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The magazine for families in the quad-state area! www.childguidemagazine.com

September/October 2013

Back to School & More

Frederick & Washington counties, MD Eastern Panhandle, WV Frederick & Clarke counties, VA Franklin County, PA

Choosing After-School Activities Finding Your Best Bet Pet Child Safety Month Fall 2013 Special Needs Section

Navigating Special Education in the School Setting

Our Heads Up calendar of events features the area’s best family-friendly fun!


CHILDREN’S SPECIALISTS

Jeffrey Pearlman, D.D.S. Melanie Newman, D.D.S. NEW PATIENTS WELCOME With an emphasis on lifetime prevention, the dental practice of Drs. Pearlman, Seidman & Newman offers you comprehensive Adult and Pediatric Dental care in the convenience of one location. Utilizing the latest techniques in Cosmetic Dentistry, Sports Dentistry, Trauma Treatment, Pediatric Dentistry, Orthodontic and Periodontal Care, your comfort and appearance are foremost in our minds. Good dentistry is more than excellent clinical skills and state-ofthe-art equipment. Establishing lasting relationships with our patients, based upon mutual trust and open communication, is an important factor. We invite your questions and value any suggestions you may have. Working together, let us help you have the smile you've always wanted.

Pediatric Care

Because establishing good dental hygiene habits in childhood has lifetime benefits, Drs. Pearlman, Seidman and Newman make every effort to put children at ease and make their visit fun. We offer comprehensive dental care for children, delivered by experienced dental professionals in a positive and caring environment. Our staff includes specialists in Pediatric and Adolescent Dentistry and Orthodontics, and we offer the latest

advancements in dental care. Additionally, we have advanced training in the treatment of patients with mental and developmental disorders.

Prevention

Preventative care is the foundation for a healthy mouth that lasts a lifetime. At Drs. Pearlman, Seidman and Newman, we guide parents and children alike in proper techniques for good oral hygiene and for maintaining good oral health. We offer to teach the proper methods for brushing and flossing and we help to develop a routine for good dental hygiene.

Orthodontics

For patients, adults and children, who have crowded or crooked teeth, spaces between their teeth or misaligned teeth and jaws, orthodontic therapy can help reduce the risk of tooth decay, gum disease, and trauma due to protruding teeth. The American Association of Orthodontists recommends that children have an evaluation by 7 years of age. More than 25% of all orthodontic patients are adults. We offer the Invisalign system for our orthodontic therapy to both our adult and pediatric patients.

18638 Crestwood Drive (Off Pennsylvania Ave.), Hagerstown, MD 21742

301-797-6950 • www.drspearlmanandseidman.com


Your Child’s Dental Office on Wheels

Ranelle Flurie, Director

Comprehensive dental care for students provided on-site during the school day at Washington County elementary, middle and high schools

ballet, jazz, tap, modern & hip-hop

Working parents love the convenience!

new students and special needs children welcome

Walnut Street Community Health Center 24 N. Walnut Street · Hagerstown MD 21740 www.walnutstreetchc.org

www.balletandallthatjazz.com

Register NOW by stopping by our studio 18703 Crestwood Drive, Hagerstown, MD 21742 by phone 301-797-2100 or online at

Check with your school or call 301-393-3450

FALL CLASSES NOW FORMING

WE HAVE OPTIONS! Pre-School A La Carte Full Days: 8:45 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. / Half Days: 8:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Five Full Days ................ $12,349 Includes extended care and summer camp ($500 camp activity fee).

Five Full Days ................ $9,900 No extended care or summer camp included.

Five Half Days................ $8,644 Includes before care and summer camp ($500 camp activity fee).

Three Full Days.............. $8,644

Three Half Days ............. $4,322

Includes extended care and summer camp ($500 camp activity fee).

No extended care or summer camp included.

Two Half Days ............... $3,088

Two Full Days ................. $6,175

No extended care or summer camp included.

No extended care or summer camp included.

Learning for Life! 1730 N. Market St. • Frederick, MD 21701 301.695.9320, ext. 32 • BannerSchool.org OPEN COURT PHONICS • WRITING • MATH • SPANISH • P.E. • ARTS • MUSIC • SUMMER CAMP • FINANCIAL AID Frederick County’s only non-sectarian, independent school, since 1982. Non-profit, 501(C)(3). Approved by MSDE. Accredited by AIMS. Member of NAIS.

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Child Guide

September/October 2013

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Child Guide is pleased to be available in schools in nine school districts. County boards of education, their agents and employees neither sponsor nor endorse this publication. The views expressed might or might not reflect those of the county boards of education or school administrations, and are neither approved nor disapproved by them.

www.childguidemagazine.com

301-665-2817

Our editorial mission: Child Guide strives to provide families and educators with a free publication packed with good ideas and local resources for raising happy, healthy children – because we believe that being a loving guide for your child is the most important job in the world.

WENDY C. KEDZIERSKI In this issue of

Founder/Editorial Consultant

13

Wendy@childguidemagazine.com

CECILIA “CIS” RHYNE Editor Cis@childguidemagazine.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Back to School & More

18

Special Needs Dyslexia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Navigating Special Education in the School Setting: What Parents Need to Know . . . . . .13 Readers Giveaways . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 Books on special needs topics

Suzanne Hovermale Lara Krupicka Jamie Loper Heidi Smith Luedtke Dennis Sandala Nicole Sergent Elisa Taub Sharon Zoumbaris ADVERTISING Office: 301-665-2817 ads@childguidemagazine.com

Special Needs Resources . . . . . . . .16

Articles: Choosing After-School Activities . . . . . . . . . . . .6

From the cover

Finding Your Best Bet Pet . . . . . . . .18

Thanks to all the parents who entered their children in Child Guide’s 2013 Cover Kids Contest.

Mastering the Basic . . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Make sure your student is prepared for higher level math September is Child Safety Month . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Stuttering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

Stephanie and Bennett of Winchester are featured on this Back to School front cover for September/October. Cover photo by Moments by Misty Photography.

Departments: Heads Up Calendar of Events . . . . .22

www.mhmoments.com • See ad on page 3.

Index to Advertisers . . . . . . . . . . . . .32

We encourage you to send seasonal photos of your children that Child Guide can use in filler space throughout the magazine ... your kids dressed up for Halloween, Christmas and other holiday pictures, spring, fall or winter outdoor photos. Email to coverkids@childguidemagazine.com throughout the year.

Special Needs Resources . . . . . . . .16

2014 Cover Kids Contest begins Nov. 1

Living Healthier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21 Tick disease remains a threat Readers Giveaways . . . . . . . .4, 17, 20

Resources:

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September/October 2013

Child Guide

Child Guide, September/October 2013, Volume XIII, Issue No. 4; headquartered in Hagerstown, MD, published by Child Guide Publishing, Inc. PO Box 3529 Hagerstown, MD 21742-3529 The design and contents are fully protected by copyright, and except as permitted by law must not be reproduced in any manner without written permission from the publisher. Manuscripts must be accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. Child Guide is not responsible for unsolicited material. Child Guide does not necessarily endorse businesses or organizations contained herein and reserves the right to reject any advertising that we feel is not in keeping with the philosophy and spirit of the publication.

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Child Guide

September/October 2013

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Inspiring One Child at a Time...

Enter to win Child Guide’s September/October Guide

Readers Giveaways 1 8

2 9

Enter online at www.childguidemagazine.com/giveaways or use form below. Entry deadline Oct. 10.

REGIONAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL

HIGHLIGHTS: •Pre-K - 8th Grade and Little Treasures PreK •Blue Ribbon School of Excellence •Designated STEM School •Spiritual Values •State-of-the-Art Campus

OPEN HOUSE November 13 9am-1pm & 7-9 pm St. John was recently named one of the 50 best private schools in the country. Visit and find out why! For more information, call Sheila Evers, Director of Development, at 301-662-6722

8414 Opossumtown Pike Frederick, MD 21702

www.sjrcs.org

Child Guide Sept/Oct Giveaway Entry Form Mail to: Child Guide Readers Giveaway, PO Box 3529, Hagerstown, MD 21742. Please include specific PREFERENCES!

Name _______________________________ Address _____________________________ City/State/Zip _________________________ Email _______________________________ Preferences: _________________________ ____________________________________

Educare Learning Center formerly Dandelion Child Care

2538 Jefferson Pike Jefferson, MD 21755 Directly off Rt. 340 (MD 100/Petersville Exit)

301-834-9007 Serving Children 8 weeks-School Age Pre-school & Child Care Programs Accredited by the Maryland State Dept. of Education

www.educatewithcare.com Page 4

September/October 2013

Little Citizens Teas The Republic of Tea offers a deliciously fruity and kid-friendly assortment of herbal, caffeine-free, organic, Fair Trade Certified teas for Little Citizens: Tangerine Red Tea, Cherry Apple Tea, and Strawberry Vanilla Red Tea. So, what makes these teas the best kid-friendly snacks? Most little ones want to play with their food to learn more about it and where it comes from. These herbal teas in particular were grown and plucked in the lush gardens of South Africa. Therefore, every sip comes with an equal dose of culture and geography for the kiddos - a great lesson to share at any after school tea party or play date! In addition, a portion of proceeds from the sale of each tea directly benefits Room to Read to establish libraries in underprivileged countries. www.republicoftea.com Kids No-Spill Bottle Caps Replace original bottle cap of any leading water and juice drink with the Kids No-Spill Bottle Cap and the bottle is ready for no-spill drinking. Adaptors for all the leading drink bottles included with each pack of No-Spill Bottle Caps. $6.99/pack, www.snacktrap.com Lunchbox Buddies These silly notes are a great new way to add a little fun to your child’s day. Each note has a different goofy character and a playful message developed by professional designer and father Jim Adorney. Simply pull one off and pack it in your child's lunch. Each packet contains a month’s worth of lunch notes. www.lunchboxbuddies.com Sachi Insulated Handbags are insulated, fashionable lunch bags, roomy enough to double as a handbag, while effectively keeping food hot or cold as desired. Easily wipes clean with a damp cloth. Handles fold down for easy fit in the refrigerator.

Child Guide

Zips closed and handles fold down to the sides so that you may lay it flat, allowing for easy refrigerator storage. Comes in a variety of styles and colors. Retails for $14.99 - $23.99. www.sachi-bags.com Four Peas Lunchbox and Backback From daycare to play dates to the back to school season, kids of all ages are always in need of bags and lunchboxes that can hold up to their busy schedules and activities. Since 2003, parents have turned to Four Peas for exclusive bags made from quality materials. As a mother of three small children, the founder of Four Peas wanted the same as all parents – only the safest most cost-effective lunch bags and backpacks possible for her kids. Since then the company has focused on developing cool stuff for hip kids. When it comes to safety, parents can feel confident in using Four Peas products as all bags are CPSIA compliant and PVC, BPA, phthalate, and lead free. For an added touch of fun, Four Peas can customize bags with their users’ names, transforming an already unique product into a truly personal gift. www.fourpeasonline.com “Wubbzy: Best of Daizy” DVD from Anchor Bay Entertainment Lavender lollipops! It’s Daizy’s turn in the spotlight. Filled with delightfully kooky adventures, this colorful animated series teaches important values for your youngsters. Being a good neighbor, helping those around you, and being a good friend are just a few of the wonderful things that your preschoolers will learn. Best of Daizy is a special handpicked compilation of seven entertaining and charming episodes starring Wubbzy’s gal pal. The action-packed Best of Daizy DVD also includes a bonus episode and cool extras like coloring and activity sheets and danceinducing music videos for preschoolers. SRP $14.98 www.wubbzy.com

Leap Frog Gift of Learning DVD Set with Plush Scout For ages 2 -5, www.leapfrog.com Make learning fun for your child! Join Scout and his friends for exciting learning adventures from the world of LeapFrog. Scout & Friends Number Land for Math skills: Number recognition, counting, skip counting Scout & Friends Phonics Farm for Early Reading Skills: The alphabet, Phonics skills, Animals www.childguidemagazine.com


September is Child Safety Month

(see article on page 9) Bubble Bum Inflatable Car Seat inflatable car booster seat meets all US safety testing standards Cost effective, portable, lightweight, and brightly colored, this inflatable car booster seat is for children aged between 4-11. Weighing less than half a pound, the light, compact design means that when deflated and folded, it can fit comfortably into schoolbags, handbags, rucksacks or even the glove compartment of your car, ready to inflate quickly and easily. The kids never have to be without a booster seat again. When traveling, it’s the perfect companion! SnoozeShade Plus Deluxe is a sun and sleep shade designed for use with babies and toddlers that fits all single prams, pushchairs, travel systems and buggies. Use it any time of day or night. SnoozeShade Plus has a single layer ‘lookout’ window for little ones to see out and enjoy the sights whilst protecting them from 80% of UV rays. When it’s naptime, simply zip up the outer layer ‘snooze’ panel to create a cosy, darkened, distraction-free environment that helps tired babies switch off to nap. In snooze mode, it blocks over 97% of UV rays and offers one of the highest levels of sun protection in the pushchair sunshade market. When there's no need for protection, open the front panel fully to easily access your little one.

October is SIDS Awareness Month Safe, Sound Sleep: Everyone Sleeps Better with HALO® The unique HALO® SleepSack® wearable blanket replaces loose blankets in the crib that can cover your baby's face and interfere with breathing. In addition to sleeping safer, with the HALO SleepSack wearable blanket, babies sleep better, too. It’s a warm, cuddly blanket they can’t kick off, ensuring baby sleeps soundly throughout the night. And when baby is sleeping safe and sound, moms and dads can rest easy. HALO is now used by more than 1000 hospitals to help teach safe sleep to new parents. New patterns for the Halo SleepSack wearable blanket and and Halo SleepSack Swaddle now available in cotton and fleece. Shown is HALO® SleepSack® wearable blanket in cotton (neutral -- grey elephant). The winner can pick a size (S 0-6 mos; M 6-12; L 12-18) and gender or neutral. See www.halosleep.com for additional information on safe sleep.

http://mslc.vpweb.com

Market Street UMC Learning Center Kindergarten with bef l and o o ore ch u S m / m y s e r /af r a e enri r ent P ter m c h e y l m a E ca ent d D n l re l a u F

540-662-9346

Ages 2-12

Bunny Foodie Adventures by Kathleen Morrissey Set in the local farm fields, this is the story of two young bunnies who learn the dangers of going off on their own, encountering scary sounds, a surprise helper and delicious temptations along the way. With fun characters and colorful illustrations, the book reminds young readers of the importance of being outside and exploring the great outdoors, as long as safety and parental guidance are involved. Lessons are learned about being safe at all times, understanding the rules before setting out on an adventure, using the buddy system, and above all, enjoy reading! www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

September/October 2013

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Choosing BY

HEIDI SMITH LUEDTKE, PH.D.

he intense demands of school work may cause you to hesitate when it comes to after-school time. Although you don’t want to overload you child’s schedule, the academic, social and physical benefits of extracurricular programs are hard to ignore. The Afterschool Alliance, an information clearinghouse and advocacy group, reports kids who participate in after-school programs have better school attendance, higher grades and loftier aspirations about graduation and college attendance. They’re less likely to use drugs or get into trouble with police, and – because they log less screen time – kids in after-school programs are at lower risk of obesity. Kids also develop social and leadership skills in after-school programs, as they interact with peers in cooperative roles and mentoring relationships. Now that’s an impressive list of benefits.

T Child Guide is “ISO” an enthusiastic & reliable part-time helper for ad sales and customer service. If you “love” ... talking on the phone, sending emails and learning about services for families in our community, this could be the position for you! Previous sales experience preferred and good computer and phone skills a must! Call 301-665-2817 or send email with resume to ads@childguidemagazine.com

What to Consider Before signing up, do your homework. These guidelines will help you sort the best from the rest. Content. If possible, let kids choose activities based on their personal interests, says Susan Kuczmarski, Ed.D., author of The Sacred Flight of the Teenager: A Parent’s Guide to Stepping Back and Letting Go. Help your child find activities that reflect who they are and what they want to learn, instead of imposing your preferences on them. Kids flourish when they’re deeply engaged. Quality. After-school programs aren’t created equal. The best programs offer much more than Page 6

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Child Guide

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After-School Activities homework help, says Sara Hill, Ph.D., Senior Consultant for the National Institute on Out-of-School Time. Discipline-based activities that allow kids to create a quality product over a period of time are best, she says. For instance, kids might learn math and science by building a boat or practice art and leadership by putting on a play or musical. Staffing. You’re looking for more than a babysitter. Staff members should be professionals with bona fide skills and experience. Programs with strong community connections usually have the best resources, Hill says. Kids may get to work with artists, scientists, and athletes from local organizations, like museums and colleges. These opportunities expose kids to real-life role models. Movement. After-school sports show kids the value of practice and encourage persistence. But the benefits of exercise are even bigger. John Ratey, M.D., Associate Clinical Professor of Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and author of Spark: The Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain, prescribes exercise for kids with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity

OPEN HOUSE

September 14th • Family Day 2-5pm

4880 Buckanan Trail East

2-3pm Open Courts for Family Play Waynesboro, PA 17272 3-4pm Free Lesson/Clinics • 4-5pm Play with the Pros 717-762-3922 September 15th • Adult Day 2-5pm 2-3pm Open Court • 3-4pm Hit with the Pros • 4-5pm Pro Exhibition

FALL TENNIS PROGRAMS (Beginning September 21st) Tiny Tots • Quick Start • Level 1 Beginners • Level 1 Advanced Advance Beginners • Intermediate • Advanced Academy/Varsity • Adult Clinics Parent/Child Classes • Cardio • Fri/Sat/Sun Night Adult Mixed Leagues

WWW.TENNISCLUBOFPA.COM

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITE AT FOR A LISTING AND REGISTRATION FORMS OF ALL THE FALL PROGRAMS OFFERED

Voice, Acting and full-scale Musicals for Grades 1-8! inspire $ explore $ unite

www.actforall.org

AUTHENTIC COMMUNITY

301-491-7228

T H E AT R E Hagerstown, MD

continued on page 8

Circle of Life Cooperative Preschool

Holiquin Riding Center Waynesboro, PA • Located minutes from exit 1, PA I-81

Enrollment open for Fall 2013

Frederick, MD Green, organic, and very AP Friendly! Miss Sue is the sole director and she has over 10 years teaching experience!

