Issuu on Google+

2A

n

Wednesday, January 4, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

Finding flaws in TransCanada’s claims

Thanks to the community from Lilbert-Looneyville VFD

HARLAN CRAWFORD Reklaw

I hope, by now, the citizens of East Texas have heard all the pros and cons concerning the TransCanada Keystone XL 10(L) tar sands oil pipeline which is planned to pass through the eastern part of the state of Texas. If so, I also hope you have made an informed and educated opinion of what you think about this 36-inch pipeline. I would like to present to you some parts about the claims and misinformation that has been made to the general public by KXL. This pipeline will be carrying some of the most corrosive oil and toxic chemicals over our only available source of water, the Carrizo-Wilcox Aquifer. This “stuff” is much heavier than water and will sink into the ground. The KXL has already had numerous spills in other areas of the U.S. If such a spill happened in East Texas, it could contaminate the aquifer, streams, rivers, the proposed

Lake Columbia and many lakes and reservoirs downstream. This information that I am presenting was obtained from a study conducted by the Cornell University Global Labor Institution titled “Pipe Dreams?” The jobs claimed by KXL is based on a $7 billion project budget. However, this actual budget in the United States is much lower $3-4 billion. This means fewer jobs than projected. The company’s claim of 20,000 direct construction and manufacturing jobs in the U.S. for two years is contradicted by TransCanada’s own data supplied to the U.S. State’s Department. According to this data, only between 2,500 and 4,650 temporary jobs will be created. There is strong evidence to indicate that a large portion of the pipe and material used for this project will not be manufactured in the United States, but in Canada, India and South Korea by temporary labor.

This KXL project will not be a major source of U.S. jobs. The company’s claim that KXL will create 119,000 total jobs is based on a flawed, erroneous and poorly documented study instituted by TransCanada by the Perryman Group. Perryman wrongly includes over $1 billion in spending and over 10,000 person years of employment for a section of the Keystone project in Kansas and Oklahoma that is not part of the KXL and has already been built. This article covers but few of the TransCanada KXL claims and promises which are severely flawed in content and misinformation. Please call your Congress representatives (federal & state) with your opinion on the subject. I hope to provide more of these type of KXL claims in the future. Mr. Crawford is the mayor of Reklaw and a member of the 391 Commission (ETSRPC).

A ‘lesson’ and a few concerns 

RAY CRYER Rusk

The late Marge Hunter once graciously announced at a large community meeting that I am one of four “community teachers.” That is laudatory, yet a role I aspire to fill, though it is not always conducive to harmony. Here’s my attempt at a lesson. The Dec. 14 issue of the Wall Street Journal indicated that the U.S. is awash with fraud against “baby boomers.” Typically they are Ponzi schemes, or self-directed mutual funds that can hide a host of bad investments. Boston College did a study which showed that the typical person is at the peak of financial decision making at age 53.3 and goes downhill thereafter. Our country has 77 million baby boomers. Some would have to trust oil companies, foreignowned news and various duplicitous organizations. Do they really think we deserve that?

Another concern I have is that our area is gun crazy. We spend large amounts on guns, and fantasize that the government wants our weapons, which we see as our salvation. The government does not want your weapons, but if it did, it would have very little trouble collecting them. I saw a silly window sticker showing an assault rifle and a statement, “Come and get it.” I presume the driver meant the government. My father was with the fourth armored division, which spearheaded Patton’s third army. Once, for 250 miles, he rode the lead tank in the spear point. There was absolutely nothing in front of him and his fellow infantrymen but the Wehrmacht. He was shot twice, so he knew the force of arms. I asked him, “If we marshaled every gun in Rusk, how long

could we hold back the WWll fourth armored?” He said, without hesitation, “You couldn’t even slow us down.” Long ago, in a survivalist mode, I suggested we build a below ground structure and stock it with food, guns and such. He said to me,” Are you prepared to shoot your hungry neighbors if they came looking for food?” I meekly replied,” No I guess not.” I do not count my survival above all things in this world, and whoever does can explain that to God. If the owner of such stickers wish to feel more macho, here’s a suggestion: go to a fitness center and press weights or start a boxing club – I’ll join.

BOBBY BRASHEARS Cushing

The Lilbert-Looneyville Volunteer Fire Department would like to express its sincere appreciation and gratitude for everything that the citizens of our communities in Nacogdoches and Cherokee counties have given to our fire department. We would also like to thank the other fire departments that responded to assist us. Those departments include, but are not limited to, Cushing, Sacul, Rusk, Douglass, Loco Valley, Linn Flat, Nacogdoches, Appleby, Swift-Shady Grove, Melrose, Central Heights, Chireno, Alto, Wells, Texas Forest Service and the Nacogdoches Rehab Unit. It’s been just a little over three months since the Labor Day weekend fires. Our communities were faced with a serious threat of wildfire due to the drought. The intensity and size of the fires were ones that we are not accustomed to seeing in our region. Through your generous contributions and support, our firefighters were able to successfully battle the largest fire in our department’s history without any injuries, loss to human life or major structural property loss. The largest fire, dubbed the Angelina River Bottom Fire, started Sunday afternoon, September 4, west of Lilbert. The origin of the fire was one mile north of FM343 in eastern Cherokee county near the river. In a matter of hours, it had jumped the river and FM343. Four days later, after consuming 6,550 acres of mostly timber, the fire was contained west of Douglass along SH21 near the river. During this wildfire disaster, our communities showed its true colors by coming

Feb 11 Valentines Dinner Train Feb 12 Peanuts™ The Valentines Express April 6&7 Peanuts™ The Easter Beagle Express April 14-15 & 21-22 New this year! Dinosaur Train™ May 5&6 RailFest 2012 May 25-27 Memorial Day Armed Forces Event Oct Select Dates Peanuts™ The Great Pumpkin Patch Express Nov-Dec Select Dates The Polar Express™ Train Ride

Kelly Leight, LUTCF, Agent

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

845 Loop FM 343 W., Rusk,TX 75785

Citizens 1st

903.683.2576

BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Coverage and discounts are subject to qualifications and policy terms, and may vary by situation. ©2010 Texas Farm Bureau Insurance Companies. AD_55

y p Hap ar e Y w e $ N MSRP PEARMAN DISC. SALE PRICE

2011 RAM 1500

17,585

$22,755 $5,170

$17,585

STK#542865

STK#524965

$

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

Mr. Brashears is the Fire Chief for the LilbertLooneyville Volunteer Fire Department.

James Blankinship, LUTCF, Agent

2011 CHRYSLER 200

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

together and lending a helping hand to the volunteer firemen and emergency workers; a characteristic that comes natural to the people in East Texas. Water, Gatorade, hot meals, snack foods, personal hygiene items, heavy equipment, man power, organized fund raisers and monetary donations are just some of the things that the citizens of our communities gave in support to our efforts. There are many businesses, restaurants, churches, community organizations and private citizens that have contributed to our fire department and to the others that were involved in the Angelina River Bottom Fire. Listing each of them would fill this entire page of the newspaper, and we would still probably unintentionally miss one. Having said that, please know that each and every one of us at the Lilbert-Looneyville Volunteer Fire Department recognizes and greatly appreciates every single donated item, man power and monetary donations that you have given and we are forever thankful for your support. We hope that our communities never see another wildfire like this one again; but if we do, we know that our citizens will stand by us ready to support our efforts once again. We also hope that you will continue to support your local volunteer fire departments, as we routinely respond to hundreds of fires, wrecks and emergency medical calls throughout the year. Once again, thank you for all your support.

“We could save you up to 40% on your auto insurance.”

903-683-2277

2012 SPECIAL EVENTS

opinion

18,495

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. SALE PRICE

$20,290 $1,795

$18,495

2011 JEEP PATRIOT STK#289845

$

STK#587155

$

18,995

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. SALE PRICE

$22,995 $4,000

$18,995

2011 DODGE AVENGER STK#574699

21,490

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. SALE PRICE

2011 DODGE NITRO

$24,090 $2,600

$21,490

$

20,595

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. SALE PRICE

$25,700 $5,105

$20,595

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

HWY. 69

MOTOR COMPANY

IN

ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 • www.pearmanmotor.com Pictures for illustration purposes only.


Cherokeean

thecherokeean.com

Vol. 162

n

No. 48

n

CE

16 pgs.

ING T A R LEB

WEDNESDAY

EARS Y 1 6 1

H E R A L D

January 25, 2012 Rusk, Texas

Texas’ Oldest Weekly Newspaper

n

75 cents

See pg. – 8A

| chamber JACKSONVILLE The outstanding citizen of the year

Retired ship captain reacts to Italian pg. 7B shipwreck

see pg. 3B

will be named on Monday. Ticket information to the banquet inside this issue.

DECISION Texas could have 2 2012 primary elections O

CHEROKEE COUNTY

Important dates to remember for the April 3 primary elections: • Last day to register to vote: March 5 • Last day to apply for ballot by mail: March 27 • Early voting: March 19-30 at the following locations: ALTO: A. Frank Smith Methodist Church, 103 Cooper St., (936) 858-4347 RUSK: Cherokee County Election Office,138 W. 5th (903) 683- 8409 JACKSONVILLE: Jacksonville Public Library, 502 S. Jackson, (903) 586- 7664

CELEBRITY

Parties must agree by Feb. 6 deadline BY DAVE MUTO

TEXAS TRIBUNE.ORG

Texans again face the possibility of having to vote two separate times this spring in the state’s primary elections. Federal redistricting judges in San Antonio said Monday that they are “giving serious consideration” to splitting the state’s April 3 primary

STATE REP, DIST. 11

into two elections if the parties at odds over the state’s interim maps can’t come to an agreement by Feb. 6. The three-judge panel said in an order issued Monday that lawyers should be prepared to discuss a split primary by the end of the week and asked for input on the idea of holding a presidential primary on April 3 and all other elections at a later date. The panel said it would See REDISTRICTING, pg. 6A

JISD board members honored by district BY QUINTEN BOYD STAFF WRITER

The members of the Jacksonville ISD School Board were honored for the work they have done for the district during their monthly regular meeting Monday evening. In honor of School Board Recognition Month, each trustee and superintendent Dr. Joe Wardell were selected by one of JISD’s campuses and

presented with personalized gifts. “You all wear different hats during the day, but you come together for the good of the district,” said assistant superintendent of instruction Judy Terry. “You do so many wonderful things for our kids, our staff and our community. You are a part of JISD and we consider you as family.” The tokens put smiles on the faces of school board

q Chuck Hopson*, Republican

DISTRICT ATTORNEY COUNTY ATTORNEY

q Craig Caldwell*, Democrat

CHEROKEE COUNTY SHERIFF

County b-ball squads start playoff surges

q James Campbell*, Republican

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, PCT. 1

q Kelly Traylor*, Republican q Earl Socia, Republican

* denotes incumbent Pd political adv. by the candidates above. If you are a political candidate seeking office and would like to have your name added to the Cherokeean Herald’s political calendar, stop by our office at 140 N. Main St. in Rusk or call (903) 683-2257. Ask for information about Classic Hits Radio – 97.7 FM political calendar as well as Channel 19, public access on the Rusk cable system.

STAFF WRITER

Cherokee County Attorney Craig Caldwell presented his annual report to the commissioners court Monday morning. Mr. Caldwell said his office collected a total of $39,100.46 for hot checks from January-December 2011. Assessed court costs collected for restitutions, vendor fees, attorney fees and other costs totaled $121,653. Assessed fines collected totaled $226,838. Bond forfeitures totaled $14,109. In another matter, Veterans Service Officer David Thomason asked that the county do something about the backlog of work of the IT technician. “I have spent $3,000 on hardware and software for my computer. I spent another $1,200 for a scanner 16 months ago. The technician is unable to set my computer up because of lack of time in his scheduling.” County Judge Chris Davis said, “We have money in the budget to hire part-time help

See pg. 1B for more

Local political debate planned Feb. 7 at Jacksonville College

Rusk citizens who oppose the sale of all alcoholic beverages in Rusk are invited to a meeting of Citizens Against Legalized Liquor (CALL) at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6, at Rusk First Baptist Church

Nursing aide classes slated in Alto

Angelina College announced a new start date of Saturday, Jan. 28, for Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) classes in Alto. Classes will be held every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Angelina College postponed the medication aide classes until Feb. 6. Classes will be held on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1:45-5:45 p.m. CPR classes and courses for Healthcare providers will be offered on Feb. 10, March 9 and April 6. For more information call (936) 465-9797.Financial assistance for CNA and medication aide classes is available from Angelina College to students who qualify.

Hot check collections hit $39,100 BY GLORIA JENNINGS

COMING

CALL organizational meeting set Feb. 6

See JISD, pg. 7B

CHEROKEE COUNTY COMMISSIONERS

q Elmer Beckworth*, Democrat

A political debate for Republican candidates will be held at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 7 at the Jacksonville College chapel. Invited are candidates for state senate, state representative and county offices. Michele Reese of Channel 19 News, will be moderator.

members. “We appreciate all that you, as a school district and a community, do for us,” said board president James Houser. “It is a pleasure to serve you. Thank you all for making this a job that we love.” Several items on the agenda were deferred until next month because Dr. Wardell was not in attendance after a hospital

See CHEROKEE COUNTY, pg. 6A

Rusk Citizen of Year will be revealed Saturday 40 attend pipeline meeting in Reklaw Obama refuses to approve Presidential Permit for proposed Keystone Pipeline extension

BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

Approximately 40 persons crowded the Reklaw City Hall Jan. 17 seeking answers from a TransCanada spokesperson regarding environmental and eminent domain concerns over the proposed Keystone XL pipeline which would transport bitumen tar sands from Canada to Port Arthur. Company spokesperson Susan Medina, scheduled to address the Reklaw City Council, was unexpectedly unable to attend. Reklaw Mayor Harlan Crawford introduced David Dunnigan, a subcontractor for TransCanada, who explained that he would

BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

With a stroke of his pen, executive powers were exercised Jan. 18 as President Barrack Obama rejected TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL tar sands pipeline application. This denial of a permit to construct the 1,700-mile KXL pipeline See PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT, pg. 6A

See PROPOSED PIPELINE, pg. 6A

WEATHER 30% chance of rain THURSDAY 55 high – 45 low

BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

Walter and Maxine Session, last year’s recipients of the Rusk Citizens of the Year, will present the award to this year’s recipient Saturday night at the 71st annual chamber banquet at the Rusk Civic Center. Doors will open at 6 p.m. and dinner will be served at 6:30 p.m. Also highlighting the evening will be the naming of Rusk’s Business of the Year, Business Woman and Business Man of the Year. See RUSK CHAMBER, pg. 6A

6 CHEROKEE COUNTY FOOTBALL PLAYERS NAMED ACADEMIC ALL STATE INSIDE NEWS

n n

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 2A

n

VIEWPOINTS 3A

n

DEATHS 4A,6B

n

CLASSIFIEDS 5-6B

TEXAS STATE RAILROAD ADDS NEW SOUND SYSTEM AT PALESTINE DEPOT

3B

pg. 2B


6A

n

Wednesday, January 25, 2012

n

Cherokeean Herald

REDISTRICTING

n

thecherokeean.com

PRESIDENTIAL PERMIT

continued from pg. 1A

continued from pg. 1A

meet with the parties Friday to hear arguments on how to proceed. In an increasingly convoluted bout of legal wrangling, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled last week that the San Antonio panel, tasked with redrawing the state’s maps as they awaited federal approval, hadn’t given proper consideration to plans passed last year by the Republican-led state Legislature. The San Antonio judges must now redraw those temporary maps as a separate three-judge panel in Washington, D.C., decides whether the original plans meet federal voting rights standards. The San Antonio court must decide whether it should wait until the Washington court is finished, and the judges in their order made it clear

that they would like the D.C. court to rule before they proceed: “With high respect for the importance of that proceeding and the prerogatives of that court, this Court hereby requests both sides in the San Antonio proceedings to request, on behalf of this Court, that the D.C. Court attempt to rule on the Section 5 issues in time for this court to incorporate those decisions into its ultimate decision on the redistricting plans for the 2012 elections for the Texas House of Representatives, the Texas Senate, and the U.S. Congress.” In other words? Hurry up. This story originally appeared in the Texas Tribune: http://www. texastribune.org/texas-newspaper/ texas-news/brief-top-texas-newsjan-24-2012/.

CHEROKEE COUNTY continued from pg. 1A

and we need to address this at the February meeting.” Laying of utility lines in Precincts 1 and 4 was approved. Two refunds of overpayment of taxes greater than $500 were approved for Linda Little, county tax assessor-collector. Speed limit was set at 30 miles per hour on CR 2443. A lease agreement between Keith Griggs and Cherokee County for Hanger No. 35 at the county airport was approved. Commissioners approved racial profiling reports for Jack White, constable Precinct 2, and Eddie Lee,

constable, Precinct 3. Commissioners also approved Constable Lee’s monthly reports for November and December; Constable Jamie Been, Precinct 4, monthly reports and annual report; and re-subdivision of Lots 1, 2, 3 in lots1-A, 2-A and 3-A at Eagle’ Bluff Section 1. Attending the meeting were County Judge Davis; Commissioners Kelly Traylor, Steven Norton, Katherine Pinotti and Byron Underwood; County Clerk Laverne Lusk; and County Auditor L.H. Crockett.

from Canada to Port Arthur was in response to a Feb. 21 deadline attached to the recent bill on payroll tax cuts. The president’s decision sparked controversy in an already charged election year. Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples reacted to the news. “Denying Americans this reliable oil source also denies American jobs and energy security at a time when our country needs them most. At a time when we need private sector investment and hiring in our country, our President is closing the doors of opportunity. As environmental groups in Texas praised the decision, U.S. Sen. John Cornyn criticized Obama’s rejection of the pipeline, “This will do nothing but extend the jobs crisis and send thousands of U.S. jobs and valuable oil overseas.” The pipeline could become a sticking point for the president between two key Democratic constituencies: labor unions which support the pipeline as a job creator, and environmentalists who fear it could lead to an oil spill disaster. While there seems to be partisan division on the issue among state and federal politicians, the proposed pipeline transcends party lines at the local level. Reklaw Mayor Harlan Crawford, vice-president of the 391 Commission, said, “I think it is political; but this does not kill the KXL -- this is just a delay. They (TransCanada)

can continue working on it without a presidential permit.” An attendee at the 391 Commission meeting on Jan. 17, landowner Julia Trigg Crawford of Lamar County, agreed that this was a “hollow victory at best..... I don’t think Texans have anything to celebrate, looks to me like the door has been opened even wider for TransCanada to bully their way across our state in building the Cushing, Okla. to Houston leg. For the past four years TransCanada, a foreign owned, for-profit entity, has thumbed their noses at us Texas landowners, saying they didn’t need Federal approval....to seize our land through eminent domain. Texas courts were allowing them to do it anyway.” Ms. Crawford’s family is currently involved in litigation with TransCanada over seizure of their property via eminent domain. The day President Obama’s permit denial was announced, TransCanada released, through Marketwire, their intentions to “re-apply for a Presidential Permit.” The Washington Post quoted Alberta, Canada, Premier Alison Redford as saying, “There is a regulatory process in place, and we have to respect that process. The good news is that the president said he wasn’t making a decision on the merits of the project. It does allow for reapplication.” According to Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s office, “Obama called Prime Minister

“...this does not kill the KXL -- this is just a delay.”

HARLAN CRAWFORD REKLAW MAYOR

Stephen Harper to explain that the decision on Wednesday was not on the merits of the pipeline but rather on the ‘arbitrary nature’ of a Feb. 21 deadline set by Republican legislators as part of a tax measure he signed.” Rob Gillies wrote in the Huffington Post on Jan. 19, “A (TransCanada) pipeline executive said Thursday that the company was weighing whether to build a segment of the line – from Oklahoma to Texas – that wouldn’t require U.S. State Department approval. “ This was confirmed by Minister Harper’s office. “Calgary-based TransCanada Corp., which proposed the pipeline, said Thursday it was considering building the pipeline in segments, with the first connecting an existing pipeline in Oklahoma to refineries in Texas.” Roberta Colkin, president of the local 391 Commission, the East Texas Sub-Regional Planning Commission, said, “We need to take action to contact our legislators and local representatives to make our voices heard. We can get louder and we will.” The next scheduled meeting of the 391 Commission is Jan. 30.

PROPOSED PIPELINE continued from pg. 1A

answer questions from the group, and began by revealing that 20,000 new jobs would be created. However, according to a 42-page report published by Cornell University Global Labor Institute, “Based on jobs information provided by TransCanada for the FEIS, KXL U.S. on-site construction and inspection creates only 5,060 – 9,250 personyears of employment. This is equivalent to 2,500 – 4,650 jobs per year over two years.” The report further states, “Based on data provided by TransCanada to the State Department, only between 506 and 1,387 workers would be hired locally. A state-bystate breakdown indicates that KXL will create between 156-470 jobs in Texas.” When questioned by Mayor Crawford as to why the cities of Reklaw and Gallatin, both covered in the FEIS (environmental impact statement), have not been contacted by anyone representing the pipeline, Mr. Dunnigan said he was uncertain. Neither was he aware if anyone at TransCanada had been in contact with the American Petroleum Institute in order to promote approval by President Obama of the permit to begin construction.

Concerns about spills Mr. Dunnigan assured the group that there have been no accidents or spills but should even a “teacup” be leaked, they would assume responsibility for “restoring the area back to normal.” Rita Beving, consultant for the East Texas SubRegional Planning Commission (ETSRPC), said, “In fact, TransCanada’s existing Keystone I has had 14 spills in its first year of operation,

more than any other pipeline, one being a 14,000 gallon leak near Bismarck deemed ‘an imminent threat to life, property and the environment.’” Julia Trig Crawford, a Lamar County landowner currently involved in litigation with TransCanada over the taking of their land through eminent domain, added, “One ‘teacup’ of bitumen would contaminate our property’s whole water supply, and crop insurance does not cover contaminated water.” “It’s not a matter of ‘if’ there is a spill; it’s a matter of ‘when,’” said Hoyte Davis, Craft-Turney Water Supply Corp. Protest signs displayed by attendees read “Don’t Mix Canadian tar with Texas water” and “Remember the Kalamazoo,” referring to the tar sands spill into a Michigan river whose cleanup has reached $700 million. Concerning the carcinogenic chemicals such as benzene, tuolene and hydrogen sulfide mixed with the viscous tar sands to enable its transport, Mr. Dunnigan was unable to give a time frame of response to a spill nor to explain exactly what hazardous material protocol should be followed or who would assume liability for injuries. According to the 391 Commission’s report, “The State Department has admitted it cannot fully analyze the chemicals transported in the pipeline due to lack of disclosure….As a result, the EPA has stated that it cannot fully determine the full spill impacts on groundwater.” Uris Roberson, a Wood County minister at the Reklaw meeting, voiced his fears. “I cannot imagine what would happen if the worst does hap-

pen here. We live here, and we have to raise our families here.” Roberta Colkin, president of the 391 Commission, asked Mr. Dunnigan to clarify the requirements for “Common Carrier status -- what must be fulfilled in order to check the box at the Railroad Commission?” “I would be glad to get an attorney to respond to you,” replied Mr. Dunnigan. Other issues raised by the assembled citizens were the effects of local seismic activity upon the stability of the pipeline, the landowner’s rights in eminent domain, TransCanada’s outsourcing of pipe construction to Europe and Asia and the export of bitumen to China. Mr. Dunnigan offered to find the names and locations of pipe manufacturing plants, including the single U.S. facility, and whether the pipe manufactured outside the U.S. meets American standard safety specifications. Mr. Dunnigan justified the use of eminent domain “for energy security.” Though passions ran high throughout the discussion, the meeting was conducted in an orderly manner. Mr. Dunnigan sympathized with the group, “If I were a landowner I would be very concerned and would want to get some answers – but I would get the answers from the right person.” He agreed to draft a list of the questions presented, edit them with Mayor Crawford for accuracy and follow up with factual information. However, Julia Crawford, whose property lies on the banks of the Red River, told the group that her family had been in a similar meeting with Mr. Dunnigan several months ago but as yet had not

Bank; Nell McNatt, owner of Flowers ‘n Things; and Tina Baggett, assistant vice-president of Prosperity Bank. Business Man of the Year nominees are Scott Cockrum, owner of Scott’s KWIK Lube; David Schrank, general manager of the Texas State Railroad; Jimmy Isaacs, owner of J&P KWIK Stop; Derrick Collier, operations manager for ETECH RMS in Rusk and John Birkelbach, owner of Wood Carvings by John Birkelbach. Winners for two raffles will be awarded during the evening festivities. The spotlight raffle has been collecting registrations since May 4. The winner will receive $1,000 to be spent with chamber members. The other raffle will cost $1 per ticket or 25 tickets for $20. Local banks are selling

the tickets and the winner could receive up to $1,000. Master of ceremonies will be Robin Butt of Boogie Butt Productions. Tickets are $225 for a table of five on the second row; $200 for a table of eight on the third row; and $25 for open seating.

PHOTO: BECKY WHISENANT

Hoyte Davis of Craft-Turney Water Supply Corporation speaks during the Jan. 17 meeting at Reklaw City Hall regarding TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL pipeline. The day after the meeting, President Barack Obama rejected the application for the Keystone XL pipeline. TransCanada will reapply for the application. received any response to their concerns. “We have run into brick walls everywhere.” Katherine Pinotti, County Commissioner Pct. 3, spoke at the meeting. “Being a Cherokee County Commissioner I represent 25 percent of the people in Cherokee County. Who is allowing the eminent domain such as mentioned by Ms. Crawford from Lamar County, since they have no federal permit?” Ms. Pinotti also asked Mr. Dunnigan if the specifications for the construction of the pipe meets U.S. standards. Towards the end of the one and one-half hour meeting, Adrian VanDellen, nature photographer and conservationist, informed the group that even though TransCanada has been allowed to classify huge downstream wetlands areas as “low consequence,” a leak here will easily reach

Sam Rayburn Lake and could affect the entire network of waterways in eastern Texas. The Kalamazoo River tar sands spill in Michigan traveled more than 35 miles, he said. Mrs. Colkin mentioned the temporary water use permits applied for by TransCanada at a time when the entire state has been in extreme drought. “I’m not an attorney, I’m not a hydrologist. I can’t answer those questions,” said Mr. Dunnigan. “Personally, I am completely disappointed, and if you weren’t prepared to answer our questions, I’m wondering if anyone at TransCanada has the answers or even wants to answer our questions,” said Mayor Crawford, as the meeting neared its conclusion. “We want answers as quickly as possible, and we appreciate

you being here and appreciate your help.” Councilwoman Colkin afterward concurred. “It was profitable to be able to get a representative to at least hear us but I don’t know if it will bear fruit. Interactions with TransCanada are different than with other petroleumbased pipelines. This particular company has no business etiquette.” Jacksonville attorney Mary Decker said at the meeting, “Once your land can be taken from you, you’re a dead duck. We are now expendable – like other countries. Now we are being violated.” Attending the meeting were Mayor Crawford, Mayor Pro-Tem Janelle Laughlin, Councilwoman Betty Jackson, Councilwoman Kim Lynn, Councilman Gilbert Stafford and City Secretary Judy Ritter.

RUSK CHAMBER

continued from pg. 1A

Business nominations

Nominations for the Business of the Year are ETECH, Inc., Family Dollar, Flowers ‘n Things, Hilton SerCOMING: vices, J&P KWIK Stop, 2 news KT Seafood & photo & Grill, pages on Prosperity Bank, Scott’s banquet KWIK Lube, next week Texas National Bank, Texas State Railroad and Wood Carvings by John Birkelbach. Nominees for the Business Woman of the Year award are Diane Crockett, store manager at Family Dollar; Kimberly Chhoun, owner of KT Seafood & Grill; Laila McCalister, assistant vicepresident of Texas National

l Connie Parsons, seated, Joann Jackson and Ashley Petty of J&J Jewelry & Gifts discuss prizes to be presented to winners of the costume contest at Saturday night’s chamber banquet. Prizes will be awarded to the person with the best biker costume and to the couple wearing the most creative costumes.

Previous Citizens of the Year Previous Citizen of the Year winners are Bobby Tosh, Dr. Jim Largent, Lewie Byers, Ted Debbs, Todd Foxworth, Kevin Bowden, Jerry Rix, Mark and Angela Raiborn, Charles and Boots Burfoot, Frank and Mary Madden, Buz Parrish, Jim Perkins, Jim Hunter, Martha Neely, James Campbell, John and Cindy Cunningham, Robert Odom, Ruth Ross, Paul and

Del Cox, Mike Crysup, Jerry and Anita Ocker, Jack White, Stephanie Caveness, Glenn Miller, Charles Hassell, Virginia Penney, Charles and

Flossie Nixson, Tony Murray, Will Cumbee, Zula Pearson, Joe Ray Ocker, George Dodd, Frank and Sarah Summers, E.H. and Marie Whitehead,

Joe Terrell, Mary Buchanan, Gene Meyers, Johnnie McKay, Dr. W.E. Gabbert, Ralph Travis, Jewel McClure and Raymond Cooper.


Cherokeean

Feb. 1 marks the 9th anniversary of the Space Shuttle Columbia tragedy. See pg. 9B.

Vol. 162

n

No. 49

n

C

20 pgs.

TIN A R B ELE

YE 1 6 1 G

ARS

H E R A L D

The future of Cherokee County can be found in various places – even in the air. With several renovation and additional projects, the Cherokee County Airport is expanding to fit the needs of the future, all while growing in the present. “We’re currently building a 60 foot wide by 40 foot deep hangar, and we’ve got room for two more,” said airport manager Clint Goff. “We’re starting to attract a lot more pilots and business from the south Tyler area, as well as Bullard and Whitehouse.”

l Workers spread concrete at the site of a new hangar at the Cherokee County Airport last week. Concrete and labor was provided by Transit Mix of Tyler and East Texas Concrete Company of Nacogdoches.

It’s just another chapter in the tale of Cherokee County’s hidden jewel. “A lot of people don’t know that we’re out here, or if they do, they figure we’re just for small aircraft,” Mr. Goff said. “In truth, we have almost 300 acres and approximately 35 hangars. We get planes from companies across the country that have business in Rusk or Jacksonville.” The airport website (www.cherokeecountyairport.com) even touts the beauty of Cherokee County to visitors. “Home to many beautiful landmarks and acres of undeveloped land, economic development entities are located in the principal cities of Rusk and See COUNTY AIRPORT, pg. 6A

A YEAR OF PROGRESS Jacksonville, Rusk chambers of commerce recognize businesses, individuals for contributions during 2011 RUSK

JACKSONVILLE

e

F ir

h

R u sk

Sc

on

h e Ye ar of t

isi

C h air

D a ve

Mc

ft

ss

iv

o

t. - C iti z e n s o

ar Ye

E lt o n

p De

Both the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce and the Rusk Chamber of Commerce share the same high opinion of first responders. Both recently bestowed high honors and accolades to fire departments. Jacksonville chamber chairperson Joan Malone honored all Cherokee County first responders at their annual banquet Monday. Accepting the award on behalf of all firemen and departS R Bu O u tst a n din g ments was Jacksonville Chief Paul White. k-T sin c l l The Rusk Chamber of Commerce named D an e r va the Rusk Volunteer Fire Department as its collective “Citizens of the Year” at the annual banquet held Saturday in Rusk. Jacksonville named Elton McCune, executive director of Gateway Community Partners, Inc. as Outstanding Citizen of the year. Gerry Stovall was recognized as Outstanding Division Chairman. Dave Schranck, general manager of the Texas State Railroad, was honored by the ep ti m e A c h ire D a rt m e n Rusk Chamber of Commerce with Business L if e F iev . ts of the Year. o s C n James I. Perkins, CEO of Citizens 1st Bank, received the chamber’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Nell McNatt, owner of Flowers ‘n Things and Southwestern Abstract in Rusk, received Businesswoman of the Year. Jimmy Isaacs was named Businessman of the Year.

f t h e Ye en o ar

St

g iti z

G erry

- O utsta n din

he

e un

see pgs. 4-5A for more

BY ROBERT GONZALEZ AND GLORIA JENNINGS

C

C

see pgs. 4-5B for more

t

i

rk

Ji m P e

ke

en

hai

r m a n ’s A w a

C h ero

em

-C

e

man

rd

RUSK CITY COUNCIL

Ben Middlebrooks appointed as councilman Council approves REDCO business recruitment project with The Retail Coach BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

20% chance of rain

High: Low:

71 61

CLASSIC HITS RADIO KWRW - FM and KTLU - AM

Members of the Rusk City Council approved the appointment of Ben Middlebrooks Monday evening as a councilman to fill the position vacated by the resignation of Kris Morgan, District 1. City Secretary Fran B. MIDDLEBROOKS Wendeborn administered the oath of office to Mr. Middlebrooks, who then took

his seat at the council table. Mr. Middlebrooks has resided in Rusk for the past year and a half, coming here from Kingwood. He is a retired oil trader for a large trading company. He currently owns a ranch, a hardware store in Alto and a welding and fabrication company in Conroe. He also does oil consultant work. In another matter, the council approved a Rusk Economic Development Corporation (REDCO) project with The Retail Coach. The company will be hired to provide customized service and expertise to help Rusk

Biomass accident injures 2 BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

Two workers at the Sacul Biomass plant were critically injured in an electrical accident around 8 a.m. Tuesday morning. The two men, whose names have not been released, were taken to Nacogdoches Memorial Hospital. The workers were transferred to Parkland Hospital for burns covering up to 50 percent of their bodies. Due to low clouds and weather concerns, they were transported by ambulance. Nacogdoches County Constable William Powell, Precinct 1, said the two men were working with high voltage electricity when there was a flash explosion. “Actually, there was no fire, only sparks,” Constable Powell said. Fagen Inc. is contractor for the plant. Evan Fagen of Fagen Inc. of Granite Falls, Minn. said Tuesday morning in a prepared statement, “We are aware of the incident that occurred at the Nacogdoches County construction site this morning involving two Fagen employees who are now receiving medical care. The incident is contained and poses no threat to the plant site. As is proper protocol, we have closed the site to facilitate an investigation, which is currently underway. The safety of our workers and the surrounding communities is of the utmost importance. Representatives with Fagen, Inc. corporate are now on site.” “There were two guys who were hooking some things up and they got burned really bad,” said Tallie Holland of Rusk, an electrician at the plant. His son and wife are also employed at the site. “Little Tallie (Tallie Jr.) was working in the same spot yesterday (Monday). He was in and out of that same cabinet pulling wires.” Mr. Holland’s wife, Laura, works in safety and was close to the incident, but not inside that building at the time of the accident. Mr. Holland is employed on one of the electrical crews. The two injured men were working with 5,000 volts of electricity. “Their job was to work with the wiring and they did not know the power was still on,” Constable Powell said. “Details of the accident are not known at this time, as the two injured men were the only ones in the room.” See BIOMASS, pg. 9B

See CHAMBERS,, pg. 6A

partly cloudy

thecherokeean.com

9B

STAFF WRITER

THURSDAY

75 cents

2B

BY QUINTEN BOYD

Weather Outlook

n

Texas’ Oldest Weekly Newspaper

County airport flying high into future

Rusk citizens who oppose the sale of all alcoholic beverages in Rusk are invited to a meeting of Citizens Against Legalized Liquor (CALL) at 6:30 p.m. Monday, Feb. 6, at Rusk First Baptist Church. The meeting will be held to reorganize the CALL group as a Specific-Purpose Committee with the state of Texas. A regular meeting time and placed will be determined at the initial meeting on Feb. 6. A local option election for the sale of all alcoholic beverages for off-premises consumption in Rusk has been called for May 12. Rusk voters approved the sale of beer and wine for off-premises consumption two years ago. Also, the sale of mixed drinks in restaurants was approved at that time. The Rev. Jim Goforth, spokesperson for CALL said, “This Specific-Purpose Committee is a group that is opposed to legalizing the sale of all alcoholic beverages in Rusk. It was our hope when CALL was dissolved that we would not have to reorganize in the future. “There are many of us who live in Rusk who do not believe that this is a positive step. In fact, just the opposite, we believe that the passage of such a law will become a negative factor in our community. However, the great thing about living in America is that everyone has a vote, if you are registered to vote. It is my prayer that every registered voter in our city will take this election seriously, and will consider the issue, pray and seek the Lord’s guidance and vote their convictions.” For additional information concerning CALL, Rev. Goforth can be reached at (903) 683-6605.

