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CHICAGO STUDIES

a historian who knows that the arts cannot be regulated or promoted by edicts and monopolies; it has often been tried and has never worked. Appreciation of the arts is a matter not of legislation but of education. Finally, may I say that I was associated not with The New York Times but with the New York Herald Tribune of happy memory. Paul Henry Lang Columbia University in the City of New York New York, N.Y.

Dear Editors: I apologize for the error of fact in assoc1atmg Dr. Lang with the New York Times rather than the New York Herald Tribune. Concerning Dr. Lang's disavowal of influence and leadership among church musicians, their high regard for Dr. Lang is a fact. Within the limits of the size of the article I feared that justice could not be done to the principles and integrity of Dr. Lang. It is apparent to all who heard or read Dr. Lang's talk or enjoyed any contact with him that he is disturbed about the lack of artistic content of most-perhaps all--<>f the "new era" music and the cultural and liturgical pollution such inartistic music breeds. No guilt by association was intended and an attempt was made to prevent such implication. It is apparent from his own words that Dr. Lang is the voice of artistic integrity in evaluating and creating liturgical music even in its simplest forms and styles of expression. I am grateful for the occasion to dispel the false implications that cursory readings could create. I welcome the opportunity to acknowledge and salute again the hard-earned integrity that Dr. Lang enjoys m the world of music. Richard J. Wojcik St. Mary of the Lake Seminary Mundelein, Illinois

Profile for Chicago Studies

Spring 1968  

Volume 7:1

Spring 1968  

Volume 7:1

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