Currently accepting enrollments for 3 to 5 year old children. 2 and 3 day programs available. Please call 301.473.7680 or email us at

circleoflife.preschool@yahoo.com to schedule your tour today!

www.childguidemagazine.com

•12 week lesson session for riders ages 7 to adult •Weekend Camp October 17th,18th & 19th •Girl Scout Merit Badges •Overnight and Day Summer Camps We offer top quality English Riding Instruction. Established in 1970, we have been creating and educating generations of area riders.

www.Holiquin.com Holiquin@comcast.net

717-762-9341

www.facebook.com/pages/Holiquin-Riding-Center/160185534159

Child Guide

September/October 2013

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Inwood Performing Arts

Choosing After-School Activities continued from page 7

Think Dance ...

Now Registering 304-229-3209 www.inwoodperformingarts.com Back to School never sounded so good! Instrument Demos and Show & Tell!

Children’s Music Classes

Created by Andrea Diggs and exclusively offered through Ellsworth Music! Join us for 45 minutes of interactive, imaginative musical fun. Children will be introduced to the basic elements of music through silliness and improvisation. (Oh, and instruments, too!)

Don’t wait! Rent band or orchestra instruments early for your music students.

Tuesdays or Fridays

September – May $45/month

Visit our website for more information

www.EllsworthMusicSupply.com

Strings Classes and Private Lessons

For more information or to register call 304-728-7060.

REPAIRS • RENTALS • SALES • LESSONS

217-6 Oak Lee Drive • Ranson, WV 304-728-7060 Page 8

September/October 2013

Disorder (and everyone else) because exercise boosts mood, improves learning and memory, and relieves stress. Being a jock is anything but dumb. Leadership. Extracurricular activities, including sports and clubs, are ideal places for kids to explore and practice what it means to be a group leader, says Kuczmarski. When kids take responsibility for organizing group work and producing results, they learn valuable social skills. Encourage your child to take on leadership roles whenever possible. Logistics. Rather than causing burnout, afterschool activities can provide balance to a class schedule that is overly academic, Kuczmarski says, if locations and timing fit your lifestyle. It’s okay to keep kids busy, but avoid signing on to so many programs that you’ll be scrambling from one to the next. Pay attention to cost as well. Good programs don’t necessarily cost big bucks. Many quality programs receive funding from grants and community partnerships. As you weigh the options, keep in mind this goal: You want your child to be a well-rounded citizen and a healthy, happy person, says Hill. After-school activities can provide enrichment, adventure and variety. They shouldn’t be driven by high-stakes testing and they shouldn’t be box-fillers for college applications. Kids don’t want to participate in programs that are just more school after school. Innovative programs promote learning without rote or repetition. If you can’t find quality after-school activities near you, contact your school district to advocate for programs you’d like to see. Out-of-school shouldn’t mean out-of-opportunities. Heidi Smith Luedtke, is a personality psychologist and Virginia mom of two adventurous kids. She is the author of Detachment Parenting. Learn more at HeidiLuedtke.com

Child Guide

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Proceed with Caution ...

September is Child Safety Month BY

ELISA TAUB

momready.com - tips and topics for busy parents

Sept 15-21 is National Child Safety Seat Check Week e couldn’t let this month go by without acknowledging that September is Child Safety Month. Although most of us are pretty vigilant about keeping abreast of the latest safety features available, here are a few “momready” tips you may not have thought of.

W

Car Safety: Did you know that in some states the law requires a child to be in a booster seat until they are 8 years old or 80 lbs? Each state has its own laws, so not only do you need to check periodically for the law in your particular state, but you must also check the laws of those states you will be traveling in. To find the rules in the various states, visit elitecarseats.com/ child-car-seat-laws-state/ Although most parents do purchase a car seat, the installation is not always done properly. You may not know that there are thousands of trained inspectors across the country who can tell you whether your car and booster seats are installed properly. To find the one near you, visit www.seatcheck.org or call the toll-free hotline 866-SEAT-CHECK. After any car accident, you must replace your car seat, because the safety foam and materials which cushion your child during the actual impact will have shifted. In fact, most car insurance companies will pay for a new car seat. If yours doesn’t, insist that they do.

Home Safety: A slammed door can mean a trip to the emergency room or even a lost finger, so to prevent this needless accident. Simply throw a folded towel over the top of heavily trafficked doors (so they can no longer close all the way) thereby eliminating injury to little fingers. www.childguidemagazine.com

We can’t tell you how many people we asked do not have a fire extinguisher in their house, or they have one but it’s old. I can’t say it enough — you must have an updated fire extinguisher in your home. I say updated because believe it or not they have expiration dates on them. For those times when the cleaning supplies are out and in use, make sure that they are in their original, labeled containers and have safety caps to keep them away from little hands. They actually sell sets of safety caps to fit all different sizes of cleaning fluid. A good thing to have on hand. When putting safety latches on cabinets containing possibly poisonous, dangerous items (hydrogen peroxide, cleaning fluids, bug repellants, etc.) use TWO latches instead of one. Even the craftiest toddler won’t have the motor skills yet to hold down both at once, keeping him safe from possible poisoning. Secure all bookcases, cabinets and tall dressers to the wall using anti-tip furniture safety straps. Whether by earthquake or tipped by your kids, this is not a risk you want to take. Never hang pictures, shelves or anything over your child’s bed you aren’t willing to have fall on him. This means only fabric and foam items are acceptable.

Water Safety: To prevent soaped up babies from slipping out of your hands during bathtime, wear washcloth mitts available at most baby superstores. If you can’t find them, just hold baby using two washcloths over your hands. The texture of the cloth keeps baby from slipping. Prevent bathtub and shower falls by affixing non-slip adhesive decals or strips

Child Guide

to the bottom of the tub. We’re not talking about the daisy decals of years past. Today they make the decals in all sorts of kid friendly shapes and colors. www.inventiveparent.com Set your water heater to between 120°125°F, to prevent accidental burns from water you don’t realize is that hot, or from toddlers who play with the faucets. Place a soft, insulated cover over the bathtub faucet to prevent accidental burns or bumps. Using a bath seat or ring which adheres to the bottom of the tub with suction cups offers infants and toddlers support while sitting. But don’t be lulled into thinking that you can turn your back, for even a second. The suction cups can come loose causing the seat to tip under water, and it’s easy for an unattended child to slide out of the seat. We all know how dangerous it is to leave children unattended in the pool, but did you know that a child can drown in three inches of water? We’re talking even a bucket of water. Unfortunately this has become a proven fact. We know it’s been said, but we’ll say it again... NEVER leave your child unattended near any body of water, no matter how shallow. We have only mentioned a few safety issues to heighten your awareness. There are many resources available to enlighten you about new products on the market and about child safety concerns. Here are just a few which we found helpful.

www.safekids.org www.nhtsa.dot.gov www.jpma.org www.cpsc.gov www.burnprevention.org September/October 2013

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Mastering the Basics Make sure your student is prepared for higher level math. BY DENNIS SANDALA

4x1=4 4x2=8 M

4 x 3 = 12 4 x 4 = 16

aking the jump from elementary math to middle school math can be daunting, even for the best students. You can help your student prepare by recognizing that all math – elementary, middle school and even advanced – is really just a combination of the basic skills of adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing. Mastering these basic skills allows your student to not only solve more complex problems, but also to more easily understand and learn why complex problems are solved as they are. Of these four operations, multiplication is by far the least mastered and yet the most used. Five years ago I made the switch from computer systems development to teaching sixth grade math. In my first class, I figured we’d start slowly and so I put a simple multiplication problem on the board: 8 x 19. It was my first experience with a class full of students who started wigglin’ their fingers as they were about to solve multiplication. To be honest, I wasn’t sure whether my entire class had lapsed into an epileptic fit or if this was a new generation’s way of hiding the old one finger salute. They showed me the math trick they were using with their fingers. Much like drawings of cans with apples in them, this may be a great tool to help learn the basic multiplication facts, but as one moves into higher math, mastery is required! I liken it to spending valuable brain power recalculating every time versus just storing the answer in your brain and accessing it when you need it. Without having the basic math facts locked in their brains, more complex operations introduced in middle school math are difficult to understand. Consider fraction multiplication: it really just boils down to multiplying the numerators (that would be the top number) and multiplying the denominators (the bottom). If one has the multiplication facts mastered, Page 10

September/October 2013

after the first two examples on the board, one easily picks up on the steps. On the other hand, if one is spending the time trying to figure out why 3 x 4 = 12, then the steps of the more advanced topic are lost. So just what is “mastery”? Can your student respond with an answer to any multiplication fact for one to ten in two seconds? If not, then it is likely your student is recalculating rather than retrieving the answer from memory. If your child is moving to middle school next year and they didn’t pass the two-second test, you still have plenty of time to help them. Two straight-forward, no gimmicks techniques will get your student ready. First, purchase a pad of half-inch by half-inch graph paper. Daily, have your child create a 10 x 10 multiplication table. It will take some time at first but by the first day of school they will be able to create their own multiplication table in two to three minutes. Second, use the Internet to practice daily. My preferred site is www.mathsisfun.com/numbers/math-trainermultiply.html. Start with 1 x 1 to 5 x 5 level and have your child practice two or three sessions of three minutes each every day. When they are able to solve 100 problems correctly in three minutes, they may move to the next level. With this simple, 15- to 20-minute routine, your student will enter middle school ready to tackle the more complex math that awaits them. The best thing about mastering multiplication facts is that once done, your student gets their division facts “for free.” It’s tough to find anything out there for free anymore! Dennis Sandala teaches sixth grade Math at JohnsonWilliams Middle School in Clarke County, Va. He started teaching five years ago after 25 years as a Computer Systems Engineer and brings many real-world experiences from his various professional projects into the classroom.

Child Guide

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Stuttering BY JAMIE LOBER If your child stutters, do not panic. “It is not uncommon for kiddos between the ages of two and four to develop some stuttering which is usually the result of a rapid expansion of language and their actual motor planning or speech capabilities lag a bit behind,” said Kymberli Dixon, speech therapist with Meritus Health in Hagerstown. This is referred to as developmental dysfluency and does not always require the intervention of a speech therapist. “We want to look at speech and language, what is going on in their environment and their temperament because some kids are dysfluent and it does not bother them while for others it bugs them,” said Dixon. Consider whether you have a family history of stuttering. “Most kids that have a persistent stutter into childhood or adulthood have a genetic link or at least another family member somewhere in the family who stuttered at one point,” said Dixon. There are a range of factors that can have an impact like language abilities and how well the child can formulate a message and motor abilities like how capable he is of producing rapid and precise speech. It is important to see how the child reacts to his disruptions in speech. Sometimes you may want a second opinion. “The purpose of therapy would be to determine if the child is having persistent dysfluency and if he is having negative reactions to it, you may want to minimize any negative environmental interactions or manipulate the environment so there is less emphasis put on fluent speech and you help the child communicate effectively,” said Dixon. Stuttering lasts longer for some people than others. “If it is a developmental dysfluency it will probably resolve on its own but if it is chronic stuttering, then you usually need some type of intervention for that,” said Dixon. The goal of therapy is not to cure stuttering but to help the child stutter more easily and reduce negative reactions. “Often the stuttering is worsened by increased anxiety or worry about stuttering,” said Dixon. Remind your child that everyone is dysfluent at one time or another. “We are not 100 percent fluent all the time. You can empower your child, so he can teach other people about stuttering or dysfluency, and that it is okay,” said Dixon. Use an analogy. “Have the child teach friends or classmates that the speech machine produces speech and sometimes words can get stuck. That way there is not as much stigma attached if people understand,” said Dixon. Follow some handy tips. “Use a smooth, relaxed rate when talking to your child; use simple, short sentences and pause slightly before you respond; and make sure you take the time to listen to what your child is saying without interrupting or finishing sentences for him,” said Dixon. Reinforce that it is okay to stutter and that your child should take his time. It does not make him lesser than his peers. “It has nothing to do with cognitive level. With strategies and support from family, classroom, speech therapist and community, these kids usually do fine and can certainly be successful,” said Dixon. © 2013 Jamie Lober

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Dyslexia BY JAMIE LOBER ost people have heard of dyslexia but they may be unsure as to how it affects folks in the community. “It is a specific learning disability that is neurological in origin, characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities,” said Ben Shifrin, head of school at Jemicy School in Owings Mills. People with dyslexia have strengths and weaknesses just like everyone else. “The difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction,” said Shifrin.

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There are some secondary consequences to dyslexia. “You can have problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede the growth of vocabulary and background knowledge and you may also have trouble with reading, writing, spelling and/or math,” said Shifrin. With a little extra support, there is no reason to feel discouraged. “Individuals with dyslexia can learn but often need specialized instruction to overcome the problem,” said Shifrin. It is possible to have dyslexia and still do well. “Often these individuals who have talented and productive minds are said to have a language learning difference,” said Shifrin. A key message is that early detection is the key. “A person with dyslexia usually has several characteristics that persist over time

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If you think you have dyslexia, you are not alone. “Perhaps as many as fifteen to twenty percent of the population as a whole have some of the symptoms of dyslexia, including slow or inaccurate reading, poor spelling, poor writing or mixing up similar words,” said Shifrin. This group includes people of all backgrounds and intellectual levels. “They are often capable or even gifted in areas such as art, computer science, design, drama, electronics, math, mechanics, music, physics, sales and sports,” said Shifrin. Dyslexia cannot be cured, but it can definitely be managed. Typically people seek help from a teacher, tutor or therapist who is specially trained in using a multisensory, structured language approach. The one-on-one help can be beneficial because it allows the person to make progress at their own pace. Schools can also make accommodations like giving extra time to complete tasks, offering help with taking notes or providing books to listen to on tape. “Proper instruction promotes reading success and alleviates many difficulties associated with dyslexia,” said Shifrin. © 2013 Jamie Lober

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and interfere with learning like being late learning to talk, having difficulty pronouncing words, difficulty acquiring vocabulary or using age-appropriate grammar, difficulty following directions, difficulty with word retrieval or naming problems, difficulty identifying or generating rhyming words or counting syllables in words, difficulty with hearing and manipulating sounds in words, difficulty distinguishing sounds in words, difficulty in learning the sounds of letters and misreading or omitting common short words,” said Shifrin. Written language can be a struggle as well. “You may have difficulty putting ideas on paper, make many spelling mistakes or you may do well on weekly spelling tests but may have many spelling mistakes in daily work,” said Shifrin.

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Navigating Special Education in the School Setting: What Parents Need To Know BY: NICOLE M. SERGENT, MPT re you a visual learner or auditory learner? Do you learn best by actually doing? Do you need a quiet room to retain what you are reading? Each one of us learns in unique ways. Many good teachers recognize learning styles, strengths and challenges and accommodate the children within their classrooms. But what happens when simple modifications aren’t enough? Some children need additional supports and services to make the educational experience a positive one. And while learning about and implementing those services can seem very intimidating for parents, the process does not have to be.

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Students 3 years of age and older that need supports and services in the public school setting receive them under Part B of the Individual’s With Disabilities Act (IDEA). This is a Federal Law that ensures special education services. If you are having concerns that typical classroom strategies are not meeting your child’s needs, speak to his/her teacher early. Sometimes, simple changes to a daily routine (such as changing seat location or providing a check list to stay on task) can make a huge difference. If simple changes are not adequate, you or your child’s teacher may request testing to further identify strengths and challenges. The results of testing are reviewed at an eligibility meeting, usually held at the school, with parents, teachers, and other professionals (therapists, coordinators, etc.) in attendance. If your child is found eligible for special education services, you can consent to move forward with an Individualized Education Plan or IEP. Parents, teachers and others who have knowledge of your child’s specific needs – such as therapists, nurses, psychologists and other professionals – help create the IEP. You can invite others who know your child well and might help with the process. An IEP is a legally-binding document that includes specific goals for your child, services and frequency of those services to support goals and any additional materials needed to support your child (examples include special classroom materials, customized seating or communication devices). The IEP serves as the “map” to guide your child through the educational journey. It must be reviewed yearly, but can be reviewed more frequently per your

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request as your child changes, progresses or new challenges arise. It is important that parents understand IDEA and their child’s rights under it. Seek out the assistance of an IEP advocate (counties hire these individuals) and ask to schedule a meeting to learn more and review policies that protect your rights. Each state develops a policy that outlines procedures for defining child find (how the state finds children that need to be tested), eligibility and services as well as outlining parents’ rights and responsibilities. Refer to your own state’s Department of Education for more information on your specific policy or for support on learning more about individuals and organizations that serve to support parents through special education. It is also important to understand that the IEP serves to meet your child’s EDUCATIONAL needs versus MEDICAL needs. For example, if a child with Cerebral Palsy has tight hamstrings and an atypical walking pattern but can get around the classroom efficiently and safely, he/she would benefit from physical therapy, but would be served in a therapy clinic versus a school setting in most cases. Someone who knows both sides of the special education world in the public school arena is Tracey Parks. Parks is a 5th grade teacher at Tomahawk Intermediate School in Hedgesville, WV. While she has taught students of all learning styles and abilities for 18 years, she has first-hand experience being a parent navigating the IEP process with her 9-year-old daughter Jordyn. She offers these wonderful tips to parents: I COMMUNICATION IS KEY: Communication early and often. Request a meeting with all teachers who will be interacting with your child very early in the year

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Navigating Special Education in the School Setting: What Parents Need To Know continued from page 13

(before the first conference) to share what works best for your child. Use a simple communication journal (could even be on a number system, such as 1= good day). Teachers have little time to write daily lengthy notes, but sharing simple information daily can be helpful to both parent and teacher. Parents might also consider sharing important things daily such as deviations to sleep routines, digestive issues, changes at home or illnesses as they might impact the child’s day. I YOUR CHILD NEEDS YOU TO SHOW UP: IEP meetings are your chance to learn about your child from the people who spend hours with him/her! Make arrangements if possible to be there

so that you can listen and learn, share your opinion and ideas, and brainstorm as part of the team. Your participation shows your child’s team that you are sincere about working with them for the benefit of your child. If you can’t attend in person, request a phone conference. I ASK QUESTIONS/MAKE SUGGESTIONS: Don’t be afraid to ask questions regarding your child’s education. A good teacher should be willing to take the time to explain and answer. An example is asking for a second set of books so you can help your child at home. If you know of something that benefits your child at home or in other settings, such as during private therapies, don’t hesitate to share with your child’s team. I BE PATIENT & POSITIVE: Remember that teachers are responsible for many children besides yours. While your concern or question may be incredibly

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Tracey and Jordyn Parks on the First Day of School – both ready for a successful year!

important to you, try to allow reasonable time for the teacher to respond. Go into meetings or conversations with a positive attitude. Your disposition can be contagious and can make these exchanges more productive and pleasant for both you and the teacher. It is important for the success of each child that parents and professionals work together on common goals. Successful IEPs do just that. While the process might seem daunting at first, it is important to remember that there are many people who care about your child and want to support you. Seek out their experience and help, lean on parents with similar experience, and keep yourself focused on your priority – your child learning successfully! Nicole M. Sergent, MPT is a pediatric Physical Therapist for the West Virginia Birth To Three Program and co-owner of Milestones & Miracles, LLC. She loves seeing her former patients succeed in the school environment.