Rusk, Texas

SEE

see pg. 10A

CALL group plans organizational meeting Feb. 6

February 1, 2012

QUICK HITS: 6 CHEROKEE COUNTY FOOTBALL PLAYERS NAMED ALL-STATE 1ST RESPONDERS REMEMBER COLUMBIA

SALES TAX

COMING

WEDNESDAY

KEYSTONE XL

TransCanada will reapply for permit Spokesman says, ‘All options are on the table’ BY TERRIE GONZALEZ EDITOR

with recruitment of businesses. The Retail Coach will be retained for a period of one year, plus time necessary to create and study the city’s demographics. The REDCO budget was amended to include the expenses for The Retail Coach at a cost of $26,500. Connie Parsons of the Rusk Chamber of Commerce presented plans for a chamber-sponsored children’s carnival during the Fair on the Square. Patrick Crabtree of Crabtree Amusements in Staples is being contracted

A spokesman for TransCanada pipeline said the denial of a Presidential Permit for construction of the proposed Keystone XL does not signal an end to the project. “The intention is to reapply,” said Jim Prescott, a media consultant who has helped pave the pipeline’s path for the past five and one-half years. “All options are on the table for consideration.” One proposal is to build Keystone 3 separately with a coupling, thus avoiding the need for the Presidential Permit. “We need the Presidential Permit for approximately 50 feet of pipe at the border,” said Mr. Prescott. “We’re looking at options

See RUSK COUNCIL, pg. 9B

See TRANSCANADA, pg. 6A


6A

n

Wednesday, February 1, 2012

DECISION

2012

O

CHEROKEE COUNTY

Important dates to remember for the April 3 primary elections: • Last day to register to vote: March 5 • Last day to apply for ballot by mail: March 27 • Early voting: March 19-30 at the following locations: ALTO: A. Frank Smith Methodist Church, 103 Cooper St., (936) 858-4347 RUSK: Cherokee County Election Office,138 W. 5th (903) 683- 8409 JACKSONVILLE: Jacksonville Public Library, 502 S. Jackson, (903) 586- 7664

STATE REP, DIST. 11

q Chuck Hopson*, Republican

DISTRICT ATTORNEY

q Elmer Beckworth*, Democrat

COUNTY ATTORNEY

q Craig Caldwell*, Democrat

CHEROKEE COUNTY SHERIFF

q James Campbell*, Republican

COUNTY COMMISSIONER, PCT. 1

q Earl Socia, Republican q Kelly Traylor*, Republican

* denotes incumbent Pd political adv. by the candidates above. If you are a political candidate seeking office and would like to have your name added to the Cherokeean Herald’s political calendar, stop by our office at 140 N. Main St. in Rusk or call (903) 683-2257. Ask for information about Classic Hits Radio – 97.7 FM political calendar as well as Channel 19, public access on the Rusk cable system.

n

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

CHAMBERS

Rusk Chamber of Commerce’s Citizens of the Year

continued from pg. 1A

Rusk banquet held Saturday at Rusk Civic Center The local firemen were praised for their dedication and service during the 2011 wildfires. “These folks make a difference in everyone’s life. When the phone rings at 2 a.m., they are always there. They are there, helping citizens as they suffer the loss of personal property. They were there during the drought when the area was threatened with fire loss to pasture land and farm animals,” said Maxine Session, co-citizen of the year for 2010. Walter Session added, “We had a fire at our home and the fire department was there within 10 minutes. We lost two vehicles and would have lost everything if it had not for the fire department. I have been a councilman for 29 years and we appreciate all they do for our city.” Fire Chief Donald Lankford expressed appreciation on behalf of the entire department. Local firemen joined the chief in accepting the award. Other awards presented included Texas State Railroad as the business of the year. Dave Schranck, general manager, accepted the award presented by Jimmy Thompson of Wallace-Thompson, recipient of the award last year. Nell McNatt, owner of Flowers ‘n Things and Southwestern Abstract, was named Businesswoman of the year by last year’s recipient Anita Woodlee. Mrs. McNatt said, “The community has been so wonderful to us through the years and has made us feel so welcomed. Thank you.” The Businessman of the Year award was presented to Jimmy Isaacs by last year’s recipient, Jimmy Thompson. Mr. Isaacs is a long-time Rusk supporter and is owner of J&P Kwik Stop in downtown Rusk. In accepting his award he said, “Thank you. It is a real honor. Thanks to my friends and employees.” Early in the evening Bob Bowman, known as “the people’s historian” presented the Best of East Texas Publishing Award to Marie Whitehead. With the award, she was presented a replica water pump sculpture, like those used on East Texas farms a long time ago, Mr. Bowman said. “Just as farmers pumped water for the benefit of their families, this pump symbolized the fact that historians and writers, like the individual we honor tonight, have spent decades in pumping wonderful stories from the rich aquifer that is East Texas,” he said. The award is sponsored by the Best of East Texas Publishing Co. and the Pineywoods Foundation. Past honorees have been Bill O’Neal of Carthage, Eliza Bishop of Crockett, James Wilkins of Tyler, Max Lale of Marshall, Jim Smallwood of Gainesville and Dan Utley of Austin.

EL CAMINO REAL

COUNTY AIRPORT

continued from pg. 3A

continued from pg. 1A

promising him a small portion of my tomato crop this year to pay him back for the grapefruit. The creeks were up and there was lots of water in the bar ditches all the way to Waco, so hopefully things will be looking up for Texas agriculture in the coming year. Who would have thought that cows would be eating green grass in January after the summer we had? Things are greening up like springtime around here. The Lord does provide. I hope you are a whole lot smarter after reading all of this news. I’m going to wind it up for now. I hope you’ll keep your eyes open and your ears perked up for any news that might need telling. If you come across some be sure and let me know about it. I’ll see ya next week! And remember, Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.

Jacksonville,” the website states. “Stately old homes and churches are flanked by terrific schools, state of the art medical centers and a community of people dedicated to God and the American dream.” As a new hangar is constructed and a wildlife fence goes up around the airport, that dream is starting to become a reality. “We started on the fence project about three years ago, as far as requesting grant funds,” said Airport Advisory Board chair Tim McRae. “The fencing project is 90 percent funded by TxDOT and there are few county tax dollars involved. “The fencing will make the airport more attractive to aviation and corporations and makes things safer.” Business is starting to boom at the airport, located at 420 CR 1618 between Rusk and Jacksonville. The benefits for the airport are even found just a few miles south on U.S. Highway 69, especially during commissioners court meetings. “The airport is a huge asset for us because when businesses look to relocate to our county, the first thing they see is our airport,” said County Judge Chris Davis. “Clint has done an outstanding job of meeting the needs of pilots and making them want to come use our airport.” The county purchased Fixed Base Operator (FBO) rights to sell gas and rent hangar space from Skyways Aero

Mr. Bowman credited Mrs. Whitehead with her 2011 Rusk Volunteer Fire Department vast knowledge of Cherokee County and of always 2010 Walter and Maxine Session being willing to help others learn more about local 2009 Bobby Tosh and regional history. She was born in New Waverly 2008 Dr. Jim Largent and graduated from Huntsville High School and 2007 Lewie Byers Stephen F. Austin State University. In presenting 2006 Ted Debbs the award, Mr. Bowman said, “A measure of life is 2005 Todd Foxworth service to others.” 2004 Kevin Bowden Outgoing president Doug Hassell presented the 2003 Jerry Rix president’s award to Robby Tosh and the Lifetime Achievement Award to James I. Perkins. 2002 Mark, Angela Raiborn Entertainment was provided by the “Elmo Broth2001 Charles, Boots Burfoot ers,” Larry Sinclair and Houston White, traveling 2000 Frank, Mary Madden tattoo artists of the Friendly Tattoo Shop. Tattoo 1999 Buz Parrish customers winning the prizes for the best tattoos 1998 Jim Perkins were Chris Davis, first place and Angela Raiborn, 1997 Jim Hunter second place. 1996 Martha Neely Master of ceremonies was Robin Butt, assisted by 1995 James Campbell Judge Bascom Bentley III and Judge Chris Davis. 1994 John, Cindy Cunningham Incoming president Toni Meador expressed her appreciation for being elected chamber president. “It’s 1993 Robert Odom great to live in a small town and be able to dress up 1992 Ruth Ross and have a good time. I appreciate the opportunity to 1991 Paul, Dell Cox do this. I was born in Amarillo and brought to East 1990 Mike Crysup Texas at the age of two weeks by my parents. My 1989 Jerry, Anita Ocker husband, Randy and I have six children and seven 1988 Jack White grandchildren and I couldn’t have a better life.” 1987 Stephanie Caveness Among the dignitaries attending the banquet 1986 Glenn Miller were Phillip Smith, representative of U.S. Rep. Jeb 1985 Charles Hassell Hensarling’s office; State Rep. Chuck Hopson; State Sen. Robert Nichols; 369th District Judge Bentley, 1984 Virginia Penney District Attorney Elmer Beckworth, County Judge 1983 Charles, Flossie Nixson Davis, County Attorney Craig Caldwell, County Tax 1982 Tony Murray Assessor-Collector Linda Little, County Treasurer 1981 Will Cumbee Patsy Lassiter, County Clerk Laverne Lusk, Com1979 Zula Pearson missioner Precinct 1 Kelly Traylor, Justices of the 1978 Joe Ray Ocker Peace Brenda Dominy and Tony Johnson of Precincts 1977 George Dodd 1 and 2, Sheriff James Campbell, Constable Precinct 1976 Frank, Sarah Summers 1 Lynn Kelley, Mayor Angela Raiborn, City Attorney 1975 E.H., Marie Whitehead Larry Sinclair, City Manager Mike Murray and City Councilman Walter Session. Also attending was Jack1974 Joe Terrell sonville Chamber Chairperson Joan Malone. 1973 Mary Buchanan Executive officers for 2012 include Mrs. Meador, 1971 Gene Meyers president; Steve Winfield, president-elect; Mr. Has1970 Johnnie McKay sell, past president; Debra Dominy, vice-president; 1969 Dr. W.E. Gabbert Leslie Curtis, treasurer; Robby Tosh and Donnie 1968 Ralph Travis Barron, executive board members; Charles Hassell, 1967 Jewel McClure president of the Rusk EDCO; Mayor Raiborn and 1966 Raymond Cooper City Manager Mike Murray. GRAPHIC: CHEROKEEAN HERALD Board members are Debra Dominy, Jody Gray, Leslie Curtis, Tara Crosby, Mark Raiborn, Mr. Hassell, Robin Butt, Bob Francis, Austin Young, Colleen Fitts, Jaleea Hudnall, John Garbutt, Betty Horton, Vasquez, Cynthia Kline, Derrick Collier, Rev. Barron, Mr. Tosh, Scott Cockrum, Mrs. Meador, Carolina Glenda Long, Laila McCalister and Wendy Wylie.

in July 2009 for $277,000. “Purchasing the FBO rights was a huge asset, turning the airport from something that costs money to an entity that is actually making money for the county,” Judge Davis said. “Every year, we were putting about $50,000 into the airport. Once we bought the FBO rights, we started making a profit of almost $30,000.” “The airport handles fuel sales and owns quite a few of the hangars, many of which are fully occupied,” Mr. McRae said. “There aren’t many governmental entities that are turning profit quite like that.” Mr. Goff said the FBO rights allow the airport to provide gasoline to pilots at any time of day. “The fueling stations are all self-serve,” he said. “Pilots can fly in, swipe their credit card, fuel up and get back on their way.” In addition to selling gas and renting hangar space, the airport has several businesses on site. Bogan Aircraft Services and First Line Aero cover maintenance and inspections. Casey Aviation, Inc. provides flight instruction and KM Aviation provides aircraft painting services. “We have an aircraft dealer here in RidgeAire, Inc. that is known across the nation and the world,” Mr. Goff said. “We’ve got two maintenance shops and a paint facility. We generate revenue off of fuel sales, land leases and hangar

rental, among other things. “A lot of people are surprised that we have all of these businesses here at the airport. The airport provides around 25-30 jobs.” In addition, the airport provides a courtesy car for pilots who may need supplies or have business in Cherokee County. “This airport is a very good thing for the county,” Judge Davis said. “A lot of businesses who use our airport brag on it.” The bridge between the airport and the county is provided by the county Airport Advisory Board. In addition to Mr. McRae, members are Danny Berry, Darrell Prcin, Joe Weaver and Gerald West. “The county commissioners have never really been pilots, so they formed a committee to help oversee things,” Mr. McRae said. “We make proposals and they decide whether or not to go forward. They’ve been very supportive of our efforts and of the airport.” Mr. Goff agreed with the sentiment. “All of the commissioners recognize that there is a lot of potential at the airport,” he said. “The advisory board makes sure that everything goes smoothly and studies everything before they present it to the county.” While enhancing the present, the airport is also preparing for the future. Mr. Goff and the advisory board are currently creating a 20-year master plan for

growth at the airport. “We’re drawing up areas for expansion,” Mr. McRae said. “We’re working on some ideas to show us what our priorities are and where to expand next. “If we get a $150,000 project at the airport, that’s a lot of money going into our communities. People come in, rent hotel rooms and go to our restaurants. It’s an exciting time.” “The airport’s never really had a master plan, but we were definitely in need of one,” Mr. Goff said. “Credit the advisory board and the commissioners court for helping us get to this point. We all have a good relationship with each other and work for the good of the county and the airport.” As the airport grows and as planes fly in and out, one thing is certain – the hidden jewel of Cherokee County is starting to shine – and people are starting to notice. “I hope people start to come out and see the things that have been done at the airport,” Mr. McRae said. “It’s beautiful, and Clint and all of the businesses out there are thriving. People would really be impressed if they went to see it.” “There’s an old saying that an airport runway is Main Street for every city,” Mr. Goff said. “You can take that runway and go anywhere in the world – and the world can come right to your doorstep. “People need to know what we have going on out here. They would really be surprised.”

TRANSCANADA

continued from pg. 1A to see what’s possible. We’re ready to go. The pipe is here for phase three, and the contractors are teed up.” The permit, he said, was not denied because of the merits of the project. He said it was denied because the President requested a review of the pipeline route over the sensitive Sand Hills and Ogallala aquifer in Nebraska and had promised a decision by early 2013. Republicans added a payroll tax cuts bill rider in December 2011, requiring the President to make a decision within 60 days. Mr. Prescott said TransCanada is evaluating their options from regulatory, construction and commercial standpoints. “No one ships more oil to the U.S. than Canada,” said Mr. Prescott. “Canada is the largest by a margin of more than two to one. The next four producers, which fluctuate positions, are Venezuela, Nigeria, Mexico and Russia.” He did not mention Saudi Arabia, which the U.S. Energy Information Administration lists as the second largest supplier of oil to the U.S. Mr. Prescott defended the company’s rationale for trading with Canada. “The alternative, if the pipeline is not built, is to increase

dependence on Venezuela and Mexico. It’s an uncertain future. We can expand our business with a reliable trading partner who wants to do business with us.” He said allegations by environmentalists that the oil is earmarked for foreign markets, that China owns part of the pipeline or that the pipe is made in China or India is incorrect. He said that 65 percent of the steel is manufactured in the United States or Canadian mills. The flat sheets of metal are shipped to Little Rock, Ark., where it is rolled and fabricated into pipe. The material is coated with a fusion-bond epoxy in Louisville, Ken. The pipe varies in thickness from 1/2-2/3-inch; sometimes it is doublewalled in environmentally sensitive areas, he said. Mr. Prescott explained that pump stations are located every 50 miles. The tar sands oil is pressurized to 1,440 psi when it leaves the pump station, and drops to about 50 psi after traveling 50 miles. TransCanada’s master plan calls for a pump station in Cherokee County near Wells. He said that four-six pumps would use electricity to add pressure to the pipe, which

would translate into extra dollars to the Cherokee County Electric Co-op and property taxes to the county and Wells ISD. He acknowledged that the Keystone I and 2 have had approximately a dozen leaks in the last year. However, he said all the leaks occurred at pumping stations (including one in Canada) and not in the pipeline itself. He said the average spill was less than five barrels and was repaired and cleaned within 24-28 hours. He said that it is not a matter of saying “nothing is going to happen.” The bigger issue, he said, is to assume that something is going to happen. “What are we going to do to prevent it? What are we doing with design and construction to meet standards once it is in service, and what do we do to keep it from happening?” Pipeline detractors have criticized TransCanada for not releasing the chemical composition of the additives to the tar sands oil. Mr. Prescott denied the information is proprietary, and that he will provide the chemical composition to the Cherokeean Herald. He said once the pipeline is built, contractual relationships with

contractors and vendors on codes, statutes and response times will be in place. “There will be an incredFour phases of construction would ibly complex and thorough document connect a pipeline network from Hardisty, in place.” He said he understands the con- Alberta in Canada to Beaumont capable cerns expressed about leaks. “I get of transporting up to 1.1 million barrels this. First responders are asking, of tar sands oil daily. Cost of the original ‘How will I respond to a leak in my Keystone Pipleline was $5.2 billion. The Keystone XL expansion is estimated at jurisdiction.’” The response plan will be in place, $7 billion. • Phase 1: a 2,147-mile pipeline went he promised. “We haven’t gotten online June 2010, connecting Hardisty, there yet.” Environmentalists worry that the Alberta to Wood River and Patoka, Ill. • Phase 2: 291-mile pipeline from tar sand mixture could leak into East Texas’ Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer and Steele City, Neb. to Cushing, Ok. went contaminate drinking water for a online February 2011. • Phase 3: proposed 435-mile pipeline 60-county area. Pipeline critics, he said, think that from Cushing, Ok. to terminals in Nedertar sand oil is something new. “It’s land. An existing, 47-mile leg is proposed not the case. There are pipelines that to link Liberty County with Houston. • Phase 4: proposed 327-mile pipeline are transporting oil that is similar from the coast of California. This to connect Hardisty with Baker, Mont. Approximately 85 percent of the is not the first pipeline to carry tar pipeline’s capacity is committed. Some sands oil.” Citing a draft, supplemental and 250,000 barrels would come from the Bakfinal environmental impact state- ken formation in Montana, where fracturing ments (EIS), he said the Keystone is being used to recover difficult to reach XL has been under review for 41 oil. The remainder would be mined at the months. “That is longer than any Athabasca Oil Sands region in Alberta. pipeline, ever. To suggest as some have that there has not been enough is on the Internet and it is thousands time spent on an accurate assess- of pages long. It is incredibly thorment is not correct. The statement ough,” he said.

At a glance


8A

n

Wednesday, February 8, 2012

n

Cherokeean Herald

TR ANSCANADA PIPELINE

391 commission conducts strategy meeting to block tar sands pipeline extension Group urges members to contact elected officials BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

“Never give up – never surrender” could be the unofficial motto of the East Texas Sub-Regional Planning (391) Commission which held a strategy meeting Jan. 31 in Reklaw to discuss their next response to the latest developments in TransCanada’s Keystone tar sands pipeline. Following the denial of TransCanada’s application for Presidential Permit to construct the pipeline from Hardisty, Alberta, Canada to the Texas coast near Houston, company spokesman Jim Prescott has said, “All options are on the table for consideration.” At the meeting. commission consultant Rita Beving said TransCanada considers the denial “a bump in the road.” Six members of the 391 Commission met at Reklaw City Hall, along with attorney Wendi Hammonds, volunteer legal consultant for the 391, to review previous meetings, and discuss their ongoing plans. Primary concerns were discussed such as China’s financial interests in the pipeline. According to an article published in the Dickinson Press, “The Associated Press reported that the company announced it sold the remaining 40 percent of its MacKay River oil sands development to Petro China for $673 million. “Petro China had already acquired a 60 percent stake in two oil sands projects, including Mackay River. Is the Keystone pipeline going to carry oil owned by China across the United States to the Gulf? Who is going to build the pipeline? The U.S.? Canada? China?” Uris Roberson, minister from

Wood County and member of the commission, asked, “Who would get the product? Are we getting the product or is it going to someone else?” Ms. Beving, owner of Beving & Associates, reported to the group that as of Jan. 27 TCEQ (Texas Commission on Environmental Quality) has not issued water permits to TransCanada “Water permits for all six east Texas rivers involved are still being held up due to ongoing drought.” Ms. Hammonds, legal consultant, said, “They are going to have to have water permits and that would be through 404 permits through the Army Corp of Engineers.” Ms. Hammonds encouraged the group to aggressively pursue contact with elected officials and various state agencies connected with the bitumen tar sands pipeline. Roberta Colkin, president of the 391 commission, said she had contacted state Sen. Nichols’ office and “he has received the letters, e-mails and phone calls and his representative was sent to listen in, but there has been no response from him.” Commission members are also waiting on a response from Cherokee County officials to whom a letter was sent out to see what transactions may have taken place between them and TransCanada. Several of the nine public attendees at the meeting were granted permission to speak. Reklaw Mayor Harlan Crawford, vice president of the commission, was present, along with Janelle Laughlin, Reklaw City Council, Roberta Colkin, Rita Beving, Sara Barnette (proxy for Gallatin City Council member Tom Colkin) and Uris Roberson. Other business included the approval of minutes from the previous meeting and calling the next meeting at 5:45 p.m. on Feb. 27 at the Reklaw City Hall.

n

thecherokeean.com

Republican candidates’ forum in Jacksonville

l Incumbent state Sen Robert Nichols and his challenger, Tammy Blair of Bullard spoke before a crowd of approximately 70 at Jacksonville College Tuesday. l Incumbent state Rep. Chuck Hopson (left) of Jacksonville is challenged by Tony Sevilla of Alto and Travis Clardy of Nacogdoches (right). Nine candidates spoke at the forum

l Discussing county budget issues were (from left) Commissioner Pct. 3 Katherine Pinotti, Patrick Reagan and Jessie “ Jay” Hooker. Not pictured is Pct. 1 candidate Earl Socia.

MEETING

continued from pg. 1A offer a four-year education to high school graduates. The Promise program will be a linked to a new Etech RMS program in which the call center will serve a large department store chain. Etech will contract with the chain and the new duties of the company will provide 150-200 additional employees. The company will lease the Baskin’s building in downtown Rusk for its extended services. Etech will pay $5,000 per month rent on the building provided they do not reach their agreed quota of employees. If they meet target employment, rent will be waived. Etech is interested in the Promise program because it will increase the education of persons applying for employment. Through the program up to $1,750

per semester will be offered as scholarships for high school graduates who have a grade point average of 2.0. The scholarships will offer two years of academic schooling at Tyler Junior College, as well as an opportunity to attend the various trade schools on the college campus. Students will be required to apply for PELL grants. Administration of the program will be provided by Tyler Junior College. Mr. Hassell asked REDCO to contribute $1 million to the program. The Perkins Family Foundation will provide $3 million and Citizens 1st Bank another $250,000. The funds will be placed in escrow and used as payment of the scholarships for the first 15 years. Plans are to use this scholarship program to attract new industries

and businesses to Rusk. “We feel that people will hear about the scholarship and want to move to Rusk, get their children enrolled in school here so they can benefit from the scholarships,” Mr. Hassell said. “When more people live here, it will increase the sales tax,” he said. “This is a win-win situation.” Rusk High School already offers a number of Tyler Junior College dual credit courses. Students will be able to take those classes and be well on their way to an education when they enter Tyler Junior College. “Currently 30 Rusk class of 2012 students have indicated they want to attend Tyler Junior College,” Dr. Jim Largent, superintendent said. “More may be interested when they learn of the prospective scholarships.”

✯✯✯✯✯ Look for our five-star rating in the 2012 Medicare & You booklet

Scott & White Health Plan member Bill Mateja with Insurance Agent Eileen St. Amant.

When Bill turned 65, he asked Eileen for Medicare advice. Bill Mateja and his wife Susan wanted a health plan they could trust, with convenience and affordability so they wouldn’t lose their nest egg. That’s why Eileen at Scott & White Health Plan recommended the SeniorCare1 (Cost) HMO plan. Now the Matejas get the affordable coverage they need, plus extras like a 24-hour Nurse Line, coverage when they travel2 and most importantly, Eileen—a trusted agent and adviser when they need help.

To find out more about SeniorCare, call us in Tyler at 1-800-782-5068 or TTY 1-800-735-2989 for hearing-impaired assistance. Monday–Friday • 8 am–5 pm www.SeniorCareTX.org

Trinity Mother Frances and Palestine Regional Medical Center contract with Scott & White Health Plan to bring you SeniorCare. Other providers are available in our network.

Medicare-approved HMO plan. Emergency care is limited to the United States for our Select plan members. The benefit information provided herein is a brief summary, not a comprehensive description of benefits. For more information contact the plan. Benefits, formulary, pharmacy network, premium and/or co-payments/co-insurance may change on January 1, 2013.

1 2

H4564_ETSCTRUSTMF_REV3_2011 CMS approved 12/28/2011

H4564


2A

n

Wednesday, February 15, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

thecherokeean.com

n

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

Pride, effort can help Alto grow

MONTY COLLINS Alto

It’s time to write you a letter, because from now to March 5 is time to sign up for the city election coming in May. How about some of you put your name in the hat for city councilman? There are at least three vacancies up for grabs. Of course, those now holding those positions, may re-run and beat you, but you could still win. Just go to city hall to get an application and keep a copy. I would like to see a representation of both the black community and a lady or two. There is no reason why white men should dominate this sector of life. Hopefully someone on the incoming council will be bilingual. So, sign up and go get those promises to vote for you. Now, on to another subject. I have heard a bit of talk about cleaning our unsightly city. Do you know why it is thought to be so? The answer is: people live in it. It is a good indication that we have more important activity in which to be involved. A messy house indicates it is occupied by healthy, active, young children where there is a mother cooking for them to keep them that way – to keep messing the house. Do you follow me? Ever see a clean barn? It means that no animals live there, and no profit. Follow me? That is Biblical. Look it up. What is a clean city? First, it is pride in oneself. Why? God does not make mistakes. It is “us’uns” who messed ourselves up or down. We remember too well our past and its miserableness

with our poor decisions. It got us where we are and now with clouded sight, we see nothing for the future. That is sad and I speak with authority, so read on. I grew up with five other boys and four girls. Two of the girls and one boy were the cleanest of us nine in our neighborhood. Typically, we were a bunch of snotty nose kids, barefoot and plugged with toe jam when barefoot, or shoes which had heavy cardboard in place of the soles of our shoes which we took out in school and then put them on if it rained or snowed. We bathed once a week standing in a number three tub at the kitchen sink with a shallow pan for wash water. Rinse? Mother poured a two-quart pan of warm water on top of your head. Rinse good, because there was no more water for you. “Get out and call your brother”. That was life until I was 12, but we all had pride. We did with what we had and we had pride. If there was no mud to make pies, we found some water – very possibly out of the gutter – and made our own mud with cupcake cups from our mothers – plural – kitchen and with pride as we tried to sell them to those who passed by. I look around Alto and what do I see? You live better now than I did back when. I think they called it the Dark Ages. So, where do we begin? The answer may be to first make an effort like when you took your first step – one foot at a time..

Is TransCanada interested in ‘fair’ review?

failed to address major environmental concerns that they were intended to address. In addition, the much publicized open public meetings that were supposed to have been organized and held by our State Department last fall were also put on by Cardno Entrix. The bias in favor of the pipeline was all too apparent: comments from critics were delayed until near the end, and their time was cut short. At the meeting in Austin, the microphone was shut off at two minutes, with no warning signal so speakers could hurriedly complete their thought. At 8 p.m., the hearing was abruptly adjourned. Two dozen would-be opposition speakers, who had waited hours for their chance to raise questions, were denied time to comment. When one man politely asked why he and others had been left out, he was arrested. One wonders why, if Tran-

2012 SPECIAL EVENTS Feb 11 Valentines Dinner Train Feb 12 Peanuts™ The Valentines Express April 6&7 Peanuts™ The Easter Beagle Express April 14-15 & 21-22 New this year! Dinosaur Train™ May 5&6 RailFest 2012 May 25-27 Memorial Day Armed Forces Event Oct Select Dates Peanuts™ The Great Pumpkin Patch Express Nov-Dec Select Dates The Polar Express™ Train Ride

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church presents

GRANT ADKISSON February 19, 2012

10AM

Ridin’, Ropin’, Rodeoin’ for the Lord. Telling cowboys about The Way for cowboys and leading them to Christ. He’s a wildlife guide and rancher in Colorado. He’s a rodeo pastor, he preaches Gods Word. Everyone is Welcome Admission is Free

H E R A L D

Call (903) 683-2257 for details

sCanada is so confident that their pipeline, and the diluted bitumen it carries, is no threat to our water supply or our environment, and that it will be to the economic benefit of all US citizens, did officials interfere with a fair review process in the first place? “The intention is to reapply (for the permit),” says Mr. Prescott. In this case, the reviews will have to start from scratch and be carried out completely before an assessment can be made on the merits of the pipeline; and they certainly cannot be done within the time table demanded of President Obama in the rider attached to the payroll tax cuts bill. He was right to say, “No.” Here’s hoping this time, neither the processes nor the public meetings will be rigged.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Doing laundry; making breakfast; driving to swim practice; racing to soccer practice; packing lunches; food shopping; helping with homework; and still finding time to learn, manage your career and have a little fun? You don’t have time to be exhausted! That’s why we make it easy to get the proper vitamins and nutrients you need to feel your best.

C

hapman

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

Pharmacy

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

Buy a new Ram truck at Pearmans thru February 29, 2012 and receive a $500 gift card to use as you please.

2012 RAM 3500 4X4 DIESEL STK#157366

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE-IN BONUS SALE PRICE

$

$42,175 $4,325 $3,000 $1,000

MSRP PEARMAN DISC.

33,850

2012 RAM 1500

2012 RAM 1500

25,855STK#101560

$

2012 RAM 1500

QUAD CAB LONE STAR HEMI CREW CAB LONE STAR HEMI CREW CAB LONE STAR HEMI

17,755 STK#591743

$

$33,850

2011 RAM 1500

5592 Hwy 110N Rusk

Cherokeean

Top Stories • Local News Local Sales • Classifieds Each Week In The

Rusk

I wish to take issue with some of the points made during an interview with TransCanada spokesperson James Prescott, which appeared in the Cherokeean Herald on February 1st. Mr. Prescott states, “The permit was not denied (by President Obama) because of the merits of the project.” It is true that the President was not weighing in on the merits of the pipeline, either way, when he denied the permit. There is good reason he was in no position to do so, and won’t be for some time. The supplemental and final environmental impact statements, which Mr. Prescott cites in reference to the pipeline’s being under review for 41 months, were written by Cardno Entrix, a company revealed to have financial ties to TransCanada. Therefore, the findings were highly questionable, and suggested a serious conflict of interest. Further, these documents

Monty Collins is the mayor of the city of Alto.

GET MORE FOR YOUR BUCKS...

