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UNIVtIRSAL

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STAR-MAIL THURSDAY WEEKLY MADISON, N l i

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Survey to assess needs Iof rural sma I businesses mZ

The Kuml E':ritc.rpriseAssistance Project, a p:ug,ral?t of tllc: Center for Rural Affairs, i s circu:aling a stntewide small bu,inrss necds assessment

The survey, which takcs about 10 minutes to comple:~,is for snlall business oL\,ncis, lencicrs and service providers. Pcople arc asked LO cornplete the survey by Milrch 10. "'l'ht small business clirnatc in Neraska is coris~antlycl~ariging.Mectg the needs of startup and existing mall businesses is extremely impornt to all organizations and entities at provide snnall business services," aid Jeff Reynolds, REAP program

director. '"The Center for Rural Affairs REAPprograni will be using the results of this 'necds' based survey to help shape future programming and to best serve the critical needs of today's entrepreneurs." REAP is Nebraska's largest microenterprise program and is committed to meeting the nrcds of startup and existing entrepreneurs in rural Nebraska. REAPpruvi'des lending, loan packaging, trainirrg, networking, and technical assistance opportunities for startup and existing sn~allbusinesses. For more infortnation about REAP and its services or to access the survey, visit www.cfra.org/reap. i

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UNIVERSAL

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REPUBLICAN THURSDAY 'IVEEKLY IMPERIAL, NE Circulation= 2080

02/07/2008

Seminar addresses sma 1 business development A

About 30 people attended a meeting concerning the transition of business ownership Tuesday night in Imperial. "Planning for Business Success" was sponsored : locally by banks in the area, BW "elcom and Farm Credit Services of America in Imperial. A presentation on the Rural Enterprise Assistance Project, or REAP, was the main focus of the evening. Sponsored by the Center for Rural Affairs, REAP consists of the elements of networking, business management training, credit and technical assistance. As representatives of businesses from Grant, Wauneta,Imperial and Benkelman listened, Tara Hosick of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development explained that when a Business Expansion and Recruitment survey was made in Chase and Perkins Counties recently, the main concern was the transition of ownership of businesses. She said the concern was not just for the critical needs of the business, but also for the aging population in small communities. "What do you do about a business before you just close it?" she questioned, so that a community doesn't lose that business. Randy Raile of BW Telcom of Benkelman said his family's fourth generation business is a case in point. In 1989 his parents, the owners of BW Telcom at the time, were killed in an auto accident. There was no plan of succession in place, and not much estate planning. Although he was able to take over operations, Raile said that under other circumstances, "the people you might want to sell to might not have the same morals and values." Small business is the 1 character of little communities,he noted. ! Sometimes it's better to have a business successor from within the community "Fin.4 >anindividual, and &each _*_-

them how to run the business," he urged. How do you retain those individuals? Raile said a good pension plan and split-dollar life insurance to ensure longevity are the answer. He also suggested a business evaluation for the true value every 10 years or so for IRS records, life insurance gn the key business person to pay down taxes, and "last to die" insurance, for the health of the business concerned. pana Beck of the Center for Rural Affairs explained REAP'S "Harvesting the Entrepreneurizl Venture" to the group. Business succession is important, she stated, because one third of business owners in the United States are over the age of 55. According to the Small Business Administration, the primary cause for business failure is lack of planning. At some point, every business owner leaves their business, she noted, whether voluntarily or otherwise. Over two thirds of owners expect their business to remain in the family, while only 35 percent survive to the second generation.. Business owners also think there is plenty of time to make a written stk-ategic plan. Beck said an advisory team can aide in a business succession plan. Team members may be an attorney, accountant, lender and financial planner and/or business consultant. The team and business owner wiU assess the current health of the business, identify priorities, set time frames and communicate with each other. Beck said the place to start is by updating the business plan, networking with other businesses, and identifying candidates as potential business transfers. She also said that besides the team of advisors, a business owner might want to reach out to successors such as young adults and alumni from the community Another plan is to involve youth in the communitx to make them .aware pf business-... opportunities. " b.5 ,Ffi... "*L

Dana Beck of the Center for Rural Affairs presented a power point display on creating a plan of succession for businesses. A plan keeps the business open and growing in small towns, she stated. (Republican photo)

The evening was organized by the Chase-PerkinsCounties Hometown Competitiveness Program, in partnership with the Imperial, Perkins County and Wauneta Chambers of Commerce. The project is funded in part by a grant from the Nebraska Department of Economic Development administered by the Nebraska

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Rural Development Commission. Leslie Carlholm, Economic Development Director for the City of Imperial, said representatives of the Creighton University School of Law will be in the area Feb. 11 to talk with business owners interested in creating a plan of succession. She may be contacted at the city offices '. =. for more infor~ation. &'

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CHIEF IVEDNESDAY WEEKLY RED CLOUD, NE Circulabon = 1610

