costume and swap for Playground, Jefferson County Community geometric planning. STEAM program is free with price a new-to-you costume. Drop off donations starting of admission to museum. Recommended for children Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $5 for first child, $3 for Sept. 15. All ages. www.fcpl.org. 5 & up. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. “Halloween and Fall Crafts,” Discovery Station, siblings. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Civil War Reenactors, Walkersville Southern 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. First Friday Fun, The Children’s Museum of Railroad, 34 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Walkersville, MD. Halloween and Fall Crafts activities in our STEAM Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Reservations recommended. Machine Art Room. Activities are suitable for children Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Father Bear Comes Admission. 301/898-0899. www.wsrr.org. of all ages. Program free with price of admission to Home.” Story with art exploration, activities, and The Art of Paper Quilting, Chambersburg (PA) museum. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Council for the Arts, 81 N. Main St. 11:30 a.m.-4:30 craft. Pre-registration recommended. Ages 3-4. $5. Native American Heritage Day, Shenandoah 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. p.m. For teens and adults. $35 plus $20 materials Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, First Fridays Celebration of the Arts, Old Town fee. 717/264-6883. www.councilforthearts.net. Winchester. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 540/722-2020. Chili Cookoff, Town Square, Downtown Martinsburg. Winchester. 3 p.m. Special gallery events, musicians www.discoverymuseum.net. 2-5 p.m. Crafts, live music, games, beer and chili. $5 playing in restaurants and cafes, and many shops Family Tunes and Tales: Symphony Storytime stay open late. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. armband for tastings. Kids under 7 are free. with Frederick Symphony Orchestra, C. Burr Artz Night Out on the Ranch, Full Moon Ranch, www.travelwv.com/events/ Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 11:15 Twilight Hikes at Monocacy Battlefield, Gambrill Berryville, VA. 6-8 p.m. Clarke County Parks & Rec has teamed up with Pony to Go/Full Moon Ranch. All a.m. All ages. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Mill, 4801 Urbana Pike, Frederick. 6-8 p.m. ages. $30 per family. Children must be accompanied Family Film, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Registration requested. 301/662-3515. Winchester. 12 noon-2 p.m. “Sleeping Beauty.” by parent/guardian. 540/955-5140. www.visitfrederick.org. Family picnic and movie event. All ages. 540/662www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. www.ponytogo.com. Welcome Campfire, Sky Meadows State Park, 9041. www.handleyregional.org. Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. Wind Down Downtown, The Maryland Theatre, 21 Baking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Community S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 6-9 p.m. “Freaky Friday.” 7 p.m. 540/592-3566. Building, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 1-3 Food, drink, live music, and children’s activities. & 30 38th Annual Pippinfest, Historic p.m., ages 9-12; 4-6 p.m., ages 5-8. $34. 301/600301/790-2000. http://winddownhagerstown.com/ Fairfield, PA. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Community yard 2936. www.recreater.com. Teen Theme Night, Clark County Parks & sale on Sat. 8 am- 3 pm. Sun. features arts & crafts, Family Movie, Washington County Free Library, 100 Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 6:30quilt show, live music, kids’ area, pony rides, and S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. “Monsters 8:30 p.m. “Pottery Night.” Explore the basics of more. www.pippinfest.com. University.” 301/739-3250. www.washcolibrary.org. 44th Annual Smithsburg (MD) Steam Engine & pottery. Ages 13-19. $10. 540/955-5140. Special Saturday, For the Kids, By George Craft Show, Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. (parade); Sun., 10 www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. & 6 61st Springs Folk Festival, 1711 a.m.-4 p.m. 301/665-2882. Martin St., Martinsburg. 2 p.m. “Chocolate History Springs Rd., Springs, PA, 4 miles north of Open Airplane Afternoon, Hagerstown Day.” Ages 8-15. 304/264-9977. Regional Airport Terminal, 18434 Showalter Grantsville, MD I-68 exit 19. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Juried artisans demonstrate their craft. Quality handcrafted www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. Rd., Hagerstown. 1-4 p.m. items, demos, PA Dutch food, music performances, Creative Outlet at The Delaplaine Arts Center, www.hagerstownaviationmuseum.org. 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. “Morocco – Zellij and more. Admission. www.springspa.org. Family Tunes and Tales: Symphony Storytime Mosaic.” Family-friendly event that offers drop-in art , 6, 12, 13 & 26 “Paranormal with Frederick Symphany Orchestra, Urbana Library, Investigations,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 activities for all ages. $2 per artist. 301/698-0656. 9020 Amelung St., Frederick. 1:05-1:35 p.m. For all www.delaplaine.org. E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 10 p.m.-3 a.m. ages. 301/600-7000. www.fcpl.org. Astronomy for Everyone, Sky Meadows State Park, Investigations accompanied by Mid-Atlantic Investigations. $30. Reservations required. Ages 17 Historic Area, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 6:30 p.m. $5 per vehicle. 540/592-3566. & under must be accompanied by an adult. & 7 Apple Harvest Festival, Marker-Miller 301/263-6766. www.apollocivictheatre.org. Orchards, 3035 Cedar Creek Grade, Winchester. , 8, 15, 22 & 29 Parent and Me Little , 12 & 19 Dance Party, Handley Regional Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 20 varieties Artists, Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Library Children’s Room, 100 W. Piccadilly St., of apples, and more. Music from 1-3 p.m. Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 9:15-9:45 a.m. “Name Winchester. 10:30 a.m. Toddlers, preschoolers and www.markermillerorchards.com. Monsters” (10/1), “Rolled Paper Pumpkins” (10/8), their grown-ups are welcome to come dance. Confederate Living History Weekend, Antietam “Painting Vincent Van Gogh Sunflowers” (10/15), 540/662-9041. www.handleyregional.org. National Battlefield, 5831 Dunker Church Rd., “Batty Sponge Art” (10/22), and “Assemble a Pasta Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum 5K Sharpsburg, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission. 301/432Skeleton” (10/29). Ages 2-5. $7. 540/955-5140. Run/Walk and Kids Dash, 541 Redbud Rd., 5124. www.heartofthecivilwar.org. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Winchester. 8-11 a.m. Proceeds go to SVDM to