SUZANNE MORRIS

Next, know your neighbor. There are two of them – one on each side. If you have no fence or a hole in the back fence, then you have three. What am I trying to say? Simply, help another and the job or chore will go faster and easier. You can start by complaining about what I am telling you to do – “That mayor wants us to do what?” Now you can laugh. It will lighten your spirit and you will at least feel better about the mess in your garbage can. Call me, and maybe I can help you get started. Now what did I say earlier here? “God made you, and in a beautiful way made He, into us.” Now it is up to us to give back to Him what He designed us to be. And, in doing so, we will be giving Him the glory, the honor, and the praise which He so rightly deserves. Then, stand back, and watch our city clean up. Do I get to see you in church some Sunday soon? Hospitals are for hurting bodies and churches are for those with hurting hearts. See you there. Cut out this newspaper article and give it to the pastor and tell him you want to trade-in your hurting heart for one that is healthy and full of joy. I think it was Jesus that said it was easier for Him to put life into a dead body than to heal a heart that is hard as stone.

$

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$23,030 $5,275

SALE PRICE $17,755

HWY. 69

$34,165 $3,500 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $25,855

26,540STK#125545

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$34,650 $3,300 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $26,540

MOTOR COMPANY

IN

$

26,990STK#160050

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$35,600 $3,800 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $26,990

ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 • www.pearmanmotor.com

Pictures for illustration purposes only.


2A

n

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

TransCanada should admit final destination of tar sands oil 

STEPHEN DASILVA Nacogdoches

I find it very disappointing that TransCanada didn’t deem East Texans, citizens of Cherokee County, and specifically, the Gallatin/Reklaw 391 Commission important enough to send a representative to their Jan. 17 meeting who was actually cleared to answer valid questions. Instead, they used their PR man to peddle the same old line in a venue that prevents any direct answers. I, for one, have many questions regarding TransCanada’s statements, but will focus on just one of the topics addressed. Mr. Prescott said that environmentalists allege the tar sands crude products are earmarked for foreign markets. His statement indicates his belief that the U.S. State Department is staffed by environmentalists, because the same State Department, in the Final Environmental Impact Statement, says “the primary purpose of the (KXL) project is to get tar sands oil to delivery points in Texas.” Why, if there are already existing “delivery points” in the Midwest? Upon further inspection, it does appear that these tar sands

crude products are destined for foreign markets. TransCanada’s planned pipeline ends at refineries located in Port Arthur in a tax-free zone. Valero, with refineries located there, has formally notified its shareholders of its plan to refine tar sands crude into diesel, heating fuel and jet fuel and export them to Europe and South America. Shell, headquarted in the Netherlands, and aligned with British Petroleum (BP) to prevent the European Union from halting the flow of tar sands products into Europe, has a refinery in Port Arthur, as well. Shell, and its refinery partner, Saudi Arabia’s state-owned Aramco, are contracted to take a percentage of the tar sands crude, too. This will help to reduce the oversupply of crude in the American Midwest, which has depressed the price of oil there and, at the same time, allow Shell and Aramco to sell their products on the open market. Don’t think for a moment that means it will not be shipped

out of the U.S. Don’t think for a moment, either, that this wasn’t TransCanada’s plan all along. Testifying before Canada’s National Energy Board, they spoke of their plan to bypass Midwest refineries with their pipeline’s gulf coast terminus, thus manipulating the market and raising the profits of the industry by $4 billion annually. Questions arise as to whether this violates U.S. antitrust laws. Furthermore, in testimony to the U.S. Congress, TransCanada President Alex Pourbaix declined to support a condition that would require tar sands products delivered by the Keystone XL to remain in the U.S. because that would force refiners to back out on their contracts. Why does TransCanada insist on playing games with the truth? Why not just be honest with the honest citizens of East Texas? Admit that your tar sands crude has the best chance of being sold if you can get it off the continent, and the quickest way is to pipe it through East Texas.

Right to bear arms ‘matter of national security’ 

KENNETH WHITE Rusk

I recently read a report about the reasons the Japanese did not invade the West Coast of the U.S. immediately after they decimated the American Fleet at Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941. They could have sent their troop ships and aircraft carriers directly to California to finish what they started. The prediction from our Chief of Staff was we would not be able to stop a massive invasion until they reached the Mississippi River. So, why did they not invade? After the war, the remaining Japanese generals and admirals were asked that question. Their answer was they knew that almost every home had guns and Americans knew how to use them. The worlds largest army: America’s hunters. I had not thought about this until I read the information concerning the number of licensed hunters there are in

America. One example is there were about 600,000 hunters in the state of Wisconsin this past hunting season. Wisconsin’s hunters have become the sixth largest army in the world – more men under arms than Iran and more than France and Germany combined. These men were deployed in the woods of a single American state to hunt with firearms, and no one was killed. This number pales in comparison to the 750,000 who hunted the woods of Pennsylvania and Michigan’s 700,000 hunters, all of whom are now home safely with no loss of life. Add another 250,000 hunters from West Virginia and it literally establishes the fact that the hunters of those four states alone would comprise the largest army in the world. That’s 2,300,000 armed hunters. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife

25¢ OR LESS!

Great selection of Clothes, Shoes, Knick-Knacks!

GOOD SAMARITAN 203 W. 2nd Street • Rusk (903) 683-2376

Open Monday, Wednesday and Friday – 9 - 11:30 a.m.

2012 SPECIAL EVENTS Feb 11 Valentines Dinner Train Feb 12 Peanuts™ The Valentines Express April 6&7 Peanuts™ The Easter Beagle Express April 14-15 & 21-22 New this year! Dinosaur Train™ May 5&6 RailFest 2012 May 25-27 Memorial Day Armed Forces Event Oct Select Dates Peanuts™ The Great Pumpkin Patch Express Nov-Dec Select Dates The Polar Express™ Train Ride

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

Service reported a total of 14,974,534 paid license holders for the year 2009. America will forever be safe from foreign invasion with that kind of home-grown firepower. Hunting is not just a way to fill the freezer – it’s a matter of national security. This is why all our enemies, foreign and domestic, want to see us disarmed. This should be food for thought when some say we need more gun control. A writer recently thought it to be wrong why we like our guns. He said something about Costa Rica, I believe, not having an army but spending it’s money on healthcare and the welfare of it’s citizens instead. Well, who wants anything in Costa Rica? I know many people who like their guns as well as I do. We raise our kids to hunt with them and that has been an American right and tradition since the founding of this country. The second amendment

Loans or CDs

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

Mar. 3, Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am

citizens were disarmed and those who wouldn’t give up their weapons were hunted down and murdered. Hitler did the same in Germany and we see the conflict

that came out of that. Some may not like guns, and that’s their right. However, many – like I do – like our guns and intend to keep them.

Doing laundry; making breakfast; driving to swim practice; racing to soccer practice; packing lunches; food shopping; helping with homework; and still finding time to learn, manage your career and have a little fun? You don’t have time to be exhausted! That’s why we make it easy to get the proper vitamins and nutrients you need to feel your best.

Check our rates 1st:

C

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

hapman

Pharmacy

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422 We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

Buy a new Ram truck at Pearmans thru February 29, 2012 and receive a $500 gift card to use as you please. 2012 RAM 1500

2012 RAM 3500

QUAD CAB LONE STAR HEMI

4X4 DIESEL

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

guarantees us this right for not just hunting purposes, but to protect us from a tyrannical government. When the communists seized control of Russia in 1917, the

$

33,850

STK#157366

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE-IN BONUS

$ $42,175 $4,325 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $33,850

25,855

CREW CAB LONE STAR HEMI CREW CAB LONE STAR HEMI

$ STK#101560

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$34,165 $3,500 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $25,855

2012 RAM 1500

2012 RAM 1500

26,540

$ STK#125545

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$34,650 $3,300 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $26,540

26,990STK#160050

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE NO CHARGE HEMI

$35,600 $3,800 $3,500 $1,310

SALE PRICE $26,990

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

HWY. 69

MOTOR COMPANY

IN

ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 • www.pearmanmotor.com

Pictures for illustration purposes only.


2A

n

Wednesday, March 7, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

Gun control more about control Sulphur, La.

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

Postal Service must change with times

MIKE HANSON

opinion

thecherokeean.com

VICTOR BENAVIDES

In reality, guns have only two enemies; rust and politicians. Gun control is not actually about guns; it’s about control. Only a government that is afraid of its citizens would attempt to control them to the point of rendering them defenseless. The American Revolution would have never happened with gun control, and the Second Amendment was put in place in case the politicians ignored the others. What part of, “shall not be infringed” do people not understand? I’ve read many of Mr. Ray Cryer’s letters to the editor, and have considered him to be a bright, worldly gentleman. However, I feel compelled to remind him of the history and ramifications of attempts at gun control: In 1929, the Soviet Union established gun control. From 1929-1953, 20 million dissidents, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and executed. In 1911, Turkey established gun control. From 1915-1917, 1.5 million Armenians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and executed.

In 1935, China established gun control. From 1948-1952, 20 million dissidents were rounded up and executed. In 1964, Guatemala established gun control. From 1964-1981, 100,000 Mayan Indians, unable to defend themselves, were rounded up and executed. In 1970, Uganda established gun control. From 1971-1979, 300,000 defenseless Ugandans were rounded up and executed. In 1956, Cambodia established gun control. From 19751977, one million educated, defenseless people were rounded up and executed. Because of gun control, the total number of defenseless people executed in the twentieth century totals roughly 56 million. Sadly, we live in an ever changing world. We, as well as Europe and other countries, are experiencing higher taxes, socialized medicine, a more “activist” judiciary and, in short, a more dangerous world in which the rights you have will be the rights you’re willing to fight for. The street riots happening

in London, Greece, and other countries can, and possibly will, occur here on our soil. Rocks and bottles have proven to be ineffective against a heavily-armed police state. Our Founding Fathers knew the importance of an armed citizenry. Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Those who hammer their guns into plows will plow for those who do not.” John Adams wrote, “Those who trade liberty for security have neither.” George Washington wrote, “Firearms stand next in importance to the Constitution. They are the American People’s liberty teeth and keystone under independence.” The only reason the Japanese did not invade the U.S. during WWII was because they knew we were an armed society. Otherwise, we could be speaking Japanese now. I, and many others like myself, do not intend to plow for anyone but ourselves, never sacrifice our liberties and protect the keystone of our independence. I suggest the others gather a cache of rocks and bottles. I’ll pray for you.

Dallas

America needs a financially stable Postal Service. Toward that end, the Postal Service is taking aggressive actions to preserve the long-term affordability of mail and to adapt to a changing marketplace and evolving mailing needs. Subject to adoption of a final rule changing its delivery service standards, the Postal Service is pursuing a significant consolidation of its national network of mail processing facilities that will reduce the number of facilities from 461 to fewer than 200 by the end of 2013. No consolidations will occur before May 15, 2012. Declining mail volumes and substantial fixed costs dictate that we take this bold action to preserve and protect the world’s leading Postal Service for our customers and our employees. From 1940 to 2006, the Postal Service oversaw a

continuous expansion of mail processing and retail facilities to meet growing demand for mail delivery. This expanded capacity was built to handle high mail volumes that peaked at 213 billion pieces of mail in 2006. However, since 2006, First-Class mail volume has rapidly declined as the economy recessed and the age of digital communications advanced. In 2011, 168 billion pieces of mail were delivered. By 2020, the Postal Service expects to deliver as few as 130 billion pieces. By any standard, this is a steep decline. In just the past quarter, the Postal Service lost $3.3 billion and is projecting further losses for the remainder of the year. No one is to blame. Times have changed. So must the Postal Service.

The American public and businesses are relying more on electronic communications. Bills are paid online. Friends and family interact through Facebook and Twitter. Nevertheless, the demise of the Postal Service is greatly exaggerated. The Postal Service sustains a $900 billion industry that employs over 8 million people. Every day, we deliver to more than 151 million locations. Even in a digital age, mail remains a powerful communications, marketing and delivery tool. The aggressive steps we are taking to realign our mail processing network will keep mail affordable, valuable and viable for generations to come. These are responsible steps any business would take.

Pipeline’s opponents also coordinated 

TED WHEELER Bullard

As a print and online subscriber, I’ve followed your coverage of the pipeline’s challenges in Cherokee County, and specifically, in Reklaw. Now, I learn that there is a long-standing, well-financed, coordinated, and centrallymanaged “defeat the pipeline” organization: http://dailycaller.com/2012/02/20/campaign-

against-canadian-keystone-xl-pipelinedriven-by-us-foundation-millions/. Your last issue letter-writer on the subject, Suzanne Morris, ended with, “Here’s hoping this time...the process...will not be rigged.” I guess “rigged” is in the eye of the beholder.

Your Pharmacy of Choice

NEWS Free health screenings; card games at Ross Center Jordan Health Services will hold free health screenings at 11 a.m. Tuesday, March 20, and every third Tuesday of the month at the Ross Activity Center, 555 Euclid St., Rusk.

Blood sugar and pressure tests will The Activity Center is located in be available. the Rusk Civic Center, 555 Euclid Additionally, the Ross Activity St., in Rusk. Center offers card games at noon on Tuesdays and domino games at noon on Thursdays. Both events are free and open to the public. Refreshments are provided. Check our rates 1st:

Sat. March 10

Piney Woods Steam Excursion Departing The Rusk Depot

Find the right remedy for your symptoms. From vitamins and supplements to natural remedies, over-the-counter drugs and prescription medications. We have a variety of options to take care of your needs.

Loans or CDs 903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

11:00am - 3:30pm

C

Sun., March 11

Piney Woods Steam Excursion Departing The Rusk Depot 11:00am - 3:30pm

hapman

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

Pharmacy

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

Buy a new Ram truck at Pearmans thru march 31, 2012 and receive a $500 gift card to use as you please.

Pearman Mo

tor Compa

ny

2012 RAM 1500 EXPRESS HEMI

STK#117724

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$25,910 $2,420 $2,500 $1,000

SALE PRICE $19,990

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

Mar. 3, Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am

$

19,990

2012 RAM 1500

2012 RAM 1500

STK#126291

STK#208171

QUAD CAB 4X4 HEMI

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$34,260 $3,000 $2,500 $1,000

SALE PRICE $27,760

Demo

QUAD CAB HEMI

$

27,760

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$30,655 $2,800 $2,500 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $24,355

2012 RAM 1500

24,355

2012 JEEP PATRIOT

CREW CAB LONGHORN EDITION

STK#610389

STK#183387

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$44,120 $4,635 $2,500 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $35,985

35,985

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$18,870 $885 $1,000

SALE PRICE $16,985

$

16,985

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

HWY. 69

MOTOR COMPANY

IN

ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 • www.pearmanmotor.com

Pictures for illustration purposes only.


2A

n

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Pipeline would provide jobs 

KENNETH WHITE Rusk

I would like to take issue with the different writers opposed to the Keystone pipeline. The Canadian company has already agreed to reroute the pipeline around the main aquifers along the route from Canada to Houston and Beaumont, Texas. This pipeline will bring 700,000 barrels of oil per day to Texas and Louisiana refineries to produce gasoline for Americans. I have no concern of any tragic spills that would endanger any of our water supplies. Recently, Fox News displayed a map of the U.S. and Canada with thousands of miles of pipelines already in the areas in question – all the way from the ‘tar sands’ in Alberta, Canada through middle America to the Gulf Coast. I remember the hype by the “tree huggers” about the danger from the BP tragedy in the Gulf back in 2010. I always knew BP would contain the well and provide for the cleanup. If you’ve been in these areas affected along the Gulf Coast like I have in the past year, you will find no evidence there ever was a spill. Keep in mind, this was the first and only disaster in the Gulf by a company drilling for U.S. interests. There was an explosion and disaster back about 70 years ago off the Yucatan Peninsula by Pemex, the Mexican oil company. This pipeline will bring jobs and oil products to the U.S. when we need it. We currently import 10 million barrels a day from OPEC, and the 700,000

barrels per day will free us from the stranglehold OPEC has on us. Another development in America is the development of the Bauken oilfield in North Dakota and also into Montana and Southern Canada. The current available oil in this field is around 25-35 billion barrels. This is larger than Prudhoe Bay in Alaska. Experts predict the field will be pumping 500,000 barrels per day to the Gulf Coast refineries by the year 2020. There is a potential of more than 500 billion barrels in this field in North Dakota, which is more oil that Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq. With new drilling technology, there will be enough oil to last for the U.S. for over 100 years. A new refinery is being built in North Dakota and the unemployment rate in the state is 3.4%. There are 16,000 jobs in the drilling and pipeline industry right now in North Dakota. There are plans to run this oil through a similar pipeline alongside the Keystone pipeline down to the Gulf Coast and free us from the stranglehold of OPEC. There is a possible motive of the ones opposed to the Keystone project to stop the project and keep the price of oil at record high prices. I don’t believe they are looking out for the best interests of America. I’m in favor of the Keystone pipeline and further development in the Dakotas, and also the shell oil in Utah and Colorado, which holds a potential of almost two trillion barrels

Cherokeean Herald

State sales tax revenue may be up from this time last year, but only a few cities in Cherokee County can say the same. Only Alto, Rusk and Wells posted percentage gains. Alto’s revenue went up 19.29 percent, Rusk saw revenue increase by 9.54 percent and Wells’ rebate increased by 22.58 percent.

Cuney suffered the worst fall in revenue, dropping 75.96 percent. Jacksonville posted a decrease of 4.56 percent and New Summerfield’s revenue decreased 24.97 percent. Cherokee County’s sales tax revenue decreased from this time last year, falling by 4.52 percent. Texas received $2.01 bil-

lion in sales tax revenue for the month of January, a 14.8 percent increase from February 2011. “Sales tax revenue in all major industries was up, indicating growth in both business and consumer spending,” said State Comptroller Susan Combs. “Rapid growth in tax collections continued from oil

and natural gas sectors, while revenue from retail trade, restaurants and telecommunications was also up significantly.” In all, Texas cities, counties, transit systems and special purpose taxing districts will receive $473.6 million for the month of March, an increase of 9.3 percent from last year.

City and County Sales Tax Rebates Released January 2012

Cities

Rate

Alto Cuney Jacksonville New Summerfield Rusk Wells County Total Cherokee

1.500% 1.500% 1.500% 1.000% 1.500% 1.000%

Net Payment this period

Comparable payment prior year

12,205.32 1,073.95 219,057.57 1,179.26 42,415.36 2,313.98 278,245.44 101,752.41

0.500%

10,230.78 4,469.03 229,525.28 1,571.91 38,721.02 1,887.61 286,405.63 106,578.62

% Change to date

Allergy Relief

2012 to date

19.29% -75.96% -4.56% -24.97% 9.54% 22.58% -2.84% -4.52%

C

of oil – more oil than all the world combined. Check out the Bauken oil reserves on Google and follow the other stories connected with it. So why the hype to stop the pipeline? I guess we’ll leave this answer to the ‘green climate’ folks in America. I don’t know, but maybe they want $7 a gallon gas. I say build the pipeline and rebuild the oil industry along the Gulf Coast.

2011 to date

37,081.35 7,656.68 787,564.62 5,360.87 152,978.75 7,581.84 998,224.11 366,892.03

33,145.17 14,669.28 800,035.24 4,424.57 146,959.14 6,858.98 1,006,092.38 374,357.62

% Change payments

graphic: Cherokeean Herald

hapman

Pharmacy

Your Express Prescription Store

Prescriptions & Pain Relief

Jacksonville. It could not have good. happened if you, Talk Time/ Take this as both a thank Country Corner and other you and a compliment for doing papers were not willing to help such a good job. promote the conference. It is unfortunate, but true that, too often, people complain about the bad and never think to thank and compliment the Check our rates 1st:

Fill all your family’s needs in one place! from cold remedies and personal care products, we have aisles and aisles of great values in store for your shopping convenience.

Personal Care, Health & Wellness, Personal & Gifts, Baby Items

Loans or CDs

Hair Accessories

903-683-2277

C

hapman

Pharmacy

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

Citizens 1st BANK

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

Baby Items

Member F.D.I.C.

11:00am - 3:30pm

Buy a new Ram truck at Pearmans thru march 31, 2012 and receive a $500 gift card to use as you please.

Sun. March 25

Piney Woods Steam Excursion Departing The Rusk Depot

Pearman Mo

tor Compan

y

2012 RAM 3500 CREW CAB DIESEL 4X4 STK#183862

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$46,750 $4,500 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $38,250

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

Mar. 3, Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am

2012 RAM 1500

STK#126291

STK#208171

$34,260 $3,000 $2,500 $1,000

SALE PRICE $27,760

$

QUAD CAB HEMI

27,760

2012 RAM 1500

DEMO

CREW CAB LONGHORN EDITION

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

STK#183387

SALE PRICE $35,985

$

HWY. 69

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$30,655 $2,800 $2,500 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $24,355

24,355

2012 RAM 1500

HEMI BEDLINER TOW PACKAGE STK#136352

$44,120 $4,635 $2,500 $1,000

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

38,250

2012 RAM 1500

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

$

QUAD CAB 4X4 HEMI

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

11.87% -47.80% -1.55% 21.16% 4.09% 10.53% -0.78% -1.99%

New Prescriptions • Prescription Refills • Prescription Transfers

11:00am - 3:30pm

opinion

Comptroller of Public Accounts

Rusk

Piney Woods Steam Excursion Departing The Rusk Depot

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

County sales tax revenue decreases, but Alto, Rusk and Wells see gains; state rate increases

GINNY SCURLOCK

Sat. March 24

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

Assistance made spring conference a success I want to thank the Cherokeean Herald for working with us to make the Cherokee County Master Gardeners Association Spring Conference such a success. We had attendees from Rusk, Henderson, Gallatin, Tyler, Bullard, Flint, Frankston and

n

35,985

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

SALE PRICE $19,785

MOTOR COMPANY

IN

$25,305 $2,020 $2,500 $1,000

ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 • www.pearmanmotor.com

$

19,785

Pictures for illustration purposes only.


2A

n

Wednesday, April 4, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

Voices need to be heard on women’s rights

Pipeline studies available online 

KATHY SILBERMAN

opinion

Austin

EDWARD RADILLO Lake Fork

The times, they are a’changing – and not for the better. These are perilous times for women in Texas. Due to a political power play in the last legislative session, 300,000 Texas women lost their access to cancer screenings, mammograms and preventative care. The trans-vaginal sonogram, an invasive, expensive and medically unnecessary procedure is now mandatory before legally terminating a pregnancy. For a woman facing the hardest of decisions, to be forced to endure this shaming test is punitive and disgraceful. Legislators passed this law based on their personal and

religious motives, yet they do not support sex education or contraception, which lower unplanned pregnancy rates. Instead, contraception itself – the key to control over our lives and reducing abortion rates – is under attack. Does that make sense? Decades ago, women fought for and won equality under the law. We will not sit quietly by and allow our rights to be eroded. We demand the right to make our own reproductive decisions with our physicians. We insist on determining our actions based upon our own personal and religious values. These decisions must not be mandated by the state.

On April 28, a roar will be heard from women and men at rallies being held in every state and DC. Join us on the steps of the Texas Capitol on April 28 at 4 p.m. Help make Texas’ voices the strongest in the country. We must do this for ourselves, our mothers, sisters, daughters, granddaughters and for all the women we love. We must halt this stampede to go back to the days when women were not in control of our lives, our choices or our destinies. Visit wowtex.org to get involved. Then, come to Austin where we will make it clear that we will not go back. We’re outraged and we vote!

Rusk

As one of the pipeline opponents referred to in Kenneth White’s letter in the March 21 Cherokeean Herald, “Pipeline would provide jobs,” I have already registered dissenting views on many of the points he makes. I wish to address a few more in this letter. First, Mr. White informs us, “The Canadian company has already agreed to reroute the pipeline around the main aquifers along the route from Canada to Houston and Beaumont, Texas.” To the contrary, TransCanada has made no such concession in Texas. Under heavy pressure from the Nebraska legislators who responded to the concerns of their citizens, the company agreed to reroute the pipeline around the Nebraska Sandhills and the Ogallala aquifer running underneath that environmentally sensitive area. TransCanada boldly proposes to cross our Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer, which supplies water to 60 East Texas counties, and

a number of other vital waterways in this state. Unlike in the case of Nebraska, our elected representatives, including U.S. Senators John Cornyn and Kay Bailey Hutchison and U.S. Representative Jeb Hensarling, as well as all Texas legislators, beginning with Governor Rick Perry and including Senator Robert Nichols and Representative Chuck Hopson, have turned a deaf ear to our concerns. Secondly, Mr. White seems to place all citizens opposed to this pipeline under the umbrella term, “tree huggers.” In fact, opponents are highly diverse in their viewpoints, and represent all political stripes, including Democrats, Republicans, Tea Party sympathizers, Independents and persons of no particular political affiliation. We include landowners who have been threatened by TransCanada and dragged into court when they refused to sign a lease; and yes, citizens who are attached to the idea of preserving the integrity of our environment for generations

Peanuts™ The Easter Beagle Express Departing the Rusk Depot 11:00am

H E R A L D

Call (903) 683-2257 for details

Spring Is Here - And So Are We!

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Fill all your family’s needs in one place! From cold remedies and personal care products, we have aisles and aisles of great values in store for your shopping convenience.

C

hapman

Pharmacy

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

T R A I L E R S , L L C .

We carry a full line of Kearney, Gooseneck & S&H trailers 3,650

$

Kearney 20’ gooseneck lowboy utility trailer with, 2-7,000 # axles, electric brakes, 2 7/8” pipe top rail, slide in ramps, 10,000 # jack and treated floor

1,499

$

Kearney 77”x16’ utility trailer, 2-3500 # axles, 2 3/8” pipe top rail, 2” bulldog coupler, new tires, treated floor, E-Z lube hubs

2,895

1,240

$

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

Each one of these studies is mandated by both houses of Congress, and must be briefed to them upon completion. We must especially make sure that we tell our representatives that TransCanada should only allow domestic crude to be shipped through this pipeline, if approved, and not diluted bitumen until the study of diluted bitumen is finished and dictates what equipment should be used in its transportation. Our safety, our water and our future generations are depending on us to make sure of this. Contact your county officials and your state representatives. Make them accountable. Let them know you expect them to put your safety first.

Cherokeean

Top Stories • Local News Local Sales • Classifieds Each Week In The

to come. We all have certain things in common: a concern for protecting our property rights, our water safety and the health and safety of East Texas citizens and our descendants. One more important point – Mr. White speaks of the great number of jobs the pipeline will bring, a projection that has already been called into serious question. I would ask that he have a look at the latest report from Cornell University projecting the number of jobs that will be lost, and the devastating effect on local economies and public health, should a tar sands pipeline spill occur. This analysis is based, in part, on the disastrous tar sands spill twenty months ago into the Kalamazoo River, which has yet to be cleaned up in spite of the 720 million dollars already spent.

903-683-2277

Saturday April 7

mtg?mtg=75. For those of us who could not watch the live webcast, it was recorded, and should be available soon to view on your schedule. The workshop’s agenda is at this link: https:// www.federalregister.gov/articles/2012/02/09/2012-2929/ pipeline-safety-notice-of-public-meetings-on-improvingpipeline-leak-detection-systemeffectiveness. The third study on diluted bitumen (tarsands) has been contracted by the U.S. Department of Transportation to the Academy of Sciences, Engineering and Research board. The results of this study should be available sometime in summer 2013.

GET MORE FOR YOUR BUCKS...

Registering dissent with pro-pipeline letter SUZANNE MORRIS

The Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) is conducting three important studies in accordance with the Job Creation Act, signed into law January 3. These studies will deal directly with our safety and well-being. TransCanada’s plan to build their pipeline through our counties in Texas and we must make sure they abide with the findings of these studies. On March 27 and 28, PHMSA streamed live workshops on “Improving Pipeline Leak Detection System Effectiveness” and “Understanding the Application of Automatic/Report Control Valves,” available at this link: https://primis.phmsa. dot.gov/meetings/MtgHome.

Kearney 83”x16’ landscape trailer, 2-3500 # axles, electric brakes, treated floor, 2” bulldog coupler, 4’ expanded metal sides, weedeater rack, 2’x2’x83” storage box on front

$

Kearney 77”x12’ utility treiler, 3500 # axle, E-Z lube hubs, new tires, treated floor, 2 3/8” pipe top rail, fold down ramp, spare tire mount, 2000 # jack

8,250

$

Kearney 32’ dual tandem axle trailer, 2-10,000 # axles, 2-10,000 # jacks, 2-spring assisted fold up ramps, 27’ deck + 5’ dove, center pop up between ramps to make 32’ straight deck, lockable storage between gooseneck uprights, LED lights, treated floor

990

$

Kearney 60”x10’ utility trailer, 3500 # axle, E-Z lube hubs, new tires, treated floor, fold down ramp, spare tire mount, 2000 # jack

MOTOR COMPANY

HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmantrailersales.com

Pictures for illustration purposes only.


2A

n

Wednesday, May 2, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

Readers need the facts about TransCanada, Keystone Pipeline

TERRY CUNHA Calgary, Alberta, Canada

We are working to help secure America’s energy future by building the Gulf Coast Project – an oil pipeline from Oklahoma to the refineries near Beaumont. We want to be more than just a pipeline company; we want to be a trusted neighbor. In order for that to happen, your readers need the facts about TransCanada and the way we have done business in the U.S. for the past 45 years. A recent letter from Suzanne Morris contains misinformation about the Gulf Coast Project. As a threshold matter, the letter notes that TransCanada has not changed its route in Texas to avoid

the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer. This is correct, but Ms. Morris is omitting some important points: TransCanada has not been asked by regulators to route around the aquifer. The aquifer in question already hosts literally hundreds of miles of pipeline. The elected officials Ms. Morris identifies did not “turn a deaf ear” to information about the Gulf Coast Project. On the contrary – they studied it very carefully and concluded, as we have, that this project is vital to America’s energy security and can be built and operated safely with minimal impact to the environment.

The letter does not even attempt to explain how the Gulf Coast Project poses negative consequences for the aquifer, so it is difficult to know how to respond. The letter simply assumes that pipelines must be bad. What a strange conclusion to reach in Texas, a state that more than any other has depended on pipelines for its prosperity for more than 100 years. Texas knows better than any other state that pipelines are the “cleanest and greenest” way to transport the enormous amounts of energy produced within its borders. Ms. Morris’s characterizations that TransCanada “threatened” landowners and “dragged them into

Alto

industry. It would only be fair of them to allow us to confront our accusers and get to the facts rather than resort to blind accusations. And finally, it is Texas statute, not TransCanada policy, that makes the courtroom a last resort. “Dragged into court” makes a catchy slogan, but it isn’t how these things work. And I assure you, TransCanada’s preference is always to reach mutual agreement. We make our money moving energy to market, not meeting landowners in court. Mr. Cunha is the manager of stakeholder relations for TransCanada’s Gulf Coast Project.

Justice is not a party platform

Community comes together for ‘Health for All’ KATHI DAVIS

court” is a serious misinterpretation of fact and law. While this is a common accusation leveled by activist opponents of the Gulf Coast Project (and every other energy project in the U.S.), your readers are wise enough to have noticed that no opponent has yet made a specific accusation of a named individual making a threat against a specific landowner. We wonder: Why not? We think it’s because our land agents keep such meticulous records of landowner contacts. Why? For the very reason that this accusation is routinely made by a small but vocal minority of landowners and others who simply oppose the energy

RAY CRYER Rusk

If it weren’t for a collaborated effort from so many contributors, the recent Alto Health Screening Fair and Wellness Education Seminar would not have been as large of a success. One of the participating healthcare providers indicated, for the size of the community served, this event was as good as any other he’d joined. Nurse Kris Sturrock, on behalf of At Home Health, said, “It was a great job; well done on organizing this event!” Ashley Rojo of the Star program and initializing a new program called Lone Star Military Resource Group said, “The event was very well organized, and I feel this was a good resource for the Alto area.” AgriLife Extension’s Master Wellness volunteer Linda Cryer, who demonstrated healthy cooking recipes, said “It was a good turn-out. Everybody loved my samples and everything was well put together.” The Arbors had a booth decorated for the St. Patrick’s holiday and Steve McCarty professed, “I am positive about how the people responded.” Jim Walker, a retired Massage Therapist, gave free shoulder massages and was pleased he had 16 people sign-

up for massages. He said, “A really good day that it turned out to be.” Kevin Watts representing Jordan Health Services said, “I had a nice time sharing information and testing clients with approximately 15 glucose checks.” For me, in my first time managing a health-related event, this whole experience was rewarding. I am excited to help the people in this community continuing with the Health for All wellness and education program. The experience wouldn’t be as wonderful without special people helping me facilitate it all. I’d like to thank Nick Scarinni, retiree from North Texas Public Health District; Kris Sturrock and Kevin Watts. Carey Palmer, the president of the Alto Economic Development Corporation and volunteer Shawn Davis were huge aides during the event. It amazed me how the providers there stepped in to help set up. Jo Malone with the ETMC Olympia Center; Brandon Greene with the Cherokee and Anderson County Crisis Center; Steve McCarty with The Arbors and Theresa Scalding with Hospice of East Texas were

Sat. & Sun. May 5 & 6

tremendously supportive. Other partakers involved were Cherokee County Public Health Dept., SCCADA, ETMC, TJC Rusk VNE, Texas Health Steps/Maximus, Gold Eye Clinic, The Blood Center of East Texas, Rigsby Chiropractic, Birmingham Health Care, CCSO SWAT and Crimestoppers with assistance from Alto PD – all contributed to our door prize giveaways. Curtis Murphy from Lufkin donated the moonwalk for a kid’s outdoor activity, and Lisa the clown with Classic Clown volunteered her balloon artistry. A special acknowledgement is extended to Alto First Baptist Church, the Alto Ministerial Alliance and Birmingham Golf Course in Rusk. I do wish to also thank all the media who has partnered with us to promote our event and program, especially KWRW/KTLU, KBJS 90.3 FM radio, the Cherokeean Herald, KFXK Fox 51 Today and the Tyler Morning Telegraph. This shows how nice colleagues can be to work with and what fun it brings coming together as a community.

When they vote, some folks vote straight ticket – Republican or Democrat. The net result is often that competent officeholders are cast aside for party hacks. Newcomers, relying on such a phenomenon, are often swept into office without merit. It is

a self-inflicted wound on the voters. Voting straight ticket may, though doubtful, make sense at some level. However, I have never understood why the offices of judge or district attorney should be partyaffiliated.

