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(402) 342-31 78

WORLD-HERALD MORNIhTG DAILY OMAHA, NE Circulation = 192075

I MIDLANDS VOICES

I A rural remedv: natural amenities BY TRACI BRUCKNER The writer is assistant policy director at the Centerfor Rural Affairs, based in Lyons, Neb. =

If rural communities are to toration efforts to reach their have a future, wemust rethink full potential. When communitraditional economic develop- ties see environmental restora- : ment in search of new ap- tion as a force for positive : proaches. change in their communities, One promising new strategy they can embrace it as an opporis to use access to open, natural tunity rather than see it as a space as an economic engine, threat. It gives them a stake in , drawing residents, dollars and theprocess. businesses. This potential exThrough the Cooperative ' 1 s t only ~ if we etXage our rural Conservation Partnerships Inicommunities in environmental tiative, which is administered , restoration efforts. by the Natural Resources ConThe 2008 farm bill contains a servation Service (NRCS), state 1 provision - the Cooperative conservationists will have the Conservation Partnerships Ini- opportunity to seek out projects tiative - that could provide that combine environmental landowners and communities restoration and rural developthe incentives m e n t objecto work in an One promising - new tives. areawide strategy is to use Under such partnership to direction, rural , support envi- access to open, communities , r o n m e n t a l naturalspaceas a c r o s s Nerestoration. braska and the This would a n eco.n-ic country could provide the engine, drawing work collabomeans to join residents, dollars ratively with conservation their regional Resource Cona n d r u r a 1 and businesses. community servation and Development councils to put todevelopment efforts. The potential is great. The gether a proposal that would inrural communities in the na- tegrate environmental restoration's midsection that have con- tion and rural community sistently grown in recent dec- development. The proposal ades are largely those with could pull together multiple environmental amenities - partners for a project, such as primarily lakes and mountains. wildlife, rural development, But in the future, access to un- tourism and farm-based orgacrowded, restored natural nizations and agencies. space will become as valuable Through such a project, the and important as lakes and partners could agree to work tomountains. gether with local farmers and Communities that provide ranchers to restore a native access to restored, natural prairie (such as mentioned space are more attractive above) to increase wildlife habiplaces to live, work or start a tat and water quality, provide business. Imagine living in a ru- public access and create plenty r a l Nebraska community of opportunities for community where just minutes outside members and others to enjoy your back door is a walking, the great outdoors. hiking and bicycling trail runThe concept behind the Coopning through a restored native prairie or wetland, where you erative Conservation Partnercan find multiple species of ship Initiative is to allow for much-needed flexibility in how birds, fishand wildlife. Those amenities could be federal conservation programs marketed by a community to are used to better fit unique, lodraw in families to buy homes, cal circumstances in addrespopulate schools and start busi- sing environmental restora- n e s s e n h e y will creaKfie 60- tion. It is designed to support tential for tourism-related those efforts where folks want businesses by providing oppor- to work together to have a tunities for hunting, horseback broader impact than on individriding and wildlife viewing, for ual farms orranches. The NRCS released the reexample. And when we combine that with support for quest for proposals on March small-scale entrepreneurship, 11. Let's make the most of this it fosters the creation of good- opportunity by encouraging quality jobs through self-em- our NRCS to seek out projects ployment. that ' combine environmental Community support is im- restoration and rural developportant for environmental res- ment objectives. '

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U BREEZE THvRSDAY WEEKLY WAUNETA, NE Circulation = 1050

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March REAP office houri in McCook announced Dena Beck, central and southwest Nebraska Business Specialist with the CenterJor Rural Affairs' Rural Enterprise Assistance Project will hold office hours in McCook on March 17th. Hours will be 10a.m. until 2:45 p.m. McCook Economic Development Corp. (MEDC) will handle the appointments;(308) 345-1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Norris Avenue, Suite 200. The Center for Rural Affairs' Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) and its services are available to rural communities across Nebraska. REAP offers technical assistance, educational and networking opportunities,

and a loan program for small businesses. REAP is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer employees, self-employed full-time, part-time, home-based, farm-based, start-up, and storefront businesses. REAP has six regionally based Business Specialists across Nebraska. These Business Specialists can get involved in assisting entrepreneurs at various stages of their business progress. MEDC is pleased to partner with REAP in order to offer an expanded list of services to businesses of all sizes.