3 4

4

5

29

5

30

October 1

Page 18

5 5

6

September/October 2018

6

Child Guide

45th Annual Apple Butter Festival, Berkeley Springs, WV. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Apple butter making, crafts, food, contests, music, parade and more. www.berkeleysprings.com. Fall Festival Weekend, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free admissino. Fees vary for activities. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. Fort Frederick in the Civil War, Fort Frederick State Park, 11115 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Living history and tactics demos. 301/842-2155. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. Brunswick Railroad Days, Downtown Brunswick, 1 W. Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 301/834-7500. www.brunswickrailroaddays.org. 49th Page County Heritage Festival, Page County Fairgrounds, Luray, VA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Familyoriented weekend. Admission. www.pagecountyheritage.com. Maryland Pumpkin Festival, Summers Farm, 5620 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. Sat., 10 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 301/620-9316. & 20 “SOAR” Bird Walks, Renfrew Park, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 7:30-10 a.m. “Studying Ornithology at Renfrew.” Walks begin at Renfrew’s lower parking lot off Welty Rd. Free. www.renfrewinstitute.org. , 13, 20 & 27 Sensory Sensitive Storytime, Handley Library, 100 E. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 11:30 a.m.-12 noon. Designed for children of all abilities in an inclusive environment of stories, rhymes, movement and song. Geared especially for children on the autism spectrum and those with sensory integration challenges. Registration required. All ages. 540/662-9041. , 7, 14, 20, 21, 27 & 28 Fall Foliage Train Ride, Walkersville Southern Railroad, 34 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Walkersville, MD. 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. $10-$12. Children under age 2 are free if riding on a lap. 301/898-0899. Apple Fest, Washington County Rural Heritage Museum, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 1-4 p.m. 240/420-1714. www.ruralheritagemuseum.org. , 14, 20, 21 & 27 Historic Downtown Frederick Walking Tour, Heritage Frederick, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. 3rd, 4th & 5th Sat., 11 a.m.; 1st, 2nd & 3rd Sun., 1:30 p.m. 301/6631188. www.visitfrederick.org. American Girl Book Club, Boonsboro (MD) Library, 401 Potomac St. 6 p.m. 301/432-5723. www.washcolibrary.org. “Surgeons vs. Chefs: Pumpkin Face-Off,” The Barn at Springfield Farm, 12 Springfield Lane, Williamsport, MD. 7-9 p.m. Discovery Station is hosting this 5th annual event and one-of-a-kind pumpkins will be auctioned off for their benefit. 301/790-0076. “Guardians of the Galaxy, Vol. 2,” C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 57:30 p.m. Rated PG-13. For grades 6-12. 301/6001630. www.fcpl.org. Fall Mason Jar Craft, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 7-8:30 p.m. Call to reserve your supplies. All ages. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 10-11 a.m. A parent and child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Toddler Play Date – Finger Painting Fun, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 1-2:30 p.m. Arts, crafts,