Your Pharmacy of Choice Find the right remedy for your symptoms. From vitamins and supplements to natural remedies, over-the-counter drugs and prescription medications. We have a variety of options to take care of your needs.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

RailFest 2012 Held at Rusk Depot

What has party affiliation got to do with legal justice? Politics is about the reallocation of resources, not the application of law. If the voter thinks one party would adhere more strictly to the law over the other, he is fooling himself.

C

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422 We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

5th - Piney Woods Steam Excursion & Night Photo Shoot 6th - Mixed Train Photographer’s Special

2012 DODGE CHARGER STK#131836

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$27,515 $2,030 $2,000

$

SALE PRICE $23,485

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

Mar. 3, Apr. 7, May 5, June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am

2012 DODGE DURANGO

2011 DODGE AVENGER

DEMO

STK#153605

STK#574699

MSRP PEARMAN DISC.

$25,700 $5,725

SALE PRICE $31,635

$

31,635

2012 DODGE JOURNEY SXT STK#174364

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$35,635 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $19,995

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

$

19,995

2012 RAM 1500 EXPRESS STK#117724

$28,900 $2,225 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,675

$

25,675

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$25,910 $2,920 $2,500 $1,500

SALE PRICE $18,990

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

23,485

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Pictures for illustration purposes only.

$

18,990


2A

n

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

TransCanada letter leaves out details of current study

EDWARD C. RADILLO

Yantis

In response to Suzanne Morris’ letter to the editor that was recently published by your paper, Terry Cunha, spokesperson from TransCanada, wrote the following: “As a threshold matter, the letter notes that TransCanada has not changed its route in Texas to avoid the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer. This is correct, but Ms. Morris is omitting some important points: TransCanada has not been asked by regulators to route around the aquifer. The aquifer in question already hosts literally hundreds of miles of pipeline. The elected officials Ms. Morris identifies did not ‘turn a deaf ear’ to information about the Gulf Coast Project. On the contrary – they studied it very carefully and concluded, as we have, that this project is

vital to America’s energy security and can be built and operated safely with minimal impact to the environment. The letter does not even attempt to explain how the Gulf Coast Project poses negative consequences for the aquifer, so it is difficult to know how to respond. The letter simply assumes that pipelines must be bad.” I beg to disagree with Mr. Cunha. He does not mention to your readers the most important study of all, which is currently being conducted by the National Academy of Sciences concerning the leak potential of diluted bitumen. Diluted bitumen is the Tar Sands blend of oil that his company, TransCanada, wants to get from Cushing, Okla. to the Gulf refineries to meet their contractual obligations. The numer-

ous pipelines he mentions that already cross over the Carrizo-Wilcox Sands Aquifer are that of our domestic crude oil and not of diluted bitumen. Both the House and Senate in Washington voted in favor of this crucial study which was part of HR 2845, Sec 16, signed by the President January 3, 2012. Logically, this study would not be being conducted if there was not the likelihood that in fact this type of oil blend is more dangerous running through pipelines than our conventional crude. The National Academy of Sciences is a trusted agency with Pulitzer Prize winners and not influenced by outside interest. For our safety and well-being, we should wait for the results of this study. Why? Because if it is determined that diluted bitumen causes a greater threat of leak

potential and henceforth the equipment such as valves, pipes, etc. are deemed unfit/unsafe for the transportation of this diluted bitumen over our aquifer, TransCanada and any other company would have to abide by the safety regulations that would govern it. Look at it this way – just as we would not take medicines or give medicines to our children or grandchildren that have not been approved by the FDA, we should not let this diluted bitumen – which has already caused problems in other areas – cross over our precious waterways and aquifers in Texas. Remember, TransCanada may transport domestic oil from Cushing, Okla., but their main objective is to get the diluted bitumen to the Gulf refineries. Everyone should get involved.

Sen. Nichols answers your government questions

STATE SEN. ROBERT NICHOLS R – Jacksonville

As I travel across Senate District 3, people often ask me questions. My favorite was from an elementary school boy who asked if I knew George Washington. I’m sure to that kid, I did seem as old as the first president. S o m e questions are asked STATE SEN. over and over ROBERT NICHOLS again. These are important questions about the nature of state government and the future of Texas. As a reader of this column, you are probably curious about the same things. In this month’s column, I am going to answer the top five questions I hear from people in Senate District 3. I hope you find the answers helpful, but if you don’t see your question here, please feel free to call or write my office. 1. Is the Trans Texas Corridor really dead? Many Texans were relieved to hear the Texas Department of Transportation would not be building the Trans Texas Corridor. However, some wondered if the plan was really cancelled or simply delayed. I can reassure you the Trans Texas Corridor is not just temporarily gone, but has been

buried six feet deep. Not only has the Texas Department of Transportation cancelled the project, but last session, legislators repealed the body of law that even made the project possible. There are absolutely no plans to revive the Trans Texas Corridor. 2. Wasn’t the lottery supposedtofixourproblems with education funding? Recent record-breaking jackpots created a renewed interest in the state lottery and, with that, a renewed interest in how lottery money funds education. In 2010, the lottery had about $3.74 billion in sales. After subtracting prize money, administrative costs, retailer costs and a small amount for the Texas Veterans Commission, education received about $1 billion. While this money helps fund education, it is only a small part of the $25 billion the state will spend on education this year. 3. What is the state doing about illegal immigration? While immigration is ultimately a federal issue, Texas cannot afford to wait for Washington to take action. As a state, we are spending more than $100 million a year to increase security at the Texas border, have tightened

controls on state identification cards and passed legislation requiring voters to present photo identification as a way to help guarantee only citizens cast a ballot. More work still needs to be done. I continue to support legislation outlawing sanctuary cities in Texas. 4. How big is the district you represent? In 2011, state and house seats were redistricted to reflect population changes reported in the 2010 Census. Senate District 3 went from 16 counties to 19. While some senators in p o p ula t io n- d e nse a re a s represent an area you can view from a tall building, Senate District 3 is more than 16,000 square miles. That is bigger than nine states and the equivalent of 16 Rhode Islands. It has a population of more than 840,000 people and more than 100 school districts. 5. Why does the Texas Legislature only meet every other year, and why don’t legislators meet more often? In their wisdom, Texas’ founders had a strong suspicion of government and did not want a centralized power with too

much authority. The Texas Constitution is particularly long and complex because our state’s forefathers did not want the state to have any powers that were not expressly spelled out. In that spirit, they only called on the Legislature to meet every odd year for just 140 days. Not only did this limit the

time legislators could create new laws, it also allowed for elected officials to be citizen legislators. Because Texas senators and representatives do not live and work in Austin full time, they stay close with the people in their district where they live and work. Also, because legislators

work in other professions besides lawmaker, they better understand the challenges and pressures faced by Texas families and businesses. I believe this leads to better representation. Legislative committees meet during the interim to study issues before the legislative session.

June 1, 2012

Great

C

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk • 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

Gifts

for

Grads

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

Fri. - Sun. May 25-27

Memorial Day Armed Forces Event Held at Palestine Depot

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st

T-Shirts Frames Jewelry & More

Guys & Gals

BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

WWII Mock Battle Train Ride 1940’s USO Show Dinner & Dance Plus many more military activities!

DEMO

2012 DODGE AVENGER SXT Sunroof, V-6

STK#198310

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$26,395 $2,000 $3,000

$

SALE PRICE $21,395

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study UPCOMING EVENTS

Arena Open to Public Every Monday Night

Saddle Play Day Dates

June 2, July 7, Aug. 4 Starts 10am Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

2012 DODGE CHALLENGER SXT

2012 DODGE CALIBER SXT

STK#257555

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$26,115 $1,640 $1,500

SALE PRICE $22,975

STK#529754

$

22,975

2012 DODGE CHARGER DEMO

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$19,515 $1,540 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $16,975

16,975

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB

Hemi, V-8, 20” Chrome Wheels STK#208175

STK#200922

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

21,395

$28,705 $2,010 $2,000

SALE PRICE $24,695

$

24,695

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$30,655 $3,000 $2,500 $1,500

SALE PRICE $23,655

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Pictures for illustration purposes only.

$

23,655


6B

n

Wednesday, July 4, 2012

n

Cherokeean Herald

thecherokeean.com

n

391 COMMISSION

Michigan resident testifies against tar sands pipeline BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

“We came home and smelled this awful smell, between tar, diesel fuel and gasoline, all mixed together. It was literally so thick you could see it in the air. You could feel it and smell and taste it,” said Michelle Barlond-Smith, a resident on the Kalamazoo River near Battle Creek, Mich. where the tar sands pipeline belonging to Enbridge, Inc. erupted with a leak two years ago. Over 1 million gallons traveled 35 miles downriver for 12 hours before the spill was shut down. Ms. Barlond-Smith spoke to the East Texas Sub-Regional Planning (391) Commission and 12 local citizens at the Craft-Turney Rural Water Assoc. office on the loop in

Jacksonville on June 26. Earlier that day, Ms. Barlond-Smith, along with commission consultant Rita Beving of Beving & Associates in Dallas, addressed the Energy Resources Committee in Austin. The purpose of the ERC hearing was to focus on broadranging topics related to oil and gas production and pipeline safety standards in Texas. As a part of this hearing, Ms. Barlond-Smith testified as a Michigan resident who is a victim of the largest and most expensive tar sands spill in U.S. history. Ms. Barlond-Smith alleges, “In the two years since the spill, 10 of the 160 people living in our neighborhood have died as a result with many more sick.” Enbridge, Inc. is a Canadian

company which transports and distributes energy across North America and is part owner of the 36 year-old Seaway pipeline that was re-purposed to carry diluted bitumen (tar sands) from near Dallas to the Texas coast. Enbridge is in a race with TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline to gain the right to transport the hazardous bitumen crude to coastal refineries. Since the Seaway pipeline already exists, new permits are not necessary; a tariff approval from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has been secured. The only thing lacking are pumping stations which are necessary to move the viscous tar sands. “The reason I’m down here in Texas,” Ms. Barlond-Smith told the Jacksonville group,

Young people from Alto First Baptist Church attending summer camp last week in Livingston are, in front from left, Lee Ellen Pearman, Jordan Hall and Clay Anderson. On the second row are sponsor Melissa Wood, Kaylynn Hinson, Morgan Lindsey, Peyton Smith, Allee Jones, Caitlin Morris, Kelly Crosby, Kelcey Chometa, Conner Richardson and Keenan Johnson. In back are Colten Hinson, Dyllan Wood, Kolten Black, Lindsey Smith, Tanner Jones, Kade Black and sponsor Kyle Hess. Not pictured is Alyssa Duplichain.

NEWS

Emily Austin of Jacksonville received a Bachelor of Arts in advertising during the May SMU Commencement ceremony. After the university-wide commencement, SMU’s schools and departments held individual receptions throughout the day to honor graduates. SMU is a nationally ranked private university in Dallas founded 100 years ago. Today, SMU enrolls nearly 11,000 students who benefit from the academic opportunities and international reach of seven degreegranting schools.

Republicans sponsors 9th annual July 4 picnic The Cherokee County Republican Club’s annual July 4 picnic will be held at 11:30 a.m. at Love’s Lookout Park, U.S. Highway 69 north of Jacksonville. Special guest speaker will be Rafael

Cruz, father of U. S. Senatorial candidate Ted Cruz. Callie Wallace, one of the annual scholarship recipients, will read her and Emily Jones’s winning essays. The Club will provide brisket, drinks and paper goods. Members and participants are asked to bring side dishes, desserts and lawn chairs. The public is invited. For further information call (903) 721-2467 or (903) 683-6870.

Forest Baptist Church plans Vacation Bible school July 9-11

Vacation Bible School at the Forest Baptist Church is planned for July 9-11 for children ages three through sixth grade. Other sessions will be held for teenagers. Jimmy Hedges is pastor. Susie Edge is vacation Bible school director. The church is located at 978 FM 1911, Alto. For additional information call (936) 867-4554.Forestry Service expects quiet July 4

Say it’s dark as a tomb in your living room? Let us wash those windows and clean them curtains We will make them shine and that’s for certain! Spring cleaning, this is the season, Ginny’s can do it and all within reason!

Ginny’s Odd Jobs If it’s not illegal, immoral or fattening,We’ll consider it!

903 903 530-8610 683-5739 Bonded and Insured

and under creeks, rivers and lakes on its route through East Texas. In December President Obama authorized that dilbit crude (tar sands) be studied for its chemical content to assure adequate pipeline requirements to transport it. However, the study is not due for 18 months. In the interim, if either of these pipelines is completed, the concern is whether any new regulations would retroactively apply. Ms. Barlond-Smith listed possible health hazards and causes of death as a direct result of exposure to the tar sands spill. Over $752 million has been spent on cleanup so far but none of this has benefited the victims. “After hearing Ms. Barlond-Smith’s testimony, state

Rep. Jim Keffer (R-Eastland), Chairman of the Energy Resources Committee in Austin, assured those at the hearing he would take the bitumen crude matter into account very seriously and pursue clarification as to whether legislation is needed to protect Texans against Canadian tar sands,” said Ms. Beving. To view the complete hearings by the Energy Resources Committee select “video/audio” at www.house.state.tx.us. Attending the 391 meeting were President Roberta Colkin, Reklaw City Councilman Gilbert Stafford, Gallatin City Councilman Tom Colkin, Alto City Councilman Carey Palmer, members Uris Roberson and Hoyte Davis, consultant Ms. Beving, Ms. BarlondSmith and Jim Schutze with the Dallas Observer.

Local man arrested for oil field theft in 4 area counties

Summer camp

Jacksonville woman graduates from SMU

“is that I don’t want what happened in my town to happen in yours. I have been documenting it for the last two years and walking up and down the river and talking to a lot of sick people. When it first happened, I started uploading photos to the CNN website and they called me. “You need to be aware of what can happen if this pipeline has a spill. It is not sweet crude, nor even Venezuelan crude. It is something completely different containing heavy metals such as lead, mercury, arsenic, vanadium and many others. The tailings piles left over from processing are so toxic that they put up speakers to ward off birds because it kills them,” said Ms. Barlond-Smith. This is the same substance which would be passing over the Carrizo-Wilcox aquifer

Independence Day for fire fighters at the Texas Forest Service in Jacksonville should be a lot quieter than last year which was spent fighting the Bastrop fire. Texas flame fighters are not expecting to be called upon to help with the Colorado wildfires since the methods vary greatly in the mountainous terrain.

A Cherokee County man, Ricky Lee Schakosky, 26, was arrested June 27 on several outstanding warrants. Officers arrested him after waiting six hours outside the Jacksonville hotel where he was staying. He is the primary RICKY SCHAKOSKY suspect in battery thefts from county oil fields. When Mr. Schakosky arrived at the hotel he had 13 batteries and other oil field equipment in the trunk of his car. The items were believed to have been taken from two sites in Cherokee and Houston counties. The vehicle was towed to the Cherokee County sheriff’s office, and Mr. Schakosky was booked on the original warrants. Mr. Schakosky is believed to be responsible for several other oil field thefts in Cherokee, Angelina, Nacogdoches and Houston counties. He remains in the Cherokee County jail on the following charges: •Cherokee County charge of failure to ID/fugitive, a

Officers confiscated batteries and other oil field equipment when they arrested Ricky Lee Schakosky, 26, on June 27. class A misdemeanor; bond was set at $2,000; •Rusk County warrant of forgery, a state jail felony with bond set at $8,000; • Shelby County warrant for failure to appear on charges of organized retail theft, a state jail felony with no bond. He was arraigned before Justice of the Peace Precinct 3 Phillip Grimes.

He has not been arraigned on two other felony theft charges stemming from battery thefts in Cherokee County. Investigators anticipate filing several more charges of felony theft. There are other suspects in the incidents. Other charges may be filed in Angelina, Houston and Nacogdoches counties.

REAL ESTATE JoEd

A N D E

Office Phone 903-683-5423

RealtoR

SO N

102 S. Main St. Rusk, Texas 75785 www.easttexaslandsales.com

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY & LOTS

0.3561 AC. Loop 343, good for small business or home ....................................................... $2,900 0.75 AC, US Hwy 84E. 140’x250’ lot.......................................................................................... $4,000 115 Thompson St. Corner of Pryor & Thompson. Residential lot with all utilities .............. $4,900 0.75 AC. Alto city lot, utilities .................................................................................PENDING $7,500 172 Highland Dr. 62’x135’ lot, 20’x24’ vinyl storage bldg....................................................... $6,900 0.792 AC. US 69, Rusk, wooded, owner finance 20% down .................................................. $9,995 1.2 AC. - wooded, 6 lots, $2,100 each .................................................................................... $12,600 7350 Hwy 110 N. Small mercantile frame bldg. ..................................................................... $15,000 3.3 AC. Rusk, high traffic area, corner lot ...........................................................PENDING $16,900 3.944 AC. on US 69, prime location for business, wooded.................................................. $19,720 2.04 AC. 1/2 block off Loop 343 on Old Salem Rd. All util. avail. 2 city sts, level.............. $19,900 1600 W. 6th St. Investment prop., comm. site, Blk from loop ............................................. $29,000 4.515 AC. Hwy 69 S, 300’ frontage, develop to meet your needs ........................................ $33,862 4231 Loop 343, Metal bldg, prime investment property...................................................... $39,950. 5 AC. Corner, Hwy 84 downtown bus. dist., high traffic count, ample parking, 2100 Sq. ft., + storage Bldg. ................................................................................................... $79,500 117 S. Henderson, Restaurant bldg., kitchen, serving & dining area, across from courthouse ......................................................................................................... $79,900 2270 Loop 343, 1 ac, 40x100 metal bldg. ............................................................................ $120,000 596 N. Main, Fully equipped cleaners, ready for new owner. ................................. SOLD $138,000 2.595 Acres, corner of Hwy. 69 & 84, high visibility ........................................................... $150,000 5.7565 AC. Hwy 69 at Loop 343. Great business site. ........................................................ $215,000 2.451 AC. (150 & 180 N. Dickinson & 84E) prime commercial site & high traffic............. $250,000 105 W. Rusk, Mt. Enterprise. Thriving auto parts business .............................................. $280,000 312 N. Hwy 69S. 0.767 ac. Downtown Bullard, commercial spot ...................................... $330,000 22.086 Acres, 7 homes, prime location................................................................................ $400,000

HOMES ON ACREAGE

28140 US 69 N. (1.16 AC) 3/2, brick, large shop .................................................................. $126.900 4.57 AC. Cuney, Brick 2-2-2 carport, on corner of FM & State Hwy. ..........................$115,000 4.098 AC. (135 Firetower Ln.) 3/2/2cp, storage bldg. .................................................. $122,500 3.77 AC., 963 Copeland, 4-2-2, brick on Rusk city lake, just updated, quality built & spacious, 30x50 metal building.................................................................................... $299,000 7 AC. Ryder Rd. 3-2-2 home, shop, & horse stalls ..................................................... $179,500 10.75 AC., SWMH 2/1, woods, game .............................................................................. $32,500 16.82 AC. Alto, 4/3, shop, barn, woods, pond, creek.................................................. $139,952 872 S. Dickinson (Hwy 69) 1.33 Ac., 4-3, CH&A, many large rooms. ........................ $155,000 62.63 AC. Laneville, 4 br, creek, timber ....................................................... SOLD .... $169,000 72.5 AC. Gallatin, 3-1 frame, 2 car det., wooded, game.............................................. $192,675 73.69 AC. Alto, 2/1, fenced. ........................................................................................... $220,000 80.076 AC. 2/2, metal house, plenty game................................................................... $245,000 78.893 AC., Troup, 3-2-2, brick, pool, workshop, pond, creek ................................... $559,000 131.6 AC. Reklaw, 3/2, cedar/brick, 1.5 mi. frontage, some minerals available ....... $457,500 269 AC. Angelina River, 3-2-2, brick, well, 1/2 pasture ..............................................$750,000

JoEd Anderson - 903-520-5423 Sharon Bowling - 903-683-5074 Ken Peloquin - 903-625-0956 Bill Fountain - 903-721-2521 HOMES

564 Butler, 2-1 gutted, ready to rebuild ...........................................PENDING.....$11,000 30745 US 69 N. 2/1 ...................................................................................................$14,000 968 Henderson St., 1/1 2 story, siding, on hill with scenic view ..........................$17,000 149 8th St. 2-1 frame.................................................................................................$19,000 569 W. 6th St. Corner of Butler, 2/1, brick ..............................................................$19,900 225 E. Johnson, 3-1, siding, good rental investment ............................................$19,900 144 Ricketts, 2 story, 3-2, frame, a fixer upper .....................................PENDING $19,900 32 Homer St., Wells, 2 BR, 1 BA, vinyl siding, metal roof.....................................$19,950 801 Henderson, 2-1 frame, close to square. .........................................................$24,000 348 Hospital St. 2-1-1, wall furnace, needs some repairs .....................................$29,900 784 4th St. 2-2 frame, rustic decor throughout ......................................................$29,500 285 N. Main St. “Old Sugar House”, 2-1 frame, historical value ..........................$39,950 677 W. 6th St. Frame, 2-1-1cp, storage bldg, fenced backyard ............................$39,900 238 CR 1501, 4-2-2cp, brick, edge of town. ............................................................$44,500 1167 S. Dickinson Dr. 3/2, brick, close to town .....................................PENDING $44,900 6659 Hwy 84W, maydelle, 3-3, cedar frame, needs repair.....................................$47,500 156 Tower Dr. 3-1.5-2, brick, storage/shop bldg. fence ......................... SOLD .... $72,900 8860 Hwy 294W, Alto, 3-2, brick, metal roof, fresh paint in & out ........................$79,900 226 Fisher St, Alto, 1.5 ac, 3/2, 1cp, brick, 2 storage bldg. ................... SOLD .... $84,900 110 Short St. Neat & clean 3/2 brick, 3 cp, storage bldg. ......................................110,000 335 FM 1857 (1.734 ac) 3/2.5/2, brick, CH&A, workshop, pond .........PENDING $149,900 1194 CR 3113, Lake Jacksonville, 2-story, Lake house, 2-2-2 carport ...............$179,500

ACREAGE $ PER ACRE $ 1.06 AC. J’Ville, fronts 2 sts., util..................... $8,900 37.584 AC. Reklaw, fenced, FM ....................... $2,450 1.99 AC. Secluded, wooded .. PENDING ... $2,500 50 AC. Bullard, wooded, utilities ....................$11,350 8.06 AC. Wells, in town, util.............................. $4,800 1 AC, Secluded, wooded, sandy land ............ $2,500 25.125 AC. US Hwy 84W. Invest. poss ........... $1,200 122.1 AC. Reklaw, fenced, FM ......................... $2,450 26.7 AC. Landlocked, good hunting ............... $1,200 130 AC. Atoy, hunting woods, creek ...... SOLD $1,495 30.0 AC. Jacksonville, wooded, gently

160.45 AC. Lufkin, Hwy frontage, hunting .................$1,295

rolling, game ...................................................... $2,350 220.3035 AC. Mt Hope 2/3 timber, creek ....................$1,995


2A

n

Wednesday, July 18, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

n

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Cherokeean Herald

thecherokeean.com

n

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

Cub Scout day camp a great success

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

Examine real benefits of affordable health act 

HOLLY FOYE WEST

CAESAR A. ROY

Palestine

Jacksonville

During the week of June 11-15, nearly 40 boys from Anderson, Rusk and Cherokee Counties gathered at the Rusk Civic Center to participate in Boy Scouts of America, East Texas Area Council, Three Rivers District’s 2012 Cub Scout Day Camp. This year’s theme was “Prehistoric Adventure” and the boys, ages 7-11, enjoyed swimming, playing “prehistoric” sports and games, making dinosaur fossils, sculptures and other crafts and learning about nature, as well as how to shoot with a bow and arrow and a BB gun. They met new friends and experienced the camaraderie of the brotherhood of scouting. All of this was possible only through the donations of many agencies, organizations and volunteers. The camp and program directors, George Morey and Holly Foye West, would like to thank them for their generosity. Thanks go to the City of Rusk, especially Cristin Ross, for the use of the Rusk Civic Center and Rusk City Park,

including the pool. We want to thank four local churches who stepped up to feed the Cub Scouts and staff during day camp. Thank you First Methodist Church of Rusk, First Baptist Church of Rusk, Church of Christ of Rusk and Sacred Heart Catholic Church for making sure all of us had a nourishing lunch. Thank you to East Texas Medical Center’s (ETMC) Rebekah Morris and Jeff Down for providing and setting up the shade tent for the shooting ranges. Thanks to Rusk Fire Department and Terry Joe Phillips for “hosing down” the Cub Scouts when the pool was overwhelmed by the storm. Thank you, Bart Bauer, Michael Brown and Zachariah Brown, for helping the Webelos earn their Engineering and Traveler Activity pins and telling all of the Cub Scouts about the Order of the Arrow. Thanks to Jason Ellis, district forester of our local Texas Forest Service, and his foresters, Brett Foreman and Grant Thredford, for teaching

I attended the town hall meeting conducted by U.S. Rep. Jeb Hensarling in Rusk on July 2. The Honorable Hensarling presented his views on the Affordable Health Care Act and the resulting Supreme Court Decision regarding same. He reluctantly accepts the Supreme Court decision but now plans to work in the Congress to repeal the act itself, thus causing the decision to become moot. He spoke at length about possible negative impacts the act will have on jobs in our area; he expressed concern about the possible negative impact on small businesses; the impact on availability of physicians to treat patients in the area and of course, the impact the Affordable Health Care legislation will have on the national debt. I think even the congressman will agree that these “negative impacts” are in fact speculative; and based on the small samples he quoted, they are questionable. I am reminded of my many

the Cub Scouts about forest management and fighting forest fires. But day camp would not have been possible without the many people who volunteered their time during the week of camp. Thanks goes to Linda Caldwell and Cynthia Adams for being our medical officers. We would like to thank our activity directors and their assistants, Zach Vaughn, Meaghan Vaughn, Madeleine Ross, Catherine “CJ” Lake, Resia Morey, Daisy Black, Eldon Tedder, Michael Tedder, Daryl Tedder, Nicholas Craddock and Sam Morey. We would also like to thank the volunteers who organized and motivated our Cub Scouts, the den walkers and their assistants, Cherri Goodwin, Tristan Goodwin, Laura Richardson, Raven Legal, Amy Brooks, Judy Jensen, Andrew Ross, Melissa Dunn, Hillary Dosser, Mike Dunn and Theresa Dunn. None of this could have been possible without our district executive, Hank Googe. Thank you, everyone.

A call for nonviolent blockade against Keystone

visits to my health care provider who from time to time prescribes medicine for me. He always cautions me that the drugs may have some negative side effects, but he believes that “known” benefits of the medications far outweigh the “potential” risks. I believe this risk benefit analysis is appropriate when we consider the Affordable Health Care Act (or OBAMCARE) as some of my Republican friends delight in calling it. I was disappointed that the Congressman failed to mention any of the benefits that his constituents are now receiving and will continue to receive when this act is fully implemented. He failed to consider the vast number of young people in this district who will benefit from being able to remain covered by their parents insurance until they reach age 26. He apparently does not support a provision of the Act, when fully implemented, that will prevent insurers from denying coverage to

young and old with preexisting conditions. The act prevents insurance companies from placing annual or lifetime caps on health benefits, but this was not deemed worthy of being mentioned by our congressman during the town hall meeting. Nor did he mention that preventive care services are available now without charge thru Medicare and private health plans. I trust that Mr. Hensarling is aware that when fully implemented, 100 percent of his constituents will have some health insurance, thus contributing their “fair share” to the overall health care system. These are just a few of the benefits assured by the act. I suspect when my fellow citizens become fully aware of the actual benefits of the act, they will be less inclined to agree with the naysayers who spend their time touting the “possible” side effects. Mr. Roy is the Cherokee County Democratic party chairman.

RON STEIFFERT Dallas

Environmental activists from across the country will converge in Texas this summer to blockade the Gulf Coast portion of the Keystone XL pipeline. The Tar Sands Blockade (http://www. tarsandsblockade.org) will coordinate nonviolent direct actions along the pipeline route. We are working with national allies as well as local communities to coordinate a road show that will travel throughout Texas and Oklahoma as well as a regional training effort for activists interested in getting involved in the blockade movement against the Keystone XL. “Our action is giving a new meaning to ‘Don’t Mess with Texas,’” says Tar Sands

Blockade Collective Member Benjamin Kessler. Kessler is also a member of Rising Tide North Texas and Iraq Veterans Against the War. The Keystone XL remains key to the expansion of the Alberta tar sands, and leading NASA climate scientist James Hansen has called the pipeline “a fuse to the largest carbon bomb on the planet.” According to Hansen, if the carbon stored in the tar sands is released into the atmosphere, it would mean “game over for the climate.” Founder of the 350.org Bill McKibben has worked hard to get Hansen’s message out to the public and to lawmakers in Washington. After more than 1,200 were arrested during the onset of the Tar

Sands Action last fall, and another 12,000 turned out to surround the White House to tell President Obama that the Keystone XL is not in the nation’s best interest. McKibben was elated. Because this is an export pipeline, working Americans will pay the cost of environmental destruction, and never see any of the profits. Tar sands oil threatens streams, water tables, grasslands, forests—all of which families along the pipeline route need to survive. Texas landowners are organizing on their own to stop the pipeline, and we are doing everything we can to help them.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

Saturday July 21

Spring Is Here - And So Are We!

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Jarvis Summer Evening Steam Excursion

Fill all your family’s needs in one place! From cold remedies and personal care products, we have aisles and aisles of great values in store for your shopping convenience.

C

hapman

Pharmacy

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

4:00pm - 6:30pm Departs The Rusk Depot

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SE STK#367027

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$23,990 $1,250 $1,750

$

SALE PRICE $20,990

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

2012 DODGE CHARGER SE DEMO

V-6, Chrome Wheels, Spoiler

STK#258541

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$28,810 $2,000 $2,000

$

SALE PRICE $24,810

24,810

2012 RAM 1500 MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$23,820 $2,125 $2,500 $500

SALE PRICE $18,695

2012 DODGE CALIBER SXT

Sunroof, V-6

STK#198311

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

STK#529754

$26,395 $2,000 $3,000

$

SALE PRICE $21,395

21,395

MSRP PEARMAN DISC.

$

18,695

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$44,015 $3,530 $3,000 $500

SALE PRICE $36,485

$

STK#270109

36,485

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

16,515

Ram Box, Tradesman Package, 4x4

$33,340 $3,350 $2,500 $1,500

SALE PRICE $25,990

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

$

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB

4x4, Diesel

STK#227786

$19,515 $3,000

SALE PRICE $16,515

2012 RAM 3500 DUALLY

V-8, Automatic

STK#216707

2012 DODGE AVENGER SXT

DEMO

20,990

$

25,990


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

ACCESS board says goodbye to Allyn Lang last week l Former ACCESS executive director Allyn Lang (right) shakes hands with incoming executive director Ted Debbs during a ceremony Aug. 28. Mr. Debbs officially became executive director of ACCESS (AndersonCherokee Community Enrichment Services) Sept. 1.

Allyn Lang (fourth from left) was honored by fellow members of the ACCESS board during a celebration Aug. 28. From left are ACCESS board members Susan Johnson, Robert Gonzalez, Buz Parrish, Mr. Lang, Cathy Newman, Nancy Washburn, Linda Bowser and Kay Watkins. Not pictured is Chris Kolstad.

Where are the Keystone XL pipeline jobs? KATHY DASILVA Nacogdoches

Recently, TransCanada spokesman David Dobson was quoted as saying, “We began preliminary construction near Diboll on Aug. 6 and near Mount Pleasant Aug. 20.” He goes on to talk about the fact that his company has also already started construction from Cushing, Okla. down to Paris. TransCanada has made the claim of 20,000 local jobs for the Keystone XL pipeline. Does anyone know of any Texans who have been hired to construct their pipeline? The fact is that this Canadian company is using their own workers to build this pipeline. This is far from the only false claim by TransCanada. When landowners were approached with a contract, they were told all of the permits were already in place to build. They were told they would lose their land through eminent domain if they did not sign.

The claims about the permits being in place were blatantly false. Unfortunately, many Texans lost their land anyway through eminent domain. Dobson says his company has already received common carrier status in Texas. The truth is that all TransCanada had to do to achieve common carrier status was check a box on the Railroad Commission form that says you are a common carrier. The Railroad Commission admits that no one checks to see if in fact you are a common carrier (transporting a product for the common good of the public). In fact, the bitumen that will be transported from Canada through this pipeline is not for the public good of Texans, and is not even intended for use in our country. TransCanada’s bitumen is not regular crude oil, and not a substance we need leaking

into our waterways. The New York Times article “Crude, Dirty and Dangerous” dated Aug. 20 states that bitumen is no ordinary crude oil, and it carries risks that we’re only beginning to understand. Bitumen has long been considered “garbage crude” by industry insiders. To get bitumen through pipelines, liquid chemicals must be added to thin it enough to flow. These chemicals are highly toxic and will compromise our health and poison our waterways when leaks occur. Texans stopped the TransTexas Corridor. Isn’t it time to stand together as Texans and say we are not willing to assume the risks to East Texas and our state, in order for this bullying private company to become wealthier?

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

Sept. 8 & 9 Fall Piney Woods Steam Excursion Departs The Rusk Depot 10am & 3pm Departs The Palestine Depot 12:30pm

Buy 1 get 1 Free in Standard Class

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

HELP SUPPORT OUR TEAM! Stop by and get your Rusk Eagle T-Shirt Today!

C

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk • 903-683-2422 We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

50,000 WATTS OF MEAN STING!