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Berkeley Medical Center

Pediatric Rehabilitation Physical Therapy • Occupational Therapy • Speech Therapy Berkeley Medical Center’s Pediatric Rehabilitation offers a variety of therapy services for children in the Eastern Panhandle. Once a physician recommends therapy for your child, an evaluation will be made to review your child’s case history and discuss your concerns. Common diagnoses seen include developmental delay, cerebral palsy, sensory integration disorders, autism spectrum disorders, feeding or eating disorders, fine and gross motor delays, perpetual motor disturbances, torticollis, Down’s syndrome, spinal cord and traumatic brain injury, spina bifida, dysphagia, stuttering, cognitive and social skills delays, and alternative communication needs.

Physical Therapy: Pediatric physical therapy assists in early detection of health problems and uses a wide variety of treatment options to manage disorders. We treat infants, children, and adolescents with a variety of congenital, developmental, neuromuscular, skeletal or acquired disorders and diseases. Treatments focus on improving gross and fine motor skills, balance and coordination, strength and endurance as well as cognitive and sensory processing integration.

Occupational Therapy: Pediatric occupational therapy (OT) is a health-care profession in which intervention and treatment is provided to individuals from infancy to adolescents. Occupational Therapy is a form of intervention in which the therapist and

child work together to develop or improve the necessary skills for daily living through activity and “play” – the child’s main “occupation.” Occupational Therapy can target skills needed for coordination, school readiness and performance, self-care help such as self-feeding, dressing and grooming, focus and attention, play or social interaction, eye-hand coordination, regulatory behaviors, motor planning, and strengthening to assist functional performance with daily tasks.

Speech Therapy: A speech language pathologist (SLP) evaluates and provides treatment for children with speech, language and feeding disorders. Although people often think of speech and language as the same thing, the terms actually have very different meanings. If your child has trouble with speech, he/she struggles with the coordination of the muscle movements necessary to produce speech. If your child has trouble with language, he/she struggles with understanding and producing appropriate communication. SLPs also help children understand and use social and non-verbal language. Our SLPs are also experts in issues with feeding (chewing/swallowing), food selectivity, and breastfeeding. If your child has been referred for one of these therapys, give Berkeley Medical Center’s Pediatric Rehabilitation unit a call at 304-261-1214 for further information.

Dorothy McCormack Center, 2000 Foundation Way, Martinsburg, WV 25401

304-264-1214 www.childguidemagazine.com

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Special Needs Resources For additional resources, refer to pages 26 & 28 of Child Guide’s Annual Family Resource Guide, online at www.issuu.com/childguidemagazine.

Autism Spectrum/Asperger’s Washington County Infants and Toddlers 1350 Marshall Street, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-766-8217 Washington County Chapter of the Autism Society of America, 1801 Elizabeth Court, Hagerstown MD • 240-420-3692 • www.autismspeaks.org Providing Relief for Autistic Youth Inc. P.O. BOX 275, Williamsport, MD 21795-0275 • 240-310-9112 • www.prayinwesternmd.org

Blind/Vision Impaired, Developmental Eye Therapy Davis Vision Therapy, Winchester Office 115 Creekside Lane, Winchester, VA 22602 703-468-8310 • www.davisvisiontherapy.com. See ad on page 12. WV Schools for the Deaf & Blind 301 East Main Street, Romney, WV 26757 • 304-822-4800 • wvsdb2.state.k12.wv.us Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind 514 East Beverley Street, P.O. Box 2069, Staunton, Virginia 24402 vsdb.k12.va.us

Child Care A Special Space, Inc., 27 Mudfort Drive, Harpers Ferry, WV 25425 • 240-439-0171 • www.aspecialspace.org Building Blocks, 879 Commonwealth Ave., #7, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-797-5122 Children’s Services of Virginia (CSV), P.O. Box 2867, Winchester, VA 22604 • 540-667-0116 • www.childrensservicesofva.com Maryland Family Network: Children With Special Needs, 1001 Eastern Avenue, 2nd Floor, Baltimore, MD 21202-4325 • 410-659-770 • www.mdchildcare.org

Deaf/Hard of Hearing WV Schools for the Deaf & Blind, 301 East Main Street, Romney, WV 26757 • 304-822-4800 • wvsdb2.state.k12.wv.us Virginia School for the Deaf and the Blind, 514 East Beverley Street. P.O. Box 2069, Staunton, VA 24402 • vsdb.k12.va.us Maryland School for the Deaf P.O. Box 250, 101 Clarke Place, Frederick, MD 21705-0250 • www.msd.edu. See ad on page 14. The Pennsylvania School for the Deaf 100 West School House Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19144 • 215-951-4700 • www.psd.org The Western Pennsylvania School for the Deaf 300 East Swissvale Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 152181469 • 412-371-7000 • www.wpsd.org United Cerebral Palsy Of South Central PA., INC. 788 Cherry Tree Court, Hanover, PA 17331 717-632-5552 • ucpsouthcentral.org

Developmental Delays & Disabilities/

Special Education Programs Berkeley County, WV. Parent Educator Resource Center 515 W. Martin St., Martinsburg, WV 25401 304-263-5717

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Broadfording Christian Academy HOPE Program 13535 Broadfording Church Rd., Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-797-8886 • www.broadfording.com The Developmental Disabilities Administration (DDA) - Western Maryland Regional Office 1360 Marshall Street, Hagerstown, MD 21740 301-791-4670 • www.ddamaryland.org/WMRO Eukarya Academy 915 South Cameron St., Winchester, VA 22601 540-722-5089 • eukaryaacademy.com Family Service Foundation 610 Bowers Road, Suite A , Frederick, MD 21702 • 240-490-7101 • www.fsfinc.org Frederick County Infants and Toddlers 350 Montevue Lane, Frederick, MD 21702 301-649-1612 frederickcountymd.gov/index.aspx?NID=2498 Grafton Berryville (boys with learning disabilities) P.O. Box 112, Berryville, VA 22611 • 540-9552400 • www.grafton.org. See ad on page 17. Infant & Toddler Connection of Shenandoah Valley, P.O. Box 547, Front Royal, VA 22630 540-635-2452 • www.itcshenvalley.org Jefferson County, WV – Parent Educator Resource Center, on the campus of Page Jackson Elementary School, 370 Page-Jackson School Road, Charles Town, WV 25414 • 304-725-6473 Kennedy Krieger Institute-Montgomery County (autism and related disorders) 12301 Academy Way, Rockville, MD 20852 443-923-4170 • www.kennedykrieger.org RESA VIII Child Development Services 109 S. College Street, Martinsburg, WV 25401 304-267-3595 • Toll Free: 1-866-681-4957 Serves: Berkeley, Grant, Hampshire, Hardy, Jefferson, Mineral, Morgan, Pendleton Washington County Human Development Council, Inc., 433 Brewer Avenue, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-791-5421 • www.wchdc.org Washington County Infants & Toddlers Early Intervention, 1350 Marshall Street , Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301-766-8217 • www.wcps.k12.md.u WV Birth to Three 350 Capitol Street, Room 427, Charleston, WV 25301-3714 • 304-558-5388 • www.wvdhhr.org/birth23

Home Health Care/Respite Care Care Helpers In-home Provider Services (C.H.I.P.S.). 301-739-7169. www.chips4me.com. See ad on page 14.

Mental Health/Behavioral Counseling Brook Lane Health Services 13218 Brook Lane Drive, P.O. Box 1945, Hagerstown, MD 21742 • 301-733-0330 www.brooklane.org IBMP - Intensive Behavior Management Program 827 Marion Street, Hagerstown MD 21740 301-791-9580 • Email: wcarcbmp@erols.com The Mental Health Center of Western MD, Inc. 1180 Professional Court, Hagerstown, MD 21740 301-791-3045 • www.thementalhealthcenter.net Monocacy Neurodevelopmental Center 65 Thomas Johnson Drive, Suite A, Frederick, MD 21702 • 301-662-3808 www.monocacycenter.com

Pediatric and Adolescent Therapy Physical, Occupational & Speech Amber Hill Physical Therapy 187 Thomas Johnson Dr., Suite 6, Frederick, MD 21702 – Additional locations in Urbana,

Child Guide

Damascus, Jefferson and Thurmont 301-663-1157 • www.amberhillpt.com Essence of Play Therapy Center 2400 Valley Avenue, Suite #9, Winchester, VA 540-678-8568 • www.eoptherapy.com Pediatric Rehabilitation – Speech, Occupational & Physical Therapy at Berkeley Medical Center’s Dorothy McCormack Center, 2000 Foundation Way, Martinsburg, WV 25401 • 304-264-1214 See ad on page 15.

Products 1-2-3 Just PLAY With Me Milestones and Miracles www.milestonesandmiracles.com Email milestonesandmiracles@gmail.com See ad on page 12. Twooth-Timer The Twooth Timer Company, Inc. 6825 Levelland Road, Suite 5A, Dallas, TX 75252. Toll Free 855-TWOOTH2 • www.twoothtimer.com

Recreation Martinsburg-Berkeley Co. Parks & Recreation 273 Woodbury Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25404 304-264-4842 • www.mbcparks-rec.org Flip Over Gymnastics Open gym for special needs families on Fridays from 4:30-5:30 p.m. $5/child & $3/siblings. Martinsburg-Berkeley Co. Parks & Recreation 273 Woodbury Avenue, Martinsburg, WV 25404 304-264-4842 ext. 13 • www.mbcparks-rec.org Monkey Joe’s – Hagerstown 1113 Maryland Ave., Hagerstown, MD 21740 301-797-7716 www.monkeyjoes.com/Hagerstown Monkey Joe’s – Winchester 141 Market Street, Winchester, VA 22603-4750 540- 662-5221 www.monkeyjoes.com/Winchester

Support Groups Special Needs Support Group 3920 Star Hill Road, Greencastle Pa 17225 717-597-4681 • www.pafamiliesinc.com Pennsylvania Family Support Alliance 42 Black Avenue, Chambersburg, PA 17201 717-263-7707 • www.pafamiliesinc.com PA Playgroup (Parent Support Group and Playgroup) in Greencastle, PA - Serving families is Franklin County, PA and Washington County, MD. Contact Erin Betts: ebetts@pa.net, 717/597-7572. Find us on Facebook

Therapeutic Riding Blue Ridge Center for Therapeutic Horsemanship, 420 Russell Road, Berryville, VA 22611 • 540837-1575 • www.brcth.org Franklin County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Center 181 Franklin Farm Lane, Chambersburg, PA 17202 • 717-263-0443 • www.horseridingtherapy.org Frederick County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program, 11515 Angleberger Road Thurmont, MD 21788 • 301-898-3587 fc4htrp@aol.com • www.fc4htrp.org Horses with Hearts P.O. Box 2186, Martinsburg, WV 25302 • 304-283-8071 • horseswithhearts@yahoo.com www.horseswithhearts.com Ponies & Promises Therapeutic Riding Program Held at Shotwell Farm Indoor Arena in Charles Town, WV www.dubblerfarm.com/poniespromises.html Star Community, Inc. 13757 Broadfording Church Road, Hagerstown, MD 21740 • 301- 791–0011 • www.starcommunityinc.org. See ad on page xx.

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Child Guide Readers Giveaways ... Special Needs Books Enter online at www.childguidemagazine.com/giveaways or use form on page 4.

Autism on the Farm by Linda H. Davis A heartwarming and inspiring new non-fiction story of triumph, possibility, and a place called Bittersweet A free Kindle version is available to the first five Child Guide readers who send an email to editor@miniverpress.com Bittersweet is a small farming community for adults with autism. Overseen and taken care of by trained volunteers, residents find ways to find safe and meaningful experiences through farm work. This book tells the stories of several residents of Bittersweet, tracing their journeys from early years and family dynamics to the discovery of Bittersweet, where staff help them find a place to be and activities they can participate in and enjoy. It also chronicles the struggles of the families and of Bittersweet itself.. Designed to be a safe and supportive space, Bittersweet works to cater to the residents’ needs and find ways to grant them enjoyable and productive experiences. With careful attention, Bittersweet staff work to redirect problematic impulses in the residents to safer and more productive outlets more effectively than many traditional programs. Facing difficulties and obstacles both new and old with patience and diligence, Bittersweet perseveres in maintaining a solid and welcoming community. In touch with the natural world and allowed to work in a way that best suits their needs and abilities, these

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adults with autism can flourish. Linda H. Davis is the author, whose most recent book is “Charles Addams: A Cartoonist’s Life”. She is president of the nonprofit SAGE Crossing Foundation and is the mother of an autistic son. Miniver Press is a publisher specializing in lively and informative ebooks and print books about pop culture, history, law, sports, and entertainment.

Don’t Count Me Out! A Guide to Better Grades and Test Scores Pre K-12th Making Winners Out of Struggling Students despite Dyslexia, ADD/ADHD, or Educational Difficultes by Barbara Dianis, MA ED www.dianiseducation.com Don’t Count Me Out! can help your struggling student throughout the years from kindergarten to college! Dianis, diagnosed at an early age with dyslexia herself, overcame obstacles to become the powerful person that she is today. Now founder and CEO of Dianis Educational Systems she concentrates her over 20 years experience with learning disabled children and teenagers into this guide for parents, helping kids unlock their academic potential. Don’t Count Me Out! reveals: • A grade-by-grade guide to helping your learning disabled child or teenager with new obstacles • Proven learning strategies for students with dyslexia, as well as ADD, ADHD, and other learning disabilities • How we can restore “academic self-esteem” to our children • The important roles that parents and teachers play in shaping a student’s success • Tips for making learning fun, engaging, and effective

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Finding Your Best Bet Pet BY

hen Erica Galligan’s children were young, her family tried adopting a dog. But allergy issues forced her family to return their pet to the breeder. Over time they found other alternatives, starting with a saltwater aquarium for their whole family and gradually adding freshwater fish and a tree frog for their sons. “I figured an aquarium was easy, low-maintenance, and fun to look at,” Galligan explains about their next step into pet ownership. According to the America Veterinary Medical Association, 56% of U.S. households include a pet. But if yours isn’t among them yet, how do you find the right one? Here are five factors to consider and a few tips for easing into pet ownership:

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Amount of care and energy Different types of pets require varying levels of commitment. Consider how much time you have available each day to care for a pet. Are you willing to walk a dog? Do you want to be regularly cleaning a hamster cage? Can you give a younger pet the extra attention they will require? How will you manage that puppy when it’s full grown? Sarah Collins, Adoption Team Leader for the Wisconsin Humane Society advises, “Be honest about what you can handle. And remember that responsibilities will ultimately fall on the parents.” Aquarium pets, such as fish and dwarf frogs, require the least care. Next come tank- and cage-kept pets: Page 18

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snails, hermit crabs, birds, reptiles, rodents and rabbits. And then cats. Aside from horses, dogs can be the most time-consuming pets, with some breeds needing large amounts of exercise. Recognizing the energy level of a dog before bringing it home can prevent any surprises related to care and exercise. Puppies particularly require attention, even if they have been housebroken. “The rule of thumb is to allow one hour for their age in months, plus one,” Collins says, explaining how long a puppy can wait before being let out. For example, a two-month-old puppy would have to be walked every three hours, day and night. Knowing how much time you can invest in a pet may help to narrow your options.

L ARA K RUPICKA

Discuss how much work they’re willing to assume and explain what will be necessary for different pets. Bridget Cahill drafted a contract with her three daughters before allowing them to purchase a tortoise. Then each girl signed the contract, agreeing to the responsibilities and consequences they’d outlined together. “It did say on the contract, ‘I will not throw a fit when you ask me to feed Nelly. I will do it lovingly and happily,’ ” she says.