6 6 6

7

7

8

9

10

www.childguidemagazine.com


m

play and socialization. Ages 2-5. $12-$17. 304/7283207. www.jcprc.org. Grandparents & Seniors Morning, For the Kids, By George Children’s Musem, Caperton Train Station, 229 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 9 a.m.12 noon. Tickets are $4/person. 304/264-9977. www.forthekidsbygeorge.org. Harry Potter Party, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 4-4:45 p.m. Celebrate more than 20 years of Harry Potter with fun activities. For grades K-5. 301/600-1630. www.fcpl.org. Bullying in Our Community, Walkersville (MD) Branch Library, 57 W. Frederick St. 6-7:30 p.m. A panel of experts from the Frederick County United in Kindness Coalition to Stop Bullying will discuss bullying issues in our community. 301/600-8200. www.fcpl.org. Let’s Move, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Dancing Deer.” Ages 2-3. $5. Preregistration recommended. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Little Hands Cooking, Ballenger Creek Community Building, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 1011:30 a.m. Designed for the preschool attention span. Ages 2 1/2-5. $24. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. “Special Night for Special Needs,” Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork St., Winchester. 6-8 p.m. Low lighting, sensory activities, and Occupational & Physical Therapy staff will be on hand. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Fall Fun Fest, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 6-8:30 p.m. Trick-or-treat trail, pumpkin hunt, and more. Recommended for ages 2-12. $10. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. & 13 Fallfest at Catoctin Furnace, 12607 Catoctin Furnace Rd., Thurmont, MD. 10 a.m.4 p.m. Apple butter boiling, tours of historic buildings, and more. 443/463-6437. www.visitfrederick.org. Oktober Fest, Loudoun Street Walking Mall, Old Town Winchester. Fri., 5-11 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon-8 p.m. Bavarian inspired food, beer & wine, music, costumed professional Bavarian dancers, and more. Admission. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. “72 Film Fest,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 6:30 p.m. Two-day event. Regional filmmakers make a movie in just 72 hours. All of the entries screen during the two-day event. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. to 14 Tot Swap Frederick, Frederick County Fairgrounds, Null Building, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Discounts on maternity and kids clothes, toys, baby equipment and accessories, and more. www.totswap.net. 2018 Hagerstown Out of the Darkness Walk, City Park, Virginia Ave. 8:30 a.m.-12 noon. Funds raised help fund research, create educational programs, advocate for public policy, and support survivors of suicide loss. 240/469-8043. Monster Dash 5K and 1K Trick-or-Treat Trail, Marty Snook Memorial Park, 17901 Halfway Blvd., Hagerstown. 9 a.m. Big Brothers Big Sisters of Washington County, MD, Inc. is hosting the Monster Dash in partnership with Racine Multisports. Raises funds for mentoring kids in our community. Costumes encouraged. All ages. Race fee. 301/739-4711. Western Maryland Rail Trail Bike Tour, Meet at the C&O Bicycle Shop in Hancock. 10 a.m. Guided bike tour. Approximately 22 miles long, roundtrip. 301/842-2155. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. Infantry Day, Monocacy National Battlefield Visitors Center, 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick. A day of demonstrations and living history. 301/662-3515. www.heartofthecivilwar.org. Mt. Airy Fall Festival, Mt. Airy Carnival Grounds, 1008 Twin Arch Rd., Mount Airy, MD. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts and crafts festival, entertainment, children’s section, games, scarecrow making, pumpkin painting, and more. 301/829-5466. www.visitfrederick.org.

