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Derivatives. Chesapeake uses commodity price and financial risk management instruments to mitigate a portion of our exposure to price fluctuations in oil, natural gas and NGL prices, changes in interest rates and foreign exchange rates. Gains and losses on derivative contracts are reported as a component of the related transaction. Results of commodity derivative contracts are reflected in oil, natural gas and NGL sales and results of interest rate and foreign exchange rate derivative contracts are reflected in interest expense. The changes in the fair value of derivative instruments not qualifying, or not elected, for designation as either cash flow or fair value hedges that occur prior to maturity are reported currently in the consolidated statement of operations as unrealized gains (losses) within oil, natural gas and NGL sales or interest expense. Cash settlements of our derivative arrangements are generally classified as operating cash flows unless the derivative is deemed to contain, for accounting purposes, a significant financing element at contract inception, in which case these cash settlements are classified as financing cash flows in the accompanying consolidated statements of cash flows. Accounting guidance for derivative instruments and hedging activities establishes accounting and reporting standards requiring that derivative instruments (including certain derivative instruments embedded in other contracts) be recorded at fair value and included in the consolidated balance sheets as assets or liabilities. The accounting for changes in the fair value of a derivative instrument depends on the intended use of the derivative and the resulting designation, which is established at the inception of a derivative. For derivative instruments designated as oil, natural gas and NGL cash flow hedges, changes in fair value, to the extent the hedge is effective, are recognized in other comprehensive income until the hedged item is recognized in earnings as oil, natural gas and NGL sales. Any change in the fair value resulting from ineffectiveness is recognized immediately in oil, natural gas and NGL sales. For interest rate derivative instruments designated as fair value hedges, changes in fair value, as well as the offsetting changes in the estimated fair value of the hedged item attributable to the hedged risk, are recognized currently in earnings as interest expense. Differences between the changes in the fair values of the hedged item and the derivative instrument, if any, represent gains or losses on ineffectiveness and are reflected currently in interest expense. Hedge effectiveness is measured at least quarterly based on the relative changes in fair value between the derivative contract and the hedged item over time. Changes in fair value of contracts that do not qualify as hedges or are not designated as hedges are also recognized currently in earnings. See Derivative Activities above and Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk for additional information regarding our derivative activities. One of the primary factors that can have an impact on our results of operations is the method used to value our derivatives. We have established the fair value of our derivative instruments utilizing established index prices, volatility curves and discount factors. These estimates are compared to counterparty valuations for reasonableness. Derivative transactions are also subject to the risk that counterparties will be unable to meet their obligations. This non-performance risk is considered in the valuation of our derivative instruments, but to date has not had a material impact on the values of our derivatives. The values we report in our financial statements are as of a point in time and subsequently change as these estimates are revised to reflect actual results, changes in market conditions and other factors. Additionally, in accordance with accounting guidance for derivatives and hedging, to the extent that a legal right of set-off exists, we net the value of our derivative instruments with the same counterparty in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets. Another factor that can impact our results of operations each period is our ability to estimate the level of correlation between future changes in the fair value of the derivative instruments and the transactions being hedged, both at inception and on an ongoing basis. This correlation is complicated since energy commodity prices, the primary risk we hedge, have quality and location differences that can be difficult to hedge effectively. The factors underlying our estimates of fair value and our assessment of correlation of our derivative instruments are impacted by actual results and changes in conditions that affect these factors, many of which are beyond our control. Due to the volatility of oil, natural gas and NGL prices and, to a lesser extent, interest rates and foreign exchange rates, the Company's financial condition and results of operations can be significantly impacted by changes in the market value of our derivative instruments. As of December 31, 2016 and 2015, the fair values of our derivatives were net liabilities of $577 million and net assets of $512 million, respectively.

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Profile for Chesapeake Energy

2016 Annual Report  

2016 Annual Report