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BURT CO. PLAINDEALER WEDNESDAY WEEKLY TEKAMAH, NE Circulation= 1588

0311 112009

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On The Crow

by Patty Plugge

We are now three months into 2009, which certainly doesn't seem possible. This organization officially began in September of 2005. With only an office space, we literally started from the ground up. But with the direction of a great board of directors and the help of our economic development partners (NPPD, Black Hills Energy, DED), we are making great strides. Unfortunately, nothing hqppens quite as fast as we would like. Sometimes we need to take a quick look back to remember just how far we have come and what we have accomplished. We hit the ground running in 2005 with four ethanol prospects within the first two months. Our organization spent a large amount of time gathering information, both on our ethanol site and on the prospects. While the ethanol plant didn't mitterialize, we learned a great deal from the process. We are still marketing the industrial site between Oakland and Lyons, as well as a seven-acre site in Tekamah. With options signed on both sites, we can market these sites as premium industrial sites with the State Department of Economic Development. We assisted Feeney Manufacturing in locating its operations into Nebraska. The expansion included purchasing and renovating a building in Tekamah. REISA Construction also expanded into Tekamah when it purchased a building on the grounds of the Tekamah Airport. These two projects contributed 18 Rew-jobsto 'Burt~CGriiy,with plans for-more'we; have also answered seven formal requests for information from businesses looking to expand, as well as counseled a large number of small or start-up businesses. We must continually work to keep information and statistics updated for businesses looking for new sites or building needs. We now have a Burt County Facts Book, both in hard copy and online. Along with this, we launched a new county website in 2008: www.burtcoedc.com. This wehsite includes not only business information, but tourism and relocation information. Tourism is an area that we are promoting for the county. A new county visitor's guide will be published in April of this year. It will be distributed throughout the county at locations thal visitors frequent. Also, it will be available at visitors centers along the interstate and at the new Corps of Discovery Welcome Center in South Yankton. Each visitor we can attract brings their dollars to spend in Burt County. We started a County Business Visitation Program, which involves the board and various partners calling on our existing primary industries. We have visited 15 businesses two separate times, arid will continue bi-yearly visits. This program helps us understand the needs, challenges and trends facing the various county industries. We have sponsored an entrepreneur class called REAP, for Rural Affairs., We p a r t n c ~ d>w$h _..-_.-along ~ 1 %the--Center .... then1 again recently on a Business Exit Seminar'held on March -.s 3. Plans are for a leadership program to begin this year. Part of - our mission is to provide educational services to county businesses. Whew, I guess we are getting things done. Economic development is a test of patience. We must continue our efforts to i~nprovethe economic health of our county through inevitable changes faced each year. '

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UNIVERSAL^ Information Servrces. In (402) 342-31 78

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NEWS

WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CREIGHTON, NE Circulation = 1310

TER for RAL AFFAIRS Values. Worth. Action.

'Choosing Change For Health Care' By John Crabtree, johnc@cfra.org, Centerfor Rural Affairs lf the Obama White House and Congress hope to fulfill their promises to reform the health care system for all Americans, they must address the fundamental health caresequities that have arisen in rural America. In particular, they should address the physical plant and technology needs of rural health care facilities, provide adequate resources to cover unserved or underserved rural areas, and fix insurance problems that cause financial stress for rural families and rural health care providers alike. Rural America's financially stressed health care system is an expression of public policy choices. Medicare and Medicaid provide about 60 percent of rural hospital revenues. But Medicaid and Medicare reimbursement rates remain generally below actual cost of services provided. These policy choices were made by people - presidents, governors, senators, representatives ... and the people in those positions can choose a different path. Moreover, by many estimates, nearly half of the under-insured are facing collection or legal action over medical debts, increasing financial stress for rural families and rural health care providers. All of these issues conspire against rural America's web of small hospitals, clinics and nursing homes, bringing many close to the brink of closure. Thin financial margins also prevent rural facilities from making crucial investments in technology and physical plant upgrades. Changing these circumstances is essential if the promise of health care reform is to be fulfilled. For more information, visit http://www.cfra.org. The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as an unafJiliated nonproft corporation under IRS code 501(c)3.The Center for Rural AfSairs was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and rural communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities.

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THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

OIJ~of Crisis Comes Great Things By Elisha Greeley Smith, elishas@cf?a.org, Center for Rural Affairs With times of economic crisis come great opportunities for entrepreneurs, if we are willing to invest in microenterprise development. A recent Center for Rural Affairs' report found that investing in entrepreneurial development paid big dividends during the last recent recession (2000-.

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2003), and continuing such investment could help Nebraska weather tnis current economic recessjon. Employment in Nebraska attributable to microenterprises (businesses with 5 or fewer employees) actually grew by nearly five percent while all other private, nonfarm employment fell by nearly one percent during that last recession. According to the report, Econolni_c Outcomes of State lnvestment l n - t k Nebraska Microenterprise Develop-mentAct, a $1.5 million annual appropriation to the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act would potentially result in 184 to 198 microenterprise businesses created or expanded with assistance from the program, creation of 294 to 317 jobs across the statc, - creation of $5.6miilion to-$8.6 million in additional income in Ncbraska households (business owners and employees), creation of over $1.1 million in household asset growth in its first year, economic outcomes in Nebraska of over $6 million to nearly $10.5 million in one year, and potential economic outcomes in Nebraska of $25 million to $41 million after five years. The Governor's budget recornmendation released in January 2009 recommended cutting funds for the Act. Nebraska Legislators should not turn their backs on rural main streets at the precise time when investing in entrepreneurial development can help revitalize rural communities and reinvigorate Nebraska's economy. For a full copy of the report: ht~:Nw~~.cfra~or~./nodeI1759.