11

12

12

12

13

www.childguidemagazine.com

Woodsfest, The Woods, Hedgesville, WV. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Live music, food, wood-working, painting, jewelry, metal-work, ceramics and more. Special activities just for kids. www.travelwv.com/events/ AHA CPR/AED & First Aid, Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Hand’s-on training. Ages 16 & up. $67. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. “Oozing Jack-O-Lanterns,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Mad scientists at Discovery Station show how to get pumpkins to ooze slime with a little science thrown in the mix. Fun for all ages. Program free with price of admission to museum. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Chili Cookoff 2018, Municipal Stadium, 274 E. Memorial Blvd., Hagerstown. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Come sample and vote on the Best Chili in the Area. Local arts & crafts vendors, live music, kids zone, and more. Admission. 301/791-7165. Porch Program: Union Mills Homestead, Newcomer House, 18422 Shepherdstown Pike, Keedysville, MD. 1 p.m. Discover the Shriver Homestead, in Carroll County, then learn about early industry using augmented reality. 240/308-1740. www.heartofthecivilwar.org. Harvest Hoedown, Fairgrounds Park, 351 N. Cleveland Ave., Hagerstown. 1-4 p.m. 301/7398577, x170. www.visithagerstown.com. & 14 Wiliamsport’s World War II Weekend, Springfield Farm, 12 Springfield Lane, Williamsport, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 301/2237711. http://williamsportmd.gov/events. 40th Annual Farm Festival, Ivy Hill Farm, 13840 Smithsburg Pike, Smithsburg, MD. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. 301/824-4658. http://ivyhill-farm.com. Catoctin Colorfest, Thurmont Community Park, 21 Frederick St., Thurmont, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Outdoor craft show. Crafts, demos, art, jewelry, clothing, food & more. 301/271-7533. The Great Pumpkin Patch, Old National Pike Park, 12406 Old National Pike, Mt. Airy, MD. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. For all ages. Hayrides, inflatables, face painting, petting zoo, trick-or-treat trail, and more. $5. Ages under 2 are free. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. MSO Concert – Visions of America, The Maryland Theater, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. Sat., 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 3 p.m. A visual concert experience featuring photographs by Dr. Ira Lourie and students of BISFA. www.marylandsymphony.org. to 27 “The Berenstain Bears On Stage!” Way Off Broadway Dinner Theatre, 5 Willowdale Drive, Frederick. Admission. 301/6626600. www.wayoffbroadway.com. Art in the Park, Berkeley Springs (WV) State Park. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Juried monthly outdoor art fair for local and regional artists. 304/258-6419. Halloween Painting, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 2-4 p.m. Kids choose their design. Children ages 2-6 will be required to have a parent present for child assistance. $35. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Bird Walk at Cool Spring Preserve, 1469 Lloyd Rd., Charles Town, WV. 7:30-10:30 a.m. Free. www.potomacaudubon.org. Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11 a.m. Frederick County’s only nonsectarian, independent, coeducational day school for children in Preschool 3 through 8th grade. 301/6959320. www.BannerSchool.org. “Super Scientific Circus,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 10 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Uncover magic behind scientific principles. Recommended for grades 2-5 in connection with the FCPS science curriculum. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 1-2 p.m. A parent and child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair. 301/6002936. www.recreater.com.