Hear All The Alto Yellowjacket Games On 100.1 FM 2012 Alto Yellowjacket Schedule Aug. 31 at Elkhart Sept. 7 at Groveton Sept. 14 Tenaha Sept. 21 at Frankston Sept. 28 Trinity† Oct. 5 Open

7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m. 7:30 p.m.

Oct. 12 Cushing* 7:30 p.m. Oct. 19 at West Sabine* 7:30 p.m. Oct. 26 Grapeland* 7:30 p.m. Nov. 2 at San Augustine* 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9 Shelbyville* 7:30 p.m. * District Games †Homecoming

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

MOTOR COMPANY

HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

County government spending too much Cherokee County government spends too much money. They justify what they are doing under the fallacy of they need to provide for the needs of the people of the county. They spend at an ever increasing rate. They rob from the rainy day fund like it is their personal piggy bank, with no effort to validate a real need to steal this money, other than they are reluctant to increase our taxes beyond a trigger point that we might remove them from office. They pay themselves a cost of living and benefits increase

when none of the private sector working people has a chance to get one. They hide behind a bureaucracy and a regulation level that makes it almost impossible for a common taxpayer to find out just how and on what the money is being used and if it is truly justified. They hold public hearings at which they want you to think they are listening to the voice of the people. However, they know that the apathy of the people will give them the advantage. This whole process allows misguided people to do whatever they want

What is wrong with this picture?

without fear of consequences. What are our options if we disagree with the unjustified spending? Wait until they are up for reelection in two to four years? Impeach them now? They know that these options are too remote and difficult to implement and they are safe to do what they want now. Our freedoms, liberties and monies are being siphoned away in baby steps by an ever growing government that is out of control and knows that there is little we the people can do to stop the train.

Looking for answers in TransCanada ruling A friend in Jacksonville sent me a copy of Becky Whisenant’s article (Suit ruling favors TransCanada trenching, Sept. 19), which is full of good information for one like me that has been fighting the TransCanada Keystone pipeline for years without success. Does anyone there know why the 10th Circuit Court in Denver, Colo. should be hearing the Texas cases? Were there any experienced oil and gas industry people included in the Aug. 27, commission meeting at Reklaw City Hall? If so, what was their

reactions? Who is Debra Medina, who testified concerning eminent domain with Julia Crawford? What background does Rita Beving have in the energy business? I thought Beving & Associations was a Home Health Firm? Has anyone appealed these cases? I don’t expect you to drop everything you are working on to answer these questions. I am just thinking out loud. I circulated attachments to hundreds of contacts September 8: a copy of the Supreme

opinion

Court of Texas Decision and my excerpt of the Texas Natural Resources Code, Section 111.002, just in case the committee did not have them. TransCanada’s Keystone XL Pipeline is not an ordinary crude oil pipeline. It is designed for diluted bitumen (dilbit) to withstand from 1,400 to 1,700 psi pump pressure. Most oil and gas pipelines operate at 1,000 psi or less. If any of the land owners or city officials have questions, I would be happy to provide answers.

The newspaper business— both small and large papers— has sounded full-throated opposition this past month about a plan by the U.S. Postal Service to purposely entice advertising out of the newspaper so ads can be placed instead with USPS favored stakeholder Valassis Inc., which bought direct mail company ADVO in 2006. The goal of USPS is to create more advertising mail. To newspapers that count on advertising to pay its reporters and cover the news, this new venture is beyond alarming. Many think it will push some newspapers—already made fragile by the economy and the Internet—over the edge. If that happens, it is the communities across our country that will feel the most long-term harm. People have a love-hate relationship with advertising, whether in the newspaper or in the mail. When advertising helps them find deals or shop smartly, they love it. When it doesn’t happen to scratch the

shopping itch, they may not like it so much. But most people understand advertising drives the economy and it brings other intangible benefits, like paying the bill for news coverage that keeps communities informed. On every level advertising is highly competitive. Local, regional and national newspapers compete with a growing field of ad media, from Internet to television and door hangers to direct mailers. But now the Postal Service wants to pick winners and losers in this market. It is providing postage rebates to Valassis of more than 30 percent if Valassis can divert more ad inserts into direct mail from newspapers. Not everyone can play. The discounts can be offered by Valassis only to large national retailers. Newspapers cannot get the same discount for their own mail because they can’t sign one national postage contract, as the direct mail company did, with USPS. Neither can a small clothing or bookstore

or a hairdresser or auto parts shop. We—the newspaper and our small businesses—are all local. This deal is only for the big guys. For the little guys, USPS has another advertising plan that enables businesses to bring unaddressed advertising directly to the post office. What’s wrong with this picture? It is that USPS isn’t a business. It is owned by Uncle Sam. It exists to serve all. It shouldn’t be picking winners and losers in any marketplace. It shouldn’t be competing with and undercutting its stakeholders, which are all of us. It should deliver the mail that exists, promptly and affordably. One of USPS’s big goals is to carry even more advertising, as the Internet saps away letters and bills. But we have to ask ourselves: does America need a federally-owned advertising service? This newspaper says no. Mr. Anfinson is the president of the National Newspaper Association.

Keystone XL pipeline needs to be finished I was pleased to read the article in this week’s Cherokeean concerning the work being done on the Keystone Pipeline and a Federal Court upholding the work on the pipeline. Now I hope Mitt Romney is elected in November to finish the pipeline and open up the vast oilfields for drilling in Utah, Colorado, ANWR, and the coastal waters of the USA. The Baaken oil field in North Dakota and Western Montana contains up to 35 billion barrels of recoverable oil and is currently being drilled and producing over one million

barrels of oil daily. One well in North Dakota is pumping 700,000 barrels of oil daily, and there are plans to pump some of this through the Keystone Pipeline to Texas refineries, creating thousands of jobs in the oil well drilling industry, all the businesses that will spring up supporting the drill sites and the new employees pouring into these areas. The unemployment rate in North Dakota is three percent. The pipeline is safe regardless of what the Sierra Club and the Cornell Study shows. These groups were financed by George

Soros and Warren Buffet, big Obama contributors. Some of these good folks in the Rusk, Gallatin, and Reklaw areas need to check closer into the background of these financiers of Obama’s campaign and the green climate folks. They may find something that might surprise them. Build the pipeline and let’s “git ‘er done.” Sixty percent of Americans want the pipeline finished.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Sept. 22 & 23

Citizens 1st BANK

Fall Piney Woods Steam Excursion

Member F.D.I.C.

Departs The Rusk Depot 10am & 3pm

$

Stop by and get your Rusk Eagle T-Shirt Today!

C

OFF

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk • 903-683-2422 We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 5.7 Hemi, Express Package

STK#269022

in Standard Class

hapman

7,500

Departs The Palestine Depot 12:30pm

Buy 1 get 1 Free

HELP SUPPORT OUR TEAM!

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

$31,185 $3,500 $3,000 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $23,685

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Curtis Oliver - Pastor

2012 RAM 3500 DUALLY Diesel

STK#229765

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE TRADE ASSISTANCE

$44,015 $5,030 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $34,985

$

7,500 OFF

2012 RAM 1500 4x4

$

34,985

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB

V-8, Tradesman Package

STK#298552

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

$32,700 $3,500 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,200

$

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

V-8, Automatic

STK#244959

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

$23,495 $2,100 $3,000 $500

SALE PRICE $17,895

$

17,895

2012 RAM 1500 CREW CAB 4x4

25,200

Hemi, Express Package

STK#280863

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

$33,675 $3,700 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,975

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

23,685

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

$

25,975


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, October 10, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

opinion

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

Indigenous people speak NNA welcomes Open Meetings out against Keystone XL Law decision by appeals court NATIONAL NEWSPAPER A SSOCIATION

Last Wednesday, indigenous people and organizations from Colorado and across the United States came together to raise their voices in the presidential battleground state of Colorado on the eve of the first nationally televised presidential debate. Dissatisfied with President Barack Obama’s and Governor Mitt Romney’s failure to address the many threats posed to clean water in Indian country, Tribal leaders and communities called on both candidates to withdraw their support for TransCanada’s Keystone XL tar sands pipeline and to honor rights and territorial boundaries established by treaties. Vice-president Tom Poor Bear of the Oglala Lakota Nation shared words about the importance of the land to his people, the obligation of the United States to respect the territorial boundaries set forth by treaties and the duty of the present generation to protect the land and water from toxic contamination by the Keystone XL pipeline. “I look at this pipeline,” Mr. Poor Bear explained, “as an 1,800 mile snake that’s going to bore itself into Mother Earth and start spitting black venom at our water, which our future generations are going to drink someday. “We have one mother, and

Neches River Refuge celebration Oct. 20 Friends of the Neches River, The Texas Conservation Alliance, The Conservation Fund and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service will sponsor the Neches River Refuge celebration on Saturday, Oct. 20 at Neches River Ranch near Jacksonville. Live music, food, tours of the refuge and a canoe trip on the Neches River will all be part of the event. Reservations are required. For more information, call (903) 586-1551 or visit

that’s Mother Earth.” Colorado Native students Amanda Williams and Sky Roosevelt-Morris presented statements issued by Chief Oliver Red Cloud and the Society to Preserve Indigenous Rights and Indigenous Treaties (SPIRIT), respectively. In his statement, Oglala Lakota hereditary Chief Oliver Red Cloud, great-grandson of Chief Red Cloud – who signed the 1868 Ft. Laramie Treaty – cited specific provisions of that treaty which the United States would violate if it allowed the pipeline to be built. “I hope that the candidates will hear my words and begin to understand what they have, so far, been overlooking,” Mr. Red Cloud said. “The proposed Keystone XL pipeline is not just an environmental issue. It is an issue of sustainability and survival for Native people. It is an issue of preserving and protecting what is sacred. And it is an issue of upholding the law by honoring the treaties.” “The U.S. government has a long history of violating its own laws and policies when it comes to its treatment of Indian tribes,” said Jennifer Baker, Oglala Lakota legal counsel. “As the proposed northern pipeline segment works its way through the administrative process, our

NEWS TCATexas.org.

Lake Columbia update planned for Oct. 15

Cherokee County leaders will meet at noon Oct. 15 at the Norman Activity Center for an update on Lake Columbia. Tickets are $12 and lunch will be provided. Kelly Holcomb of the Angelina Neches River Authority will be speaker. Reservations should be made at the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce office by Oct. 12. No tickets will be sold at the door.

Oct. 13 & 14 Peanuts™ The Great Pumpkin Patch Express

The National Newspaper Association today expressed its approval of a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit that upholds the Texas Open Meetings Law. A group of city government officials had argued that requiring them to discuss their work in open meetings was a violation of their own free speech rights. But the court said the Texas law’s requirements were not a First Amendment violation. “Transparency is furthered by allowing the public to have access to government decision making,” the court said. The case is Asgeirsson v. Abbott, handed down Sept. 25, 2012. Asgeirsson and a group of fellow city council members in Alpine, TX, have carried on a long-running court battle over the Texas Open Meetings Act because of the criminal penalties in the law.

next president will have an opportunity to redefine and restore the relationship of the United States with indigenous nations by finally living up to its legal obligations. “Doingsorequiresadequately consulting affected tribes, understanding and enforcing the terms of the treaties, and rejecting the Keystone XL pipeline.” SPIRIT also issued a statement opposing the pipeline and pledged to “join with likeminded groups from this date forward to stop the pipeline.” Renewable Rider Tom Weis, a strong ally of Native communities fighting the pipeline, closed the event with firm words and action, saying, the candidates “need to understand we’re not going to stand for this pipeline. “They need to hear that message loud and clear, and we’re going to start delivering it today.” Participants then accompanied Mr. Weis, in his bright yellow, human-powered “rocket trike,” in delivering copies of an open letter to Denver’s Romney and Obama campaign offices calling on both candidates to defend America from this imminent economic, public health and national security threat.

Following two indictments against city council members for holding e-mail discussions about public matters without complying with open meeting requirements, local officials sued. Though the indictments were dropped, some local council members continued to argue that fear of criminal prosecution was inhibiting their free speech. Over more than six years, dozens of local Texas officials and five cities have been involved in multiple appeals because of the open meetings law’s requirements. The appeals court’s decision today upholds a district court decision that the open meetings law may affect the officials’ speech, but that because the law applies regardless of the content of the speech it does not offend the First Amendment. NNA President Reed Anfin-

Rusk Eagle r u o Y Spirit We’ve got Eagle Necklaces, Bracelets, Key Chains, Sunglasses, T-shirts & more!

Bags

Fall bowling leagues are still available at Highland Lanes Bowling Center, 36644 U.S. Highway 69 in Jacksonville. Mixed teams for men and women began Sept. 4. No experience is necessary to join. For more information, contact the alley at (903) 589-8555.

Shorts

Loans or CDs

SUNGL

Necklaces

SES

ACEL T BR S

CHAPMAN PHARMACY

Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

& GIFTS

100 E. 5th St. • Rusk • 903-683-2422

Member F.D.I.C.

2012 RAM 2500 4X4

Piney Woods Steam Excursion

STK#283874

Departs The Palestine Depot 11am

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$34,490 $3,500 $2,500

$

SALE PRICE $28,490

2012 RAM 3500 CAB & CHASSIS

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

STK#256287

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

4 Wheel Drive

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN

SALE PRICE $29,980

$

29,980

2012 CHRYSLER 300

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

STK#311466

$29,890 $1,500 $3,500

$

24,890

STK#534300

$23,990 $1,305 $1,000

$

SALE PRICE $21,685

21,685

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

SALE PRICE $27,795

$

27,795

Hemi, Lone Star

STK#313468

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE LONE STAR BONUS CASH

$37,095 $4,100 $3,000 $1,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $27,995

STK#308547

$

27,995

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

$30,390 $2,4000 $2,000

SALE PRICE $25,990

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

$30,530 $2,235 $500

2012 RAM 1500 SLT CREW CAB 2012 DODGE DURANGO SXT DEMO

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

28,490

2013 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE

STK#506179

$37,180 $4,700 $2,500

SALE PRICE $24,890

5592 Hwy 110 N

Key Chains

Headquarters

Fall leagues still forming at Highland Lanes

Departs The Rusk Depot 11am & 2:30pm

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

son said the court had put the emphasis in the proper place: the public’s right to know. “This was an issue about public officials having an obligation to speak their minds in front of their constituents. Doing so requires courage at times, but it is essential so that these public servants are on the record with their thoughts,” Mr. Anifson said. “Whatever they have to say may be insightful or show simple common sense on a matter before the elected body. But their comments can also reveal prejudice, ignorance and self-serving motives, all of which the voting public has a fundamental right to hear and judge.” NNA appeared in an amicus brief before the court authored on behalf of Belo Corp. and other newspaper associations by James Ho, an attorney with Gibson Dunn and Crutcher in Dallas.

$

25,990


8A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, November 7, 2012

n

thecherokeean.com

KEYSTONE XL PIPELINE

Pipeline protestors arrested in Sacul BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

The TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline has arrived in East Texas, and a face-off between opposing forces representing financial, emotional and geographic interests is underway. Forest clearing in advance of trenching activity is progressing outside Winnsboro – moving south to Sacul, just inside the Nacogdoches county line approximately 15 miles east of Rusk. Last Wednesday evening a New Hampshire woman, who was camped on a platform suspended in a tree near State Highway 204 approximately one mile east of Sacul, was arrested by local law officials. Then at approximately 2 a.m. Thursday morning, a second blockade member was removed from her tree platform with a cherry picker and

arrested after her food, water and platform were removed. She was taken to the Nacogdoches County Jail. Both were released under bonds of $11,500 and $14,000. Tar Sands Blockade is a coalition of Texas and Oklahoma landowners and organizers using nonviolent direct action to physically stop the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline. The blockade has drawn national attention to the path of the controversial pipeline through East Texas. Ramsey Sprague, spokesperson for the TSB coalition, said, “We are doing everything we can to bring attention to all the reasons why KXL is a bad project not just for landowners, but also for the communities in which it will be refined and the communities in which it is mined. The diluted bitumen (dilbit) is surface mined in Alberta, Canada, in an area the approximate

size of the state of New York. “We intend to employ a wide variety of tactics to bring attention to the stories of East Texas landowners who are being abused and also the negative impacts of the chemicals flowing through the pipeline,” said Mr. Sprague. “TransCanada is suing people, including people arrested in a Tar Sands Blockade action against the KXL pipeline. They are threatening SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuit Against Public Participation) suits to scare people and discourage them from participation in any action against the pipeline. They would not only be arrested but also sued. However, this type of lawsuit is illegal in Texas.” The Texas Citizens Participation Act, H.B. 2973, signed into law in 2011, was designed to curb lawsuits that infringe on free speech, petition

CITY OF RUSK

Council discusses new Singletary Library plans BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

The Rusk City Council named the Cherokeean Herald Thursday evening as the city’s official newspaper. City Secretary Fran Wendeborn explained to the council at the Thursday evening meeting the city is required to pass an ordinance officially naming a city newspaper. The Cherokeean Herald has filled this position for many years, but has not been named officially in an ordinance. “This is something that we need to do annually,” Mrs. Wendeborn said. A proposal from Berry-Clay of Rusk was approved designating the construction company as the design building firm for additions and renovations at the Singletary Memorial Library. Qualifications from interested companies were received until Oct. 31. The other company submitting a proposal was J.E. Kingham of Nacogdoches. Cost of the library project is expected to be approximately $907,000. Councilman Don Jones asked City Manager Mike Murray if the city has the money for this project. Mr. Murray replied, “No, we will have to float bonds. This matter will come before the council at a later meeting.” He suggested that the city pass certificates of obligations and include street paving, water improvements and an industrial park in the bond request at the same time. “We actually do not know how much the library project will cost,” Mr. Murray said. “The library will finance part of the project with donations.”

COUNTY

Utility write-offs of $10,000 were authorized. A customer will be required to pay what is owed the city, when attempting to get back on city services. Two of the largest outstanding accounts were Dairy Queen, $994.73 and Thomas J. Rusk Hotel, $860.14. The owner of the Dairy Queen filed bankruptcy and the business was sold to another company, the current operator, which is not required by law to pay outstanding debts created by the former owner. The amounts due include water, sewer and dumpster services. The council adopted a resolution accepting work done on paving of 13 city streets.

City holidays approved

or association. The Green Party’s presidential candidate, Dr. Jill Stein, was arrested last week at the KXL site in Winnsboro for her participation in the TSB’s opposition to the pipeline. That blockade action is in its 43rd day at the location and organizers say TransCanada has shown signs of considering a possible alternative route to bypass the original easement on the property. Jim Prescott, of Prescott Group, LLC, a spokesperson for TransCanada said, “The presence of tree-sitters near Sacul has not impacted overall progress on the 485-mile Gulf Coast Project. It is important to note that even though they had little impact, the intent of these out-of-state protestors is to keep thousands of Americans from going to work to build a project that is important for America’s energy security.

NEWS Jacksonville College hosts fall concert Thursday The Jacksonville College Music Department will present its fall concert at 7 p.m. Thursday in Buckner Chapel. The program will consist of a variety of selections from the fall semester’s repertoire. The concert will include performances by the choir and singers under the direction of Tom Vandegriff; the band, directed by Mike Kellogg; and the Overcomers, directed by Tim Timmons, former minister of music at Rusk First Baptist Church. The concert is free and open to the public. For more information, contact the college at (903) 586-2518.

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church hosts benefit barrel race for Tiffany Wolven The Branded by Christ Cowboy Church arena will be the scene for a benefit barrel race for Tiffany Wolven on Dec. 15. Exhibitions begin at 10 a.m. Exhibits are $5 each or three for $13. Open 4-D is $30; youth, $20; poles open 3-D, $20; youth poles 3-D, $15. All proceeds will help the family with medical expenses for Tiffany Wolven. The 22-month-old child has a rare genetic disorder that has led to her having multiple surgeries on her head and stomach. She was

continued from pg. 1A

Ryan ticket. Another 24.01 percent voted for the Barack Obama/Joe Biden ticket. In the U.S. Senate race, Cherokee County gave Ted Cruz, 70.94 percent of its vote and Paul Sadler, 27.24 percent. U.S. incumbent Jeb Hensarling received 73.19 percent of the county’s vote. Democratic challenger Linda S. Mrosko received 24.32 percent.

Voting straight party were 5,884 Republicans and 2,327 Democrats. At press time, projections from major media outlets had President Obama winning reelection over challenger Gov. Romney after the president won several battleground states, including Ohio, New Hampshire and Pennsylvania.

RUSK STATE HOSPITAL VETERANS DAY

Cherokee County Commissioners met briefly Monday morning to make plans for expansion at the Cherokee County Airport’s hanger area. Clint Goff, airport manager, discussed requests he has received for enlarging one hanger and the addition of two new hangers at the facility. Triad Asset Management of Tyler owns the hanger to be expanded and has been approved by commissioners to construct an additional hanger. The hanger he owns is the largest one at the airport. “They plan to house several planes at our facility,” Mr. Goff told commissioners. “Triad will lease hanger space to persons or companies owning planes. “I am excited about this. It looks like our airport is really going to be growing and we will increase our planes housed out there,” he said. Triad owns Hanger No. 35 and will construct Hanger No. 36. Ron Rose of Alto plans to construct Hanger No. 37. Commissioners made plans at

direction of David Weaver. Belle Matloc will offer the benediction. Taps will be played by Hayden Curl and Ty Mason.

Alto celebration Alto ISD will hosts its annual Veterans Day program from 9-10:15 a.m. Monday in the high school gym. Lunch will be provided to all veterans in the school cafeteria.

EL CAMINO REAL

More hangers needed at Cherokee County Airport STAFF WRITER

diagnosed with an encepholcele at birth. The encepholcele was a skin covered cyst on the back of her head that had a small portion of her brain in it, along with spinal fluid. This required surgery when she was 10-weeks-old. A portion of her brain had to be removed and the encepholcele repaired. Since March, she has had five stomach operations and a VP shunt placed in her head. Tiffany is facing more surgeries on her back and eyes around the first of the year. She also has a heart condition with a small hole in her heart. For additional information, call Tammy Wolven at (903) 952-5391 or (903) 330-0686, txnhabarrelracer@yahoo.com; or Stacy Wolf at (903) 724-9956 or sscanchaser@hotmail.com.

ELECTION NIGHT

City holidays adopted included Christmas, Monday and Tuesday, Dec. 24-25, 2012; New Year’s Day, continued from pg. 1A Tuesday, Jan. 1, 2013; Martin Lu- continued from pg. 1A ther King Jr. Day, Monday, Jan. 21, 2013; President’s Day, Monday, Campbell, president of the Rusk High She replaces Ted Debbs, who Feb. 18, 2013; Good Friday, March resigned effective Sept. 1 to School Student Council will lead in the 29, 2013; Memorial Day, Monday, become executive director of pledge of allegiance. May 27, 2013; Independence Day, ACCESS. Diane Faucher Moy, Dr. Scott Davis, Rusk ISD Thursday, July 4, 2013; Labor Day, a former RSH superintendent, superintendent, will welcome guests Sept. 2, 2013; Columbus Day, Mon- returned in September to and present comments. The Rusk High day, Oct. 14, 2013; Veterans Day, serve as interim superinten- School band, directed by Mike Miller, Monday, Nov. 11; Thanksgiving Day, dent while a search committee will present a musical medley. Thursday and Friday, Nov. 28-29, vetted candidates. A patriotic medley will be presented 2013 and the employee’s birthday. The new superintendent has by the Rusk High School choir under the Members of the council denied more than 30 years of service a proposed rate increase made by to Rusk State Hospital. She CenterPoint Energy. began work in 1978 at the institution as a social worker, continued from pg. 3A Attending the meeting were Mayor where she was a leader of way to slice a smoked coon. I think Angela Raiborn; Councilmembers workgroups. Ben Middlebrooks, Walter Session, She helped establish the I’m going to put my turnip greens in Jones, Donald Woodard and Sam Family House, a facility to a long pan, slice a boiled egg on top Florian; City Manager Murray; and meet the needs of out-of-town of them, and call it a turnip green City Secretary Wendeborn. families visiting hospital casserole. We’ve only got a couple of patients, and also served as weeks until Thanksgiving, so now is director of the Cypress Unit. the time to start thinking about your Rusk State Hospital is blessings and quit worrying about funded for 335 beds with a your troubles. COMMISSIONERS Our lives are going to get plenty biennial budget of $40.27 million. There are 990 employees. busy between now and the first of

BY GLORIA JENNINGS

“The safety of the tree sitters was and is a priority. Even though we disagree with their reasons for being there, the last thing we want is for anybody to get hurt, and that includes protestors as well as our own crews and neighboring landowners.” “Our tactics are obviously controversial but somebody has to do something. The landowners can’t afford to go up against an army of lawyers for these multi-million dollar organizations. They (TransCanada) have a complete disregard for the wishes, well-being and concerns of the landowners they are affecting.” TransCanada asserts it is a leader in the responsible development and reliable operation of North American energy infrastructure. To find out more about the pipeline, visit www.transcanada.com and www. tarsandsblockade.org.

the meeting to begin hauling dirt to level the area for the hanger expansion and the addition of the two new hangers. Dirt will need to be removed to eliminate a hill. The extra dirt will be used to fill in a ditch at the airport. A drainage ditch will be repaired in this particular area of the airport. A new road will be constructed behind the new hangers. Commissioner Katherine Pinotti, Precinct 3, will take a trailer to the airport to be used when the fencing is removed and installed again after the work is completed. Since the airport is located in Precinct 1, Commissioner Kelly Traylor, will coordinate the site preparation work. He will provide a loader and the other three commissioners will provide dump trucks. Plans are to start work at the airport on Tuesday morning, Nov. 13. Attending Monday’s meeting were Judge Chris Davis; Commissioners Traylor, Steven Norton, Pinotti and Byron Underwood; and County Clerk Laverne Lusk.

the year, so if you have something that needs telling or an activity going on in the community that folks need to know about, please let me know about it. I’ll see ya next week! And remember, Happiness cannot be traveled to, owned, earned, worn or consumed. Happiness is the spiritual experience of living every minute with love, grace and gratitude.

LON MORRIS

continued from pg. 1A for an education facility including dorms and the theater. The other non-core assets would include singlefamily dwellings around the college. Dawn Ragan of Bridge Point Consulting Co., chief restructuring officer for the school, said the college had various inventories that will be sold. Two vendors have agreed to take their collateral back to bypass the process. Ms. Ragan also said, “news reports have stated that the City of Jacksonville feared the rodeo grounds would be sold. An agreement between the city of Jacksonville and Lon Morris stated the rodeo grounds cannot be sold without the permission of the city of Jacksonville.” The rodeo grounds were given to the college in 2009. The college agreed to give The Lodge, a student housing facility, which opened last year back to Tilley LLC. The Landmark building has been returned to the Bailey family. Former Lon Morris President Miles McCall and accountant Lynn Acker were examined by attorneys in the matter to determine where the college money had been spent. “There is no issue that the money was spent for personal gain. It was spent on buildings and payroll. This is not an issue of money missing,” Ms. Ragan said.

Lon Morris filed a voluntary chapter 11-bankruptcy petition in July after spending millions of dollars since the 2007-08 school year on a costly plan to grow enrollment. At one time during recent years, almost 1,000 students were enrolled at the college. All athletic activities were cancelled for the fall 2012 semester at the college and approximately 100 students were expected to attend during the current fall semester when the college lost its student financial aid. In February 2010, Lon Morris announced a new agriculture curriculum, with classes having begun in the fall of 2010. By March 2010, a new dormitory, Cooper House, had opened on campus, with rooms for 32 students. Another new dormitory was called “The Lodge.” Money problems at the school seem to stem around the cost of the new dormitories and financing additional scholarships. On May 23, more than 100 college employees, with the exception of 11 core employees, were furloughed indefinitely after the school missed three pay periods. Dr. Miles McCall, the president, submitted his resignation effective May 24. The decision to furlough was made by the Bridge Point Consulting

Company. On May 5, the board of trustees asked Bridge Point to make recommendations on how to proceed with a planned restructuring of the school. Lon Morris has a history of having a successful theater arts program, as well as producing famous athletes. Successful alumni included theater students, Sandy Duncan, Margo Martindale, K.T. Oslin, Tommy Tune, Anime voice-actor Christopher Ayres, Amanda McBroom, Edwin Neal and Alan Tudyk. Other notable Lon Morris alumni include: Dexter Cambridge, Bahamian professional basketball player with the NBA’s Dallas Mavericks in 1993; Russell B. Cummings, member of the Texas House of Representatives from Harris County,1963–67; John Wesley Hardt, a retired American Bishop of the United Methodist Church, elected in 1980; Micah Hoffpauir, Chicago Cubs first baseman; Johnny Horton (April 30, 1925 – November 5, 1960), an American country music singer; Mike Lee, an award-winning correspondent for ABC News; Neal McCoy, an awardwinning American country music artist; retired U.S. Army Major Gen. Dee Ann McWilliams; Carl Reynolds, major league baseball player and member of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame; and Chris Sampson, current major league baseball player.


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, November 14, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

COMMENTARY

Legal notices continue to serve useful purpose BY DONNIS BAGGETT SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR

An informed citizen is the ultimate source of power in a democratic government, which is why Texas’ governmental entities are required to print notices of their plans for actions ranging from annexation to zoning, and from large expenditures to tax hikes. For several y e a r s , lobbying e f f o r t s have been underway to eliminate DONNIS BAGGETT this essential element of government transparency, which bodes ill for an informed electorate. Somestateagenciesandsome associations representing local governments are pressuring legislators to eliminate printed public notices in newspapers, saying they should be allowed to “publish” notices solely on

their government-owned, government-controlled and government-operated websites. Ever since Texas declared its independence, notices of governmental intent have been printed in newspapers to get the word out efficiently to as many citizens as possible through a non-governmental medium. Newspapers – not obscure pages in the maze of a difficultto-navigate government website – are still the best way to do this. Most citizens who are vigilant about government activities also happen to be avid newspaper readers. They are well served by the fact that most of the state’s 500 or so newspapers print public notices – and print them at their lowest classified advertising rate, as required by law. Newspapers also post legal notices on their websites, for the convenience of those who choose to read the paper electronically.

And for commercial enterprises that do business with governments outside of their home county, the Texas Press Association maintains a free statewide compilation of legal notices from all over the state. There is some cost involved to print a newspaper notice, of course. The expenses of paper, ink, personnel and delivery are very real, and like any other business, newspapers must charge for what they provide or close their doors. There’s no difference between a local government paying a newspaper for a printed legal notice and paying an automobile dealer for police cars – except for price. When it comes to printed public notice, that price is miniscule. In 2011, Texas counties spent an average of 0.00533 percent of their budgets on legal notices regarding procurement. To put that in perspective, imagine that the height of

the Empire State Building represents the total budget of a Texas county. Now visualize the height of a thumbtack, and consider this: 0.00533 percent of the height of the Empire State Building would be the height of the thumbtack. It’s ironic that the associations lobbying to kill printed notice are funded primarily by dues paid by local governments – governments that get their money by taxing the very citizens who’d find it hard to keep an eye on city hall if legal notices were no longer printed. Legislators considering this issue should consider the Empire State Building and the thumbtack. And citizens should remind lawmakers that a thumbtack serves a useful purpose and never causes a problem – unless you happen to sit on it. Donnis Baggett is the executive vice-president of the Texas Press Association in Austin.

opinion

Maintaining safety on Texas roads LARRY KRANTZ Tyler

As hard as it is to believe, the last day we were able to enjoy without a single fatality on Texas roads was 12 years ago: November 7, 2000. That means since this date, at least one person has died every single day on a Texas highway or roadway, bringing the total to 41,252 fatalities – almost the size of the population in San Marcos. In 2011 alone, Texas experienced 3,048 traffic fatalities. The majority of these traffic fatalities resulted from people who did not use seat belts, were drinking and driving and/or driving distracted: · 28.9 percent of people killed in fatal crashes were not wearing seatbelts · 34.9 percent were attributed to drinking and driving · 13.4 percent were associated with people being distracted (i.e. texting and driving) TxDOT continues to partner with the Texas Department of Public Safety and local law enforcement to protect all drivers on our roadways. “Texas state troopers are dedicated to protecting the public and they will continue working to identify and remove dangerous drivers from our highways,” DPS Director Steven McCraw said. “I urge all drivers traveling in our state to do their part by driving

responsibly, eliminating distractions, adhering to the posted traffic signs and ensuring everyone in the vehicle is buckled up. Together we can reduce the dangers on our roadways and improve safety for everyone.” In an effort to educate drivers on the dangers of driving without a seatbelt, drunk driving and distracted driving, TxDOT has begun displaying the number of fatalities to date on dynamic message signs along Texas highways. So far this year there have been 2,545 fatalities on Texas roads. Each month, this number is updated, and drivers can see it along with a message on how to drive safely. Additionally, TxDOT continues to educate drivers through various seasonal campaigns that focus on the following simple steps for safe driving: • Pay attention. • Buckle seatbelts. • Put phone away. • Left lane for passing only. • Never drink and drive. • Obey all traffic laws. While TxDOT and DPS will continue to work to enhance safety, citizens are asked to step up and do their part to keep Texas roadways safe. Larry Krantz is the public information officer for the Tyler District of TxDOT.