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--DeuelopmentCrucialto Economic Recovery

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Center for Rural Affairs' Report - Highlights Benefits of Microenter-

prise Development to Nebraska Economy 1,YONS - A Center for Rural Affairs report released today finds that investment in microenterprise and en- trepreneurial development paid big dividends during the last recession, and continued investment in microenter-' prise development would help Nebraska weather the current economic recession. During the last recession (2000-2003), employment in Nebraska attributable to microenterprises (small businesses with 5 or fewer employees) actually grew by nearly five percent

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while all other private, non-fann employment fell by near!y one percent. "We are again in a period of recession. It is a critical time to invest in job creation and econonlic recovery by supporting microenterprise development," said Jon Bailey, Rural Research and Analysis Director for the Center for Rural Affairs. According to the Center's report, entitled Economic Outcomes of State Investment in the Nebraska Microen- -.terprise ~ e v e l o ~ m e Act, n t a g.5 mil- ' lion annual appropriation to the Nebraska ~icroenterprise Development Act would potentially result in: 184 to 198 microenterprise businesses created or expanded with assistance from the program, creation of 294 to 3 17jobs across the state, creation of $5.6 million to $8.6 million in additional income in Nebraska households (business owners and employees), creation of over $ 1.1 million in household asset growth in its first year,

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million in one year. The report also finds that a $1.5 million one year investment in the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act would result in potential economic outcomes in Nebraska of $25 million to $41 million after five years. "Microenterprise development is especially critical in light of the deepening recession. Investing in initiatives such as the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act has great to spur innovation and job creation in rural communities and urban neighborhoods alike," said Bailey. In the 2007 session of the Nebraska Legislature, funding for the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act was increased significantly to $1.5 million annually in the biennium budget for the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 fiscal years. This funding contained an annual general fund appropriation of $500,000 and a newly created cash fund of $1 million per year. In the 2009 session, the Legislature is tasked with developing a new state budget for the next biennium. The Governor's budget recommendation released in Januarv 2009 recommended maintaining the general fund appropriation, but recommended terminating the annual cash fund appropriation. "The Governor's proposed disproportionate cuts to Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act funding are ill-advised. Nebraska legislators should not turn their backs on rural main streets, especially at the precise time we should be investing in entrepreneurial'devel'opment and other proven strategies that 'can help revitalize rural communities and reinvigorate Nebraska's economy," added Bailey. The report employed previously published research and data to examine the potential economic outcomes of maintaining the $1.5 million annual appropriation for the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act, including the potential job creation and effects on income and assets for business owners for one year and five year periods. For more information about the rcport or to obtain a full copy of the report go to http://www.cfra.org/r1ode/l759 or call (402) 687-2 100.

MONITOR TT-J~SDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD,

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STAR-MAIL THURSDAY WEEKLY MADISON, NE Circulation = 1 I l l

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Center for Rural Affairs9r e p o ~ highlights microenterprises

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A Center for Rural Affaiis report re- such as the Nebraska Microenterprise leased last week finds that investment Development Act has great potential in microenterprise and entrepreneurial to spur innovation and job creation in development paid big dividends dur- rural communities and urban neighboring the last recessjon, and continued hoods alike," said Bailey. investment in microenterprise develIn the 2007 Nebraska Legislature, opnlent would help Nebraska weather funding for the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act was increased the current economic recession. During the last recession (20CX)-03), to $1.5 million annually in the bienemployment in Nebraska attributable nium budget for the 2007-08 and 2008to microenterprises (small businesses 09 fiscal years. This funding contained with five or fewer employees) actually an annual general fund appropriation grew by nearly five percent while all of $500,000 and a newly created cash other private,. non-farm employment fund of $1 million per year. In the 2009 session. the Legislature fell by nearly one percent. "We are again in a period of reces- is tasked with developing a new state sion. It is a critical timc to invest in budget for the next biennium. The job creation and economic recovery by governor's budget recommendation resupporting microenterprise develop- leased in January recommended tnainment," said Jon Bailey, Rural Research taining the general fund appropriation, and Analysis Director for the Center but recommended terminating the annual cash fund appropriation. for Rural Affairs. According to the Center's report, :entitled "Economic Outcomes of State lnvestment In the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act," a $1.5 + million annual appropriation to the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act would potentially result in: 184 to 198 microenterprise businesses created or expanded with assistance from the program; . Creation of 294 to 317jobs across the state; Creation of $5.6 million to $8.6 million in additional income in Nebraska households (business owners and employees); Creation of more than $ 1.1 million in household asset growth in its first year; Economic outcomes in Nebraska of over $6 million to nearly $10.5 million in one year. The report also finds that a $1.5 million one-year investment in the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act would result in potential economic outcomes in Nebraska of $25 million to $41 million after five years. "Microenterprise development is especially critical in light of the deepening recession. Investing in initiatives

"The governor's pl-oposcc! disproportionate cuts to Nebr-iiviia h4ic1-Genterprisc Development Act funding are ill-advised. Neblaska Legislators should not turn their backs on rural mainstreets, especially at thc precise - time we should be investing in erltreprenenrial deielopment and other proven strategies that can help revital- _ize rural conununities and reinvigorate Nebraska's econoniy," added Bailey. The report employed previorlsly published research and data to examine the potential economic outconles of maintaining the $1.5 n~illionannual appropriation for the Nebraslia Microenterprise Developnnent Act. including the potentialjob creation and effects on income and assets for business owners for one year and five year periods. For more information about the report call (402) 687-2 100.