13

13

14 17

18

Make-it, Take-it Family Craft Night, Clear Spring Library, 12624 Broadfording Rd. 5-6:45 p.m. All ages. 301/842-2730. www.washcolibrary.org. Spooky Skeleton Hands, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 6-7 p.m. Sign up online or call. Ages 13-18. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. to 21 Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival, Martinsburg, WV. Thurs., 5:30 p.m.; Fri., 10 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun., 8 a.m.-5 p.m. www.msahf.com. Mommy & Me, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Ages 1 ½-2. $5. Advance registration recommended. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Nerf Wars, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 57:15 p.m., ages 5-9; 7:30-9:45 p.m., ages 10-14. $10. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. The Park at Dark, Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Halloween themed activities for preschool and elementary school aged children ( must be supervised by an adult at all times). Online tickets www.eventbrite.com. $5. No ticket required for ages 0-11 months. 240/313-2805. www.washcorecfit.com. Movie Night on the Creek, Carroll Creek Amphitheater, Carroll Creek Park, Frederick. 6-9 p.m. “The Nightmare Before Christmas.” Free. 301/6988118. www.visitfrederick.org. Pokemon, Clark County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Pokemon competition. Ages 6 & up. $2. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Astronomy Night, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 19 W. Cork Street, Winchester. 7-9 p.m. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. & 20 “Grease,” The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 7:30 p.m. Popular musical about Rydell High’s senior class of 1959. Presented by Authentic Community Theatre. Admission. www.actforall.org. www.mdtheatre.org/act. Harvest at the Market, Hagerstown City Farmers’ Market, 25 W. Church St., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-12 noon. Harvest and children’s activities, local vendors, and live music. 301/7398577, x183. Color Me Autumn Festival, Middletown Community Park, 7628 Coblentz Rd., Middletown, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Over 50 arts and crafts vendors, trick or treating fun, and more. www.visitfrederick.org. “Halloween Slime,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Join the mad scientists at Discovery Station as they make Halloween slime. Fun for all ages. Program is free with the price of admission to the museum. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Pumpkin Festival, Renfrew Museum & Park, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $8, adults; $4, ages 4-12; free, ages 3 & under. www.renfrewmuseum.org. Movie Marathon, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 11:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Guardians of the Galaxy I & II. For grades 9-12. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. DIY Gingerbread Haunted House, Emmitsburg (MD) Branch Library, 300A S. Seton Ave. 1-3 p.m. For grades 6-12. 301/600-6329. www.fcpl.org. Cooking for Kids, Ballenger Creek Community Bldg, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Ages 5-8. $39. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Middletown (MD) Scarecrows March Down Main Street, Martha Mason Drive & Main St. 4:30 p.m. Dress in costume and march in Middletown’s annual Hallowen Parade. Parade begins at 5 p.m. 301/6067272. www.visitfrederick.org. Spirits of the Furnace, Museum of the Iron Worker, 12607 Catoctin Furnace Rd., Thurmont, MD. 6:30-9 p.m. Guided night tour, kids craft, and more. $10,