Your Lifestyle

It's easy to think a dog or cat would be fun to own – until you're planning a trip and need to find a place for the pet to stay while you're gone. If you travel often, this can quickly become a hassle. “It's pretty easy to put a 10-day feeder in an aquarium,” notes Ages of kids and level of Galligan. Which makes fish a terrific responsibility option for families who are away Introducing a new pet into a home from home frequently. with very young children can be a For a busy family on the go, cats, challenge – for both the pet and the rabbits, guinea pigs or other child. Toddlers don’t have the independent pets work well. capacity to understand appropriate handling of animals and their quick Space motions can startle or scare pets. If It’s not necessary to have a fenced you’re ready to bring home an animal back yard – or any yard at all – to while your children are young, make own a dog. But you should have in sure to consult pet store or humane mind places to walk the dog and play society staff to find a pet whose with it. A small aquarium can go in a personality melds well with active bedroom, like the freshwater fish tank youngsters. one of Galligan’s sons keeps in his If your children are older, taking room. A litter box can be kept in a responsibility becomes more of an laundry room or basement, as long as issue. Often kids want a pet without the cat has access. continued on page 20 understanding the care involved.

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Tips to Easing Into Ownership If you've thought through these five factors but still need more reassurances to be confident in choosing a pet, consider trying one or more of the following:

Research Galligan's son developed an interest in freshwater fish before having his own aquarium. He read books from the library. He visited the pet store to investigate varieties. He learned all he could before convincing his parents to buy a freshwater aquarium. Besides books and store staff, it can help to also speak to someone who owns a pet like the one you are considering. Cahill talked with a friend who owns a turtle before letting her daughters buy the tortoise.

Pet sitting The Cahills also had extensive experience caring for a variety of animals before they brought home their own pet. They watched friends' fish, hamsters, several cats, hermit crabs and a number of dogs. And they used each of those experiences as an opportunity to talk about pet ownership. "It's totally different to have the animal every day," Cahill notes. "It makes them see that it's constant. There are certain things you have to do everyday." She recommends having a child take on a pet sitting responsibility, even if it means simply going to a house to feed a pet or let a dog out for one day.

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Start simple Not all pets are created equal. Which means you can choose to start with a low-maintenance pet to allow your children to learn responsibility before moving up to a bigger commitment. Cahill agrees. "I thought the tortoise would be great to ease in. The girls still clean and feed her and walk her in the summer." Collins also recommends guinea pigs for families new to pet ownership. "They're easy to hold and not as hard to take care of."

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Calling all creative and pet-loving kids! Pets Add Life (PAL) is accepting poems for the 5th Annual Pets Add Life Children’s Poetry Contest beginning Sept. 1, 2013 through Jan. 31, 2014. Students in grades 3rd-8th are invited to write a unique poem about their pets, what they love about them and the joys they bring to their lives, and submit online at www.PetsAddLife.org, via Facebook at Facebook.com/PetsAddLife or mail their final poem and submission form to: Pets Add Life, 661 Sierra Rose Dr., Reno, NV 89511. Deadline for submissions is January 31, 2014 at 5pm EST. One student from each grade level (6 total) nationwide will win a $250 gift certificate for pet products, and a “by-line” in a nationally circulated publication or online outlet. In addition, the six winning students’ classrooms will each win a $1,000 scholarship to spend on petrelated education. To learn more about the Pets Add Life Children’s Poetry Contest, read previous winning poems, upload submissions beginning Sept. 1, or download a printed submission form, please visit www.petsaddlife.org. www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

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Finding Your Best Bet Pet, continued from page 19 Collins says, “If you have a small house or yard... you just have to be able to accommodate your pet’s needs.” It helps to think through placement of cages and other equipment before bringing a pet home. If you live in an apartment or condo, it is also important to check any rules that apply to pet ownership before bringing home any animal.

Allergies People can be allergic to dogs, cats, birds, and even guinea pigs. Reactions such as itchy eyes, runny noses, rashes and asthma, come from a protein in pet dander and saliva, and occur in 15 to 30 percent of allergy suffers (according to The Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America). Because the allergens stick to surfaces, such as clothing and walls, it’s important for those with pet allergies to avoid having the animals in their home, if possible. But this doesn’t mean families with allergies can’t have a pet. Reptiles and amphibians don’t create the allergy-causing protein and should be safe. Or choose a

October Is Adopt-A-Shelter-Dog Month! Visit your local ASPCA or Humane Society and be sure to look at private rescue groups online or on Facebook. Friends Fur Life Rescue is in the Panhandle and has local adoptions events in Martinsburg and Winchester. Go to www.friendsfurliferescue.com to learn more.

pet requiring more regular grooming, such as a poodle or poodle-mix dog. Also note that the smaller the pet, the less dander is created to activate allergies. Ask your allergist or a veterinarian for recommended pet breeds. Collins advises, “If you're not sure, get allergy tested by your doctor.” Whatever animal your family chooses, you will find many benefits and rewards from being pet owners. “It's a lot of fun,” says Galligan. “It’s great to for kids to grow up with the responsibility for someone other than themselves.” And given so many breeds and varieties out there, you’re sure to find a pet to fit your family. Lara Krupicka is a freelance writer and mom to three girls and one dog (and at various times, several beta fish and dwarf frogs).

Special Readers Giveaway for Dog Lovers! Enter online at www.childguidemagazine.com or use form on page 4.

Maggie the English Springer Spaniel and owner Mari Campbell are an inseparable duo that have rapidly captured the hearts of people around the world with the blog, MaggieMooseTracks.com. Campbell is delighted to announce the launch of her first book, MaggieMooseTracks®: Making Friends. Maggie is an English Springer Spaniel puppy with moose antlers who gets lost on the way to her new family. When Maggie’s lost in the woods...will Alfonso the alligator eat her? Or will the other dangers get her before she can find her new family? To accompany the book, Campbell recently announced that a line of Maggie merchandise is in the works, with plush toys to be available soon. With her unstoppable energy and life-changing outlook, we’re waiting to see what Maggie will get up to next! The next book – MaggieMooseTracks® Christmas Star – is due for release in September 2013. Watch for it in Child Guide’s holiday giveaway!

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Living Healthier

BY

SHARON ZOUMBARIS

Tick disease remains a threat s temperatures drop and the kids head back to school, it is important to remember the threat of Lyme disease is far from over. In fact, Lyme disease continues its steady march across the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic and North central United States and is a very real threat from March through November in a growing number of states, including West Virginia.

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While the disease has not been identified in all areas of the U.S., for those living in Maryland, Pennsylvania, Virginia and the Panhandle of West Virginia, Lyme disease is a growing problem. The disease has been recorded for years in great numbers in Maryland and Pennsylvania. Now, it is showing up in Virginia. And according to Dr. Danae Bixler, Physician Director for the Bureau for Public Health with the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources, Lyme disease is the most common tick-borne disease in West Virginia. She said, “Berkeley, Jefferson and Morgan Counties have been considered ‘endemic’ for Lyme disease for several years. Hampshire County was added based on last year’s data.” She suggested all West Virginians take tick precautions as the threat continues to grow. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released national yearly figures into the hundreds of thousands and the CDC suspects those numbers represent just 10 percent of the actual cases of the disease. Lyme disease is a bacterial infection caused by the tick known as the deer tick or blacklegged tick. The tick transfers a bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi through its bite. The good news is if a tick is properly removed it may not cause an infection. Dr. Bixler said the tick must be attached for at least 36 hours for transmission to take place and not every tick bite will cause Lyme disease. She added, “Most Lyme disease is probably transmitted by nymphs, which are much smaller and hard to see than adult ticks.”

If a rash develops that resembles a bull’s eye and comes with a fever, headache, fatigue, neck stiffness and joint pain, chances are good it is Lyme disease. Symptoms and the rash develop anywhere from three to 30 days after tick exposure. However, it can be tricky to diagnose, since only about 50 percent of people actually get the bull’s eye rash. Additionally, it can take up to six weeks to test positive for the disease from the original bite. So stay alert, early diagnosis and prevention offer the best outcomes for everyone. Sharon Zoumbaris is a librarian, freelance writer and author of several books dealing with health and nutrition. She lives with her family in Staunton, VA where they also run Geezer Farm, a small farm that produces organically-grown fruits and vegetables to sell at the Staunton Farmers Market.

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It is important for parents to check their children after they play outside, and to look in hidden areas such as belly buttons, behind knees and in hair as the ticks can easily hide. For older kids, it is important they learn to check themselves as well as have their parents check the areas they cannot see. Important ways to prevent tick bites include spraying clothes with insect repellants containing 20 to 50 percent DEET. Long pants, long sleeves and light colored clothing will help keep ticks off or make them easier to spot.

www.childguidemagazine.com

Child Guide

September/October 2013

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September/October 2013

Heads Up Through September 2 Families in Nature Holiday Weekend, Fort Frederick, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. Bring the entire family to explore the natural side of Fort Frederick State Park. Self-guided and staff-led outdoor nature activities for all interest levels. 301/842-2155. 55th Annual Steam Engine & Tractor Show, Williams Grove Steam Engine Show Grounds, Williams Grove Rd., Williams Grove, PA. Steam traction engines, old PRR steam train, antique tractors, working saw mill, model trail exhibit, food, and flea market stands. Admission. 717/766-4001.

Through September 29 Nineteenth Century American Art Exhibition, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org. American Decorative Arts Exhibition, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Exhibition examines the stories and histories of objects from the Museum’s outstanding collection of American decorative arts, and objects on loan from local collectors. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org. Mansion House Art Center Event, Mansion House Art Center, North Gallery, 501 Highland Way, Hagerstown City Park. Fri. & Sat., 11 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. “Harvest Colors.” All members show. 301/797-6813. www.valleyartassoc.com.

Through October Potomac Eagle Train Rides, Potomac Eagle Wappocomo Station, Route 28 North, Romney, WV. Every Sat. and some Sun. Classic club and coach seating available, open window coaches, open observation cars, café car, and more. See website for schedule. 304/424-0736. www.potomaceagle.info. South Mountain Creamery Tours, South Mountain Creamery, 8305 Bolivar Rd., Middletown, MD. Tours by appointment only. Tours offered Mon.-Fri., 10 am3:45 pm, weather permitting. Interactive tour covers all dairy operations and includes a scoop of ice cream and a goodie bag for kids. 301/371-8565. www.southmountaincreamery.com.

Through October 6 Outdoor Music Series at Pen Mar Park, 11400 Pen Mar High Rock Rd., Cascade, MD. Sunday, 2 p.m. Spend the afternoon dancing. Entertainment: The Holders (9/1), Fancy Brass (9/8), Variety (9/15), Détente (9/22), The Josh Tindall Combo (9/29), and The Bill Krantz Combo (10/6). Free. Donations welcome. 240/313-2700.

Through October 19 North Square Farmers Market, 50 N. Main St., Chambersburg. Saturday, 8 a.m.-12 noon. Local produce, foods, and artisan crafts. Live music and free kids’ activities. www.northsquarefarmersmarket.com.

Through October 27 Walkersville Southern Railroad Weekend Excursions, Walkersville Southern Railroad, 34 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Walkersville, MD. Sat. in Sept. and Sat. & Sun. in Oct., 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. departures. Ride in vintage 1920s passenger cars or an open flatcar

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September/October 2013

A look at what’s happening in the region

COMPILED BY SUZANNE HOVERMALE

as your rail excursion runs past a 100-year-old lime kiln and out into picturesque Maryland farm country. 301/898-0899. www.wsrr.org. Walking Tours of Historic Frederick, Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. Sun., 1:30 p.m.; 2nd & 4th Sat., 11 a.m. Experience the history and beauty of downtown as guides share fascinating stories of historic Frederick. $7, adults; $6, seniors; $5, children 12 & under. kbutler@frederickhistory.org. 301/663-1188, x105. www.hsfcinfo.org. Destination Arts! Main St., in and around Center Square, Waynesboro, PA. Fri., 5-8 p.m.; Sat., 11 a.m.6 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-4 p.m. Seven vacant buildings have been converted into full-fledged, curated art galleries, and art is also displayed in nine other storefronts. All the art is for sale, plus there is live music, special programs, children’s activities, literary readings, and more. Check website for more information and weekly schedules. www.ArtsAllianceGW.org. Hagerstown Corn Maze, Celebration Farm, 17638 Garden View Rd., Hagerstown. Fri., 5-10 p.m.; Sat., 12 noon-10 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m.; Sept. 2, 12 noon-6 p.m.; other days by appointment. 8-acre corn maze and pick-your-own pumpkin patch. Moonlight mazes on Fri. & Sat. Admission. 301/393-4377. www.hagerstowncornmaze.org.

Through November 3 Art Exhibition, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. Tues.-Fri, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Juried art exhibition that recognizes and celebrates the work of amateur and professional artists. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org.

Through November 17 The Students of Ski Holm, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Exhibition of artwork by the students of Ski Holm. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org. Works in Clay, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park, Virginia Ave. at Park Circle. Tues.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 1-5 p.m. Mary Bowron’s lifetime of creating works of art in clay will be featured in this exhibition. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org.

Through November 28 “Miracles Amid The Firestorm,” National Shrine of Saint Elizabeth Ann Seton, 339 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg, MD. Fri. & Sat., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. & 3 p.m. Take a guided tour of the grounds to learn how the Sisters and Daughters of Charity served the soldiers during the Civil War. Contact bbassler @setonheritage.org for more information. 301/447-6606. www.setonheritage.org.

Through December 13 Textile Exhibition, Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. “From Fibers to Fashion: the Textile Industry in Frederick County.” The heritage and legacy of the local textile industry. 301/663-1188. www.frederickhistory.org.

Through December 31 Forever Free: The Emancipation Proclamation Exhibit, Harpers Ferry National Historical Park,

Child Guide

Harpers Ferry, WV. The Union Commitment to End Slavery. www.nps.gov/hafe/index.htm.

September Autumn Nature Walk, Craftworks at Cool Spring, 1Explore 1469 Lloyd Rd., Charles Town, WV. 7:30 a.m. and discover. Free. 304/728-6233. www.wvcraftworks.org. 5k Fun Walk and 10k Trail Run, ThorpeWood, 12805-A Mink Farm Rd., Thurmont, MD. 8-11 a.m. Run or walk on the beautiful trails course around ThorpeWood and help raise money to support the YMCA youth programs. http://www.thorpewood.org. Art In The Park, Berkeley Springs State Park, 2 S. Washington St., Berkeley Springs. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Juried outdoor art fair for local and regional artists to show and sell their work. 304/258-6419. Battle of Cedar Creek Driving Tour, Cedar Creek Battlefield Foundation Headquarters, 8437 Valley Pike, Middletown, VA. 2 p.m. Two-hour guided tour, using a car-caravan system, which covers the Battle of Cedar Creek in a chronological fashion. Free. 540/868-9176. www.ccbf.us. & 15 Carillon concert, Baker Park, Carillon Tower, Frederick. 12:30. Free. 301/600-2888 or 800/999-3613. www.fredericktourism.org. , 6 & 20 Guided Civil War Walking Tour of Old Town Winchester, Old Town Winchester. Mon., 10 a.m.; Fri., 6 p.m. Meet your guide at 2 N. Cameron Street. Experience the Civil War as a civilian. Learn about the citizens and the events that took place in Winchester. $5. Call to make reservations. 540/542-1326. to May Ellworth Music Note-able Minds Classes, Ellsworth Music, 217-6 Oak Lee Dr., Ranson, WV. Tuesdays and Fridays. 45 minute lessons of interactive, imaginative musical fun. Call for more information or to register. 304/728-7060. www.EllsworthMusicSupply.com. Let’s Make Scrapbooks! BE-Hive, 205 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 5:30 p.m. Every child takes home a scrapbook. 301/704-0324. www.behive.org. & 12 Market Faire in Hagerstown, Elizabeth Hager Center Lot, City Center, Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Fresh produce, fruits, baked goods, flowers and more. 301/739-8577, x183. www.hagerstownmd.org. First Friday in Greencastle, Greencastle, PA. 58 p.m. Enjoy artists, shops, restaurants and live music. 717/597-4610. www.explorefranklincountypa.com. First Friday in Chambersburg, downtown Chambersburg, PA. 5:30-8:30 p.m. “Cruisin’ Car Show.” Artists, kids activities, in-store specials & samples, music and more. “Road Toads” on the Courthouse Plaza. 717/261-0072. www.chambersburgfirstfriday.com. Classic Car Cruise In, Town of Williamsport, MD. 69 p.m. Classic cars, trucks & motorcycles. 301/5731501. www.williamsportmd.gov. Red, White & Blue Summer Concert, Hagerstown (MD) Community College Alumni Amphitheater, 11400 Robinwood Dr., Hagerstown. 6:15 p.m. The U.S. Air Force Concert Band. Free. 240/500-2346. www.hagerstowncc.edu.