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lnformat~onServ~ces,Inc-Y (402) 342-31 78

CITIZEN EVENING DAILY HOLDREGE, NE Circulation = 2993

30 entrepreneurs get business goal advice ' V

PK Partnership's Inventors and

Entrepreneurs lib considered "Will My Idea Work for Me?" at the monthly meeting on March I6 at the Minden Fire Hall. Some 30 entref5eneurs attended. Dena Beck of.the Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) ,and Sharon Hueftle of South Central Economic Developine~lt District (SCEDD) talked about how important blending personal goals with business goals is in planning for the success of a small business. They said entrepreneurs must consider iifestyle, professional and financial criteria, then decide how well the personal vision matches up against the business opportunity. "lt's not worth it if (the business) leaves your personal life out of whack." said Hueftle. REAP offers assistance with developing new businesses and has a loan program to help with financing. SCEDD is a consortium of 12 niral Nebraska counties who work to improve economic conditions in the region by fostering business, housing and community projects. The I & E Club is a group where innovators, investors, inventers and entrepreneurs meet to network with members, make connections with people who can help thcrn, and learn about important topics. Meetings are held the third Monday of the month at 6:00 pm and include social time, an educational presentation, and networking time. The next niccting is scheduled for April 20 at Supcr 8 in Holdrege. Market Research and Target Marketing are the scheduled topics with Pam

Sorcide of the Holdreee Publlc Library and Phil Soreide oflOne Good Adguy slatcd to speak. L& E is sponsored by South C'cnf i a l Fcononiic Devcl-op~nentDistrict (SCEDD), Rural E n t e ~ 6 s eAssis: tance Project (REAP) and PK Partnership of Phclps a i d Kcarney Cot111ties. For more information, go to www.scedd.~~s undcr Traini~ig.


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Entrepreneurial * Development Crucial Cenfer for Rural Afjizirs' Report ~ X h l i ~ h Betgelits ts qf Microenterprise Development to Nebrcrska -Economy

A Center for Rural Affairs report released today finds that investment in microenterprise and entrepreneurial development paid big dividends during the last recession, and continued investment in microenterprise development would help Nebraska weather the current economic recession. During the last recession (2000-2003). employment in Nebraska attiibutable to microenterprises (small businesses with 5 or fewer employees) actually grew by nearly five percent while all other private, non-farm employment fell hy nearly one percent. "We are again in a period of recession. It is a critical time to invest in job creation and economic recovery by supporting microerrterprise development." said Jon Bailey, Rural Research and Analysis Director for the Center for Rural Affairs. According to the Center's report, entitled Economic Outcomes of State Investment In the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act, a $1.5 million annual appropriation to the Nebraska Microenterprise Developnlent Act would potentially result in: 184 to 198 microenterprise businesses created or expanded with assistance from the program, creation of 294 to 3 17 jobs across the state, creation of $5.6 million to $8.6 million in additional income in (business Nebraska ho~~seholds owners and employees), creation of over $ 1.1 million in household asset growth in its first year, economic outcomes in Nebraska of over $ 6 million to nearly $10.5 million in one year. The report also finds that a $1.5 million one year investment in the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act would result in potential economic outcomes in Nebraska of $25 million to $41 million after five years. "Microenterprise development is especially critical in light of the deepening recession. Investing in initiatives such as the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act -- has great potential to spur innovation and job creation in rural communities and urban neighborhoods alike," said Bailey. In the 2007 session of the Nebraska Legislature, funding for the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act was increased significantly to $1.5 million annually in the biennium budget for the 20072008 and 2008-2009 fiscal years. This funding contained an annual general find appropriation of $500,000 and a newly created cash fund of $1 rnillion per year. In the 2009 session, the Legislature is tasked with developing a new state budget for the next biennium. The Governor's budget recommendation released in January 2009 recommended maintaining the general fund appropriation, but recommended terminating the annual cash fund appropriation. "The Governor's proposed disproportionate cuts to Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act funding are ill-advised. Nebraska Legislators shouid not turn their backs on rural mainstreets, especially at the precise time we should

be investing in entrepreneurial developn~entand other proven strategies that can help revitalize rural communities and reinvigorate Nebraska's economy," added Bailey. The report employed previously publisher1 rtsearch and data to examine thc pclential economic outcomes of maintaining the $1.5 million annual appropriation for the Nebraska Microenterprise Developme!lt Act, including the potential job creation and effects on income and assets for businesb owners for one year and five year periods. For more information about the report or to oblain a full copy of the report go to ~ : i l w w w . c f r a . o r ~ n o d1759 e ~ or call (402) 687-2100.