18 19

19

20

Child Guide

20

adults; $5, children 12 & under. 301/271-7574. www.visitfrederick.org. & 21 Homegrown Hay Days, Frederick (MD) County Farms. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-4 p.m. Visit some of the hardest working farms in Frederick County, each hosting special activities and events. No registration required. 301/600-1058. www.visitfrederick.org. Oktoberfest at Schifferstadt, Schifferstadt Architectural Museum, 1110 Rosemont Ave., Frederick. Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. Traditional festival features juried arts, crafts, cultural activities, German food and drink, oompah band, colonial history demos, and children’s fun. $3 per adult. 301/663-3885. www.visitfrederick.org. & 27 “The Rocky Horror Picture Show,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. 11 p.m. doors open, 12 midnight, show. Movie accompanied by the ACT RHPS shadow cast. $15. $3 for audience participation packs. Rated R. 301/263-6766. www.apollocivictheatre.org. Bob Baronner Apple Trample 5K, Martinsburg. 10:30 a.m. Race fee. www.appletrample.com. Open Airplane Afternoon, Hagerstown Regional Airport Terminal, 18434 Showalter Rd., Hagerstown. 1-4 p.m. www.hagerstownaviationmuseum.org. “Kate DiCamillo,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 2 p.m. Former National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature and twotime Newberry Medal winner. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. Family Tunes and Tales: Symphony Storytime with Frederick Symphony Orchestra, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 6:30-7:30 p.m. FSO musicians perform classical music to beloved stories. All ages. 301/6007200. www.fcpl.org. Free Movie Night, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 7 p.m. Free showing of the movie “Won’t You Be My Neighbor.” Rated PG-13. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. I Love Nature, Fountain Rock Park, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 10-11 a.m. A parent and child class. Ages 3-4. $8 per pair. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Bone Bridge STEM Challenge, Smithsburg Library, 66 W. Water St., Smithsburg, MD. 6-7 p.m. Ages 512. 301/824-7722. www.washcolibrary.org. Catoctin Creek Park, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 1-2 p.m. Hike on Catoctin Creek trails with activities along the way. Ages 3-5. $9. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Toddler Play Date – Halloween Craft, Jefferson County Community Center, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 1:30-3 p.m. Arts, crafts, play and socialization. Ages 2-5. $12-$17. 304/7283207. www.jcprc.org. Fright Night, Thurmont (MD) Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd. 6-7 p.m. We welcome witches, wizrards, warlocks, and all teens grades 6-12 in costume or not. Food, games, music and prizes. 301/600-7200. www.fcpl.org. Trick-or-Treat Through History, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Bring a bag to collect treats as you meet costumed characters from throughout time while exploring the museum and grounds. $2 per person. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Movie Night, Wright Denny Intermediate School, 209 W. Congress St., Charles Town, WV. 8:45 p.m. “Hocus Pocus.” Bring your blankets and chairs. Movie begins at sundown. Free admission. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. & 27 Haunted Hayride, Square Corner Park, E. Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 7-9:30 p.m. Enjoy a haunted hayride to and from a spooktacular destination in Brunswick. $5, adults; $3, children. www.visitfrederick.org. Checkerboard Days Fall Festival, H.C. Summers Feed & Supply, 4002 Jefferson Pike, Jefferson, MD. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. 614/202-7370. www.visitfrederick.org.

20

21

23

24 25

26

26

27

September/October 2018

Page 19


INDEX OF ADVERTISERS

24/7 Dance Studio....................................Back Cover City Ballet.........................................Inside Back Cover

Cluggy’s Family Amusements..................................14 Discovery Station ...........................Inside Back Cover

Educare Learning Center .........................................9 Ellsworth Music ...........................................................9

Family Healthcare of Hagerstown...........................11

Frederick Pediatric Dentistry ...................................3 Hann’s On Portraits..................................................20 Kids Closet Connection Fall Consignment Sales Washington Co., MD & Loudoun Co., VA ...............1 Kids First Swim Schools.............................................1

The Light of the Child Montessori School...................................................9 The Maryland Theatre ................................................5

Muscular Skeletal Therapies .....................................7 The Pediatric Center of Frederick ...........................14

Pediatric Dental Center of Frederick..................................Inside Front Cover ProDesign ..................................................................14

Smile Frederick Orthodontics ................................Inside Front Cover St. John’s Regional Catholic School..........................8

Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum................................................20 Shepherdstown School of Dance..............................3 Shepherdstown School of Dance Young Dancers Program .........................................3

Heads Up

September/October 2018

Oct., cont. from page 19

Spring Mills Primary Care WVU Medicine..............................Inside Back Cover

Toothman Orthodontics ...........................................10

A look at what’s happening in the region EMAIL CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