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& 7 Seton Center Thrift Shop One Day $5 Bag Sale, 16840 Seton Ave., Emmitsburg, MD. 6 Fri., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Shoppers are given a grocery-sized paper bag by Seton Center and are allowed to fill it full of merchandise for $5 and overflow bags will be charged $7. Clothing, household items and merchandise are on the shelves. Call for more information or to make a donation. 301/4476102. www.setoncenterinc.org. to 8 2013 Pickin’ in the Panhandle, Shiley Acres, 1446 Nadenbousch Lane, Inwood, WV. Bluegrass, newgrass, Americana, country, and rockabilly. Top music artists such as Kellie Pickler, Davisson Borthers, and Marty Raybon. 22 bands on 2 simultaneous stages. West Virginia State BBQ Championship and a Backyard BBQ Cook-off. Camping accessibility. 304/264-8801. www.panhandlepickin.com. Kids Closet Sales, 431 W. 2nd Ave., Ranson, WV. Save 60-90% off the retail price for quality, gently-used children’s clothes. Find everything you need for your babies, children and teens. Free admission. www.kidscloset.biz. Saints Peter & Paul Greek Fall Festival, St. Peter & Paul Greek Orthodox Church, 920 W. 7th St., Frederick. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. Authentic Greek cuisine, live music and traditional dance performances. 301/6630663. 57th Annual Thurmont & Emmitsburg Community Show, Catoctin High School, 14745 Sabillasville Rd., Thurmont, MD. Fri., 6-9 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Great family event with exhibits/displays, farm machinery, quilts & afghans, poultry, livestock, hay & straw, Thurmont library book sale, petting zoo, pony rides and more. Turkey & country ham supper on Sat., 3-7 p.m. Chicken BBQ Sun. at 12 noon. www.thurmont emmitsburgcommunityshow.webs.com. , 13, 20 & 27 Music on the Terrace, Carroll Creek Linear Park Amphitheater across from the C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Entertainment: Bonerama (9/6), Cabinet (9/13), Chaise Lounge (9/20), and Fishtank Ensemble (9/27). Free. 301/600-1629. www.fcpl.org. & 20 Guided Civil War Walking Tour of Old Town Winchester, 2 N. Cameron St., Winchester. 6 p.m. Experience the Civil War as a civilian in Old Town Winchester. Call to make your reservation. 540/542-1326. & October 4 First Friday Fun, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. Fun filled story, craft and program centered around a different Little Golden Book each month. “Johnny Appleseed” in Sept. and “The Saggy, Baggy Elephant” in Oct. Ages 26. Pre-registration recommended. $4. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. Free First Friday, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 54 S. Loudoun St., Winchester. 5-7:30 p.m. Explore the museum free of charge. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. First Friday Art Walk, 1 N. Loudoun St., Winchester. 6-9 p.m. Enjoy an evening of exceptional shopping, drawings, paintings, new works and exhibits, and live music. 540/667-5166. www.oldtownwinchesterva.com. Middle School Dances, Jefferson County Community Center, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 6:30-10 p.m. Dance and socialize with friends in a fun, safe environment. Food and beverages available. For grades 6-8. $8. 304/7283207. www.jcprc.org. to 29 Eastern West Virginia Juried Exhibit, Berkeley Art Works Gallery, 116 N. Queen St., Martinsburg, WV. Opening reception Sept. 7, 5-8 p.m. 304/596-0873. www.berkeleyartswv.org.

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See all of our family-friendly calendar plus newly added updates online at www.childguidemagazine.com 3rd Annual

Valley Rally Bicycle Ride October 12, 2013 Rain or Shine

Clearbrook Park, Clear Brook, VA Routes of 10 (Family Route), 25, 50 and 65 (metric century), & 100 miles. Enjoy the picturesque countryside this area has to offer riding through the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. This is a self-paced ride for everyone from the recreational to the serious cyclist.

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Fall Sales Washington County, MD September 20-22, 2013 Montgomery County, MD Coming Fall 2013!

Register at www.valleyrallybikeride.com for $35. Special pricing for teams of 5 or more. Questions? Email valleyrallybikeride@gmail.com or call 540-662-2551.

Child Guide

September/October 2013

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September/October 2013

Heads Up September continued from page 23 Community Yard & Craft Sale, 7 Shady Grove Community Center, Buchanan Trail East between Greencastle & Waynesboro, PA. 7 a.m.1 p.m. Concessions. Call to reserve a $20 space that benefits the Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) group in Greencastle. 717/597-3738. Muddy Mamas, Washington County Agricultural Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 9 a.m. Untimed mud run obstacle course just for girls and women ages 10 and up. Run, walk, climb or crawl. Proceeds go to Girls Incorporated. www.muddymamasmudrun.com Yard Sale/Bake Sale, 20301 Barbara Dr., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Benefits Providing Relief for Autistic Youth. www.prayinwesternmd.org. Fort Ritchie Community Center Pet Fest, Fort Ritchie Community Center, 14421 Lake Royer Dr., Cascade, MD. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Prizes for cutest, best dressed, most original, prettiest, largest, smallest, and best of show in annual pet parade. 301/241-5085. Town of Middletown’s Car Show, Middletown Community Park, Middletown, VA. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Enjoy pizza from Italian Touch and see spectacular cars. www.visitwinchesterva.com. Renfrew Park Heritage Day, Renfrew Museum and Park, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Crafters and artisans from the Royer Farmstead Era. All day entertainment and activities. $5, adults; $2, children 6-12; free, ages 5 and under. 717/762-0373. Five Senses Hike at Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Meet at Blue Ridge Trailhead. Take a journey of discovery that will require you to use all five senses. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Fall Magic, Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Dean Burkett, “Mr. Magic,” presents autumn magic tricks. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. The Lincolns of Virginia, Handley Library auditorium, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 2 p.m. Lincoln expert and former Bridgewater College president Phillip C. Stone presents a lecture on the Lincolns of Virginia. Free. 540/662-9041. The Magic of Michael T, Opera House Live, 131 W. German St., Shepherdstown, WV. 2 p.m. An entertaining hour of great magic. $5.

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A look at what’s happening in the region

EMAIL EVENTS TO CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

304/876-3704. www.operahouselive.com. Creative Outlet Drop-In Art Session, Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. Creative Outlet Theme: “Australia.” $1-$3 per art activity. All ages welcome. 301/6980656. www.delaplaine.org. September First Saturday, Downtown Frederick, 19 E. Church St., Frederick. 3-9 p.m. “Dog Days of Summer.” Children’s activities, live entertainment, gallery openings and more. 301/698-8118. www.downtownfrederick.org. Craftworks Outdoor Festival, Craftworks at Cool Spring, 1469 Lloyd Rd., Charles Town, WV. 4-7 p.m. Community event for the whole family. Great music concert, food, and silent auction. 304/728-6233. www.wvcraftworks.org. Zoo-La-La, Carroll Creek, Frederick. 7 p.m. Show, auction and additional fun at the Faux School on Carroll Creek. Benefits the non-profit Catoctin Wildlife Preserve and Zoo. $35. Tickets sold in advance at www.cwpzoo.com. Fall Campfires, Catoctin Creek Park & Nature Center, 2929 Sumantown Rd., Middletown, MD. 7 p.m. Stories or songs, a night hike and live animal presentations based around the glow of the fire. All ages. $4. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Exploring The Night Sky By Telescope, Foundation of the State Arboretum: Blandy Farm, 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Boyce, VA. 7-9 p.m. Meet in Parkfield Learning Center. Shenandoah Astronomical Society members will guide us as we search the night sky for stars, constellations, planets, and more. $8, FOSA members; $10, nonmembers; $20, whole family. 540/837-1758, x224. & 8 Hampshire Heritage Festival, 426 W. Main St., Romney, WV. Annual History and Culture event for WV’s first county. Civil War reenactors, children’s inflatables, lumberjack championship, parade, music, food, wildlife exhibit, and arts & crafts. 304/822-3647. www.hampshireheritagefest.com. Boonesborough Days, Shafter Park, Boonsboro, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Quality antiques and collectibles, Early American artisans, WWII living history, historical craft demonstrations, Master Gardener plant clinic, Civil War display and artifacts, Tri-State Astronomers, trolley rides, worship service and antique car display on Sunday, and much more. www.boonesboroughdays.com.

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1st Weekend Handmade Market, War Memorial Building, 102 E. German St., Shepherdstown, WV. Sat., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Quality handmade market. https://www.facebook.com/SCCHandm adeMarket. Gathering of the Arts at Lake Royer, Lakeside Hall on Lake Royer, Former Fort Ritchie Army Base, Cascade, MD. Sat., 6-9 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Art festival of juried twodimensional and three-dimensional art. Live music both days. 717/794-5121. & 21 Civil War Walking Tour, downtown Frederick. 11 a.m. Begin tour at Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick, MD. Learn about Civil War topics related to Frederick County through 1863. Fee. 301/663-1188. www.frederickhistory.org. , 21 & 28 Candlelight Ghost Tours of Frederick, Tours begin in front of Brewer’s Alley Restaurant, 124 N. Market St., Frederick. 8 p.m. Based on factual events and actual eyewitness encounters, 90-minute tour highlights numerous epicenters of paranormal activity. Fee. 240/6260963. to October 27 “3 Billy Goats Gruff,” Wonderment Puppet Theater, 412 W. King St., Martinsburg. Sat. & Sun., 1 p.m. $5; free admission for children under age 2. 304/258-4074. www.wondermentpuppets.com. HAPPY GRANDPARENTS DAY!

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National Day of Service and Remembrance, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Meet near the Visitor Center. Park-wide clean up. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Children’s Workshop: The Great Cover-Up, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Meet near the Visitor Center. Children can create their own mini-floorcloth at this hands-on history workshop. Ages 5 & up. $5 materials fee. Reservations required. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. & 23 Let’s Move Mondays, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Active play with a new theme each week. Ages 2-6. $4. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. & October 8 Home School History Days, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 1:30-3 p.m. “Colonial America” (9/10)

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and “Let’s Start a Revolution.” (10/8). Experienced staff enrich your child’s studies with a multi-disciplinary, handson approach to history. Ages 5-14. $5. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. Annual 9/11 Remembrance Parade, Main Street, Boonsboro, MD. 6:30 p.m. Parade in memory of fire, rescue and law enforcement personnel that lost their lives on Sept. 11, 2001. 301/432-4772. 9/11 Remembrance Ceremony, Square Corner Park, E. Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 7 p.m. Pay tribute to those lost on 9/11 and honor their memory. 301/834-7500. , 14, 20 & 21 God & Country, Antietam Recreation, 9745 Garis Shop Rd., Hagerstown. 6 p.m., activities & dinner buffet; 7:30 p.m., show. Family activities, dinner & a show. Singers, dancers, gymnasts and actors show us what makes America great. Reservations required. $22.75$33.75. 301/797-7999. www.antietamrecreation.com. Gardens At Night: Robbie Limon Band, Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 901 Amherst St., Winchester. 6-9 p.m. Music of the 1970s. Free activities for kids offered from 6-8 pm. Free/MSV Members and children 12 & under, $10/adults (includes music, gardens, and gallery admission.) www.shenandoahmuseum.org. One Maryland One Book: “King Peggy,” Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 7:30 p.m. The real life astonishing journey of American secretary, Peggielene Bartels, who finds herself King of a Ghana town. Free. 301/600-2828. to 15 Battle of Antietam Anniversary Weekend, Antietam National Battlefield, 5831 Dunker Church Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. Special battlefield hikes, and living history firing demonstrations. 301/4325124. www.nps.gov/anti. The New Mel Brooks Musical: “Young Frankenstein,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. Fri. & Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Check with theater for age appropriateness. 304/263-6766. www.apollo-theatre.org. to 21 The Great Frederick Fair, The Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Livestock, farm and garden products, demolition derby, carnival/midway, musical entertainment, tractor/truck pull, and much more. 301/663-5895. www.thegreatfrederickfair.com. & 27 Schools Out for the Day, Clarke Co. Parks & Rec,

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225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Activities for ages KGrade 5. Camp follows Clarke County Public School schedule and is subject to change. $25. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks.

to November 3 13 Gaver Farm Fall-FunFestival, Gaver Farm, 5501 Detrick Rd., Mt. Airy, MD. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Corn maze, farm animals, jumping pillow, straw activities, mini mazes, pedal karts, giant slides and more. Farm market, food concessions, and free hayrides to pick-your-own pumpkin patch on weekends. 301/865-3515. Lawyers Farm & Corn Maze, Lawyer’s Farm & Corn Maze, 13001 Creagerstown Rd., Thurmont, MD. Friday, 5-10 p.m.; Saturday, 12 noon10 p.m.; Sunday, 12 noon-5 p.m.; and weekdays by appointment. Corn mazes, pumpkin cannons, indoor playground, indoor hay maze and more. 240/315-8133. Community Yard Sale, Jefferson County Community Center, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. $25 booth fee. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Market Street Mile, Frederick YMCA, 1000 N. Market St., Frederick. 8:45-10:45 a.m. One-mile race to kick off the annual In The Streets celebration. www.steeplechasers.org/msm. www.downtownfrederick.org. Colorsplash 5K, Fairgrounds Park, 351 N. Cleveland Ave., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-12 noon. Unique family event where participants are splashed with powdered color for every kilometer they run or walk. After Party Celebration follows 5K. Funds raised for HEAL of Washington County MD, Inc. 301/739-8577. www.healofwashingtoncIounty.org. Hagerstown Model Railroad Train Sale, Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Fall model train sales event in support of operations and maintenance of Antietam Station in Sharpsburg, MD. Admission. 301/800-9829. www.antietamstation.com. BBQ Contest, Green Hill Farm, 5329 Mondell Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Antietam Cast Iron Chefs Dutch Oven Cook Off & Outdoor Cooking Contest. $25, contestants; $5, spectators. 301/991-0265. Farm Day at Ravenwood, Diakon Senior Living, Ravenwood campus, 1183 Luther Drive, Hagerstown. 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Bluegrass music, petting zoo, pony rides, games, food and more. www.diakon.org/ravenwood. Sharpsburg Heritage Festival, Sharpsburg, MD. 9:30 a.m.-9 p.m. Street festival celebrating Sharpsburg’s past, present and future. Arts & crafts, literature, music, history, food, and more. www.sharpsburgheritagefestival.com.

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Woodmont Lodge Open House, Woodmont Natural Resources Management Area, 11761 Woodmont Rd., Hancock, MD. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Annual open house. Explore memories of the early days of conservation in Maryland. Entrance fee. 301/842-2155. Germanfest, Shenandoah Germanic Heritage Museum, 11523 Back Rd., Toms Brook, VA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Beer & wine garden, German & American food, live music, costumed dancers, craft fair & demonstrations, historical presentations, children’s activities, and military reenactors. Free admission. $5 per car parking. 866/936-9956. www.GermanFestVA.org. Second Battle of Kernstown Walking Tour, Kernstown Battlefield, 610 Battle Park Dr., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. & 2 p.m. Tour concentrates on Second Kernstown and the impact on the Pritchard Family. www.kernstownbattle.org. “Flutter By, Butterfly,” Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Meet near the Visitor Center for a volunteer-led walk along park trails in search of butterflies. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. In The Street Festival, Downtown Frederick, Market St. & Carroll Creek Park, Frederick. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Outdoor street festival. Children’s activities, local art organizations, regional artisans, history, sports, food & beer vendors, live entertainment, and more. 301/600-2489. www.visitfrederick.org. 2nd Annual ‘Burg Wing Off, Martinsburg Mall, Martinsburg. 12 noon-4 p.m. Wing eating contest, Wing Cook Off, wing sampling, music, vendors and beer garden. To benefit Christmas Cash for Kids and Children’s Home Society of WV. $8. http://burgwingoff.webstarts.com/ www.shopmartinsburgmall.com. Princess Party, Hagerstown (MD) Community College ARCC Gymnasium, Robinwood Dr. 1-3 p.m. Fun for the lovely princess and her royal family. $5, child (ages 0-12); $2, adult (ages 13+). 240/313-2805. www.washco-md.net. Second Saturday Crafting Workshop, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Children and adults of all ages can get their minds working and their creative juices flowing. Each month features a different history- or nature-themed craft project. Free. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. “Making Your Own Ice Cream”, Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Brittant Wedd shows how to make ice cream through endothermic reactions. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Rockin’ Riverbottom Bash! RiverBottom Park, W. Salisbury St., Williamsport, MD. 2 p.m. Rock bands,

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September/October 2013

Heads Up September cont. from page 25 food and drinks. 301/223-7711. www.williamsportmd.gov. 3rd Annual Alzheimer’s Benefit, The Cider Mill, Cider Mill, 47 Crystal Falls Dr., Smithsburg, MD. 2 p.m. Pig roast & music, festival featuring Jesse Bell (Country & Gospel), Gloryland Ramblers (Bluegrass & Gospel), one-armed guitarist and member of the WV Country Music Hall of Fame, Kenny Johnson, and a mystery guest. $12 donation includes meal, drinks, desserts and music. Tickets at J&B Trains (240/4204930) or Village Emporium (301/824-2247.) The Tennis Club Youth/Family Open House, 4880 Buchanan Trail East, Waynesboro, PA. 2-5 p.m. Attend and preview The Tennis Club’s Season Opening Specials. 717/762-3922. www.tennisclubofpa.com. Historic Heights First Annual Porchfest, S. Prospect Street between Washington and Park Circle, Hagerstown. 2-6 p.m. Musicians use porches as stages, and local restaurants sell food and drinks. 301/717-3923. David King at Singin’ In The Barn, 2778 Mont Alto Rd., Chambersburg. 6 p.m. Doors open at 5 pm. First come, first serve seating. Donation only. Proceeds benefit Samaritan’s Purse-Operation Christmas Child. www.singinginthebarn.com. Discovery Station’s Hangarfest, Rider Jet Center, Hagerstown Regional Airport, 18539 Henson Blvd., Hagerstown. 6-10:30 p.m. Fundraiser. Live music by The Reagan Years, an ’80s Tribute Band. Food vendors and cash bar available, tip jars, games and prizes. Tickets available at Discovery Station, 301/790-0076, and Convention and Visitors Bureau, 301/791-3246. $20/person. www.discoverystation.org. Red, White & Blue Summer Concert, Hagerstown (MD) Community College Alumni Amphitheater, 11400 Robinwood Dr., Hagerstown. 6:15 p.m. The U.S. Navy Cruisers. Free. 240/500-2346. www.hagerstowncc.edu. Astronomy For Everyone, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 7-10 p.m. Meet behind the historic Mount Bleak House. Half-hour “Junior Astronomer” program for ages 5-12. Multimedia presentation on the latest in U.S. space research. View deep space objects through multiple telescopes. $5 per car. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Sharpsburg Ghost Story Hour, Green Hill Farm, 5329 Mondell Rd., Sharpsburg, MD. 9-10 p.m. Sit around a campfire and listen to stories of true paranormal accounts as told to the founder of Sharpsburg Ghost Tours. Admission. 301/991-0265. www.facebook.com/Sharpsburg-Ghost-Tours. & 15 151st Anniversary of The Battle of South Mountain, Washington Monument State Park, 900 Arnoldstown Rd., Middletown, MD. Ranger guided battlefield tours and living history demonstrations featured. Fee. 301/432-4042. Barnyard Bash at Green Meadows Farm, Green Meadows Petting Farm, 10102 Fingerboard Rd., Ijamsville, MD. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Farm fun, games and crafts for kids, food, fire trucks, “I Spy” hayride, and more. 301/865-9203.