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NEWS THURSDAY WEEKLY ORCHARD, NE Circulabon= 654

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WEDNESDAY WEEKLY UNDOLPH, NE Clrculabon= 944

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( Dierks resurrects ban on corporate farms -

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BY BARBBUREACH who would otherwise engage in NORTHEAST NEB.NEWSSTAFF day-to-day labor and manageLINCOLN -- Despite the failure ment, but are prevented from of a simflar bill last year, and the performing these duties because opposition of a couple of large farm of physical or mental impairment organizations, Dist. No. 40 Sen. that substantially limits major life Cap Dierks continues to champion activities," he said. the srrlall family farm by introducLB593 goes beyond I300 by ing a rir..;ls?ire(LB593)that would allowing five or fewer unrelated ban corporate ownership of farms individual farmers or ranchers to and ranches i n Nebraska before join together to form afarm entity. The only stipulation is that all of the Agriculture Conmiittee. Dierks described the purpose the farmers and ranchers must provide day-to-day labor and manof the legislation. "LB593 is a bill to honor the agement. There is no requiremenf 1982 vote of the people for Initia- a s to where they work on a farm tive 300 which they placed in the or ranch. "1-300 withstood many legal Nebraska Constitution," said Dierks. "Nebraskavoters supported challenges during the 25 years it the concepts found in Initiative was in effect," said Dierks. 300 which restricted non-family Three county residents testified farm corporations from acquiring, regarding LB593. or otherwise obtainingan interest, "1hadbeen afarmer full-time all whether legal, beneficial or 0th- ofmy life until being elected county e~wise,in any title to real estate commissioner," said Frederick used for farming or ranching in Pinkelman of Wynot. "We need this state, or engaging in farming LB593 to level the playing field, so or ranching." younger people can compete and "LB593 was drafted by incor- get involved in farming." Scott Kinkaid of Hartington porating the original concepts of 1-300with adjustments made from wants the ability to incorpor ate his recent court decisions that raised farm, if profitable. "It means a lot questions regarding violations to me to be able to make a buck of the commerce clause and the or profit if I want," he said. Americans with Disabilities Act," "We need the legislation to supDierks said. "Farmers and ranch- port the family farm," said Rodney ers from other states may join a Flaugh of Hartington. "We already farm or ranch entity in Nebraska give corporations huge tax incenas long a s they provide day-to-day tives, not available to the small labor and day-to-daymanagement farmer. Chuck Hassebrouck, director of where they are located. Also, consideratiorl is given for people the Center for Rural Affairs, made ----." .-.. .- .*.

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three points about the bill: " 1)The bill puts no restrictions on any individual; "21 The family-operated farm is the best form of farm and ranch for agriculture; and "3) The bill simply restricts who may have limited liability. When incorporated, liability may be shifted to a neighbor, while the corporation walks away," said Hassebrouck. John Hansen, president of the Nebraska Farmers Union. said that it would be preferable to have the provision in the State Constitution rather than a s a state statute, "so we don't backslide if the Legislature should repeal or change it in the future." Mark McHargue, of the Farm Bureau, said, "The measure supports family-owned farms, but restricts how farmers can meet the challenges of the industry." Brandon Hunnicutt, of the Nebraska Corngrowers Association said, "Children of farmers often don't have the resources to take over the family farm operation, s o they must sell or lease the farm and move to where they can make more money, taking population and revenue from rural communities," said Hunnicutt. "LB593 makes it easier for beginning farmers to stay on the farm and compete." "The bill would help restore Nebraska as we know it and restore our heritage," said Clint Holmdorf of Rising City.

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(402) 342-31 78

ADVOCATE THURSDAY WEEKLY L A W L , NE Circulation = 855

0311 212009

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BYBARBBURSACH who would otherwise engage in NORTHEAST NEB.NEWSSTAFF day-to-day labor and manageLINCOLN -Despite the failure ment. but are prevented from of a similar bill last year, and the performing these duties because opposition of a couple of large farm of physical or mental impairment organizations, Dist:No. 40 Sen. that substantially limits major life Cap Dierks continues to champion activities," he said. LB593 goes beyond I300 by the small family farm by introducing a measure (LB593)that would allowing five or fewer unrelated ban corporate ownership of farms individual farmers or ranchers to and ranches in Nebraska before join together to form a farm entity. The only stipulation is that all of the Agriculture Committee. Dierks described the purpose the farmers and ranchers must provide day-to-daylabor and manof the legislation. "LB593 is a bill to honor the agement. There is no requirement 1982 vote of the people for Initia- a s to where they work on a farm tive 300 which they placed in the or ranch. "1-300 withstood many legal Nebraska Constitution." said Dierks. "Nebraska voters supported challenges during the 25 years it the concepts found in Initiative was in effect," said Dierks. 300 which restricted non-family Three county residents testified farmcorporations from acquiring, regarding LB593. or otherwise obtainingan interest, "I had been afarnler full-time all whether legal, beneficial or 0th- ofmy life untilbeingelectedcounty envisc, in any title to real estate commissioner," said Frederick used for farming or ranching in Pinkelman of Wynot. "We need this state, or engaging in farming -= LB59.3 to level the playuigfield, so + younger people can compete aiid or ranching." "LB593 was drafted by incor- get involved in farming." Scott Kinkaid of Hartington porating the original concepts of 1-300with adjustments made from wants the ability to incorporate his recent court decisions that raised farm, if profitable. "It means a lot questions regarding violations to me to be able to make a buck of the commerce clause and the or profit if I want," he said. "We need the legislation to supAmericans with Disabilities Act," Dierks said. "Farmers and ranch- port the family farm,"said Rodney ers from other states may join a Flaugh of Hartington. "We already farm or ranch entity in Nebraska give corporations huge tax incenas long as they provide day-to-day tives, not available to the small labor and day-to-daymanagement farmer. Chuck Hassebrouck, director of where they are located. Also, consideration is given for people the Center for Rural Affairs, made