Fault zones, earthquakes and the Keystone XL KATHY DASILVA Nacogdoches

In the spring of 2011, the Reklaw/Gallatin 391 commission submitted some questions to TransCanada concerning the Keystone XL Pipeline, otherwise known as the “Gulf Coast Project”. One question asked: “What is the viability of this pipeline should there be an earthquake, not unlike those other Texas and Oklahoma regions, due to increased hydrofracking activity in the area?” Here is TransCanada’s response: According to studies and the Final Environmental Impact Statement, the pipeline does not cross any active fault zones in Texas. The Mount Enterprise Earthquake Zone is not a historically active zone. A report prepared by pipeline

opponents in April 2011 was severely flawed. According to the opponent’s report, “The eastern and western ends of the fault zone were most active between 120 and 40 million years ago, whereas the central parts were more active since 40 million years ago…” Thus, the Mount Enterprise (Fault Zone) is not considered a historically active earthquake area. Fast forward to a year later, where a series of earthquakes, ranging from 4.8 to 2.1 in magnitude all occurred near the Mount Enterprise Fault Zone. Here is the timeline: May 10, 2012: 3.9, NW of Timpson May 17, 2012: 4.8, ENE of Timpson May 20, 2012: 2.7, SSW of Timpson

Nov. 16-18

The Polar Express™ Train Ride

May 26, 2012: 2.5, S of Timpson June 16, 2012: 2.1, SSW of Timpson According to Michael Brunt, a field researcher working with the University of Texas at Austin’s Institute for Geophysics, “Obviously, the fault is active. Regardless of whether it’s natural or induced by hydrofracking, the fault is active, so you have to expect more earthquakes.” The Keystone XL pipeline is being constructed across the Mount Enterprise Fault Zone. Maybe TransCanada needs to rethink their answer to the safety concerns posed by the 391 commission?

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE. We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

C

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

2012 RAM 2500

Departing the Palestine Depot 5:15pm, 6:45pm or 8:10pm

STK#319674

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$31,235 $3,000 $2,500

$

SALE PRICE $25,735 2012 RAM 2500 4X4

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$34,490 $3,500 $2,500

$

SALE PRICE $28,490

28,490

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB 4X4

Tradesman Pkg, V-8

STK#298552

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

2012 RAM 1500 CREW CAB

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

Hemi Express Pkg

STK#280863

STK#389354

STK#283874

$32,700 $3,500 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,200

$

25,200

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

$27,885 $1,400 $2,000 $750

$

SALE PRICE $23,735

23,735

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

STK#244959

$

21,985

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

$23,495 $2,100 $3,000 $500

SALE PRICE $17,895

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

25,975

V-8 Automatic

STK#313722

SALE PRICE $21,985

$

2012 RAM 1500

V-8

$29,015 $3,030 $3,000 $1,000

$33,675 $3,700 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,975

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

25,735

$

17,895


thecherokeean .com

Vol. 163

n

No. 39

n

20 pgs.

CEL

ING T A R EB

1

WEDNESDAY

ARS 62 YE

November 21, 2012 75 cents

Texas’ Oldest Weekly – Cherokee County’s Largest Newspaper

YOUTH HUNT

Indians fall, Jackets advance

A youth hunt was held recently at the I.D. Fairchild State Forest near Maydelle. See story, pg. 9B.

TURKEY DAY Elementary students are counting their blessings and talking turkey. See photos, pg. 8A

See pg. 1-2B

Woman dies in Sunday plane crash PHOTO: ROBERT GONZALEZ

BY ROBERT GONZALEZ ASSOCIATE EDITOR

k A woman was killed when her Jabiru airplane crashed into a hangar at Cherokee County Airport Sunday afternoon. Debra Birch, 60, of Jacksonville was practicing touch and go landings just before the accident. She was the only occupant of the plane.

Cherokee County sales improve The financial snapshot of the local economy is mixed, with some cities posting gains and others showing losses. Jacksonville’s sales tax collections shrank by 2.2 percent year to date compared to last year. Find out how other Cherokee County cities stack up in the year-to-date comparison. see pg. 8A for details

A 60-year-old Jacksonville woman practicing touch and go landings crashed into the roof of a hangar at Cherokee County airport Sunday afternoon and died. Debra Birch, of Jacksonville was piloting a sport aircraft made by Jabiru aircraft of Australia. Witnesses say that Mrs. Birch apparently lost control of the plane, crashing into the roof of a hangar owned by Royce Fletcher of Jacksonville. The plane apparently caught the edge of the hangar roof, with the cabin of the plane crashing through the roof and the rest of the plane cartwheeling off to the side of the hangar. The 911 call came into the sheriff’s office at 4:48 p.m.

Keystone protesters arrested at Wells Pepper spray used by law enforcement

According to authorities, when fire department personnel arrived, they had to use a ladder to remove Mrs. Birch from the cabin of the plane. The cabin of the aircraft sliced through the roof of the hangar and hung nose down inside the building. Airport manager Clint Goff said her husband Richard was at the airport at the time of the accident. Authorities told the Cherokeean Herald that paramedics performed CPR on her at the scene. Mrs. Birch was taken by ambulance to ETMC Jacksonville, where she later died. Sgt. Patrick Dark, Department of Public Safety, investigated the accident along with the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department and the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA report may take months for their investigation to be completed.

JACKSONVILLE

Woman shot in bank drive-thru A local businesswoman, Louise Barnett, 66, was shot around 5:30 p.m. Friday while waiting in line at a drive-through window to make a deposit at Austin Bank, 100 Commerce Street, Jacksonville. A man approached her car and shot her in the shoulder and hand before stealing items, including her money bag from her vehicle, said investigating officer Det. Greg Compton. Her vehicle was the only one approached by the assailant. The suspect was last seen running north from the bank toward the railroad track and

INSIDE

See ROBBERY, pg. 6A

LON MORRIS COLLEGE

Auction date set for Dec. 15 in Dallas

Dr. Roper’s crusade to preserve history Don’t call Dr. Marjorie Ferrell Roper a “pack rat.” She saves historical things for a reason. Read Betty Ewalt Taylor’s story on pg. 7A.

BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

m Protesters chained themselves to dirt-moving equipment Monday to try and stop the Keystone XL Pipeline from being constructed. A second group of tree-protesters at the Angelina River suspended themselves 50 feet above ground.

Basketball tips off Teams are hitting the hardwood running in Cherokee County. Check out Quick Hits on pg. 3B.

HAPPY THANKSGIVING

Weather THURSDAY partly cloudy 10% chance of rain

High:

72

Low:

56

CLASSIC HITS RADIO KWRW - FM and KTLU - AM

BY BECKY WHISENANT STAFF WRITER

P

epper spray was used on three protestors from the Tar Sands Blockade movement Monday at a TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline construction site two miles northeast of Wells on the Parks Cemetery road. “Six persons, five males and one female, have been arrested

See PROTESTERS, pg. 6A

Lon Morris College’s core property will be auctioned off at 11 a.m. Thursday, Dec. 13 at McKool Smith, P.C., in Dallas. The firm is located at 300 Crescent Court, 12th floor. The core property consists of the 112-acre campus including such unique features as a library, chapel, administration building, classroom facilities, student center, dormitories and fields. See LON MORRIS, pg. 6A

GOOD SAMARITAN

HELPING HANDS

Grinches break into Good Sam’s building 2 charitable A reward of up to $200 is being offered by Cherokee County Crime Stoppers for information leading to the arrest and conviction of persons involved in burglaries and vandalism at the Good Samaritan in Rusk. Rusk Police Chief Joe Evans said, “We have had three burglaries at the Good Samaritan. Two occurred one day last week and the other happened the week before. We think it was juveniles, but this is a felony crime, with charges of burglary of a building and criminal mischief. If someone needs something they should go to the Good Sam and just ask for it.” One incident happened in the middle of the day. Times of the other events is not known. Nothing appeared to have been stolen. See GOOD SAM, pg. 6A

l Vandals have broken into a new storage building owned by Good Samaritan multiple times in recent weeks. They have broken windows and punched holes in the wall.

groups gear up for holidays Good Samaritan, HOPE need non-perishable food items BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays can be stressful for local residents who do not have enough food to feed their families. Many families in Cherokee County come up short when it comes to providing food for the dinner table. Children will be out of school for the holidays, which means the family needs more groceries to handle the extra See CHARITABLE GROUPS, pg. 6A


6A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

n

thecherokeean.com

Christmas parades, activities planned BY QUINTEN BOYD STAFF WRITER

The holiday season is well underway with Thanksgiving on the collective mind of almost everyone in Cherokee County, but many of the county’s cities are geared up for Christmas celebrations over the next few weeks. With Christmas parades across the county, Santa Claus is getting prepared for his worldwide trip with a few stops in Rusk, Alto, Jacksonville and Gallatin.

Rusk The Christmas celebrations start in Rusk Nov. 30 with the Rusk Chamber of Commerce’s town Christmas lighting. The gathering will begin at 4 p.m. At 5:15 p.m., the official gathering will begin at Henderson and Fifth streets in Rusk. Rusk Mayor Angela Raiborn will deliver the welcome, and chamber president Toni Meador will give the invocation. Rusk First Baptist Church pastor Donnie Barron will read the scripture. Sandra Sanders will represent downtown merchants. Hospice of East Texas will be present, and Jacksonville Mayor Kenneth Melvin will speak during the event. The

Christmas tree lighting will take place at approximately 5:40 p.m. There will be Christmas carol performances, a live nativity, hay rides, window paintings and refreshments. Santa Claus will be in attendance, as well, on a practice run for Christmas night. The next day, the Rusk Chamber will hold their annual Christmas parade at 11 a.m. Line up for the parade will be from 10-11 a.m. on Sycamore St. This year’s theme is “A Texas Christmas.” Rusk’s Friends of the Library group has several Christmas events planned throughout December. The group will host the first Christmas Trail of Lights at Jim Hogg Park in Rusk. Lights will be on daily from 5:30-8 p.m. On Dec. 1, the Christmas Arts and Crafts fair will be held at the Rusk Civic Center. Doors open at 9 a.m. Local arts and crafts vendors will showcase their wares and musicians will perform. Visitors will have an opportunity to have cookies with Santa at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., and there will be a pancake supper from 5-6:30 p.m. Each Thursday in December prior to Christmas, the Rusk

Square will host Christmas on the Square at 5:45 p.m. Cocoa and sugar cookies will be available, and shopping hours for businesses on the Square are extended until 6 p.m. Each Friday in December prior to Christmas, a Christmas movie will be shown at 7 p.m. in the square. Popcorn and cocoa will be available. Each Saturday prior to Christmas, a Christmas hay ride will be offered starting at 6 p.m. All activities are free of charge, and each event is sponsored by Friends of the Library and the City of Rusk. For more information, contact the Singletary Memorial Library at (903) 683-5916.

Jacksonville Jacksonville’s Christmas parade will take place Dec. 6 at 6:15 p.m. This year’s theme is “Christmas Memories.” In case of inclement weather, the parade will be held Dec. 10 at 6:15 p.m. Following the parade, the lighting of Hazel Tilton Park will occur at the corner of Bolton St. and U.S. Highway 79. The event is sponsored by the Jacksonville Chamber of Com-

merce and decorated by the Jacksonville Fire Department. The last day to sign up to be a part of the Christmas parade is Nov. 30. The Jacksonville Tour of Homes will be 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 9. This year’s participants are Malinda Felts and Shoemaker Hill Ranch, 800 CR 1815; Shell and Tonya Sanford, 1031 FM 768; Weldon and Charlotte Taylor, 1627 Quevado St.; Jacksonville College’s Newborn/Rawlinson home, 406 Kickapoo St.; and the Jacksonville College Bookstore, 105 B.J. Albritton Dr. Tickets are available at the Jacksonville Chamber of Commerce, 526 E. Commerce St. Tickets are $5 in advance and $7 on the day of the event. For The Texas Department of Criminal Justice’s community more information, contact the work squad is decorating the grounds of Jim Hogg Park chamber at (903) 586-2217.

for special events planned during the Christmas season.

Alto In Alto, the annual Christmas parade will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10. Parade line up will be at 5:30 at Alto Missionary Baptist Church. The parade will start on State Highway 294 W and progress through downtown Alto, then turn south on U.S. Highway 69 and end at A. Frank Smith

at the Gallatin Community Methodist Church. The parade is sponsored by Center and the parade starts the Alto Lions Club, and there at 1 p.m. Santa Claus will be in the is a $50 prize for best float. parade, and refreshments will Gallatin be served at the Gallatin Fire The Gallatin Christmas pa- Station after the parade. Santa rade will be Saturday, Dec. 15. will make an appearance at the Parade line up will be at noon fire station as well.

PROTESTERS

continued from pg. 1A at this time, but no arraignment has been made or charges filed, so names have not yet been released,” said Carolyn Martin of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department. “They are being held pending further process.” Cherokee County law enforcement officers, including officers from the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department, Jack White, constable, precinct two, and Alto Police Chief Jeremy Jackson, spoke with protestors who had chained themselves to three pieces of equipment at the site early Monday morning before workers arrived. The owner of the property was recently deceased and no family members were present. The controversial KXL Pipeline has arrived in Cherokee County and forest clearing has begun in preparation for trenching activity. Approximately 30 Tar Sands Blockade activists from around Texas, neighboring states, New England and the Pacific Northwest were in Cherokee County encouraging their fettered friends from the sidelines. About half of them left Wells and joined a second group near the Angelina River, where tree sitters were halting work. Ron Seifert, spokesperson for the Tar Sands Blockade group said,

“We are taking action in solidarity against tar sands locally and against environmental change around the world. The individuals here today are sending the message that the people are going to rise up and do whatever they can to stop these environmental changes. “It’s very discomforting to see such brutal tactics used on peaceful protesters. The police are violating that American right of peaceful protest with brutal action.” TransCanada issued a statement regarding the protest through spokesman James Prescott. “As in the past, construction workers were instructed that if they felt the protestors’ presence posed a threat to anyone’s safety, including the protestors, they were to stop work, avoid confrontation and notify supervisors,” Mr. Prescott said. “Supervisors notified the appropriate law enforcement agencies, which took action they deemed appropriate to the situation. “As always, TransCanada is respectful of Texas statute and federal pipeline construction regulation. TransCanada has followed the law and regulations to the letter and has all permits and legal rights to be constructing the pipeline on the right of way in East Texas. “TransCanada respects everyone’s

GOOD SAM

ROBBERY

Entry was gained by kicking in the door at one time, breaking a window and climbing in on another occasion and breaking a lock on the door the other time. Persons with information concerning the burglaries are asked to contact the Cherokee County Crime Stoppers at (866) 586-7878 or the Rusk police at (903) 683-2213.

Bonner Street, Det. Compton said. She got out of the vehicle and chased the suspect before realizing she had been shot. Dept. Compton said, “We have several leads on the case but cannot release any information at this time.” Videos from the bank and surrounding businesses are being studied by police. She was taken by ambulance

continued from pg. 1A

right to express an opinion. No one, however, has a right to break the law. The protestors are consuming limited law enforcement resources in the communities in which their criminal activities are taking place.” The Angelina River protest includes tree sitters who have anchored themselves to KXL machinery and are suspended 50 feet in the air on platforms secured to pine trees. A 75-year-old woman was reportedly pepper sprayed at that location, said Ramsey Sprague, spokesperson for the Tar Sands Blockade who contacted the Cherokeean Herald. The southern leg of the KXL pipeline begins at Cushing, Okla. and will carry diluted bitumen tar sands to refineries in Port Arthur and Baytown. Because of its viscosity, tar sands requires the injection of several chemicals in order to be transported through the pipeline, some of which have been identified as hazardous, critics claim. The Tar Sands Blockade group alerted the local media of Monday morning’s protest events in Cherokee and Nacogdoches counties and several newspapers and at least five media outlets were present such as the Dallas Observer, KTRE TV of Lufkin, Free Speech Radio News of San Antonio and others.

continued from pg. 1A to East Texas Medical Center and airflighted to a Tyler hospital, where she was listed in good condition. Officers declined to give the name of the Tyler hospital. Ms. Barnett is owner of the Razorback Grocery Store and she was robbed two weeks ago at her store. Investigating the incident are Jacksonville Police Department, Tyler FBI and East

CHARITABLE GROUPS

Texas Safe Streets Gang Task Force. Persons with information concerning this incident are asked to contact the Jacksonville Police Department at (903) 586-2546 or the Tyler FBI office at (903) 592-4301. The FBI and Cherokee County Crime Stoppers are offering a reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of a suspect.

l Ken McClure of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department escorts a protester to a squad car. Six people were arrested during the protests against the Keystone XL pipeline.

LON MORRIS

continued from pg. 1A

mouths to feed. Rusk’s Good Samaritan and Jacksonville’s HOPE assist with non-perishable items to help families fill their tables. Good Samaritan feeds approximately 240 families or 700-900 persons per month. “To do this it takes a lot of food,” said volunteer Jo Ann Abernathy. “A Girl Scout troop recently brought in food. Each girl had contributed a number of cans of vegetables. But, we go through more than 100 cans every day.” The Good Samaritan has need for non-perishable food items including macaroni and cheese, peanut butter, green beans, pork and beans, corn, dried beans and peas, as well as all other vegetable items. “We are running short of all kinds of vegetables,” Ms. Abernathy said. Families served by Good Samaritan range from one person to 13 family members.

From left, Robert Cunningham of Dallas, Lauren of Nacogdoches, Kevin of Tyler and Loki of Dallas protest the Keystone XL pipeline outside of Wells. Lauren, Kevin and Loki declined to give their last names. The four protesters were part of the Tar Sands Blockade group.

continued from pg. 1A Each family member is given two cans of food per month. Application forms for Food Stamps are available at Good Samaritan. “We don’t fill them out for you, but we can give you an application and you can fill it out yourself,” Ms. Abernathy said. Volunteers are always needed at the Good Samaritan. The original purpose of the Good Samaritan is to feed people. Clothing items are collected and sold to provide money to pay for utilities and insurance. In the past, Good Samaritan has received FEMA money but because of hurricanes and storms, no money has been allocated to organizations such as Good Samaritan. Food comes from individuals, organizations and churches. Good Samaritan also makes purchases from the Food Bank in Tyler. In addition to food items, many people make monetary dona-

tions and some include the Good Samaritan on their Christmas gift list. The Good Samaritan serves individuals living in the Rusk school district. HOPE in Jacksonville has the same sort of challenges as the Good Samaritan experiences. All kinds of nonperishable food items are needed there. “It is always a struggle to have enough food to feed our people,” said Allison Hale, HOPE director. “All nonperishable items are needed on a daily basis. We need macaroni and cheese, dried beans, peanut butter, crackers and Hamburger Helper. We get our meat products through the food bank and of course money is always a welcome donation,” she said. In addition to the food pantry, HOPE serves free hot meals at noon, Mondays through Thursdays.

AmeriBid LLC will conduct the auction. The auction date is pending the approval of the U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Tyler. “Plans to have the auction in Dallas came as a result of our decision that it would be more convenient for bidders to attend,” said Carl Carter of AmeriBid. “We’re delighted to have the auction plans finalized. AmeriBid will provide prospective bidders with detailed information about the school and its extensive campus,” said Dawn Ragan, chief restructuring officer for the college. Stephen Karbelk, co-chairman and founder of AmeriBid, said he expects prospective bidders to include other colleges, churches, denominations, school systems and other groups that might wish to use the property as a conference center, corporate retreat or even residential treatment center. The 112-acre college will be offered in multiple parcels and as an entirety. “It will sell in the combination of parcels that brings the highest total price for the school,” said Mr. Karbelk. Another group of property offered for sale will be non-core assets, primarily singlefamily residential properties around the college.

The former United Methodist college has approximately 50,000 square feet of academic lecture halls, five dormitories, a technology center, a gymnasium, an athletic training complex, and fields for football, baseball and other sports. “It would make an excellent home for seniors, substance rehabilitation center, juvenile detention facility, or any of a number of other uses,” said Mr. Karbelk. “We’re providing very detailed information on the various facilities to make it easier for interested individuals.” All sales will be consummated through a Chapter 11 Plan confirmed by the Bankruptcy Court, giving the purchaser the assurances of a federal court order. Individuals seeking additional information about the auction may visit www.AmeriBid. com or call (877) 895-7077. The school was the state’s oldest two-year college, dating back 168 years. In August, an announcement was made that Lon Morris would lose federal student funding. A decision to suspend the fall semester was made at that time. Approximately 100 students were expected to attend the institution. A few years ago, enrollment rose to almost 1,000 students.


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

All talk, no action on TransCanada’s ‘special conditions’ STEVEN DASILVA Nacogdoches

All of this talk from TransCanada about the “special conditions” to which they’ve agreed in order to sell the idea that they are going the extra mile for the safest pipeline ever built, is just that – talk. The majority of these socalled “special conditions” are actually pre-existing Pipeline Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) minimum requirements for oil pipelines. Regardless, TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline is being built to transport not conventional crude oil, but diluted tar sands bitumen, for

which PHMSA has no specific data or regulations. The 57 “special conditions” can be categorized into four areas: • pipe design and manufacturing; •systemdesign,construction and testing; • integrity, operations, maintenance and monitoring; • reporting, record keeping and certification. In the first category, only three “special conditions” are not based on existing minimum regulations for hazardous liquid materials. Number one deals with characteristics of the pipe

in the second category refer to standard minimum requirements or to the use of undamaged or proper parts. The other six would seem to be based upon normal expectations. Number 10 deals with pipe coating applied in the field and that it must also be applied properly to avoid defects. While normal oil pipelines don’t reach temperatures of 150 degrees Fahrenheit, condition 15 says that the Keystone XL will not reach this temperature, either, which is a good thing because the flashpoint of the dilbit to be carried through the pipe is 100 degrees Fahrenheit. Numbers 17 & 19 mandate conditions already spelled out in TransCanada’s original permit request, and # 22 requires a minimal upgrade of maximum pressure tests. Number 23 states that TransCanada must investigate the cause of a subminimum test result and tell PHMSA about it. Of the 26 “special conditions”

steel to be used. The specifications are the same as for the pipe steel used in the Keystone I, produced by the Indian company, Welspun, and later found to be flawed. TransCanada says they will continue to use Welspun steel for pipe laid in Texas. Number three is, oddly enough, a basic minimum requirement for gas pipelines, and number seven deals with puncture resistance to a 65ton excavator’s tooth. The remaining six conditions in this first category are based on established minimum requirements. Eight “Special Conditions”

Keystone XL pipeline does not benefit public BUCKLEY MACINERNEY Mount Enterprise

The use of eminent domain is illegal without there being some “public use.” The Keystone XL Pipeline is illegal because the law of eminent domain clearly states that there must be some benefit to the public. Jobs: There was talk of 100,000 jobs, and then 20,000. Independent analysis put the number at 5,000. Now TransCanada says that one of their employees bought a truck in East Texas. It turns out there are almost no local jobs and even if there were, they won’t last very long. Energy Independence: There is a world market and a world price for oil. All the oil is for sale to the highest bidder. Alaska oil goes to Japan. There will be no benefit to the public if this pipeline is built. The price of gasoline will actually increase by $4-5 billion a year, according to testimony given by representatives of Keystone XL when they were trying to raise money from the oil companies who stand to benefit from this pipeline.

Right now, this oil is being refined in the Midwest of this country, so if this pipeline is built, people in this country will be paying $4 to $5 billion a year more for gasoline. Raising the price of gasoline is clearly a detriment and won’t benefit the public. Wouldn’t it be easier to ship it to the east or west coast of Canada? It would, but the Canadians don’t want this dangerous pipeline in their country. Not only are the benefits almost nonexistent, but there are very real detriments. This pipeline puts at risk the water supply of 60 Texas counties that depend on the Carrizo/Wilcox Aquifer for their supply of water. Unlike crude oil, bitumen cannot be cleaned up because it sinks in water and will pollute our aquifer when the pipeline leaks. Who really benefits? China, Saudi Arabia and Exxon are some of the major investors in tar sands oil. The pipe is made in India.

The Polar Express ride continues at the Texas State Railroad’s Palestine Depot Nov. 23-25 and 30. Departure times are 3:45, 5:15, 6:45 and 8:10 p.m. Riders are invited to read along with The Polar Express story as the train travels round-trip to the North Pole.

Santa Claus will be in attendance. Each child will receive a special gift. Hot cocoa, caroling and a treat will be available during the ride. Kids are encouraged to wear their pajamas for the event. The ride will include a double-decker domed car for passengers. Tickets for adults are $40 for standard class, $69 for Lone Star lower

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE.

dome class and $99 for Lone Star upper dome class. Tickets for children aged 2-12 are $20 for standard, $45 for lower dome and $75 for upper dome. For tickets, call (877) 726-7245 or visit www.texasstaterr.com/polar.

We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

C

903-683-2277

Nov. 16-18

The Polar Express™ Train Ride

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

MSRP $29,015 PEARMAN DISC. $3,030 REBATE $3,000 BONUS REBATE $1,000 SALE PRICE $21,985

$34,490 $3,500 $2,500

$

SALE PRICE $28,490

28,490

2012 JEEP PATRIOT STK#722217

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

2012 RAM 2500

DEMO $23,045 $1,550 $1,500

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

STK#502235

$31,235 $3,000 $2,500

SALE PRICE $25,735

MSRP PEARMAN DISC.

$

25,735

19,995

$

19,490

2012 RAM 1500 CREW CAB Hemi Express Pkg

STK#280863

STK#389354

$

$20,490 $1,000

SALE PRICE $19,490

2012 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

21,985

2013 DODGE JOURNEY SE

STK#319674

STK#283874

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$

$27,885 $1,400 $2,000 $750

SALE PRICE $23,735

$

23,735

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

$33,675 $3,700 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,975

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell (5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

STK#313722

SALE PRICE $19,995

5592 Hwy 110 N

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

V8

2012 RAM 2500 4X4

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

hapman

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB

Departing the Palestine Depot 5:15pm, 6:45pm or 8:10pm

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

minimums. The remaining four involve reports, record keeping, executive sign-off of reports, and in-person explanations of reports to the PHMSA. All of these reports and any oversight that all of these conditions are met falls squarely on the shoulders of TransCanada – in short, TransCanada will be selfmonitoring. To summarize, fully twothirds of the so-called “special” conditions are nothing more than minimums that are already in place for conventional oil pipelines. Remember though, diluted tar sands bitumen is not conventional oil. The remaining one-third only falls within basic expectations for basic quality work. Granted, it does sound good to talk about all of these protective safety measures that a company would take on a pipeline such as the Keystone XL. But as one digs a little deeper, one finds that it’s just another sound bite.

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

NEWS Polar Express ride continues at TSR Palestine

in category three, 22 are based on preexisting regulations. The remaining includes number 24, which requires that Keystone XL have a control room that monitors and controls the pipeline system. This system is like the one on their Keystone I line, which had over 30 leaks in its first year of operation, and was already included in TransCanada’s plans. It is also very similar to the one on Enbridge’s pipeline that leaked over one million gallons of diluted tar sands bitumen into the Kalamazoo River. Number 28 mandates that this control room has a pressure-monitoring, model validation plan. Number 32 stipulates adding two valves to the pipeline and number 38 requires an initial survey during the first year of operation rather than waiting two years. In the fourth category, half of the eight “special conditions” are existing

$

25,975


Cherokeean

thecherokeean .com

Vol. 163

No. 40

n

n

CE

16 pgs.

WEDNESDAY

ARS E Y 2 16

H E R A L D

ING T A R LEB

November 28, 2012 75 cents

Texas’ Oldest Weekly – Cherokee County’s Largest Newspaper

Man dies in Wells plane crash A Broken Arrow, Okla. man traveling from Houston to Tulsa, Okla. by private plane was killed during a thunderstorm Monday night. John Thomas Steeper, 64, apparently lost control of the plane at 9:22 p.m. while flying 24,000 feet above Cherokee County. The Cessna 421, piloted by Mr. Steeper crashed 1.5 miles west of Wells in Cherokee County. Texas Department of Public Safety Trooper Randall Noe of Lufkin reported, “After Mr. Steeper lost control of the plane, it began to fall 15,000 feet per minute, crashing in the heavy wooded area at the corner of Cherokee

and Angelina counties.” The pilot was killed on impact. Air traffic controllers had earlier lost radar and radio contact with the twin-engine Cessna 421 en route from West Houston Airport to Tulsa Riverside Airport in Oklahoma. Officers said, “The aircraft had been maneuvering to avoid weather in the vicinity of Cherokee County at the time it disappeared from radar.” Local search and rescue crews located the wreckage of the aircraft late Monday evening in a field outside Wells. The plane was located by a group of Wells teenagers using cell phone

lights. Witnesses said they saw a ball of fire descending from the sky. The plane exploded upon impact. The registered owner of the aircraft is H-S Air LP, 3101 N. Hemlock Circle Suite 110-D. An FFA investigation is underway concerning the crash, said Pat Cheshire, communications specialist for the DPS office in Lufkin. Ms. Cheshire said, “We had troopers from Rusk, Jacksonville, Palestine, as well as Lufkin at the scene. The Cherokee County and Angelina county sheriff’s departments answered the call also.”

PHOTO: ANDY ADAMS/THE LUFKIN NEWS

Texas Department of Public Safety Troopers Cody Sheperd, left, and David Hendry examine the smoky remains of a Cessna 421 that crashed in Cherokee County around 9:30 p.m. Monday.

Paws for Christmas k Bailee is dressed in her holiday best.

CHEROKEE COUNTY

13 named to historical commission Precinct 1 utility lines approved; commissioners delay adding new roads to county map

PHOTOS: TARA HOOD

BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

hay rides, window paintings and refreshments. Santa Claus will be in attendance, as well, on a practice run for Christmas night. On Saturday, the Rusk Chamber will hold their annual Christmas parade at 11 a.m. Line up for the parade will be from 10-11 a.m. on Sycamore St. This year’s theme is “A Texas Christmas.” Rusk’s Friends of the Library

Members of the Cherokee County Commissioners Court approved the appointment of 13 persons Monday morning to serve on the county historical commission for the Jan. 1, 2013-Dec. 31, 2014 term. Appointed were Dr. Deborah Burkett, Bindi Caveness, Shelley Cleaver, Dr. Jim Cromwell, Evelyn Ezell, Dr. Richard Hackney, Elizabeth McCutcheon, Dr. John Ross, Kevin Stingley, John Thomason, Mavis Wallace, Dr. Joe Daniel and Diana Vega. Current commission members who did not seek re-appointment were Willie Harold Acker, Charles Davis, Charlie Mae Esco, Guy (Butch) Holcomb, Maxine Session, Terry Guinn, Cynthia Pryor and Mary Taylor. Outgoing members and former members of the historical commission had expressed an interest in serving as ex officio members. However, no provision has been made for these positions. County Judge Chris Davis said after the meeting, “I think it is a good idea, but the commission needs to do this.” In other matters coming before the commissioners court was the approval of laying of utility lines in Precinct 1. Commissioners delayed action concerning approval of adding roads to the county map. Commissioner Byron Underwood said, “I think we need to know what we want to do before adding new roads to the county system.” The county attorney will draw up guidelines for accepting roads into the county

See CHRISTMAS, pg. 2B

See CHEROKEE COUNTY, pg. 2B

RUSK E D A R A P A

4-5

m (above) Katy Dickey and Bessie wear Twinkie Santa caps at the Rusk Christmas parade. k Posing as Joseph and Mary, Eddie and Castanya Breen cradle their son, Finnian, at last year’s Christmas parade.

County prepares for Christmas festivities Rusk

BY QUINTEN BOYD STAFF WRITER

With the leftover turkey put away – or in sandwiches – Cherokee County is already getting into the Christmas spirit as the calendar rolls forward to December. With parades and events set across the county for the next few weeks, Santa Claus will be more than ready for his worldwide trip on Christmas Eve.

The Christmas celebrations start in Rusk Friday afternoon with the Light up a Life Hospice program and the Rusk Chamber of Commerce’s town Christmas lighting. The event will start at 4 p.m. At 5:15 p.m., the official gathering will begin at Henderson and Fifth streets in Rusk. Rusk Mayor Angela Raiborn will deliver the welcome, and chamber president Toni Meador will give

the invocation. Rusk First Baptist Church pastor Donnie Barron will read the scripture. Sandra Sanders will represent downtown merchants. Hospice of East Texas will be present and Jacksonville Mayor Kenneth Melvin will speak during the event. The Christmas tree lighting will take place at approximately 5:40 p.m. There will be Christmas carol performances, a live nativity,

PIPELINE PROTEST

ALTO ISD

Candlelight vigil held at county jail

Positives accentuated Nov. 19

BY BECKY WHISENANT

BY QUINTEN BOYD

Permanently) held signs, lit candles and sang songs. Kim Huynh, spokesperson for Tar Sands Blockade, said, “We are a peaceful direct action campaign to stop the Keystone XL pipeline and to show solidarity against environmental change around the world. We are working with Nacogdoches county groups and all over East Texas.

STAFF WRITER

STAFF WRITER

A candlelight vigil was held in front of the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department at dusk Nov. 20 following the arrest of six protestors against the TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline on Nov. 19. Approximately 30 persons from Tar Sands Blockade, a national protest group, and NacStop, (Nacogdoches Stop Tar sands Oil See CANDLELIGHT VIGIL, pg. 2A

The Alto School Board spent most of their meeting Nov. 19 accentuating the district’s positives, including positive reports from all three campuses. Superintendent Kerry Birdwell presented both a finance

and a facilities report to the board, saying he was pleased all around. “Our fund balance is in good shape as far as our finances go,” he said. “As far as our facilities, we had new heating and air units installed at the high school, and they’ve been working well. Our food service department recently

had a food audit, and it came out well. We’re very pleased with everything.” The board also received information about the district’s highly qualified teachers. Mr. Birdwell said 100 percent of AISD’s teachers are considered highly qualified. To be See AISD, pg. 2B

FFALO

ek ‘J A C K E T | w e

THURSDAY

Cowboys Texans Green Bay St. Kansas Oklahoma Okla. St.

Cher

Cowboys Texans Green Bay St. Kansas Oklahoma Baylor

mber 28,

y, Nove

Wednesda

ean.com

1B

2012

thecheroke

ld okeean Hera

Cowboys Texans Green Bay St. Kansas Oklahoma Okla. St.

-HOOD T. CROSBY .753

Cowboys Texans Green Bay Texas

Cowboys Texans Green Bay St. Kansas Oklahoma Okla. St.

lphia vs. Philade Cowboys Tennessee Texans at Bay at Green Minnesota State Texas at Kansas a TCU vs. Oklahom State Oklahoma Baylor vs.