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September/October 2012

A look at what’s happening in the region

EMAIL EVENTS TO CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

Visiting Artist Series, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 54 S. Loudoun St., Winchester. Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sun., 1-4 p.m. Free with Museum admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. To Garrison The Fort, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.4 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Experience life at the fort during the French and Indian War as members of the recreated Joshua Beall’s Company and Alexander Beall’s Company garrison the fort. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155. 151st Anniversary of The Battle of Antietam @ Pry House Field Hospital Museum, Pry House Field Hospital Museum, 18906 Shepherdstown Pike, Keedysville, MD. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $5 suggested donation. 301/416-2395. , 21, 28 & 29 “Go Dog, Go,” The Fun Company at the Maryland Ensemble Theater, 31 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 2 p.m. The classic children’s book comes to life in this musical world of doggy fun. $13.50. 301/694-4744. www.marylandensemble.org. to November 2 “Pinkalicious – The Musical,” Way Off Broadway Dinner Theatre & Children’s Theatre, 5 Willowdale Dr., Frederick. Stage adaptation of the children’s book. Admission. 301/662-6600. www.wayoffbroadway.com. to November 24 Green Meadows Farm Fall Season, Green Meadows Petting Farm, 10102 Fingerboard Rd., Ijamsville, MD. Wed.Fri., 9 a.m.-2 p.m.; Sat. & Sun., 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Touch and feed the animals, milk a cow, pig races, and animal show. Free pumpkin with admission in October. 301/865-9203. The Tennis Club Adult Open House, 4880 Buchanan Trail East, Waynesboro, PA. 2-5 p.m. Attend and preview The Tennis Club’s Season Opening Specials. 717/762-3922. www.tennisclubofpa.com. Talk with Ed Miller, Renfrew Museum and Park Visitors Center at the Barn, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 7 p.m. Free. 717/762-0373. An Evening with Steve Luxenberg, The Blue Ridge Summit Free Library, Blue Ridge Summit, PA. 6:30 p.m. Book signing with Steve Luxenberg, award-winning author of “Annie’s Ghosts.” Free. 717/794-2240. Learn Flower Arranging! BE-Hive, 205 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 5:30 p.m. Take home an arrangement after lessons from Depot Florists. 301/704-0324. www.be-hive.org. and October 16 Hands-On History with Guess & Friends, Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick. 10-11 a.m. Guess the Iron Dog visits to explore how people lived in the past. Hands-on activities and historic and reproduction objects. Registration suggested. Ages 3 & up. Free, $3 suggested donation to cover craft supplies. 301/663-1188, x105. www.hsfcinfo.org. Let’s Make a Kaleidoscope! BE-Hive, 205 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 5:30 p.m. With Glass Artist Carol Slovikosky. Every child takes one home. 301/704-0324. www.be-hive.org.

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Mommy & Me, The Children’s Museum of 20 Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-10:30 a.m. “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” Reading and group activities. Adult/child pair. $8. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. or 27 Violence and Mental Illness: Current Treatment and Ethical and Legal Challenges, Brook Lane Community Room, 13218 Brooklane Dr., Hagerstown. 8:30-11:45 a.m. 8 a.m. check-in and continental breakfast. 3 hours of continuing education in ethics, law, professional conduct and risk management to satisfy Maryland licensure requirements for social workers and other mental health professionals. 301/733-0331, x189. www.brooklane.org. to November 3 Corn Maze & Pumpkin Patch, Misty Meadow Farm Creamery, 14325 Misty Meadow Rd., Smithsburg, MD. Mon.-Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 1-6 p.m. 8-acre corn maze with educational questions and activities, rope mazes, duck race, corn box, pedal tractors, play area, weekend hayrides and more. Flashlight mazes on designated weekends. 301/824-2112. www.mistymeadowfarmcreamery.com. to 22 Kids Closet Sales, Best Western Grand Venice Hotel, 431 Dual Highway, Hagerstown. Save 60-90% off the retail price for quality, gently-used children’s clothes. Find everything you need for your babies, children and teens. Free admission. http://mapq.st/gY6qwy. www.kidscloset.biz. Berkeley Springs Birding Festival, Headquartered at The Ice House, 138 Independence St., Berkeley Springs, WV. Fri. and Sat. evening programs at the Ice House, bird walks and workshops Sat., bird walk Sun. am. 304/258-0992. www.natureniche.biz. www.potomacaudubon.org. www.berkeleysprings.com/ fallbirding.htm. The New Mel Brooks Musical: “Young Frankenstein,” The Apollo Civic Theatre, 128 E. Martin St., Martinsburg. Fri. & Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m. Check with theater for age appropriateness. 304/263-6766. www.apollo-theatre.org. & October 4 Family Night Out On The Ranch, Full Moon Ranch, Berryville, VA. 6:30-8:45 p.m. Families spend an exciting night on the ranch. Farm tours, petting zoo, pony rides, and children’s activities. Clarke County Parks and Recreation has teamed up with Pony to Go/Full Moon Ranch. Children must be accompanied by parent/guardian. $20, family. 540/955-5140. www.ponytogo.com or www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Hike With A Friend, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 9 a.m. Meet at the Blue Ridge Trailhead. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Shepherd’s Fest Kids Fest, The Good Shepherd Ministries, 19763 Longmeadow Rd., Hagerstown. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Games, pony rides, crafts, barrel train rides, petting zoo, prizes, 2 bike-give-aways, hay rides, fire engine display, 18’ slide, moon bounce, family photos, sensory activities, Chick-Fil-A cow, hotdogs, lemonade, ice cream and more. For children of all ages. Call to preregister. $1. 301/665-3767. Charles Town Heritage Festival, Downtown Charles Town, WV. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Crafts, music, food,

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reenactors, children’s activities, and more. Kick-off concert Fri. in Jefferson Memorial Park featuring the Kelly Bell Band. http://ctheritagefestival.com. Elephant Appreciation Day, Bowman Library, 871 Tasker Rd., Stephens City, VA. 11 a.m. Hear stories about elephants, make elephant masks, dance the Baby Elephant dance, play elephant games and more. Free. 540/869-9000, x215. Discovery Story Theater, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 54 S. Loudoun St., Winchester. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free with Museum admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Mommy and Me Cooking, Ballenger Creek Community Building, Ballenger Creek Park, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 12:30-2:30 p.m. “After School Snacks.” Have fun learning the basics of cooking and eating what you make. Ages 4-7 and Mom. $60. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. “The Importance of Trains in the Civil War,” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 1 p.m. Presented by Alan Hedges, creator of Discovery Station’s Civil War Exhibit. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. My Dolly and Me - Samantha, Ballenger Creek Community Building, Ballenger Creek Park, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Discover the favorite recipes of the American Girl dolls. Ages 4-7 and Mom. $60. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Full Moon Walk, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 7-8:30 p.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. Follow a Park Ranger up to the Piedmont Overlook. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Symphony Idol, The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 8 p.m. MSO Pops Concert. Three popular contestants from the hit show, “American Idol” join the MSO for an evening of popular standards, jazz, rhythm & blues, and country music. Admission. 301/797-4000. www.marylandsymphony.org. & 22 Fall Farm Fun Days at Orrs Farm Market, Orr’s Farm Market, 682 Orr Drive, Martinsburg. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Kick off of the 2013 Pumpkin Patch. We will have hayrides to the pumpkin patch and corn maze, live local bluegrass, BBQ, and kettle corn. 304/2631168. Apple Harvest Arts and Crafts Festival, Jim Barnett Park, 1001 E. Cork St., Winchester. 10 a.m.5 p.m. Arts and crafts, Kids Zone, food vendors, hand-made jewelry, hand-blown glass, and more. www.visitwinchesterva.com. Opening Weekend at Summers Farm, Summers Farm, 5620 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Opening weekend honors heroes. Active military and veterans receive special pricing with identification. Pig races, old-fashioned hayrides, two gigantic jumping pillows, Farmer Golf, Baltimore Ravens-inspired corn maze, farm fresh concessions, and more. 301/620-9316. www.summersfarm.com. Canal Apple Days Festival, Widmyer Park, W. Main St., Hancock, MD. Sat., 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. Arts, crafts, contests, food, parade, music, entertainment and more. 301/678-6555. & 28 Downtown Chambersburg Walking Tour, Chambersburg (PA) Heritage Center, 100 Lincoln Way East. 10:15 a.m. Walking tours of historic sites. Features The Memorial Square fountain, the Founding Family Statue in Fort Chambers Park, the fort site, historic buildings, Falling Spring Presbyterian Church and the Old Jail. Pre-registration required. $5/person. 717/2647101, x214. & October 19 First Battle of Kernstown Walking Tour, Kernstown Battlefield, 610 Battle Park Dr., Winchester. 10:30 a.m. & 2:15 p.m. Tour concentrates on First

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Kernstown and the impact on the Pritchard Family. www.kernstownbattle.org. Guided Civil War Walking Tour of Middletown, Middletown, VA. 5-6 p.m. Meet the National Park Service guide at the intersection of First and Main Streets. Re-live the history of Middletown from a civilian’s point-of-view. Reservations. www.visitwinchesterva.com. to November 3 Summers Farm Fall Harvest Festival, Summers Farm, 5620 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. Mon.-Thurs., 1-7 p.m.; Fri., 1-10:30 p.m.; Sat., 10 a.m.-10:30 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Hayrides, pick your own pumpkin patch, 12-acre corn maze, slides, farm animals, two jumping pillows, farmer golf, pig races, and fresh baked goods. 301/788-0704. Chelsea’s Epilepsy 5k Run/Walk For SUDEP, Foundation of the State Arboretum: Blandy Farm, 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Boyce, VA. 7:30 a.m.-12 noon. www.ChelseaHutchisonFoundation.org. www.visitwinchesterva.com Wings and Wheels Expo, Hagerstown Regional Airport Terminal, 18434 Showalter Rd., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Antique and modern aircraft, warbirds, jets, cars, trucks, motorcycles, tractors, military vehicles, living history, industry exhibits, airplane rides, vendors, food, and more. 301/733-8717. www.wingsandwheelsexpo.com. Naturalist Stroll, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Meet near the Visitor Center. Join a Volunteer Naturalist for a casual walk in the park. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Drawing Birds from Life Workshop, Opus Oaks, 109 First Street, Berryville, WV. 1-4 p.m. Learn the basics of bird anatomy with Doug Pifer. Free. Ages 14+. $40 ($10 donation to Blue Ridge Wildlife). 540/955-4226. The Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 9-11 a.m. 301/6959320, x32. www.bannerschool.org. The Sweet Frog mascot, BE-Hive, 205 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 5:30 p.m. Meet the Sweet Frog mascot “Cookie,” and taste delicious frozen yogurts. 301/704-0324. www.be-hive.org. Kiwanis Travelogue: “Italy,” South Hagerstown High School, S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Travel movie narrated in person by the artist. $10, adults; $5, students. 301/739-1981. Tony M. Music, BE-Hive, 205 N. Queen St., Martinsburg. 5:30 p.m. Kids make instruments and play with Tony M. 301/704-0324. www.be-hive.org. to 28 Tri-State Antique Truck Show, Frederick County Fairgrounds, 155 Fairground Rd., Clear Brook, VA. Dawn to dusk. Antique trucks, fire trucks, farm tractors, and military vehicles. $2, adults; free, children under 12. www.tri-state-antiquetruckshow.com. Children’s & Maternity Consignment Event, The Shady Grove Community Center, Buchanan Trail East, Shady Grove, PA. Thurs. & Fri., 10 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-12 noon. Franklin County’s seasonal children’s consignment event by Two Times Around Consignments. www.twotimesaround.net. Thunder In The Square, City Center, Hagerstown. Antique car show and more. 301/739-2044. www.hagerstownmd.org. Movie In The Garden: The Lorax, Green Grove Gardens, 1032 Buchanan Trail East, Greencastle, PA. 6-10 p.m. Bring the family out for Movie Night. Concession stand, moon bounce, and great movie on a gigantic inflatable screen. 717/597-0800. www.greengrovegardens.com.

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4th Annual

Discovery Station

Hangarfest Come and Hear The Reagan Years, the East Coast’s Premiere 80’s Tribute Band! Rider Jet Center at the Hagerstown Regional Airport

September 14, 2013 Doors Open at 6pm Food venders and cash bar available! Tip jars, games and prizes! Cover Charge $20 – Tickets on sale NOW at Discovery Station, 301-790-0076 www.discoverystation.org Tickets are also available at the Hagerstown-Washington County Convention and Visitors Bureau, 301-791-3246.

www.marylandmemories.com

“Making Your Own Ice Cream” Sept 14 Halloween at Discovery Station

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A science, technology and history museum with hands-on learning experiences, interesting and challenging exhibits, displays and programs • Civil War Trains • Civil War Music • Japanese Origins Exhibit and Programs • Full Scale Triceratops Skull • Möller Organs • C&O Canal exhibit • Hagerstown Aviation • Operate Cessna 150 console • Exact 15' replica of the Titanic & Titanic cabin exhibit • How a Weather Station Works • NASA spacecraft model • Vision exhibit • Treasure Gift Shoppe • Gift Certificates • Discovery Parties • And much more!

101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown, MD Tuesday-Saturday 10-4

www.discoverystation.org 301-790-0076 • 877-790-0076

Child Guide is “ISO” enthusiastic and reliable part-time help for ad sales! Do you read Child Guide and know its benefits? If you “love” ... talking on the phone, sending emails and learning about services for families in our community, this could be the position for you! Previous sales experience preferred and good computer and phone skills a must! Call 301-665-2817 or send email with resume to ads@childguidemagazine.com.

September/October 2013

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September/October 2013

Heads Up

September cont. from page 27 Fall Campfires, Fountain Rock Nature Center, 8511 Nature Center Place, Walkersville, MD. 7:30-9 p.m. Stories or songs, a night hike and live animal presentations based around the glow of the fire. All ages. $4. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. , 28 & 29 19th Annual Oktoberfest, Lovettsville, VA. 10 a.m. Celebrate Lovettsville’s German heritage. Music, food, crafts, entertainment and more. www.lovettsvilleva.gov. Mountain Heritage Arts & Crafts Festival, Sam Michael’s Park, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Juried artisans demonstrating and showcasing their work. Wine tasting, food, bluegrass bands, children’s make & take crafts, face painting, and more. $7, adults; $4, ages 6-17. 304/725-2055 or 1-800-624-0577. www.jeffersoncountywvchamber.org/ festival. Smithsonian Magazine Museum Day Live! Nationwide. One-day event of free admission to participating venues with a ticket. www.smithsonianmag.com/ museumday/ticket/ to download a free ticket good for two people. Celebration Day, Luther Ridge Retirement Community, 2735 Luther Drive, Chambersburg. 8 a.m.-2 p.m. Flea market, entertainment, children’s activities, homemade food, lunch stand, craft & party vendors, and more. Also celebrating the 20th Anniversary of The Inn at Luther Ridge. 717/7626621. National Public Lands Day, Monocacy National Battlefield Visitor Center, 5201 Urbana Pk., Frederick. 8:45 a.m.-12 noon. Help preserve your national battlefield and the environment. Volunteer for this annual clean up. Registration required. 301/6623515. Faire Off The Square, Elizabeth Hager Center Lot, City Center, Hagerstown. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Outdoor artisan and farmer’s market hosted by the Downtown Alliance to benefit a featured non-profit organization that will reinvest donations back into the community. 301/739-8577, x183. www.hagerstownmd.org. Junior Hunter Field Days, North American Rod & Gun Club, 12108 Belvedere Rd., Hagerstown. 9 a.m.3 p.m. Maryland Department of Natural Resources

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September/October 2013

A look at what’s happening in the region

EMAIL EVENTS TO CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

will conduct a youth hunting, shooting sport and wildlife management event. Free lunch for participants and their parents/guardians. Registration required. www.dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/ Education/youth/ Mercersburg Townfest, Downtown Mercersburg, PA. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. More than 100 crafters, artisans, culinary and local vendors, entertainment, children’s fun section and more. www.mercersburgtownfest.com. Bark In The Park! Jonathan Hager House, City Park, Hagerstown. 10 a.m. A day of fun for you and your animals. Games, demonstrations, vendors and “My Dog’s Got Talent” contest. 301/733-2060, x239. www.hswcmd.org. Art at the Point, Community Commons, Clay St., Point of Rocks, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Family oriented juried arts festival with live music, demonstrations, exhibits, children’s art tent, and more. 301/9690527. National Public Lands Day, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 11 a.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. Stewardship project and volunteer event. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. MPT’s Motorweek Carnival, Lilypons Water Gardens, 6800 Lily Pons Rd., Adamstown, MD. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Classic, antique and specialty cars, new cars, gourmet food trucks, shopping, rides, games, and live music. 410/581-4137. Free Workshop Day, Opus Oaks, 109 First Street, Berryville, WV. 1-3:30 p.m. Make a simple fused glass art object. All materials supplied. Free. Ages 13+. 540/955-4226. Conococheague DAR celebrates Constitution Week. Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 11 a.m. Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution brochures will be complimentary. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. The Lincolns of Virginia, Handley Regional Library, 100 W. Piccadilly St., Winchester. 6:30 p.m. History program presented by Dr. Phillip Stone. www.winchesterhistory.com. & 29 Fall Farm Fun Festival, MarkerMiller Orchards, 3035 Cedar Creek Grade, Winchester. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Pick your own apples, scenic wagon rides, cow train, and music from 1-3 pm both days. 540/662-1391. www.markermillerorchards.com. Smithsburg Steam & Craft Show, Fire Hall Grounds, Smithsburg, MD. 10 a.m. Parade Sat. at 5 p.m. Steam engines, working saw mill, old tractors, craft and flea market vendors and more. 301/6652882. Middletown Heritage Festival, Middletown, MD. 10 a.m. Celebrate the heritage of the Middletown Community with living history, children’s games, entertainment, parade and food. 301/371-6171. www.middletownheritagefestival.com. Guided Tours Of The Pritchard House, Kernstown Battlefield, 610 Battle Park Dr., Winchester. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-4 p.m. Battlefield admission is free; tours of the house are $3 for ages 12 and over. www.kernstownbattle.org. National Alpaca Farm Weekend, Sugarloaf Alpaca Co., LLC, 1347 Buckeystown Pike, Adamstown, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-