three points about the bill: "1)The bill puts no restrictions on any individual; "2)The fanlily-operated farm is the best form of farm and ranch for agriculture; and -31 The simply restricts who may have limited liability. When incorporated, liability may be shifted to a neighbor, while the corporation walks away," said Hassebrouck. John Hansen, president of the Nebraska Farmers Union, said that it would be preferable to have the provision in the State Constitution rather than a s a state statute, "so we don't backslide if the Legislature should repeal or change it in the future." Mark McHargue, of the Farm Bureau, said, "The measure supports family-owned farms, but restricts how farmers can meet the challenges of the industry." Brandon Hunnicutt, of the Nebraska Corngrowers Association 6. said, "Children of farmers often don't have the resources to take over the family farm operation, s o they must sell or lease the farm and move to where they can make more money, taking population a d revenue from rural communities," said Hunnicutt. "LB593 makes it easier for beginning farmers to stay on the farm and compete." "The bill would help restore Nebraska a s we know it and restore our heritage," said Clint Holrndorf of Rising City.

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THURSDAY LYONS, NE

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-2%i'th times of economic According to the report, crisis come great opportunities Economic Outcomes of State Invest for entrepreneurs,if we are willing to invest in merit In microenterprise develthe Neopment. bras ka A recent Center for Micro Rural Affairs' report ente rfound that investing prise Develin entrepreneurial development paid big opment Act, a dividends during ' the $ 1 . 5 last recent recession (2000-2003)' and million continuing such ina n nu a 1 vestment could help approNebraska weather this BY Elisha Greeley Smith priation Media and Outreach t o the current economic recession. Employment Nebrasin Nebraska attributable to ka Microenterprise Developmicroenterprises (businesses ment Act would potentially with 5 or fewer employees) result in 184 to 198 microenactually grew by nearly five terprise businesses created or percent while all other private, expanded with assistancefrom non-fann employment fell by the program, creation of 294 nearly one percent during that to 317 jobs across the state, last recession. creation of $5.6 million to $8.6

million in additional income in Nebraska households (business owners and employees), creation of over $1.1 million in household asset growth in its first year, economic outcomes in Nebraska of over $6 million to nearly $10.5 million in one year, and potential economic outcomes in Nebraska of $25 million to $41 million after fiveyears. The Governor's budget recommendation released in January 2009 recommended cutting funds for the Act. Nebraska Legislatorsshould not turn their backs on rural main streets at the precise time when investing in entrepreneurial development can help revitalize rural communities and reinvigorate Nebraska's economy. For a full copy of the report: http://www.cfra.org/ nodel1759.

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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

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Cieiuhton and Bloomlieldlocations of - Small Business Wetwork Jlteetings New Project Links Rural Small Businesses to Larger Urban Businesses LYONS - The Center for Rural Affairs in partnership with the Northeast Nebraska Economic Development District will hold several Small Business Network meetings. The first will take place in Creighton on Wednesday, March 11, 11:OO - 1:00 p.m. (lunch provided) at Drovers, 408 Rice Street. The second will be held in Bloomfield on Tuesday, March 24, 11:OO - 1:00 p.m. (lunch provided), at the Cornmunity center, 101 S Broadway St. The meetings will discuss a new project that ties rural small businesses to larger urban businesses. The project intends to identify larger urban businesses that have needs for goods and services that could possibly be "rural sourced" to a network of small rural businesses. This is an opportunity to enhance existing businesses or create new businesses. At the meetings Center for Rural Affairs staff will share information about the project and ask for input on - how to make the idea work better. Community leaders, economic developers andlor potential small business owners are all invited to attend. Stephanie Fritz, Center for Rural Affairs said, "This is an exciting opportunity to potentially expand your existing business or to jump start a business plan you have been putting together. This is the time to update your database and do some networking to enhance vour business." For more information contact Kathie Starkweather at kathies@cfra.org or (402) 438-8496.

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the grant program, how to apply and tips for complcting the application. The sessions will include discussion with input from attendees on ideas for value added projects.