20% chance of rain

66 54

CLASSIC HITS RADIO KWRW - FM and KTLU - AM

MERY

MATT MONTGO .714

Oklahoma Okla. St.

QUINTEN B .649

OYD

LARRY KRANTZ .623

TED PATTON .727

Survive and advance

the clear to made it was Richards his number 13 ‘Cats that the Bobcats. quarter- bad luck for later, Whitaker s. d was s of yard 183 down battle Close behinwho rushed Three down d touch – In a hed ns, downs. d his secon LUFKIN even ly matc int back Stur of adde t. two touch Leon two very s early 21-pothe yards and half we kinding on the nigh r Nicolas ct on Alto’ first or kicke miss perfe to help “The Juni by teams, gh was enou elves ing who t Hull extra point surge was on to defea hurt ours s and jump s,” (No. 16), hold added the left in the block time Jackets 35-28. !” a few a couple of . “We the day, 14 seconds 21-0. Daisetta, ding ball game h offsides ner said effort and with ter, Alto led the h Gard all Coac the “Outstan first quar se played hard ner head footb Gardner. Coac pleased with “The defent,” Coach Gard said Alto Keith high were kids.” an early e nigh outstand“This is all, of our ed out to s on the entir was just an d of all ”It prou Alto jump down said. school footbThe I’m atouch game. t. lead with possessions: Whit ing ball no doub .” Hull s for a played first two 16 yard who these guys offense d quarter, and ing for andns, In the secon a foothold efo u t s t whole ker rush ed by Stur n to ed to gain S score follow 20 yards out. ing the - seem first time, bega shut LEANN JONE from d the ball. PHOTO: on night.” r- score began the game se, for ely move the rusher Edmonds at offen Alto Alto’s powese Austin nce of fectiv Bobcats lead Chris the Bobc offen BEST terback back The 8, and adva ting down on both sides house ROBIN D. etta quar r running ats, 35-2 in Buffalo. whose Earl of its game giving fans Memorial Field was senio n Hull-Dais ated the Bobc aw ium Friday run(No. 46) the top going bring dow ets defe was at Abe Martin Stad one- John Outl that Alto was Herman smash-mouth ets p.m. this dives to pbell e. The Jack lle at 7:30 the Jack n Smith Friday at The Jacket’s by the sense with it. battered first, Cam round gam nst Bosquevi in. on 21 Alto’s Loga Jacol agai in Lufk y’s area to run awayup 14-0 in the the ning style for 129 yards juniors als of s. Frida Zac g terfin led ward durin With Alto touchdown two-punch (No. 2) and be nal quar setta fumb ered back and three to to the regio proved Whitaker Hull-Dai was recov line carries (No. 7) under and it 6B Sturns ble with just 24 yard kickoff ETS, pg. back Bobcat unstoppas offense. at the See JACK defensive Yellow- by Alto junior ards (No. 13). 450 yard led the T y Rich Whitakerscoring with three D’Anthon #56 TREN WT: 173 216 in HT: 5-11 ing for jackets 11 s, rush GRADE: 4.90 sec. touchdown

E

WT: 180 HT: 5-11 11 GRADE: h: 4.80 sec. 40-YD-Das: wide receiver, POSITION sive end defen ITY: 2 ON VARS baseball, YEARS SPORTS: OTHER track playing PLANS: FUTURE ge baseball colle

T GAMES

TUNE

AN #51 LOG

C WALLA

RLIE #22 CHA

THE IN TO ALL

OWJACKE ALTO YELL

SMITH

Vete

, TEXA ALTO 69 IN

GAMES

88

58-41

• Randy

ON KYBI

100.1 FM

RADI

L

ANIMA KEE CHERO LINIC C MB, DVM

ors ncretelacFlo e Alto Co • Fred Wal

ANTHONYPHRACHYL, DVM 5315 WILL 903-683• Rusk • OLCO

e Low Low - Mik

Hwy. 84

o 039 - Alt

E

936-858-4

RW KW ssic Hits

DVM Kessel, 858-3433

S • Alto

h: 40-YD-Das: left guard, POSITION sive tackle defen ITY: 2 ON VARS baseball YEARS SPORTS: professional OTHER PLANS: g FUTURE ing and fishin hunt O

6-8 S • 93

HWY.

selic Kes rinary Clin

Dan W.

Hwy 69

CURTIS

WT: 175 HT: 5-10 11 GRADE: h: 4.60 sec. 40-YD-Das: linebacker, POSITION sive line offen ITY: 3 ON VARS track YEARS SPORTS: professional OTHER PLANS: FUTURE ing hunt

• 936-

Cla

AGENT 6 YOUNG, -548 AUSTIN n-Rusk • 903-683 y.com Mai 400 N. .austinyoungagenc

97 .7 FM 305 903-683-5

th Marcus0 210 Nor -858-590 Alto • 936

www

Street • Rusk k.com 125 N. Main itizens1stban

903-683-2277

www.c

LUFKIN •

inbank.com www.aust

HES

NACOGDOC

!

Care in Eye Standard om The Gold eyeclinic.c

terprises Cox En Service Stevedsca ping • Tree et truck

Center www.gold Shopping Cherokee 6th Street - Rusk 3-4973 1400 W.

Lan

Insured

le Home Sty ! CookingOn Hwy 69 • Alto S.

o ad • Alt har t Ro 100 Elk 858-4100 or (936) -4789 6) 858 FAX (93

THE ILITATION

1B

936-8

ott, Jr. Jerry Kn1-9151

Red J

343 • Rusk 845 Loop 76 903-683-25 St. 303 W Rusk e Jacksonvill09 903-586-98

936-67

Custom Homes

69N 5308 HWY LUFKIN

-4466

936-858

E AND REHAB

• Alto

The Alto Yellowjackets continued on the road to the state championship, overcoming a test from a strong Hull-Daisetta squad to advance to the regional quarterfinals against Bosqueville. See Robin Best’s recap on 1B.

us St. • Alto 141 S. Marc -3535 58

tall buck

-1111

936-675

-68 Call 903

1 1/2 Miles

• 65 foot

CENTER

HEALTHCAR

042 903-683-1 Rusk p 343 • 1884 Loo We accept , Medicaid Medicare,

hapman acy Pharm

RUSK

IN SPORTS

Oklahoma Baylor

BEST ROBIN D. .597

osqueville s to meet B tta; advance se ai D llu H Alto edges

cloudy High: Low:

Cowboys Texans Green Bay Texas

Pack of Picks

BU P.M. IN , 7:30

VILLE

SQUE VS. BO Y: ALTO FRIDA

8 -687 -639seslufk in.com 936teelhor www.s

Helping

you

get back

e

in the gam

or Dr. Parrish tment with 86-6289. an appoin Schedule by calling 903-5 ns Dr. Sessio Physicians e ETMC First clinic in Jacksonvill Ste. 150 orthopedic doches St., 203 Nacog ay, y – Thursd Hours: Monda p.m. 9 a.m. – 5 – noon a.m. g the One with East Texas. Friday, 9 ed to improvin

tion committ | www.etmc.org ities. rofit organiza A not-for-p East Texas commun life in quality of

All-District players announced Monday A total of 14 Rusk Eagle football players were named to the District 20-3A all-district squads. Three – Chaston Bennett (right), Kody Stanley and Keshannon Dearman – were unanimous choices. 6B

Coming The Rusk City Council will meet at 5 p.m. Thursday, when city secretary Fran Wendeborn is expected to announce her retirement. She has worked with the city for 31 years – 18 Fran Wendeborn city Secretary as secretary.


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

TEX A S STATE R AILROAD

Sponsorship benefits Lone Star Military Event

Railroad’s natural beauty shines

JULIANNE SANFORD Rusk

On behalf of Lone Star Military resources, I would like to thank you for the sponsorship you provided for our Lone Star Military Event, held on Nov. 1-4. Thanks to your generous sponsorship, we were able to raise awareness of the needs

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

and sacrifices of our military members and their families. This event would not have been a success without the generous support you provided us with throughout.

Was pepper spray necessary against protesters? BECKY MAYO Nacogdoches

As a longtime resident of Nacogdoches County, I am extremely concerned about the use of pepper spray by area law enforcement on nonviolent protesters against the Keystone XL pipeline. Young people have come from across Texas and the nation to oppose the pipeline and support landowners that feel their land has been taken illegally. On Nov. 19, four of these individuals chose to “voice” their dissent with passive civil disobedience by attaching themselves to machinery in Cherokee County. Without threats of bodily harm to any citizen, worker or police officer, they were attacked

CANDLELIGHT VIGIL continued from pg. 1A

“Tar Sands Blockade has been working with a local Sierra Club, with NacStop and with a local group of Nacogdoches grandmothers working for social and environmental justice called Raging Grannies,” said Ms. Huynh. Charges of criminal trespass, misdemeanor B & C, felony criminal mischief and felony unlawful use of criminal instrument were filed against a total of 11 members of the movement on Nov. 19 at two locations near Wells. At least three protestors were pepper sprayed before being arrested at the pipeline construction site on CR 2631 east of Wells on Monday morning. Captain John Raffield, head of the Criminal Investigation Division of the Cherokee County Sheriff Department, said, “We receive a call to a scene where people are breaking the law and we do what our agency is supposed to do in order to enforce the laws of the state of Texas.”

with pepper spray directly into the face and eyes by East Texas law enforcement. The U.S. Court of Appeals Ninth District has clearly ruled that in similar circumstances the use of pepper spray is unlawful excessive force. Law enforcement grade pepper spray is a chemical weapon and should be reserved for self-defense against violent individuals. Whether you agree with the pipeline protestors’ stance or tactics, brutalizing passive dissenters with the use of excessive force has no place in American communities. Please voice your concerns to your county’s law enforcement officials.

Members of the North American Railcar Operators Association (NARCOA) area 9 group take pictures of the locomotive during a stop on the excursion. The 316 steam locomotive made its debut run after being restored, repaired and refurbished. The locomotive was donated to the city of Abilene in 1951, then to the Texas State Rail“We (the officers) have to re- equipment, preventing their road in 1974. For more, see Becky Whisenant’s “There and Back” column on pg. 3A.

main neutral on issues. What if someone came and camped out in your home because, perhaps, they didn’t like the way you were treating your dog? Would you, the homeowner, want them out of your house, your home?” said Capt. Raffield. “That is similar to what is going on here. However, they are breaking a law that has been passed by the Texas legislature, that of criminal trespass and it is our duty to enforce the laws of Texas.” TransCanada, the Canadian company building the diluted bitumen (tar sands) pipeline from Alberta, Canada to Baytown, is currently clearing and preparing for pipeline to be laid through East Texas. Ms. Huynh said, “These are brutal responses to peaceful protests, an American right.” At the protest site on FM 1911, just west of the Goodman Bridge three tree-sitters had positioned themselves 50 ft. up in pine trees with lifelines attached to the heavy

Nov. 30Dec. 1&2

removal. Upon advice from her lawyer, the landowner refused permission to the tree-sitters due to liability concerns. The protestors were told they were allowed to stand on the dirt embankment near the site but not in the right-of-way. Law enforcement gave all protestors at both sites the option and opportunity to leave the site and were given time to consider their decision. “Once the protestors were informed of trespassing and were given at least two to two and one-half hours to consider, they decided to disobey the law. Then, at that point it becomes a lawful arrest and law enforcement is authorized to use the least amount of force necessary to accomplish that. Pepper spray is the first action taken in ‘pain compliance,’” said Capt. Raffield.

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE. We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

C

903-683-2277

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

The Polar Express™ Train Ride

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

STK#581870

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$23,185 $1,200 $3,000

$

SALE PRICE $18,985 2012 DODGE CHALLENGER

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study

SUNROOF - LEATHER $30,935 $2,250 $2,000

$

SALE PRICE $26,685

26,685

2012 RAM 1500 CREW CAB HEMI - EXPRESS PKG. $33,675 $3,700 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $25,975

$

25,975

STK#502235

MSRP PEARMAN DISC.

$34,490 $3,500 $2,500

SALE PRICE $28,490

$

28,490

2012 RAM 1500 QUAD CAB STK#313722

STK#280863

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE BONUS REBATE

V8

$29,015 $3,030 $3,000 $1,000

SALE PRICE $21,985

$20,490 $1,000

SALE PRICE $19,490

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN STK#506179

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

$

21,985

MOTOR COMPANY HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmanmotor.com Photos for illustration purposes only

$23,990 $1,305 $1,000

SALE PRICE $21,685

Curtis Oliver - Pastor

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

18,985

2013 DODGE JOURNEY SE

STK#283874

STK#240574

MSRP PEARMAN DISC. REBATE

2012 RAM 2500 4X4

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

2013 DODGE AVENGER

Departing the Palestine Depot 5:15pm, 6:45pm or 8:10pm

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422


Cherokeean Herald

n

thecherokeean.com

Wednesday, November 28, 2012

The best

Kid M.D., a wood carving created by John Birkelbach, was dedicated Nov. 14 at a site behind Chapman’s Pharmacy in Rusk. From left are Pauline Birkelbach, Mr. Birkelbach and Monte Ethington, owner of Chapman Pharmacy.

heart care

more

is than a place.

Kid M.D. carving dedicated Nov. 14 Rusk citizens joined the Make Rusk Beautiful committee for the unveiling of the Kid M.D. Nov. 14 behind Chapman Pharmacy. The Kid M.D. is a hand carved statue created by John Birkelbach of Rusk. The statue features a child dressed as a doctor holding an ambulance. Dedication speaker was the Rev. Jacob Smith, pastor of the First United Methodist Church in Rusk. He was introduced by Larry Long. The site was presented to those men and women who have dedicated their lives to the medical profession including Chapman Pharmacy, East Texas Medical Center Emergency Medical Service, East Texas Medical Center and Trinity Mother Frances. Those who have contributed to make Kid M.D. a part of “Kids are our Future” plan in Rusk

include Mayor Angela Raiborn; Bob Goldsberry, Chamber of Commerce executive vice-president and executive director of the Economic Development Corporation; Charles Hassell, EDC president; John Birkelbach, designer and wood carver; City Manager Mike Murray; Monte Ethington, owner of Chapman Pharmacy; and Toni Meador, 2012 chamber president. The Keep Rusk Beautiful committee is composed of Jan Hardy, project manager; Jeannie Plyler, project consultant; Thomas L. Parsons, project designer; Cristen Parker, city liaison; Doug Hassell, chamber liaison; and Connie A. Parsons, chamber manager. Mrs. Meador extended the welcome. Rev. Smith offered the benediction.

VFW winner

What may seem to start with a pain in your chest actually starts long before, in your family history, in your coronary arteries, on your couch, in a pack of cigarettes or even on your plate. To be truly successful, heart care should start before you ever experience chest pain, and it should not end with your discharge from a hospital.

[ It’s a program.

At ETMC we believe the best heart care is a whole program of care that includes research, prevention, easy access to every stage of heart care throughout East Texas, new ways of delivering that care, and a plan of care not just for your heart, but for your health.

[ It’s professionals.

It’s care that is given by professionals trained at leading medical centers, celebrated for their skill and committed to improving outcomes by advancing care. It’s care that is centered not on where we are but on where you are: your home, your work, your lifestyle. Care that has made a lifesaving, life-enhancing difference for tens of thousands of East Texans.

[ And it’s a promise.

Providing that kind of heart care has been our focus and our promise to you for more than 20 years. It has guided everything from the number of steps between the cath labs, surgery suites and cardiac intensive care unit in the ETMC Cardiovascular Institute, to the number of emergency helicopters and ambulances we field, to the number of minutes it takes to open the blocked artery of an East Texan whether that process begins in Carthage or Crockett or Cedar Creek Lake. And it continues to guide us as we strive to provide you with the information and access you need to put our program and our professionals to work for you and the ones you love. To learn more about what the best heart care means and why it matters, please visit www.etmc.org.

VFW Commander Emerson Griffin of the Cherokee County VFW Post # 3406 presents a gift certificate to raffle winner Doug Levin of Alto. Mr. Levin had his choice of a $500 gift certificate from VISA, Walmart or Brookshire Bros.

391 Commission update presented BY RITA BEVING

SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR

An update on ongoing litigation against the Army Corps of Engineers (Corp) was presented at the 391 Commission meeting Monday, Nov. 12, at the Craft Turney Water Supply in Jacksonville. The lawsuit is now in appeal at the U.S. Court of Appeals, 10th Circuit in Denver, Colo. The case concerns a suit over the nationwide permit (NWP) 12 for TransCanada’s southern segment. The suit alleges that the Corp violated the Clean Water Act and the National Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) in the granting of the permit. TransCanada’s southern segment of the Keystone XL pipeline travels over 531 water crossings in Texas under the jurisdiction of the Galveston, Fort Worth and Tulsa Corps district offices. The Corps case was brought in the U.S. District Court in Tulsa with the request for an immediate injunction against construction. At the Nov. 12 meeting the 391 Commission discussed

how it would move forward since TransCanada had begun pipeline construction. Rita Beving of Beving & Associates in Dallas, said, “Based upon recent and past complaints from landowners and ongoing concerns for water and the safety of local residents should a spill occur, the 391 voted it would pursue working on supporting changes. “The proposed changes are on granting common carrier status and the eminent domain process to be considered at the upcoming Texas legislative session. Hearings on concerns regarding eminent domain transpired this summer in front of the Texas House Land and Resources Management Committee.” Testimony was given by Reklaw’s Mayor Harlan Crawford on water and safety concerns at the Texas House Energy Resources Committee at the end of June. Attending the meeting were Commission Chairwoman Roberta Colkin, who presided and four additional commission members, as well as consultant Rita Beving, and legal advisor Wendi Hammond.

Free iPhone app

A not-for-profit organization committed to improving the quality of life in East Texas communities.

www.etmc.org

One with East Texas.

3B


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, December 5, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

Clearing misconceptions about Keystone XL JAMES MILLAR Houston

In a recent letter to the editor, Steven DaSilva reiterated his long-standing opposition to the Gulf Coast Project under construction in East Texas and to the Keystone Pipeline generally. We would like to correct the facts regarding some of his statements. First, Keystone Pipeline has never leaked. Some small, above-ground fittings did leak oil onto our property. It was controlled and cleaned up quickly. The average amount of oil that leaked was five gallons. In all the instances cited, only a small amount of crude oil ever left TransCanada property and was never a threat to the community. Second, Mr. DaSilva refers to a spill in Michigan involving a pipeline owned by Enbridge. Let’s be clear: Enbridge is not TransCanada. Enbridge’s pipe is not Keystone pipe. This pipeline cited was made in a different era with different materials built to different standards than Keystone and the Gulf Coast Project. The logic used in the writer’s argument is this: “A Toyota built in 1960 had a wreck last year. Therefore, 2013 Fords are unsafe.” Third, it is gratifying that Mr. DaSilva continues to make the point that TransCanada is being held to a higher standard than any pipeline in history, but it is puzzling why he then discounts his own assertion. While we would argue with the contention that the special conditions Keystone will meet or exceed are already required by

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

regulators – they’re not, at least not to the degree TransCanada agreed to meet – the fact remains that Keystone XL and the Gulf Coast Project will be the newest, most modern and most advanced onshore liquid pipelines built in North America. In fact, the federal Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration concluded that implementation of the special conditions would “provide a level of safety equal to or greater than that provided if the pipeline were operated under the current federal standards.” Mr. DaSilva suggests that is no big deal. We think it is significant. We agree that the project deserves scrutiny. In that regard, no pipeline in history has received the years of scrutiny to which Keystone XL and the Gulf Coast Project have been subjected. We want your readers to know as much as possible about the way the Gulf Coast Project is being built in your community and the standards we will observe in operating it over the coming decades. Informed citizens make good choices, and we believe these citizens support the thousands of American jobs the Gulf Coast Project is creating, along with the energy security this pipeline system provides by pushing out higher priced foreign oil from regimes like Venezuela and the Middle East that do not share American values. Mr. Millar is the manager of corporate communications for TransCanada.

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

UPCOMING COUNTY CHRISTMAS EVENTS A look at Christmas events around Christmas concert at 7 p.m. Dec. 13. Cherokee County: All performances will take place at the RHS auditorium. Rusk For more information, call (903) Each Thursday in December prior to 683-5401. Christmas, the Rusk Square will host Rusk First Baptist Church will hold Christmas on the Square at 5:45 p.m. a Christmas concert by their children’s Cocoa and sugar cookies will be choirs Dec. 9 at 6:30 p.m. at the church, available, and shopping hours for busi- 372 E. 4th St. nesses on the Square are extended For more information, contact the until 6 p.m. church at (903) 683-5494. Each Friday in December prior to Rusk First United Methodist Church Christmas, a Christmas movie will be will hold their Christmas cantata at 11 shown at 7 p.m. in the square. Popcorn a.m. Dec. 9 at their location, 308 N. and cocoa will be available. Henderson. Each Saturday prior to Christmas, There will be a luncheon and pie a Christmas hay ride will be offered auction following the program. starting at 6 p.m. For more information, contact the All activities are free of charge, and church at (903) 683-4675. each event is sponsored by Friends River of Life Christian Center will of the Library and the City of Rusk. present “Born for Such a Time as For more information, contact the This” at 6 p.m. Dec. 11-12 at 677 S. Singletary Memorial Library at (903) Dickenson Dr. For more information, 683-5916. call (903) 683-3132. The Cherokee Civic Theater presOn Dec. 14, Texas National Bank, ents Narnia: the Musical, Dec. 7-9 484 N. Main St., will hold an open and 14-15 at the theater, 157 W. 5th house at their Rusk location from 9 St. in Rusk. All show times are 7:30 a.m-3 p.m. p.m. except the Dec. 9 show, which For more information, call the bank is at 2 p.m. at (903) 683-5916. For more information, contact the Alto theater at (903) 683-2131. In Alto, the annual Christmas parade The RHS theater group will put on their Christmas program at 7 p.m. will be at 6 p.m. Monday, Dec. 10. Parade line up will be at 5:30 at Alto Dec. 6. The RHS band will hold their Missionary Baptist Church.

The parade will start on State Highway 294 W and progress through downtown Alto, then turn south on U.S. Highway 69 and end at A. Frank Smith Methodist Church. The parade is sponsored by the Alto Lions Club, and there is a $50 prize for best float. The Alto Elementary Christmas program will be Dec. 18.

Gallatin

The Gallatin Christmas parade will be Saturday, Dec. 15. Parade line up will be at noon at the Gallatin Community Center on CR 768. The parade starts at 1 p.m. Santa Claus will be in the parade, and refreshments will be served at the Gallatin Fire Station after the parade. Santa will make an appearance at the fire station as well. Cookies and hot chocolate will be served. The annual Christmas lights judging will take place the evening of Dec. 14. Participants must have their Christmas lights turned on no later than 6 p.m. that night. For more information, contact Mayor Chase Palmer at (936) 537-2448.

Wells

A Christmas parade will be held at 5 p.m. Dec. 8. There is no charge to enter a float in the parade. For more information, call the city office at (936) 867-4615.

Rusk’s Good Samaritan helps in holiday season KAY EPPERSON Rusk

The Good Samaritan has been in operation and serving the Rusk and Cherokee County area for many years. The Good Samaritan is a non-profit organization that is staffed with volunteers who give endlessly of their time to help provide food and clothing to the less fortunate in our community. The Good Samaritan receives food and clothing to help these families from churches, businesses, the Tyler Food Bank, the United Fund and individuals. The coordinated effort of everyone working together is what makes this organization a success. Every year, the Good Samaritan provides Christmas baskets

for these families. These baskets are provided to families within the Rusk Independent School District. The goal for the 2012 Christmas season is 500 baskets. This is where we need your help. Please consider making a special donation to this year’s Christmas basket drive. The Good Samaritan will appreciate monetary donations or food donations for these baskets. If you would like to make food donations, please contact me at (903) 683-2376 to find out what is needed for these baskets. Monetary donations may be mailed to P.O. Box 632, Rusk, 75785. Please designate your donation for the Christmas basket drive. All of your dona-

tions are tax deductible. Thank you so much for all you do to bless the lives of those less fortunate.

25¢ OR LESS! Great selection of Clothes, Shoes, KnickKnacks!

GOOD SAMARITAN 203 W. 2nd Street • Rusk (903) 683-2376 Open Monday, Wednesday, Friday 9 - 11:30 a.m.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Dec. 7-23

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

The Polar Express™ Train Ride Departing the Palestine Depot Selected Times

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE. We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

C

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF GOOSENECK, KEARNEY & S&H TRAILERS

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

FINANCING AVAILABLE ON ALL TRAILERS

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’ Stock Trailer with 2 - 7,000 lb torsion axles, 2 cut gates, a full escape door on the drive side, and a rubber dock bumper. It is black with a gray canvas top and 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides. $9,140

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Curtis Oliver - Pastor

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’8 Stock Trailer with 2 - 7,000 lb torsion axles, 2 cut gates, a full escape door on the passenger side, and a rubber dock bumper. It is black with a gray canvas and a 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides. $9,850

Gooseneck 32’ x 6’8 Stock Trailer with 3 - 7,000 lb torsion axles, 3 cut gates, a full escape door on the driver side, and a rubber dock dumper. It is black with gray canvas and 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides. $12,995

Gooseneck 14 Bale Haymaster measures 37’ x 102” and comes equipped with 3 - 7,000 lb spring axles. $10,495

Gooseneck 32’ x 5’ hay hauler, 5 bale capacity, dumps bales individually & to either side, 2 - 6000 # axles, 12 ply radial tires, electric brakes on both axles. $6,295

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell

5592 Hwy 110 N

(5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

MOTOR COMPANY

HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmantrailersales.com


Cherokeean

thecherokeean .com Vol. 163

No. 42

n

48 pgs.

n

CEL

S T R O SP K WEE L E T T E R S TO S A N TA Cherokeean Herald

thecherokeean.com

n

1D

From left, Hayley, Kirsten and Hayden McIntyre – and a little friend – show Jacksonville High School’s Cherokee Charmers dressed for the occasion in their best Santa hats their support for Santa’s reindeer during the Jacksonville Christmas during the Jacksonville Christmas parade, held Dec. 6. Parade.

2012

Santa’s southe LETT rn swin ERS T O SAN g: 2012 TA RuskasCParade h m t r s i i s r t m h Happy|holidays 2 RuTwin sk C Oaks Health & as Parade g: 201 Rehabilitation n Center i w s n of Jacksonville would like ther u o s ’s to wish everyone a very Santa ke

rald

n

He keean

n

theche

rokee

an.co

m

n

theche

Wedn

esday,

INSID

Decem

Chero

ber 12

E

, 2012

1C

Merry Christmas & Happy New Year!

Please remember that if you are traveling out of town for the holidays and need respite care for your loved one, we would love to make them feel at home while you are away.

Your friends at ETMC Rusk want to help you and yours have a safe and healthy holiday season. We encourage you to keep these tips in mind as you celebrate:

Rejoi

ALL PH OT WWW.H OS: TAR A HO IDDEN , OD AN EAGL Even ERICH D MIK E FRIED of the Santa him E.COM E FRIED Ru re ERICH AND MIK sel Winn sk Christ f (cente ,OD the allu A HO r) mas resist Baptis ing top : TAR Parad couldnOS ldn’t pri 1. OT ’t resistGLE.COM r) cou Rock secon t Church ze amon ALe,L PH Dec. held for the g DeENEA the allu f (cente e, held was Solid ishing (top d was Bra W.HtsIDD c. 1.himsel re rad ir “bu the rig WWfloa nd s Pa the floats p left). Fin Rusk wanta ma Sa s Churc ht). Third ed by Ch ll train” (to g So rist of Even left amon ll train” (to Church wboy sk Chlid Ro ze ck Easte h in Jackso place we rist Cowb pRu Finpri oy Ch ).top ir “bu Cowboy Christ Co nt to nt to of the x Fin ish nvi the ing lle ing Trail nn urch h for e Art rist we At rig and Wi s to Ch Churcof Ru ed by Ch to Trail to ntion parad ht, parad and Pio honorab ptis sk t rist Co nd nt le me ). ne le s Bra oyplace we honorab sentede. In all, moe Queen er Spirit Bame ntio d wa wb (above enjoys the (ab on n .we Jam Third nville and er Spirit reoks by Pe in this yeare than 40 arria secove to ).ht) ntkso ne p rig Bro(to ia Bro s were rep ed arman org r’s oks in Jac s and Pion Jamarr vid and tion enhjoy Bacon Motor Co parade. anizationChurc Art n re pro ee aniza s ethe e Qu n 40 org hicles we rd/Lincol x Fin Auto mpan Vehicles s we Coun parad Fo Eastere rep y, Bil tha Ve Rae l McRa wereAtpro try. right,re-all, more parade. vidIn Bill Mc e Fo ed any, rd/rad year’s Line. pa colinn this tor Comp sented an Mo Country. arm by Pe con Auto Ba and

• Prevent injuries. Use a step stool or ladder to hang decorations. Don’t leave burning candles unattended. Make sure toys are age appropriate. Keep choking hazards, such as hard candy, out of reach. • Travel safely. Don’t text while driving. Wear your seat belt. Make sure children are buckled in properly. When drinking, designate a driver. • Handle and prepare food safely. Wash hands and surfaces often. Cook foods to the proper temperature. Refrigerate leftovers promptly.

ce

• Manage stress. Balance your commitments. Build “down time” into your schedule. Manage your time and your budget well. • Eat healthy and be active. Indulge in just one or two favorites. Substitute fruit for candy or other sweets. Take a walk with a family member. Dance to holiday music.

Best wishes for good health

‘AtollyouIand yours! s presente Well’ d by T4 HE W SANTA OR CHOIRSHIP Sunday , Dec

I

ce INSIDE SECTIONS i o j e R RUSK

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR INQUIRIES, PLEASE CALL (903) 586-9031.

East Texas Medical Center Regional Healthcare System

1123 N. BOLTON, JACKSONVILLE, TX 75766

Children share ‘confidential’ correspondence 6:30 p. . 16 m.

LordC’s hristmas Ev S Monda upper Se e y, Dec. rvice 24 • 6 p.m

.

C

rvices

are Te

levise

d on Pu

blic Ac

cess Ch

annel

19 Su

nday

at 11

’ s Well ‘All preIsented by P I ORSH THE WHOIR C nday, Dec. 16 Su

d 6:30

4

PM •

rron ie BaPastor

Donn

Asso

ciate

Wedne sd

ay at

6:30 PM

Donn

ie Ba

t Us A k With rship f Rus4 o e Wo h m c Je o r ff C Carroll hu -549 rron

Pasto

Ja

Pasto

r of Stuson Ho ffm dents /Educ an ation Minis

372

rvices

Worsh

ip

nel 19

an cess Ch

c Ac

bli d on Pu

levise

are Te

de

ay at

Sund

11 AM

30 PM

and 6:

nesday

• Wed

PM at 6:30

Letters to Santa reveal hopes and dreams – and a little humor

BY QUINTEN BOYD STAFF WRITER

Cherokee County’s children are prepared to bring tidings of comfort, joy and – hopefully for them – many presents this Christmas. Another batch of Christmas letters from Cherokee County kids on Santa’s nice – or at least semi-nice – lists can be found in four sections, totaling 48 pages. Letters this year came from elementary schools in Rusk, Alto, Jacksonville as well as Christ the Redeemer’s kinderprep program. Additionally, the Cherokeean Herald is happy to present Christmas letters in Spanish for the first time. This year’s edition is the largest Christmas section in the history of the Cherokeean Herald. This year, students across the county have searched near and far for presents – sometimes, near. “I would like...an Angry Bird ball,” one writer said. “I saw it at Walmart yesterday.” One student was impressed with the entire North Pole infrastructure. “Rudolph’s nose is as bright as a light bulb,” they said. “Well, that’s his job. Your elves work hard! Wow! 100 little people make 1,000,000,000 toys in 11 months and you deliver that many presents. All of you work hard.” One writer had questions for “Santa, Elves and Reindeer.” “Why does Mrs. Claus feed Santa so much?” they asked. “How does the sled get into the sky to fly? How do you get down my chimney?” Some kids learned how to negotiate with Santa. After detailing their wish list, one writer ended with, “That’s all I want for Christmas, and I won’t put any more beads up my nose.” Another writer said, “I know I’ve been See CORRESPONDENCE, pg. 6A

Weather Outlook

ciate

Asso

r

tC -683 Baptis et • 903 First E. 4th Stre

Our Se

of Stu stor

Pa

Jeff

sunny 0% chance of rain

61 40

See JACKSONVILLE COUNCIL, pg. 6A

Dream Tree Jason Hoffman, youth and educational director of Rusk First Baptist Church, is coordinator for this year’s Dream Tree. Through the program, 43 applications were accepted from families in Rusk ISD. The names of qualifying children were then put on Christmas ornaments and added to trees in Rusk area financial institutions. Donors can still choose a child from the trees. Mr. Hoffman said,

“The deadline to select a child is Dec. 12. All children’s names must be chosen by someone, taken off the tree and their present turned in to a local church by that time. This year, 43 applications were submitted by qualifying families with children and Dream Tree project is expecting to be able to assist approximately 120 kids, compared to 100 last year.” For more information See CHARITIES, pg. 7A

TRANSCANADA PIPELINE

Temporary restraining order against pipeline granted in Nacogdoches County EDITOR

resented the material intended for transport as crude oil. He described it as “hazardous material.” He also claims that a foreign, private corporation lacks the authority under the Texas Constitution to use eminent domain as a common carrier. The case will be heard at 1:30 p.m. Dec. 19 in the Nacogdoches County Court-at-Law office. The TRO applies only to the 20-acre property owned by Mr. Bishop near Douglass. Mr. Bishop held a one-hour telephone conference call Tuesday afternoon, which was

A retired Marine filed a Pro Se lawsuit against the Keystone Pipeline last Friday and succeeded in getting a temporary restraining order issued on Tuesday against TransCanada in Nacogdoches County. The order was granted by Nacogdoches County Court-at-Law Judge Jack Sinz, and the required bond was posted Tuesday morning by Michael Bishop, who is seeking a jury trial. In his petition, Mr. Bishop asserts that TransCanada misrep- See PIPELINE, pg. 6A

CHEROKEE COUNTY

Commissioners honor county employees BY GLORIA JENNINGS STAFF WRITER

Service awards were presented to 13 Cherokee County employees Monday morning during the regular commissioners court meeting. Employees were honored for service ranging from five-30 years. Among those recognized were Julie K. Fletcher, Patricia D. Jones, Coralia A. Santos, Clinton D. Goff, Leigh A. Davis and Kelley D. Peacock, five years; Mary L. Blackmon and Donald E. Williams, 10 years; Vera L. Foreman, Bryan K. Radcliff, Deborah G. Shreve and Annette A. Gonzalez, 15 years; and Laverne Lusk, 30 years. Elizabeth McCutcheon, Cherokee County Historical Commission chairman, presented an annual report for the organization. “Work is continuing on many yearly projects. The commission has submitted designation for several cemeteries and a repaired marker has been returned to a site. The Mixon Cemetery marker dedication was held during the year,” Mrs. McCutcheon said. Commission members are working on oral history DVDs and recordings for archives. A new map for the Cherokee history trails See COMMISSIONERS, pg. 6A

Final 2 performances of ‘Narnia, The Musical’ will be presented this weekend SPECIAL CONTRIBUTOR

THURSDAY

It’s official – Jacksonville will soon be “eating good in the neighborhood.” The Jacksonville City Council approved a zone change to a special use permit for a restaurant at 1702 S. Jackson by SD Apple Properties I, LLC, the parent company of Applebee’s Restuarant. Applebee’s was represented in negotiations by Robert Means of Landbridge Real Estate of Tyler, who was not in attendance. The location is the former site of Chubby’s Restaurant, which closed in 2008. Under the special use permit, the restaurant will have a bar and serve alcohol as part of its menu fare and will close at 2 a.m. The council unanimously accepted the zone change. Mike McEwen of Cherokee Real Estate, the building’s listing broker, said he was impressed with Applebee’s from the top down. “I had a chance to meet with the vice president of operations for Applebee’s, and I was

Worsh

BY TERRIE GONZALEZ

On the menu: council okays Applebee’s STAFF WRITER

f the number of giftgiving projects and organizations for toys, gifts and food donations this Christmas season is any indication, Cherokee County has a big heart beating strong. There are plenty of opportunities for those wishing to spread some good cheer and help their neighbor this season. Projects such as Childrens Christmas Tree, Toys for Tots and Dream Tree are a few of the worthy endeavors that would melt the heart of any Grinch. This is in addition to the myriad church baskets, handmade items and presents given out personally to needy families, nursing home residents, shut-ins, veterans or less fortunate county residents.