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5 p.m. Feed the alpacas, watch them nurse, learn about husbandry, and shop in the alpaca shop and fiber studio. Learn to knit, hand spin, and weave. 240/500-0007. Antietam Battlefield Event, Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg, MD. Sat., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. & 3 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Weapons Firing Demonstrations. www.nps.gov/anti. Frederick’s Oktoberfest 2013, The Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Sat., 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Family friendly event with bratwurst, Oktoberfest bier, German wines, dancing, music, children’s events and much more. All benefits Frederick County charities. Admission. www.frederickoktoberfest.org. & October 12 Parent’s Night Out, Clarke Co. Parks & Rec, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 5-9 p.m. for ages 3-12. Children enjoy fun, popcorn and games while parents have a night out. Emergency forms must be completed prior to enrollment. $15, child; $10 per child when 2 or more children from same family attend. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. & October 26 Guided Civil War Walking Tour of Stephens City, Newtown History Center, 5408 Main St., Stephens City, VA. 10:30-11:30 a.m. Reservations required. $5. 540/869-1700. to November 2 Corn Maze and Pumpkin Patch at Crumland Farms, Crumland Farms, 7612 Willow Rd., Frederick. 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Starlight maze Fri. & Sat., 7-10 p.m. 8acre corn maze. Take a free hayride to the pumpkin patch to pick you own pumpkin. Feed the animals, watch the goats, ride the moochoo train, slide on the giant slide or leap into a pile of fresh, soft hay. 301/845-8099. 4th Annual Pumpkin Fun Run, Summers Farm, 5620 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. 9 a.m. 5K run and 1-mile family fun run-walk to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. 301/620-9316. Registration found online at http://summersfarm.com/great-pumpkin-fun-run/. www.summersfarm.com. Perry/Brandenburg Recital, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park at Park Circle. 2:30 p.m. D’Amore Duo. Ticketed event. $5, nonmembers; free, members and children 12 & under. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org. Haircut-A-Thon, 9-West Hair Salon, 1018 Hedgesville Rd., Martinsburg. 10 a.m.12 noon. Fundraising event for BE-Hive. Come in and get a great haircut for $10 between those hours. 100% of the payment will be donated to the BE-Hive. Questions, call Tammy at 9-West Hair Salon, 340/267-6791.

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OCTOBER to 6 Child Spirit Consignment Sale, 3 Berkeley County Youth Fairgrounds, 2419 Golf Course Rd., Martinsburg. High-quality children’s clothing, furniture, toys, and maternity items. Thurs. & Fri., 10 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat., 8 a.m.-1 p.m. and 50% off sale 2-5 p.m.; Sun., Great Dollar Event 1-4 p.m. wwwchildspiritconsignment.com.

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October First Friday Fun Fest, 4 Westview Promenade, Buckeystown Pike at Crestwood Blvd., Frederick. 10-11:30 a.m. Fall-themed story time, music, games, crafts, food samples, giveaways and coupons. 410/561-1300. First Friday in Greencastle, Greencastle, PA. 5-8 p.m. Enjoy artists, shops, restaurants and live music. 717/597-4610. www.explorefranklincountypa.com. First Friday in Chambersburg, downtown Chambersburg, PA. 5:308:30 p.m. “Funtastic Fall.” Artists, kids activities, in-store specials & samples, music and more. 717/261-0072. www.chambersburgfirstfriday.com. Classic Car Cruise In, Town of Williamsport, MD. 6-9 p.m. Cruise in the Pink cancer awareness. Classic cars, trucks & motorcycles. 301/5731501. www.williamsportmd.gov. & 5 “Go Dog, Go,” The Fun Company at the Maryland Ensemble Theater, 31 W. Patrick St., Frederick. Fri., 7 p.m.; Sat., 2 p.m. The classic children’s book comes to life in this musical world of doggy fun. $13.50. 301/694-4744. www.marylandensemble.org. & 18 Guided Civil War Walking Tour of Old Town Winchester, 2 N. Cameron St., Winchester. 6 p.m. Experience the Civil War as a civilian in Old Town Winchester. Call to make your reservation. 540/542-1326. Green Circle 5K and Kids Run, 631 Jubal Early Dr. (Children of America), Winchester. 8:30 a.m. start. Run will use existing trail and local neighborhood streets. Register online at www.active.com. www.visitwinchesterva.com. Mainstreet Waynesboro’s 2013 Market Day, Waynesboro, PA. 9 a.m.4 p.m. Craft & specialty vendors, food, sidewalk sales, live music & entertainment, scarecrow contest, chili cookoff and more. 717/762-0397. www.mainstreetwaynesboro.com. Metal Sculpture, Opus Oaks, 2330 Crum Church Rd., Berryville, WV. 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Using hand tools and small power tools, go on an adventure with wood and metal to make a sculpture piece that is both natural and a mix of creativity. Ages 8-14. $40. 540/955-4226. Audubon Bird Walk – Natural and Man-Made Habitats, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Meet at the Visitor Center. Walk will take visitors along Woodpecker Lane, prime habitat for the Red-Headed Woodpecker. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Historic Clermont Farm Day: Life on the Farm Then and Now, Clermont Farm, 801 E. Main St., Berryville, VA. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Food vendors, heritage crafts and demonstrations, children’s events, historic tours and lectures, hayrides, live animal exhibits, and much more. $5. Children 12 & under are free. 540/955-0102.

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“Mr. Lincoln Returns to Harpers Ferry,” Harpers Ferry National Park, Harpers Ferry, WV. 1-3 p.m. Visit with our nation’s 16th president as portrayed by Jim Getty. Park entrance fee. 304/535-6024. “Fall Butterflies.” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Presented by Dave Kaplan, “Butterfly Man.” 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Creative Outlet Drop-In Art Session, Delaplaine Visual Arts Education Center, 40 S. Carroll St., Frederick. 3-5 p.m. Creative Outlet Theme: “Europe – Haunted Castles.” $1-$3 per art activity. All ages welcome. 301/698-0656. www.delaplaine.org. October First Saturday, Downtown Frederick, 19 E. Church St., Frederick. 3-9 p.m. “Frederick’s Fall Festival.” Hayrides, pumpkin painting, scarecrow competitions, and more. 301/6988118. www.downtownfrederick.org. My Dolly and Me - Kit, Ballenger Creek Community Building, Ballenger Creek Park, 5420 Ballenger Creek Pike, Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Discover the favorite recipes of the American Girl dolls. Ages 4-7 and Mom. $60. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Astronomy Program, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. Dusk. Join our park naturalist for an evening of star gazing and sky navigation. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155. Tamburitzans, Capitol Theatre Center, 159 S. Main St., Chambersburg, PA. 8 p.m. Dances, music and songs of East European & neighboring cultures. 717/263-0202. www.thecapitoltheatre.org. & 6 Catoctin Antique Gas Engine Show, Wolfsville Ruritan Club, Wolfsville Ruritan Community Park, 12708 Brandenburg Hollow Rd., Myersville, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. 41st annual. Antique tractors, hit & miss engines, farm machinery, cars, trucks, working saw mill, flea markets, country food, and craft booths. 301/606-9130 or 301/293-2281. Fort Frederick in the Civil War, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Reenactors assemble for a weekend of living history demonstrations and tactics demonstrations. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155. Fall Festival Weekend, Rose Hill Manor Park & Museum, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-4 p.m. Farm exhibits, hayrides, demonstrations, animals, music, food, crafts and more. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. 30th Brunswick Railroad Days, downtown Brunswick, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Entertainment, children’s activities, model trial displays, excursion train rides, food, arts & crafts, photography contest and more. www.brunswickmd.gov. Mt. Airy Fall Festival, Main St., Mt. Airy, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Old-fashioned street

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festival. 301/829-2112. www.mtairylions.com. & 12 Downtown Chambersburg Walking Tour, Chambersburg (PA) Heritage Center, 100 Lincoln Way East. 10:15 a.m. Walking tours of historic sites. Features the first railroad station in Chambersburg, the Old Jail, the John Brown House, the second railroad station, the Rev. Denny House, the Kennedy Mansion, the Masonic Temple, the Old Market House, Zion Reformed Church and the first public hospital in town. Pre-registration required. $5. 717/264-7101, x214. & 19 Civil War Walking Tour, downtown Frederick. 11 a.m. Begin tour at Museum of Frederick County History, 24 E. Church St., Frederick, MD. Learn about Civil War topics related to Frederick County through 1863. Fee. 301/663-1188. www.frederickhistory.org. to 27 Fall Farm Festival, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. Weekend, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Map and daily programs and activities available at front gate. Celebrate the fall harvest at Mount Bleak Farm each full weekend. Live music, interpretive programs, living history demonstrations, Ghosts of Mount Bleak Tours, children’s play area, pick-your-own pumpkin patch, and more. 540/5923556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Candlelight Ghost Tours of Frederick, Tours begin in front of Brewer’s Alley Restaurant, 124 N. Market St., Frederick. Fri., 7:45 p.m.; Sat., 7:30 p.m. Based on factual events and actual eyewitness encounters, 90minute tour highlights numerous epicenters of paranormal activity. Fee. 240/626-0963. & 20 Carillon concert, Baker Park, Carillon Tower, Frederick. 12:30. Free. 301/600-2888 or 800/999-3613. www.fredericktourism.org. to 13 National Finals: Sheepdog Trials, Belle Grove Plantation, 336 Belle Grove Rd., Middletown, VA. Join handlers and their dogs from all over the East coast as they compete at the Annual Regional Belle Grove Sheepdog Trials. www.bellegrove.org. to 13 TotSwap Children’s and maternity consignment, Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Wed., drop-off; Thurs., pre-sale event; Fri., public sale 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., public sale 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., public sale 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Featuring items from fall/winter. www.totswap.net. “Junie B. Jones,” The Weinberg Center for the Arts, 20 W. Patrick St., Frederick. 10 a.m. & 12:15 p.m. Outspoken, lovable Junie B. Jones stars in a colorful, funny musical. Theatreworks USA. Admission. 301/600-2828. www.weinbergcenter.org. Gardens At Night: Shag, Museum of the Shenandoah Valley, 901 Amherst St., Winchester. 6-9 p.m. Pop rock. Free activities for kids offered from 6-8 pm. Free/MSV Members and children 12 &

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under, $10/adults (includes music, gardens, and gallery admission.) www.shenandoahmuseum.org. 2nd Annual Barn Dance, ThorpeWood, 12805-A Mink Farm Rd., Thurmont, MD. 7:30-10:30 p.m. Features The Speakeasy Boys. To benefit the YMCA of Frederick County. $20. 301/271-2823. www.thorpewood.org. to 13 Fall Sale, TotSwap Baby to Teen Consignment Event, Frederick Fairgrounds, 797 E. Patrick St., Frederick. Fri., 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Anyone can shop, consign or volunteer. 301/330-2678. www.TotSwap.net. Jack Russell Terrier National Trials, Washington County Agricultural Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 240/420-1714. www.jrtca.com. World War II Weekend, Town of Williamsport, MD and the Springfield Farm Barn. Fri., 5 p.m.; Sat., 9 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sun., 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Parade, 1940s fashion show, movies of the era, USO dance and canteen, salute to veterans and military members, antique cars and much more. http://williamsportmd.gov/ wwii_weekend.html. & 14 Schools Out for the Day, Clarke Co. Parks & Rec, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Activities for ages K-Grade 5. Camp follows Clarke County Public School schedule and is subject to change. $25. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. 3rd Annual Valley Rally Bicycle Ride, Clearbrook Park, Clear Brook, VA. Ride through the beautiful Shenandoah Valley of Virginia and Eastern Panhandle of West Virginia. Routes of 10 (family route), 25, 50, and 65 (metric century), and 100 miles. Bike ride to benefit Boy Scouts of America. Register online for $35. Special pricing for teams of 5 or more. 540/662-2551. www.valleyrallybikeride.com. Hike With A Friend, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 9 a.m. Meet at the Lost Mountain Parking Area. 540/5923556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Hedgesville Heritage Day, Hedgesville, WV. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Handcrafted arts & crafts, church tours, history presentations, children’s area, bounce houses, magic shows, food, treats and live music. 304/7544827. 43rd Annual Festival of Leaves, Chester and Main Streets, Front Royal, VA. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Warren Heritage Society’s fundraiser. Arts and crafts, 5K race & fun walk, living history demonstrations, crafts people, apple butter making, parade, bluegrass, country, jazz, big band, choir music, museums, historic home tours and more. 540/636-1446. www.FestivalofLeaves.com. Second Saturday Crafting Workshop, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 1-3 p.m. Children and adults of all ages can get their minds working and their

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Heads Up October cont. from page 29 creative juices flowing. Each month features a different history- or nature-themed craft project. Free. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Harvest Hoedown, Fairgrounds Park, 400 N. Mulberry St., Hagerstown, MD. 1-4 p.m. Familyfriendly event featuring music, fall activities and more. 301/739-8577, x183. www.hagerstownmd.org. “Why Do Leaves Change Color?” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 2 p.m. Presented by Keagan Boyce. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Astronomy For Everyone, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 6-9 p.m. Meet behind the historic Mount Bleak House. Half-hour “Junior Astronomer” program for ages 5-12. Multimedia presentation on the latest in U.S. space research. View deep space objects through multiple telescopes. $5 per car. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. & 13 Arborfest, Foundation of the State Arboretum: Blandy Farm, 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Boyce, VA. 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Fall festival and plant sale with scarecrow making, hay rides, bird walks and nature walks for the kids. 540/837-1758, x224. http://blandy.virginia.edu/our-foundation/arborfest. 40th Annual Apple Butter Festival, Berkeley Springs State Park and throughout town, Berkeley Springs, WV. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. Entertainment, band concerts, theater, crafts, parade, apple-butter making, games, food and more. 1-800/447-8797. www.berkeleysprings.com. Catoctin Colorfest, Community Park, Frederick Rd., Thurmont, MD. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Juried arts & crafts show. Free shuttle bus service and free admission. www.colorfest.org. Apple Harvest Festival, Marker-Miller Orchards, 3035 Cedar Creek Grade, Winchester. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 20 varieties of apples, apple cobbler, apple caramel sundaes, cow train, antique tractors, playground, music from 1-3 p.m., and more. 540/662-1391. www.markermillerorchards.com. Ivy Hill Farm Festival, Ivy Hill Farm, 13840 Smithsburg Pike, Smithsburg, MD. Sat., 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Fresh apple cider and copper kettle apple butter, craft vendors, free magic show, sheep shearing demonstration, food and more. www.ivy-hill-farm.com. Visiting Artist Series, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 54 S. Loudoun St., Winchester. Sat., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.; Sun., 1-4 p.m. Free with Museum admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. 44th Page County Heritage Festival, Page County Fairgrounds, Luray, VA. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Live entertainment, children’s activities, over 200 crafters, homemade food, historic book sale, antique tractor & engine show, and more. 540/743-2915. www.pagecountyheritage.com. Maryland Pumpkin Festival, Summers Farm, 5614 Butterfly Lane, Frederick. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Special weekend celebrating all things pumpkin. Pumpkin patch, pumpkin egg hunt, pumpkin donuts, pie and donut eating contests, face painting, live

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September/October 2013

A look at what’s happening in the region

EMAIL EVENTS TO CALENDAR@CHILDGUIDEMAGAZINE.COM

music and more. 301/620-9316. www.summersfarm.com. Antietam Battlefield Event, Antietam National Battlefield, Sharpsburg, MD. Sat., 11 a.m., 1 p.m. & 3 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m. & 1 p.m. Weapons Firing Demonstrations. Iron Brigade Weekend. www.nps.gov/anti. The Great Pumpkin Patch, Old National Pike District Park, 12406 Old National Pike, Mt. Airy, MD. 12 noon-5 p.m. Hayrides, moon bounces, pony rides, petting zoo, trick or treat trail, pumpkin decorating, face painting, games, and more. All inclusive pass for $5 per person. Pre-register by phone or online. 301/600-2936. www.recreater.com. Maryland Symphony Orchestra, The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 8 p.m. “Time for Three.” Admission. 301/797-4000. www.marylandsymphony.org. Gallery Quartet, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park at Park Circle. 2:30-4 p.m. Chamber music program featuring classical music. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org. School’s Out! Holiday Sports Express, Jefferson County Community Center, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sports and activities to keep the kids busy. Ages 5-12. $50. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. & 28 Let’s Move Mondays, The Children’s Museum of Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 9:30-11:30 a.m. Active play with a new theme each week. Ages 2-6. $4. 301/600-1650. www.rosehillmuseum.com. Planetarium Show: “Astronaut,” Earth and Space Science Laboratory, 210 Madison St., Frederick. 5:30, 6:30 & 7:30 p.m. Experience a rocket launch from inside the body of an astronaut. Admission. 240/236-2694. Kiwanis Travelogue: “Rediscovering Ancient America,” South Hagerstown High School, S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Travel movie narrated in person by Gray Warriner. $10, adults; $5, students. 301/739-1981.