Value Added Producer Grant Program meeting

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An informational meeting on the Value Added Producer Grant Program is Monday, March 23, at Auburn. It is from 6:30-8 p.m. at the library, 1810 Courthouse Avenue, 402-274-4023. Officials of The Center for Rural Affairs, in partnership with USDA Rural Development, will hosting the information meeting. Joan Scheel, USIIA Rural Development business program specialist, will present information on the purpose of

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to the Susie McEntire Luchsinger Matthew Dockhorn might have Hospice Concert in Broken Bow. been present if Doyle hadn't told Sunday dinner guests at Vivian's . him on Friday night that he was fixwere Eric Ritz and Dorrie Carson ing oatmeal the next morning. That wi& probably a nice change for the and her two boys from Ainsworth. Just a reminder: this Saturday guys. When they do the cold cereal evening. Mar. 2 1. is Family Game thing. I'll know they understand the Night at Wescott Baptist. All are KlSS principle. welcome. Bring your favorite board On Saturday it was to be expectgame and finger food. Maybe you ed t h ~ Ron t and Lindn Schweitzer should tuck in some earplugs in would have to take a bike ride. They case the younger set decide to play also had to go shopping in Kearney Pit. to replace a dead vacuum cleaner On Thursday Karen Smith had a and take grandson. Dallas Fuestman birthday party at her home in QrQ his birthday gift and an ice cream for Milly Roth. Helping celebrate cake. Dallas turned 1I on Mar. 10. the ?birthday were Bill Roth, Elmer On Sunday they were dinner guests Kruml and Gene Ferguson. Vivian at Rick and Luella Leach's in Ritz visited Milly that day and Eric Arcadia. Other family members and Zoe Ritz visited one evening'. present were Larry and Connie Although it was a belated celebra- Schweitzer of Ord and Jerry tion as Amy Roth's Lirthday was on Schweitzer and son, Michael of March 5, Milly did the observance Broken Bow. up big time with a full house for the It did not help my nervousness dinner. Present were Ginger and e a t we picked up Barb Gibbons' Ginnifir Hawk. Dan Hardesty. letter as we were headed for Shawn and Lara Lyons and girls JMMMH on Tuesday and the scope Matti and Sam. Karen Smith, Bill. thing. It was another informative Bob, and Tom Roth. Taylor and Zoe piece of literature on the sadism of Ritz and Dale and Pam Thompson. ceitain practitioneis. (Does it ever Kathleen Nennemann returned make you nervous that doctors and home very late Saturday night from lawyers "practice" their profession? a four-day vacation in Colorado And I hope Dr. Cronk does not read Springs. CO. On the way home, she this.) I think Barb knew I needed missed the Sterling exit and had to another laugh. On Thursday afterreturn to Comstock via of noon, Kelsey Bredthauer, Kylie Cheyenne, which added two hours Dean and Kourtney Ogle were at the to the journey. But she had a great gallery to begin paintings for entry time, so maybe that makes up for in the upcoming competition. We the loss of sleep. have one more week to get them finPat Coyan and Mike Cosentina. ished, but they have a good start. We both of Omaha, were dinner guests missed Jon Landrigan. On Friday it was a toss-up where to spend the evening. We did want to go to the Hospice Concert but opted for picking up seed corn, a meal out at the Downey Well appreciation surf and turf meal in Merna, and the Listening Session for Center &l Rural Affairs. There was a good at Calvin. and Rae lean .Treptow's cTwd from-all over this part of on Saturday and Sunday. They were Nebraska at LB Custom Chrome here helping Randy Treptow. and Detail in Broken Bow. The Twenty guys showed up for owner, Lany Harbour, was recipient Men's Breakfast on Saturday morning. Vernon Babcock of Broken of the 2009 Nebraska Entrepreneur Bow was the speaker. Doyle Dowse of the Year award from CFRA. On Saturday some of the m i t e and Bryce Ritz cooked.

The Comstock Lode Sue Oiler -Dowse How's this for a full week? On Tuesday evening Glenn and Marilou Dockhorn were in Ord for Trotters customer appreciation dinner at the Vets Club. Glenn took advantage of being in Ord to visit , Rea Fern Fauss, Eleanor Dowse and Don Coleman at Valley View Living Center. On Saturday at noon the joint birthdays of Glenn and Julie Tatman were celebrated at Dockhorn's. Glenn had already had his and Julie's is coming up, but Saturday fit their schedules best. Glenn and Julie joined forces to blow out all the candles, but didn't get them all. Think that has something to do with someone's numerous years. Present were Matthew of Burwell. Jonathan of Columbus, as welt as the hostess and honorees. On Saturday night Glenn and Marilou headed for North Platte and joined Marilou's siblings and their spouses and others for a surprise shivaree for David and Lisa Fauss, held at the Chinese Buffet there. Back in the hills from whence I came, newlyweds had to provide treats for those doing the very noisy shivarees-usually candy bars. David and Lisa lucked out. Present were Dennis and Honey Lou Fauss of Burwell. Nicole Giest of Ord, Don and Diane Atkinson of Lyons, Dwain and Maxine Fowler of Beaver City and Sharon Olson of Beaver City. On Sunday Marilou attended visitation for Kenneth Peetz at Scotia and had supper at Valley View Living Center with Rea Fern Fauss. There was a breath-taking sunrise this morning, a foretaste of a warm day. I'm hoping the ice at the pond melts as Don Edwards promised he would go fishing if it did. Ro.~'s fried fish have been sorely missed of late and I'm hoping he catches a mess. (That's a WV