Twilight Hikes at Monocacy Battlefield, Gambrill Mill, 4801 Urbana Pike, Frederick. 5-7 p.m. Prowl around the park with a ranger at twilight and search the trails for wildlife. Registration requested. 301/662Pumpkin Festival, Marker-Miller Orchards, 3035 Cedar Creek Grade, 3515. www.visitfrederick.org. Winchester. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Choose from already picked pumpkins or Alsatia Mummer’s Parade, North and South Potomac Streets, pick your own. Pumpkin pie, pumpkin rolls, pumpkin bars, pumpkin Hagerstown. 6 p.m. One of the oldest nigh time parades in the nation. donuts, and more. www.markermillerorchards.com. 301/739-2044. Halloween in Downtown Frederick, Historic downtown Frederick. 10 Halloween Party in Downtown Brunswick, Square Corner Park, 1 E. a.m.-12 noon. Great for families and kids of all ages. Costumes Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 6-8 p.m. Trick-or-treating, costume encouraged. 301/698-8118. www.visitfrederick.org. contest, haunted house, and more. www.visitfrederick.org. Howl-O-Ween Dog Costume Parade, Fairgrounds Park, 351 N. Not-So-Scary Family Halloween Party, Adventure Park USA, 11113 Cleveland Ave., Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Dress your dog and win W. Baldwin Rd., Monrovia, MD. 6-9 p.m. Family-favorite characters. prizes. Vendors, giveaways, fun contests and photos. $10 entrance fee. Dress up in “not-so-scary” costumes. All-inclusive tickets include a 301/739-8577, x170. www.visithagerstown.com. light-meal, attractions and video games. 301/865-6800. Halloween Celebration at Westview Promenade, Buckeystown Pike & 28 A Pleasant Diversion, Fort Frederick State Park, (Rt. 85) & Crestwood Blvd., Frederick. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Designed for 11115 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m., children 12 years & under, in costume and accompanied by an adult. with a 7 p.m. campfire program; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Members of the 410/561-1300. www.visitfrederick.org. recreated Maryland Troops garrison the fort. Park entrance fees apply. Spooktacular, Loudoun Street Walking Mall, Winchester. Afternoon of 301/842-2155. www.friendsoffortfrederick.info. trick-or-treating at downtown businesses. 18th Annual Great Outdoors Festival, Whitetail Resort, 13805 www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. Blairs Valley Rd., Mercersburg, PA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission. 717/3289400. www.skiwhitetail.com.

27

Page 20

September/October 2018

Child Guide

Friends of Cunningham Falls 10K, 5K, Fun Run/Walk & 28 Tot Trot, Cunningham Falls State Park, Houck Area, 14039 Catoctin Hollow Rd., Thurmont, MD. 8 a.m. Family-friendly event. $10-

$40. 301/271-7574. St. John Regional Catholic School Open House, 8414 Opossumtown Pike, Frederick. 1-4 p.m. Christ-centered environment and exemplary education for PreK through Grade 8 students. 301/6626722. www.sjrcs.org. Halloween Party, Brunswick (MD) Branch Library, 915 N. Maple Ave. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Ages birth-5. 301/600-7250. www.fcpl.org. Trunk-or-Treat, Walkersville (MD) Branch Library, 57 W. Frederick St. 67:30 p.m. Community partners with treats, family games and costume contest. All ages. 301/845-8880. www.fcpl.org. Moonlight Festival & Trick or Treat, Town of Williamsport, MD. 6-8 p.m. http://williamsportmd.gov. Trick or Treat, Town of Boonsboro, MD. 6-8 p.m. Residents will turn on their porch light if they’re participating. http://town.boonsboro.md.us/

31

See www.childguidemgazine.com/events for more happenings in the region.

www.childguidemagazine.com


Sept/Oct 2018 Child Guide  

Back to School issue includes articles for parents to help their children adjust to the new school year, along with lots of fall events (pum...

Sept/Oct 2018 Child Guide  

Back to School issue includes articles for parents to help their children adjust to the new school year, along with lots of fall events (pum...

Advertisement