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, 18, 21, 23, 25, 28, 30 & 31 16 Williamsport Haunted Walks, Town Hall, 2 N. Conocheague St., Williamsport, MD. 8 p.m. Meet at Town Hall for an evening of ghost hunting and ghost stories. 301/331-4891. www.williamsportmd.gov. to 20 Weekend Camp at Holiquin Riding Center, Waynesboro, PA. Enjoy a weekend of riding, attending the Pennsylvania National Horse Show, and renewing old camp acquaintances. 717/762-9341. www.Holiquin.com. to 20 34th Annual Mountain State Apple Harvest Festival, Martinsburg, WV. Gala ball, square dance, car show, parade, apple pie baking contest, apple arranging, photography contest, 5K Apple Trample race, music, arts and crafts, and much more. 304/263-2500. www.msahf.com. Mood Disorders and Cognitive Impairment in Neurological Disorders, Robinwood Professional Center, Newman Auditorium, Hagerstown. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. 7:30 a.m. check-in and continental breakfast. Continuing education opportunity provided by Meritus Health and Coprovided by Brook Lane. 301/733-0331, x189. www.brooklane.org.

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-19 & 25-26 Field of Terror, Star 18 Community, 13674 Greencastle Pike, Hagerstown. 7:30-10:30 p.m. The cornfield maze is free of hauntings for families with young children. No scare hours, 3-6 p.m. 301/791-0011. www.starcommunityinc.org Battlefield Hikes, Monocacy National Battlefield Visitor Center, 5201 Urbana Pike, Frederick. 9 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 2 p.m. National Park Service rangers conduct hikes that take visitors to separate areas of the battlefield highlighting the tactics and troop movements that transpired in those areas on July 9, 1864. 301/662-3515. Fort Ritchie Community Center’s Fall Craft & Car Show, 14421 Lake Royer Dr., Cascade, MD. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Fall indoor/outdoor craft show and car show. Car show proceeds benefit FRCC & Children’s Miracle Network. 301/241-5085. Chambersburg Apple Fest, Main St. & Lincoln Way, Chambersburg. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Arts, crafts, food, entertainment, apple-related products & services, contests and more. 717/263-8529. www.chambersburg.biz. Apple Festival, Richard’s Fruit Market, 6410 Middle Rd., Middletown, VA. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Family friendly event with plenty of apples and a petting zoo. www.richardsfruitmarket.com/festivals. 4th Annual Living History Day, Rural Heritage Museum, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Experience rural life in Washington County in the mid 1800s. Free. 240/420-1714. www.ruralheritagemuseum.org. Discovery Story Theater, Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum, 54 S. Loudoun St., Winchester. 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Free with Museum admission. 540/722-2020. www.discoverymuseum.net. Pumpkin Fest, Renfrew Museum and Park, 1010 E. Main St., Waynesboro, PA. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Admission. 717/762-0373. “Explore Fossils and Rocks in America and Washington County.” Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 1 p.m. Presented by Alan Hedges. 301/790-0076. www.discoverystation.org. Concordia Youth Chorale Concert Tour, National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, 339 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg, MD. 4 p.m. Performance by the 30member children’s choir, ages K-12, which has performed worldwide. 301/447-6606. Halloween Happenings, Clearbrook Park, Winchester. 5:30-9:30 p.m. Games, haunted hayride, pumpkin painting, trick-or-treating and more. 5:30-6 p.m., trick-or-treating; 6;30-9:30 p.m., haunted hayrides. $5, ages 8 & up; $3, ages 4-7; free, ages under 3. www.visitwinchesterva.com. Full Moon Walk, Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 6-7:30 p.m. Meet at the Visitor Center. Follow a Park Ranger up to the Piedmont Overlook. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Ghost Walk, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. 7-9 p.m. Western Maryland legends and scary stories come to life as you walk thought the supernatural night time park. Program not appropriate for young children. Park entrance fees apply. 301/842-2155.

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Spirits of the Furnace, Cunningham Falls State Park, Manor Area, Route 15 South, Thurmont, MD. 79:30 p.m. Guided night hike to the historic Catoctin Iron Furnace with stops along the trail to hear historical accounts and spooky tales from costumed interpreters. Small campfire with S’mores and apple cider available at Visitors Center. Bring a flashlight. Order tickets in advance by calling 301/271-3676. & 20 149th Anniversary Reenactment of the Battle of Cedar Creek, Middletown, VA. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Commemoration of the largest Civil War battle in the Shenandoah Valley held on the original battlegrounds in Middletown, VA. Military, civilian and living history camps; crafts, gifts, food, music, educational demonstrations, and more. $12, adults; $6, ages 7-17; free, children 6 & under; $40, family rate per vehicle with up to 9 people. 540/8692064. www.ccbf.us. Civil War Living History and Reenactment Weekend, Belle Grove Plantation, 336 Belle Grove Rd., Middletown, VA. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Costumed interpreters demonstrate life on the homefront during the Civil War. www.bellegrove.org. Family Festival at the Farm, farms throughout Frederick County, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-4 p.m. Rain dates: Oct. 26 & 27. Visit Frederick County farms on this self-guided adventure. Tours and activities wil be available at various locations. 301/600-1058. www.discoverfrederickmd.com/funfarm. South Mountain Creamery Fall Festival, 8305 Bolivar Rd., Middletown, MD. Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Ice cream and butter making demonstrations, hayrides, tours, local vendors, bluegrass music, and South Mountain Creamery and vendor samples. 301/371-8565. www.southmountaincreamery.com. Oktoberfest at Schifferstadt, Schifferstadt Architectural Museum, 1110 Rosemont Ave., Frederick. Sat., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sun., 12 noon-5 p.m. German cultural activities, arts & crafts, oompah band, children’s activities, living history demonstrations and more. 301/668-6088. www.frederickcountylandmarksfoundation.org. “Drink Your Apples: Roeder’s Tavern Cider Making, 1860,” Harpers Ferry National Park, Harpers Ferry, WV. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Join living history rangers and foodways expert Carol Anderson for demonstrations of cider-making and Fall food preservation. Park entrance fee. 304/535-6024. Zombie Run, Star Community, 13674 Greencastle Pike, Hagerstown, MD. 301/791-0011. Registration available online at www.starcommunityinc.org Rose Hill Carriage Sociey’s Annual Carriage Drive, Rose Hill Manor Park, 1611 N. Market St., Frederick. 1-3 p.m. Parade of horsedrawn carriages. 301/600-1650. Illustration for Books Lecture, 109 First Street, Berryville, WV. 2-4 p.m. Doug Pifer will share his experience in having artwork published both in magazines, newspapers and as an illustrator of books. Ages 12+. $10. 540/955-4226. Bats program, Blandy Farm, 400 Blandy Farm Lane, Boyce, VA. 7-8:30 p.m. Hear about these amazing mammals and the many ways they contribute to healthy environments. Learn about ongoing and emerging threats to their well being, and what you can do to help. $8, FOSA members; $10, nonmembers; $20, whole family. 540/837-1758. to 25 5th Annual Halloween in Baker Park, 121 N. Bentz St., Frederick. 6:30 p.m. Register for Halloween Haunted guide walking tour throughout Baker Park. Zombies, goblins and creatures of the night will appear. Dance Unlimited of the Performing Arts Factory will be performing nightly in the Bandshell. 301/600-1492. NOW THIS! KIDS! The Maryland Theatre, 21 S. Potomac St., Hagerstown. 10 a.m. Interactive, improvised blend of Blues, Broadway, folk

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music and a musical folklore or fairytale “Nobody Ever Heard of Before.” Entire performance is based on audience suggestions. $5. 301/790-3500. www.mdtheatre.org. Planetarium Show: “Enchanted Reef,” Earth and Space Science Laboratory, 210 Madison St., Frederick. 5:30, 6:30 & 7:30 p.m. The enchanted reef Kaluoka’hina. Admission. 240/236-2694. Middletown Annual Halloween Parade, downtown Middletown, MD. Costume judging will be held at the tennis courts at 5:45 p.m. Parade begins at 6:15 p.m. Dress in costume and march down Main St. Treats for children will be handed out to kids after the parade at the fire dept. 301/371-6171. to 27 Kids Closet Connection Fall Sale, 890 W. Main St., Berryville. Save 6090% off the retail price for quality, gently-used children’s clothes. Find everything you need for your babies, children and teens. Free admission. www.kidscloset.biz. The Park at Dark, Washington County Agricultural Education Center, 7313 Sharpsburg Pike, Boonsboro, MD. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Moonbounces, prizes, games, scary stories, hayrides, spooky graveyard, goodie bags, costume contest and more. $5, ages 2-11; $1, ages 12 and up. Everyone 2 and up must have a ticket. Tickets limited, register early. 240/313-2805. Ghost and History Tour of Fort Ritchie, Fort Ritchie Community Center, 14421 Lake Royer Dr., Cascade, MD. 6 p.m. Guided walk around Fort Ritchie. Learn about Nazi prisoners, secret codes, ghostly sentries and more. Free event, recommended for children 9 and older. 301/241-5085. Halloween Happening, Jefferson County Community Center, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 6:30-9 p.m. Family-friendly event with games, costume contests, prizes, hayrides, and much more. Preregistration preferred. $5. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. City Center Ghost Tours, Hagerstown. 7 p.m. Take a walking tour or hayride through historic Hagerstown’s City Center and learn about hauntings along the way. Reservations required. 301/739-8577, x183. www.hagerstownmd.org. & 26 A Night at the Brunswick Heritage Museum, 40 W. Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 8 p.m. Evening of Halloween fun with a spooky surprise or two. 301/834-7100.

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Child Guide

& 27 Back from the Dead: Cemetery 25 Walk, National Shrine of St. Elizabeth Ann Seton, 339 S. Seton Ave., Emmitsburg, MD. 7-10 p.m. “Evangelization drama” to help teach the faith about the “Last Things.” Registration required. 301/4476606. Furmont Day, Thurmont Carnival Grounds, Main St., Thurmont, MD. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Bring your canines, felines, or any critter with fur, large or small, and enter to win great prizes. Games, contests, and lots of fun. 240/529-7814. Pumpkin Festival, Marker-Miller Orchards, 3035 Cedar Creek Grade, Winchester. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Come find the “great pumpkin.” Pick your own or pick one that’s been picked. Enjoy pumpkin pie, pumpkin rolls, pumpkin bars, pumpkin donuts, wagon rides, barrel train, music, pumpkin pitch, and more. 540/6621391. www.markermillerorchards.com. Western Maryland Rail Trail – Guided Bike Tour, Fort Frederick State Park, 11100 Fort Frederick Rd., Big Pool, MD. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Meet at the C&O Bicycle Shop in Hancock at 10 a.m. Ranger-guided bike ride is approximately 22 miles long and is taken at a leisurely pace. 301/842-2155. Silk Painting, Opus Oaks, 109 First Street, Berryville, WV. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Learn the art using dyes and resists to create a scarf suitable as a gift or a hanging. Ages 12+. $60. 540/955-4226. Goods from the Hearth, Roger Brooke Taney House, 121 S. Bentz St., Frederick. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Explore 18th and 19th century methods of food preparation and preservation. Hearth cooking demonstrations and activities for younger visitors will be ongoing. Tours and activities included with regular museum admission. 301/663-1188, x105. www.hsfcinfo.org. Halloween Trick or Treating, Westview Promenade, Rt. 85 at Crestwood Blvd., Frederick. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Children decorate their own treat bag, visit activity stations throughout the center, and receive candy from participating merchants. 410/561-1300. Enchanted Pumpkin Patch, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 12 noon-2 p.m. Play area and party with Halloweenthemed activities, games, prizes, music, candy and decorations. Youngsters encouraged to wear a costume. Ages 3-10. $5. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Halloween in Downtown Frederick, 19 E. Church St., Frederick. 12 noon-4 p.m. Trick-or-treat downtown and enjoy additional Halloween fun. 301/698-8118.

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Heads Up Oct. cont. from page 31 Fused Glass Ornament Workshop, Opus Oaks, 109 First Street, Berryville, WV. 1-4 p.m. Learn how to make small holiday ornaments out of beautifullycolored glass with Gail Gramprie. Free. Ages 13+. $50 ($25 materials fee). 540/955-4226. Zombie 5K Chase, Fitness Trail, Clarke County Parks & Recreation, 225 Al Smith Circle, Berryville, VA. 1:30-6 p.m. Register as a runner, zombie chaser, zombie walker or zombie creeper. Must be 10 or older. Scary event. Race fee. 540/955-5140. www.clarkecounty.gov/parks. Halloween at Discovery Station, 101 W. Washington St., Hagerstown. 1-3 p.m. Children are invited to come dressed up in their own costumes and Trick-or-Treat through the exhibits for clues to discover. Volunteer staff will be dressed appropriately for each exhibit. Halloween cookies and punch will be served upon completion of “discovery clues” in the Cafe. Reservations are required. 301/7900076. www.discoverystation.org. Annual Un-scary Fall-o-ween Party, Thurmont Regional Library, 76 E. Moser Rd., Thurmont, MD. 2 p.m. Entertainment, costume parade, carnival-style games, and easy

A look at what’s happening in the region

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seasonal crafts. Ages 2-8, with adult. 301/600-7200. Mummers Day Parade 2 Mile Spooky Sprint, race from Hagerstown Fairground Park on 351 N. Cleveland Ave. and finish at Bester Elementary School on Memorial Blvd. in Hagerstown. 5 p.m. Course closed to traffic from 4:45 p.m. until end of race. Registration/packet pick up 3:45-4:45 p.m. Costumes encouraged. T-shirts to first 200 registrants and award ceremony at 6 p.m. $20, registration fee before Oct. 25; $25, registration fee after Oct. 25. 240/313-2808. Alsatia Mummers Parade, Hagerstown. 6 p.m. Longtime fall traditional parade features local floats, bands and individual costumed mummers. 301/739-2044. www.alsatiaclubinc.com. Walkersville Southern Railroad Ghost Trains, 34 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Walkersville, MD. 7 & 8:30 p.m. Take a “spook-tacular” night ride. Cider and cookies in the museum after your ride. Reservations recommended. Admission. 301/898-0899. Brunswick Halloween Party & Trick-or-Treating, Main Street Brunswick, Potomac St., Brunswick, MD. 7-9 p.m. Holiday fun for children. Trick-or-treat throughout the city and downtown shops, and enjoy other activities. 301/834-5591.

Planetarium Show: “Star of & 27 Halloween Trick or 29 Pharohs,” Earth and Space 26 Treating and Haunted Science Laboratory, 210 Madison St., House, Everedy Square & Shab Row, East and Church Streets, Frederick. 1-5 p.m. Decorate a treat bag and trick or treat throughout participating merchants. Family-friendly haunted house. For kids of all ages. 301/6624140. Hike through History at Sky Meadows State Park, 11012 Edmonds Lane, Delaplane, VA. 10 a.m.-12 noon. Meet at Lost Mountain Trailhead. Walk in the footsteps of George Washington, Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, and James Longstreet. 540/592-3556. www.virginiastateparks.gov. Halloween on the Farm, Crumland Farms, 7612 Willow Rd., Frederick, MD. 1-4 p.m. Wear your best costume and enjoy a fun-filled day of trick-or-treating, crafts, vendors, games, corn maze, MooChoo train, giant slide, hayride to pumpkin patch, and more. 301/8458099. Appalachian Wind Quintet, Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown (MD) City Park at Park Circle. 2:30-4 p.m. Woodwind quintets from the classical period to the present. Ticketed event. $5, nonmembers; free, members and children 12 & under. 301/739-5727. www.wcmfa.org.

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Frederick. 5:30, 6:30 & 7:30 p.m. Travel to Ancient Egypt to see how science was used to tell time, make a workable calendar, and align huge buildings. Admission. 240/236-2694. The Banner School Open House, 1730 N. Market St., Frederick. 4-6 p.m. Coffeehouse. 301/695-9320, x32. www.bannerschool.org. HAPPY HALLOWEEN! Colorful Characters Parade, C. Burr Artz Public Library, 110 E. Patrick St., Frederick. 10:15 a.m. Dress as your favorite character and join the parade. Ages 2-5, with adult. 301/600-1629. www.fcpl.org. Spooktacular Halloween Craft, Jefferson County Community Center, Sam Michael’s Park, 235 Sam Michael’s Lane, Shenandoah Junction, WV. 3:30-4:30 p.m. Decorate pumpkins and make other fun Halloween crafts. Ages 3-5. $14. 304/728-3207. www.jcprc.org. Moonlight Festival, Town Center, Williamsport, MD. 6-8 p.m. Fun, games, costumes welcome, treats, hay wagon rides, spooky things and much more. 301/223-7711. –CG www.williamsportmd.gov.

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INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 1-2-3 Just PLAY With Me. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 24-7 Dance Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Back Cover Authentic Community Theatre – ACT, Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Ballet and all that Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 The Banner School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Blue Mountain Home Pet Care . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Child Spirit Consignment Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Circle of Life Cooperative Preschool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Cluggy’s Family Amusements. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Dr. Tod R. Davis, Developmental Optometry and Vision Therapy Service. . . . . . . . . . 12 Discovery Station . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Educare Learning Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Ellsworth Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Field of Terror (Star Community) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Frederick Pediatric Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Grafton Integrated Health Network . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Holiquin Riding Center. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Inwood Performing Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Kid’s Closet Connection Sale – Washington Co. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 The Light of the Child Montessori School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Page 32

September/October 2013

Maryland School for the Deaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Moments by Misty Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Jeffrey Pearlman, D.D.S. & Melanie Newman, D.D.S, Children’s Dentistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Inside Front Cover The Pediatric Center of Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 Pediatric Dental Center of Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Back Cover ProDesign . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Pups N’ Cuts. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Rings of Life Therapy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Saint John Regional Catholic School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Shenandoah Valley Discovery Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Shepherdstown School of Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 The Tennis Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Thirty-One Gifts, Lizzy Fontaine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 TotSwap Consignment Sale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Trinity School of Frederick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Valley Rally Bike Ride . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Walnut Street Dental Practice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 WV Pediatric Therapy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Zumba Fitness with Jaye Gelwicks. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

Child Guide

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Sept/Oct 2013 Child Guide  

Back to School and More! From choosing after-school activities to the pet that fits your family, this issue covers it, plus Special Needs se...

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