expression.) On Wednesday Rosa went to Grand Island to get granddaughter, Hannah Workman who was on spring break and needed Grandma to make a skirt for her dance recital. Before Rosa took her back to Grand Island on Saturday, she had to bake some bread. Minnk Pearl is missing Hannah something fierce. Grandma Terri ~voboda and mom, Jennifer Svoboda had an outing to Omaha. They left these pans on Friday night and spent Saturday doing some fun things with Weston and Wryder. They toured the Children's Museum to see the presidential travel exhibit, then went to Old Town Market and had a carriage ride on the river walk. They returned home late Sunday. Weston' is a very busy little guy, what with 4-H projects and Chess club. On Tuesday Gary and Jo Wells went to Pleasanton to watch Nick Gabriel in the speech meet. On Thursday Jo took Tanner Chilewski to the dentist in Kearney. On Saturday they took all five grandkids to Bartlett for a concert by Susie McEntire Luchsinger, then stopped at the rodeo in Ord to see if anyone could stay on Janies Ritz's bull. That hasn't happened yet. They got home really late, so all spent the night at Grandpa and Grandma's and went to church on Sunday morning. (Vivian Ritz reported that if Ted and Joy Erikson. Taylor and Zoe Ritz, and Doyle and I had been present. we'd have had one hundred in church, not bad for a not-a-special-holiday morning. Having kids home from college also helped swell the congregation.) On Sunday afternoon Gary and Jo went to Megan Gabriel's volley ball game in Arcadia. Did you check out that wedding picture of John and Barb Gibbons in Custer County Chief? They've' been married fifty years! I'm waiting to get all the details of the celebration

Universal Information Services, Inc. http://news.universaI-info.com Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

and I hope it wasn't sharing a bottle of Geritol. LeAnn Dowse. Wilma Nagorski and Rosmarie Ritz were Mission Circle hostesses on Wednesday evening, which was a hearth wanning for new people to Comstock. two of which were unable to be there. (Stina Huskie and Terry Kusant; Julie Tatrnan was there to receive a wall piece from the circle.) There was a full house with Deb Ritz, Julie Tatman, Jo Wells, Sue Schauda, Leona Anderson, Marilou Dockhorn. Linda Schweitzer, Rosa Edwards, Hannah Workman. Terry Drake, Vivian Ritz, Twila Lenstrom. Ramona Kirby and the hostesses present. Ramona Kirby and I vied for the door prize. The green candle now graces Ramona's house. Marilou Dockhorn reported that the ladies salad luncheon will be on Apr. 4 at noon in Fellowship Hall. "I Am The Light of the World" is the theme. Julie Tatman reported that the "Worthy" cantata will be the centerpiece of the Good Friday service at Wescott Baptist on Apr. 10. It will be presented at the Sargent Church of Christ on Maundy Thursday. On the evening of Mar. 8, Charlotte Kamarad was a visitor at Dorothy and Sandy Granger's. Bill Granger visited there on Thursday afternoon and Josh Granger was a dinner guest on Sunday. Gayle and Twila Lenstrom were in Kearney on Friday for a doctor's appointment for Gayle. Candi Kirwan is in North Platte' all this week until Friday, attending city clerk schooling. Meanwhile. Will is trying to match, or top, her cooking for the girls. Alana and Jamie begin track season this coming Friday. Vivian Ritz hosted Bridge at her house on Thursday. Jean Marsh, Ramona Kirby and Pauline Hansen from Sargent played. On Friday night, Lane Kirby went with Vivian Page:

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Universal Information Services , Inc. http://news.universaI-info.com Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Afairs Recipient: John Crabtree

junior members were at the gallery for a painting session, also getting ready for the Mar. 26 entry of pieces for the 1st Comstock ArtIPhoto Competition. It was an all-day thing (or felt like. it) for Amanda Shepperd, Emily Kusant, and Morgan Ritz. If you don't think art isn't important. know that Morgan passed up going horse riding in Norfolk with her mom to be present. Put Saturday evening. Mar. 28, on your calendar so you won't miss the open house and artist's reception for the competition. It will be fun. Vissi d'Arte is still looking for entries for the show and the awards are worthy of trying. Entry day is 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Thurs., Mar. 26, or by prearrangement with me on Friday. We have very few rules re.. originality or date of execution. except pieces must be framed and wire hangers used. No limit on entries. The professional judge for the competition is Dora Hagge of Hastings, who has a long list of art credentials and awards as qualifiers. This competition is something quite new for Comstock and I hope that ynu'll stop by to SPP i t k f o r e it .is dismantled on Apr. 24.

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