CITY OF JACKSONVILLE

BY QUINTEN BOYD

ll Carro ip

ter of

Minis

How many tourney titles did Cherokee County teams win last week?

Inside – 2B

STAFF WRITER

BY SHEILAH O’HEANEY

High: Low:

The tournaments. The stats. The standings. The stand-outs.

ffman n Ho ation Jaso nts/Educ

y,

Monda

3-549

AM an

m.

6:30 p.

ve mas E ice Christupper Servm. S p. Lord’s Dec. 24 • 6

ter of

CLASSIC HITS RADIO

Our Se

First ome Worship W B ith U s At 372 E aptist C . 4th h Stree urch of t • 90 3-68 Rusk

PLAYMAKERS

BY BECKY WHISENANT

A not-for-profit organization committed to improving the quality of life in East Texas communities

The Cherokee Civic Theatre will present the last two of five performances of the holiday magical world “Narnia, The Musical.” Performances are at 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Dec. 14 and 15. Director David Weaver, Producer Monica Kelley and a cast of more than 30 actors and singers, some playing multiple roles, will bring the world of Narnia to East Texas. Based on the beloved Chronicles of See NARNIA, pg. 6A

75 cents

QUICK HITS

Charitable groups discover that Cherokee County residents have big hearts

Chero

n Heral A few little angels from Branded by Christ CowboyeaChurch A few kind souls rode in bearing gifts for good little boys and girls. The listen to some last minute instructions before the start ofd Jacksonville Christmas Parade brought people from all over Cherokee the parade. County Dec. 6, bringing glad tidings and looking forward to the holiday m ALL PHOTOS: KORI WELLS AND ee CHRISTIE an.co MARSH season. rok

December 12, 2012

Texas’ Oldest Weekly – Cherokee County’s Largest Newspaper

NO GRINCHES HERE

INSIDE

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

n

Northern lights: 2012 Jacksonville Christmas Parade

2012 Y A D I L O H

H E R A L D

Despite a stand-out game from Whitaker, Alto falls to Mart.

B

H O L I D AY |

16

SEASON FINALE

1-2

HOLIDAY | 2012

ING T A R EB

WEDNESDAY

RS 2 YEA

Narnia’s Dryads are reminders of summer days gone by, before the White Witch put the country into eternal winter. In front from left are Abigail McCalister, Liz Heidel, Tori Davis; back, Moira O’Heaney Debbs and Rebekah Heidel.

‘Godspell’ auditions set Cherokee Civic Theatre Inc. will hold open auditions for its upcoming musical production, “Godspell” at 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 16 and 6:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 17, at the Cherokee Theater, 157 W. 5th Street in Rusk. “Godspell,” a Grammy Award-winning musical by Stephen Schwartz (“Wicked”) and John-Michael Tebelak, is based on the parables in the Gospel of St. Matthew. It showcases a variety of musical styles and features the song, “Day By Day” which became a Billboard hit in the 1970s. CCT’s “Godspell” auditions are open to teens and adults. Actors are asked to prepare a song to perform. Cold readings and movement activities will also be part of the auditions. Cherokee Civic Theatre will present “Godspell” March 22-24 and 29-30, 2013. For more information, contact CCT at (903) 683-2131 or visit the website, www.cherokeetheatre.net.


6A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

n

thecherokeean.com

LON MORRIS COLLEGE

Bankruptcy auction rescheduled for Jan. 14, 2013 The Lon Morris College auction scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 13, has been postponed until 11 a.m. Monday, Jan. 14, 2013. The auction will be held in the Dallas offices of McKool Smith PC, the law firm representing the estate. The U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Eastern District of Texas ruled Wednesday the auction date would be moved back a month from the date originally planned. “We will use this extra time to work with additional bidders, answering any questions they might have,” said Carl Carter of AmeriBid, the auctioneer company. “No property will be offered for auction that cannot be sold,” Mr. Carter said. “We are excited about the new auction day.”

The college buildings and property were opened to prospective bidders Nov. 30. “Shifting the auction date to Jan. 14 will give bidders more time to further research the property, which will ensure they are able to bid with confidence. We’re glad to have time to help them in any way we can, and we look forward to a great auction,” said Stephen Karbelk, co-chairman and founder of AmeriBid. “I feel sure that those parties planning to bid will welcome the additional time to research the property, arrange financing and address other needs,” he added. Attorney Hugh Ray III of McKool Smith agreed. “All systems are go for a Jan. 14

NEWS Blood drive Thursday at Alto B&B

Retirement Party planned for Rusk city secretary

A Life Saving Blood Drive will be held from 2-6:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 20, at B&B Grocery in Alto. The donor coach will be in the parking lot. Call Mollie or Brad at B&B, (936) 858-5900 to sign up. All walk-ins are welcomed. Everyone who donates will receive a free long sleeve T-shirt.

Rusk City Secretary Fran Wendeborn will be honored with a retirement party from 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 19, at Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Mrs. Wendeborn has been employed by the city for the past 31 years. The event will be come and go and the public is invited, said City Manager

Rusk’s Good Samaritan will hold a special benefit sale from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday Dec. 15 at the Rusk Civic Center, 535 Euclid St. Bargains on various items will be available and proceeds from the sale will go to the Good Samaritan to help needy families in the community.

up my dog because he will try to jump on you.” A third said, “You might want to bring my dogs treats so they don’t attack you.” A third writer warned Santa about their cat. “Please do not step on our cat because she will wake up and give me...a scare,” they explained. One kid was in a bit of a rush to grow up. “I want to be 18,” he or she said. Some writers went with the succinct approach. One letter, in its entirety, said, “Dear Santa, Leappad.” Another letter, excluding the greeting and signature, was three words long: “Zebra. Cookies. Princess.” A third writer apparently created their correspondence close to lunch time. “Dear Santa, I would like a cheeseburger and

barbecue sauce,” they said. Still others wanted to ride the reindeer, with one requesting Prancer and others requesting Rudolph by name. Some kids figured it was better to tell Santa the truth. “Dear Santa, I kind of been good,” one writer said. “Dear Santa, I have been a boy,” another pointed out. Whatever their methods, the kids of Cherokee County know how to ask Santa for the things they want. “Cherokee County’s boys and girls are always on my nice list, and they write such wonderful letters,” Santa said. “I’ll have to get a larger sleigh for some of the presents they’re asking for this year. Santa’s old sleigh won’t carry elephants and zebras like it used to.”

Mike Murray.

Good Samaritan benefit sale Dec. 15

CORRESPONDENCE continued from pg. 1A

naughty, but if I was good for two months, can you give me stuff?” Many writers touched the heart with their letters. “Dear Santa, I want to see my family forever,” one writer said. “I like Jesus and I like Santa,” another said. “I love you, Santa, and I know you love me,” another writer said. This holiday season, some kids got creative with the treats they left for jolly old St. Nick. “I will leave you hot cocoa and cereal for a snack because I know you get tired of all those cookies,” one writer said. A few writers warned Santa about their dogs. “Please sneak up while my dog is sleeping so he will not bark at you,” one writer said. Another writer advised, “Be safe and careful not to wake

auction, and AmeriBid is actively working to provide prospective bidders the information they need to make bidding decisions,” Mr. Ray said. The court ruling gave interim approval for $150,000 of a debtor-in-possession loan of $500,000 to cover expenses related to continued staffing and marketing the property. The auction of the 112-acre campus in Jacksonville includes most of the facilities, including a library, chapel, administration building, classroom facilities, student center, doors, gymnasium and athletic fields. The 158-year-old college– the oldest junior college in the state– entered bankruptcy last summer. Mr. Karbelk said potential bidders for

the college include colleges, churches, denominations, school systems and others who might wish to use it as a conference center, corporate retreat or even mixed use development. “The potential uses are almost unlimited,” he said. Individuals seeking additional information about the auction may visit www.AmeriBid. com or call (877) 895-7077. AmeriBid is a global real estate auction firm specializing in the sale of commercial and residential real estate, land properties and other assets for lenders, servicers, receivers, bankruptcy attorneys, estates, private owners, investment companies and local, state and federal government agencies.

COMMISSIONERS continued from pg. 1A

is in the proofing process to be printed in the new year. Photos of the prison cemetery have been documented by members. A work project of cleaning headstones was completed in May by commission members and the public. Video and picture displays were offered to the public at the Tomato Fest in June. The new county calendar is on sale from the commission office for $5 each. Members serve as tour guides and speakers and do radio and television interviews on projects when asked. The commission is involved with work at Caddo Mounds State Historic Site. Sid Riley, human resource director, presented job description and grade determinations. Recommendations for the juvenile probation department employees were approved by commissioners. Approval of recommendations for employees at the public health department was postponed until after the first of the year. Mr. Riley said he wanted to discuss salaries in executive session and commissioners decided to postpone consid-

eration of all job description and grade determinations for that department until the executive session was held. A public hearing for setting the speed limit on CR 4910 at 35 miles per hour will be held at a meeting in January 2013. Commissioners approved a burn pit on CR 4716. Commissioners will meet briefly on Dec. 27 to authorize the payment of bills, payroll and transfer of funds. Commissioners voted to add several roads to the county road map. These county roads had been overlooked when the road map was created in July 2007. The roads added were CR 3224, CR 3306A, CR 3305A, CR 1905A, CR 1804A, CR 1804B, CR 3821 and CR 3161. Information concerning roads that had been listed incorrectly on the map was corrected. CR 3303A was listed twice on the county map. The road number was left for a portion of the road that connects with FM 747 and the other was changed to CR 3319 adjacent to CR 3303A. CR 3138 was added to the 911 map. CR 3915 was

removed from the 911 map because its address was not a county road. Information concerning CR 4117 will reflect where the Jacksonville city limits cease and the county road begins on the 911 map. The portion of CR 3215, which runs to FM 747, will be changed on the county map to CR 3214. No action was taken concerning CR 3329. Commissioners changed CR 3326 to CR 3332. CR 3438 was changed to reflect information on the 911 map. A portion of CR 3209 is not shown on the county map. That road will be added and named CR 3222. Commissioner Katherine Pinotti will present the length of the changed roads at a January meeting. The monthly report for the county auditor was approved. A plat for the Peters subdivision was approved. Attending the meeting were County Judge Chris Davis; Commissioners Kelly Traylor, Steven Norton, Pinotti and Byron Underwood; County Clerk Laverne Lusk; and Judy Johnson of the county auditor’s office.

JACKSONVILLE COUNCIL continued from pg. 1A

told that the restaurant will have between 70-75 people on the payroll,” Mr. McEwen said. “This is good for the city, both for jobs and economically. I’m very excited about the ruling.” City Manager Mo Raissi called the installation of the restaurant a “win/win situation.” “This gives Jacksonville more restaurants, more sales tax for the city and more options for our citizens,” Mr. Raissi said. “There’s a lot of growth throughout the city. Even though we’re in a recession, Jacksonville is doing a lot better than some other communities.” Mr. Raissi said work would begin soon to outfit the building with Applebee’s decor. “The building’s still in good shape; they just need to add their own touch from their restaurants to it,” he said. In other business, the council approved a request from Jacksonville Fire Chief Paul White to replace three driver positions

with the 11-year step program. Under the step program, firefighters would receive a pay raise after three, six, nine and 11 years with the department. Chief White said the change would not impact the operational budget. The three individuals who served as drivers were also paramedics and received payment at the top step of the program, since they had already been with the department for 11 years. Two of the drivers are still with the department. Two more firefighters are set to reach the top payment step. “We originally gave up the step program when we installed the driver positions, but we’ve basically been doing the step program since,” Chief White said. Chief White said he believed the step program would lead to more firefighters staying with the department. The council tabled a discus-

sion about a proposed contract agreement between the city and National Recovery Systems for debt collection through ETMC until next month. John Thomason and Sam Hopkins were reappointed to the Vanishing Texana Museum Board of Directors. Councilmembers approved the transfer of money from the utility fund to the utility fund capital projects fund. Finance director Freddy Thomas said the transfer would allow the city to accumulate a reserve to fund unexpected major utility repairs and capital projects without the use of debt financing. The council recognized Martin Swanson of Texas Basket Company, who has mowed and maintained upkeep on land around U.S. Highway 79. “He keeps our main thoroughfare into the city well-groomed, and I want to thank him,” said Councilman Billy MacDonald.

pensation payment. At that time he was represented by counsel, as this agreement was reached through a formal mediation process. The easement that he agreed to specifically permits the installation of a pipeline for oil and crude petroleum products - including the crude oil that will be transported through TransCanada’s pipeline. He is now seeking to void that legal agreement.” Mr. Howard said that Trans-

Canada has been open, honest and transparent with Mr. Bishop, and that TransCanada’s common carrier status has been affirmed in local and state appellate courts. Mr. Bishop said in the press conference that he signed the agreement under coercion and duress. He said that under Texas law, he is seeking to nullify the signed agreement based on his claim of fraud.

PIPELINE

continued from pg. 1A monitored by national media outlets including Bloomberg News, Los Angeles Times, USA Today, Politico and many local news sources, including the Cherokeean Herald. Mr. Bishop said he will continue to fight the pipeline. A statement issued by Shawn Howard of TransCanada said, “Just three weeks ago, Mr. Bishop signed an easement agreement with TransCanada and accepted a significant com-

Please Join Us For Our

Christmas

Open House Tuesday, December 18 9am - 3pm We will have plenty of food, refreshments and smiles!

NARNIA

continued from pg. 1A Narnia books by C. S. Lewis, the CCT production follows the adventures of the Pevensie children (played by Austin Sizemore, Jamie Becker, Jake LeGrone and Heather Duke) who have been uprooted from their home and family by the London Blitz. While staying at the gloomy country home of the mysterious Professor (Anthony Williams) they find a secret entrance to a snow-covered land inhabited by talking creatures, mythical monsters and ruled by the cruel White Witch (Kelly Sizemore). Inspired by the enigmatic lion hero, Aslan (Mark Becker), the Pevensies lead a battle to save

Narnia from the White Witch’s cold evil grasp and bring back a spring of hope and promise. Tickets for Narnia are on sale at the theater box office, which is open Monday - Friday from 2-5 p.m., as well as one hour before each performance. Online tickets are available 24 hours a day at www.cherokeetheatre.net. For more information, visit the box office at the historic Cherokee Theater, 157 West 5th Street, next to the Rusk Post Office, or call (903) 683-2131. Tickets are $9 for adults, $6 for students and all at-the-door tickets are $10. Group rates are available for this family favorite.

125 N. Main Street • Rusk • 903-683-2277 www.citizens1stbank.com


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

Protesters are out of bounds

Clearing misconceptions about Keystone XL

KENNETH WHITE

JOHN MAYO

Rusk

Nacogdoches

It’s to be expected that TransCanada spokespersons James Prescott and James Miller would run loose with the facts and engage in hyperbole; after all they are “spin doctors,” – it’s their job. But, it is disappointing when so many media outlets quote their inaccurate spin as if it were gospel. TransCanada and many in the fossil fuel industry continue to refer to the diluted bitumen being forced through their pipelines as “crude oil.” It is not crude oil. Actual crude oil is pumped from the ground as a lighter than water liquid and sent to refining. Tar sands bitumen is more akin to soft asphalt. Tar sands bitumen is mixed with highly toxic liquids and gasses forming diluted bitumen, to be forced through a pipeline at high pressure destined

for specially prepared refineries here in Texas. The “spin doctors” won’t tell you diluted bitumen is heavier than water, and the gasses included in this mix are heavier than air. When leaked, the toxic liquids will permeate river beds, sandy soils and faults and could permanently pollute our ground water, and the harmful gasses lie close to the ground and sicken humans as it does at the Kalamazoo River spill. This is why highly corrosive diluted bitumen is especially dangerous. It poses imminent danger from extraction in Canada, through our heartland, to the Gulf; especially at the Ogallala and Carrizo Wilcox aquifers, rivers and faults. Considering documented incidents of substandard workmanship and failures of the TransCanada XL I pipeline (online

2010: 14 leaks in the first year, 35-plus since, including a 400 barrel geyser), TransCanada bitumen pipelines represent unacceptable risks. Another repeated false claim that this “oil (will) reduce dependence on foreign product” flies in the face of reality. Know this – it is foreign product. It’s not a traded U.S. commodity. TransCanada sends their diluted bitumen direct to refining, and sells the refined product outside the U.S. That makes our homeland a cheap conduit for TransCanada’s profit machine. What do we get… unusable property, toxic pollution and increased global warming. Mr. Prescott, I say “that would be lunacy.” Mr. Mayo is part of the Landowners Rights Alliance.

Dec. 1 was a great day for a parade CONNIE PARSONS Rusk

Dec. 1 was a beautiful day to host the Rusk Chamber of Commerce Christmas Parade. I would like to thank the following for helping to make this year so successful: Lee Pearman, Bob Pearman, Paul Laney and Tim McRae for providing new vehicles from Pearman Motor Company, Bacon Autoplex and Bill McRae Ford. Thanks to chamber and city officials for helping pick up and return these vehicles: • Bacon – Chamber and City Officials: Bob Goldsberry, Mike Murray, Derrick Collier, Gary Epperson • Bill McRae – The Garden Club - Cissy Crysup, Wally Walker, Marcie Art and Dorothy Graham • Pearman - The Lions Club - Vic Wharford, Sam Mormino, Ann Brown, and Jan Hardy from Flowers n Things • Toyland Farms – Kay “Baby” Epperson • Steve Norton – County Commissioner • Rusk Fire Department – Mr. & Mrs. Santa Claus who came in from the North Pole for this event

• Houston White and Tara Hood with the Rotary Club of Rusk Dignitaries and clubs: Garden Club; Mayor Angela Raiborn; The Lions Club; 2012 Chamber President – Toni Meador; Brenda Dominy, Justice of the Peace, Pct 1; Craig D. Caldwell, county attorney; 2012 Grand Marshall - Mike & Cissy Crysup; City Treasurer Patsy Lassiter and County Clerk - Laverne Lusk, who rode together; Linda Little, Tax Assessor-Collector; Kelly Traylor Cty Commissioners; Jamarria Brooks, Fair on the Square queen; Elmer Beckworth, district attorney. Also, special thanks to the City of Rusk; James Campbell, Cherokee County Sheriff; Harry’s Building Materials; Lynn Kelly, Constable; Maydelle, Reklaw, Alto, New Summerfield and Rusk Fire Departments; New Birmingham Golf Club; New Summerfield Police Department; Rusk Chamber of Commerce; Jan Hardy, Jeannie Plyler and Thomas Parsons from the Keep Rusk Beautiful Committee; Rusk Police Depart-

ment; T’s Tumbling, Cheer and Dance; Charlie Glen and his 1934 Ford; Civic Theatre (Narnia); Leslie Birdwell; Linard Dowling wagon and horsemen; Miss Jacksonville Rodeo Association; Rusk Junior High and Rusk High School bands, cheerleaders and football players Many thanks to the three judges for stepping up and doing such a great job. The following floats that participated this year are listed in alphabetical order. Scores will be posted at the Chamber. Awana East Side Baptist Church; Boy Scout Troop 405; 2nd place, Branded by Christ Cowboy Church, Rusk; Cherokee Trails Rehab and Nursing Facility; Christ the Redeemer and walking unit; Cub Scout Pack 227; Cub Scout Pack 405; honorable mention, Eastex Fine Arts & Pioneer Spirit; Gallatin Missionary Baptist Church; Rusk Church of Christ; 1st place,

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Now-Dec.23rd The Polar Express™ Train Ride Departing the Palestine Depot Selected Times

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Solid Rock Baptist Church, Bull Train; The Arbors Rehab and Nursing Facility; 3rd place, Trail to Christ Cowboy Church, Jacksonville.

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday • 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Curtis Oliver - Pastor

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE. We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

C

hapman

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

5592 Hwy 110 N

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF GOOSENECK TRAILERS

FINANCING AVAILABLE ON ALL TRAILERS

Gooseneck 32’ 5 Bale hauler, 2-6000 # spring axles, 12 ply radial tires, 7 pin wiring, Red.

Gooseneck 32’ x 6’8”, 3-7000 # torsion axles, 3 cut gates, 1st cut gate dogproof & moveable @ 4’ & 8’, full escape door (driver side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, 7 pin wiring, rubber dock bumper.

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’, 2-7000 # torsion axles, 2 cut gates, 1st dogproof & moveable @ 4’ & 8’, 12 ply tires, full escape door (driver side), black canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, rubber dock bumper, 7 pin wiring.

$9,325

Gooseneck 20’ x 6’ 8”, 2 - 7000 # Torsion axles, 12 ply radial tires, 1 cut gate moveable @ 4’, 8’ & 12’ & dogproof, full escape door (pass. side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, rubber dock bumper, 7 pin wiring, black trailer.

$6,295

$12,995

Gooseneck 16’ x 6’ bumper pull, 2-6000 # spring axles, 12 ply radial tires, 2 5/16” bulldog coupler, full escape door (driver side), full metal top/front, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, dark shadow gray.

$6,095

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’8”, 2 - 7000 # Torsion axles, 12 ply radial tires, 2 cut gates, 1st moveable @ 4’ & 8’ & dogproof, full escape (pass. side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, 7 pin wiring, rubber dock bumper, black trailer.

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell (5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

protest. They were denied the right to protest on private property, which is accurate according to the law. Don’t these people have something better to do with their lives than to follow a pipeline around trying to stop the construction of it? Don’t they have a job to work at, or a school to attend? Is this part of the “Occupy Wall Street” crowd last year, that littered lower Manhatten with filth and garbage, urine and feces deposits in the open where pedestrians could view and smell this? I suggest these people make better use of their time by protesting Planned Parenthood and their abortion clinics. Maybe they might help stop the “slaughter of the innocents” being carried out everyday in clinics nationwide, much in part paid for with your tax dollars. Again, I want to compliment the Cherokee County Sheriff’s Department and Capt. John Raffield on a job well done.

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

$6,295

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

I’m puzzled as to why someone would chain themselves to some equipment on private property, and then some folks complain when the law enforcement officials resort to pepper spraying the individual(s) to safely remove these protestors from private property. The sheriff’s deputies gave the protestors of the Keystone Pipeline ample time to remove themselves from the equipment and private property so they could continue their protest off of the property as long as it was peaceful. However, these protestors refused to comply with a reasonable order and thus brought their own punishment on themselves by refusing to comply with reason. I fully support the way the law officers handled this. They were doing their lawful duties in my opinion. The ones who think the pepper spraying was too harsh should ask themselves which side of the law they are on. No one was denied the right to a peaceful

MOTOR COMPANY

HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmantrailersales.com

$9,850


2A

n

Cherokeean Herald

Wednesday, December 26, 2012

LETTERS POLICY

Letters must contain the writer’s name, address and zip, along with a daytime telephone number so we may contact you with clarification or confirmation. We will not print letters that contain incorrect

n

thecherokeean.com

information or allegations deemed libelous, nor will we publish form letters or copies intended for mass distribution to other publications. The shorter the letter, the better its chances for publication; we

reserve the right to edit letters for space. Deadline is 11 a.m. Friday. Send letters to: herald@mediactr.com, FAX to (903) 683-5104 or mail to P.O. Box 475, Rusk, Texas, 75785.

opinion

JACKSONVILLE

Final 2012 directors meeting shows successful year Staff still works 36 hour week even if consumers increase

BY MARIE WHITEHEAD PUBLISHER

The directors for Gateway Community Partners, Inc., sponsors of the sheltered workshop, heard reports Dec. 14 of a successful year. Directors held their final meeting of 2012 in the workshop on Loop 456 in Jacksonville. “Four months into this year and we are in a better financial position than I had forecast,” stated Executive Director Elton McCune. “We are also in a very favorable position as far as cash on hand is concerned. “Last year at the start of December, we had a cash balance in the operating account of $332,000. This year, we have $388,000 cash on hand.”

Directors approve staff bonuses at meeting His remarks preceded discussion of proposed bonuses. After reviewing Mr. McCune’s financial report, the directors voted to pay the same amount to the staff members as last year, plus an additional three percent. Mr. McCune prefaced discussion of their bonus amounts by saying, “Our staff is a wonderful group of dedicated and caring people. All day staff have been on a 36-hour work week for almost two years. And they

they have done a remarkable job; they have put in the extra efforts and they continue to make the program work. “Last year, you were very generous to the staff and me. You gave bonuses that were much more than any of us expected. “I promise you that the bonuses you gave were appreciated and needed.” President Jim Cromwell presided at the business meeting and welcomed board members Birda Parker, Bobby Coates, Jo Lee, Letha King, Connie Glenn, Tom Dunn, Marie Whitehead,

‘We are in a better financial position than I had forecast.’

ELTON MCCUNE

know this situation will not improve until September 2013 at best. “On top of this, we are serving more consumers than ever before. In spite of this,

Frank Waggoner, Billy Watson, Sammie Attaway, Mary Germany and Pete Smart. Also, board members were former Lufkin State School Superintendent Paul May-

berry, ACCESS Executive Director Ted Debbs and Kim Johnson of Todd Hamaker & Johnson LLP accounting firm in Lufkin; as well as staff members, Andrea Grimes, Jeanie Goree and Peggy Munsinger. Mrs. Johnson presented copies of her firm’s audit for the workshop saying, “We found your records to be in

exceptional shape. Mr. McCune and the staff are to be praised for their good work. “We found no recommendations for any changes to make.” Directors, officers and members were re-elected and approved by acclamation. Officers are Mr. Cromwell, president; DeWald Lake, vice-president; Mrs. White-

head, secretary and Mr. Waggoner, treasurer.

NEWS

Good Sam’s hours slated The Good Samaritan in Rusk is open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday and the first Saturday of the month. Hours are 9-11:30 a.m.

Most pipeline protestors from East Texas STEPHEN DASILVA Nacogdoches

Nacogdoches County Stop TarSands Oil Permanently – NacSTOP – is a grassroots, community-based group of concerned citizens from Nacogdoches County who have been actively protesting TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline. As such, we cannot begin to compete financially with a multi-billion-dollar corporation like TransCanada. They are able to run ads in numerous East Texas newspapers on a whim and not be stressed in the least to afford them. NacSTOP would love to be able to afford equal advertisement space, but we are not selling a

product such as Canadian tar sands, and do not have the financial backing of China, India, or any of their tar sands industry sponsors. We resent TransCanada’s portrayal of protestors of their for-profit, for-export pipeline as being from outside of East Texas. We have collected signatures of over 100 East Texas patriots who have the foresight and concern for all Americans to stand up to TransCanada’s propaganda and tar sands exploitation. Our “Open Letter to TransCanada” can be seen in its entirety online at www.nacstop.org. Thank you for your interest and your support.

No difference between bitumen and other crude oils DAVE NORTON Anchorage, Alaska

For those who believe that oil sands crude is somehow more corrosive than other crudes, and is therefore reason to oppose the KeystoneXL project, here is the answer from ASTM International, the key international testing organization for steel properties. Tests performed by ASTM International have determined that bitumen-derived crude oil is no more corrosive in transmission pipelines than other crudes. ASTM published these findings in its Guide G205, measuring the corrosivity of a variety crude oils under pipeline conditions. The findings were based on research conducted by several organizations, including the CANMET Laboratories of Natural Resources Canada

(NRC). NRC says the low corrosivity of all crude oils – including bitumen-derived crude in transmission pipelines regulated by the Canadian National Energy Board – comes from removing the bulk of corrosive (water) and erosive (mud, sand) constituents upstream of the pipelines. Current requirements mandate basic sediment and water content of less than 0.5 percent by volume for transport in transmission pipelines regardless of the crude’s source. NRC also points out that crude oils, including bitumenderived crudes, contain little or no carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide. Transmission pipelines’ operation at below 140 degrees Fahrenheit also prevents formation of naphthenic acid and

sulfur compounds that can cause corrosion under refinery conditions (greater than 400 degrees Fahrenheit), NRC also noted. Pipelines carrying bitumenderived crude oil operate at roughly the same pressure levels as pipelines carrying other crude oils. NRC described Guide G205, which details test methods allowing direct comparison of the corrosivity of crude oils from various sources, as a step toward creating an industrywide standard test to measure the corrosivity of different crude oils under pipeline conditions. Mr. Norton is an engineer for Hawk Consultants, LLC.

Loans or CDs Check our rates 1st:

903-683-2277

Dec. 26-29 The Polar Express™ Train Ride

Departing the Palestine Depot Selected Times

Citizens 1st BANK

Member F.D.I.C.

Can’t swallow pills? Medicine taste bad? Kids think it’s really bad stuff?

WE TAKE THE “YUCK” OUT OF MEDICINE. We can compound your medication into a liquid to make it easier to swallow. Pick your favorite flavor and let us do the rest! Chapman Pharmacy compounding flavors: Cherry, Bubble Gum, Raspberry, Tutti Fruiti, Strawberry & Grape

C

Sunday • 10 a.m. Worship Service Thursday ��� 6:30 p.m. Bible Study Curtis Oliver - Pastor

Pharmacy

903-683-2422 or 1-800-657-1873

5592 Hwy 110 N

We are a Participating Medicare Provider!

FINANCING AVAILABLE ON ALL TRAILERS

Gooseneck 32’ 5 Bale hauler, 2-6000 # spring axles, 12 ply radial tires, 7 pin wiring, Red.

Gooseneck 32’ x 6’8”, 3-7000 # torsion axles, 3 cut gates, 1st cut gate dogproof & moveable @ 4’ & 8’, full escape door (driver side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, 7 pin wiring, rubber dock bumper.

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’, 2-7000 # torsion axles, 2 cut gates, 1st dogproof & moveable @ 4’ & 8’, 12 ply tires, full escape door (driver side), black canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, rubber dock bumper, 7 pin wiring.

$9,325

Gooseneck 20’ x 6’ 8”, 2 - 7000 # Torsion axles, 12 ply radial tires, 1 cut gate moveable @ 4’, 8’ & 12’ & dogproof, full escape door (pass. side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, rubber dock bumper, 7 pin wiring, black trailer.

$6,295

$12,995

Gooseneck 16’ x 6’ bumper pull, 2-6000 # spring axles, 12 ply radial tires, 2 5/16” bulldog coupler, full escape door (driver side), full metal top/front, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, dark shadow gray.

$6,095

Gooseneck 24’ x 6’8”, 2 - 7000 # Torsion axles, 12 ply radial tires, 2 cut gates, 1st moveable @ 4’ & 8’ & dogproof, full escape (pass. side), gray canvas, 4 - 1” x 3” tube sides, 7 pin wiring, rubber dock bumper, black trailer.

(936) 867-5533, home or (936) 675-3205, cell (5 miles from 84 & 110 in Rusk)

108 E. 5th St. • Rusk 903-683-2422

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF GOOSENECK TRAILERS

$6,295

Branded by Christ Cowboy Church

hapman

MOTOR COMPANY

HWY. 69 IN ALTO, TEXAS • 936-858-4188 www.pearmantrailersales.com

$9,850


Coverage of TransCanada Keystone XL pipeline