02/06/2008

A call of entrepreneurship

I Karen Kunkle had I .worked as a substitute ' teacher, but wanted a

career she could be excited about. She answered the call of entrepreneurship after an unsuccessful search for soirle fresh produce. What started out as a craving for a fresh tomato, ended up as Lil' Ladybug Gardens & Greenhouse. Karen knew there was a customer base for local produce and Community Supported Agriculture. 1 All she needed was training and some money to h v e s t in her idea. Karen initially con- Rural tacted the Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP), a

microenterprise development program of the Center for Rural Affairs that works with startup and existing small businesses in Nebraska. She attended 'Business Plan Basics' training beforc she opened Lil' Ladybug. T h e n in February

2007 she attended the first Marketplace Conference i n Kearney. There Karen learned to keep good records for I her business, networked I with other entrepre- neurs and service providers, and acquired new customers. -


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TRIBUNE-SENTINEL THURSDAY WEEKLY GRANT, NE Circulation = 1738

02/07/2008

cbusinessdevelopment If!

tion in small communities. "What do you do about a busiThe Imperial Republican ness before you just close it?" she About 30people attended a meet- questioned, so that a community ing concerning the transition of doesn't lose that business. Randy Raile of BW Telcom of business ownershipTuesday night Benkelman said hisfamily'sfourth in Imperial. "Planningfor Business Success" generation business is a case in was sponsored locally by banks in point. In 1989his parents, the owners of the area, BW Telcom and Farm Credit Services of America in Im- BW Telcom at the time, were killed in an auto accident. There was no perial. A presentation on the Rural En- plan of succession in place, and not terprise Assistance Project, or much estate planning. Althoughhewas able to takeover REAP, was the main focus of the operations, Raile said that under evening. Sponsored by the Center for Ru- other circumstances, "the people ral Affairs, REAP consists of the you might want to sell to might not elements of networking, business have the same morals and values." management training, credit and Small business is the character of little communities, he noted. Whnical assistance. As representative6 cf businesses ' "Sometimes it's better to have a withirl the froM Graiif, Wauneta,f m@l'fa1 and ~!d;usirlesssuccessorfio~n Benkelman listened, Tara Hosick community. "Find an individual and teach oftheNebraska Department of Economic Development explained that them how to run the business," he when a Business Expansion and urged. How do you retain those indiRecruitment survey was made in Chase and Perkins Counties re- viduals? Raile said a good pension cently, the main concern was the plan and split-dollar life insurance transition of ownership of busi- to ensure longevity are the answer. FIc also suggested a business nesses. She said the concern was not just evaluation for the true value every for the critical needs of the busi- 10 years or so for IRS records, life ness, but also for the aging popula- insurance on the key business per-

By Carolyn Lee

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son to pay down taxes, and "last to die" insurance, for the healthofthe business concerned. Dana Beck of the Center for Rur a l w a i r s explained REAP'S"Harvesting the Entrepreneurial Venture" to the group. Business succession is important, she stated, because one third of business owners in theunited Statesareoverthe age of 55. According to the Small Business Administration,the primary cause for business failure is lack of planning. At some point, every business owner leaves their business, she noted, whether voluntarily or otherwise. Over two thirds of owners expect their business toremain in thefamily, whileonly 35percent surviveto the second generation. R t T s i r , a owners &so tHihk there is plenty of time to make a written strategic plan. Beck said an advisory team can aide in a business succession plan. Team members may be an attorney, accountant, lender and financial planner and/or business consultant. The team and business owner willassess the current healthofthe business, identify priorities, set time frames and communicate

with each other. Beck said the place to start is by updating the business plan, networking with other businesses, and identifying candidates as potential business transfers. She also said that besides the team of advisors, a business owner might want to reach out to successors such as young adults and alumni from the community. Another plan is to involve youth in the community, to make them aware of business opportunities. The evening was organized by the Chase-Perkins Counties Hometown Competitiveness Program, in partnership with the Imperial, Perkins County and Wauneta Chambers of Commerce. The project is funded in part by a grant from the Nebraska Depar!.ment of Economic-rievefopinent administered by the Nebraska Rural Development Commission. Leslie Carlholm, Economic Development Director for the City of Imperial, said representatives of the Creighton University School of Law will be in the area Feb. 11 to talk with business owners interested in creating a plan of succession. She may be contacted at the city offices for more information.

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UNIVERSAL

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TIMES THURSDAY WEEKLY PENDER, NE

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Circulation = 1338

02/07/2008

Center wants to know all aboutpro-small businessesP-' The Rural Enterprise Assis- mented Jeff Reynolds, mitted to meeting the needs of REAP

r Rural Affairs' ill be using the

sting small businesses is exmely important to all organiions and entities that provide all business services," corn-

startup and existing entrepreneurs in rural Nebraska. It provides lending, loan packaging,

www.cfra.org/reap . The Center for Rilral Affairs was established in 1973 a s a n .,' unaffiliated nonprofit corporation. Now located in Lyons, it was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and . . m r a l communities.

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DAILY NEWS EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation= 17282

0211512008

strategies -.

Speclal to the Daily News

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SOUTH SIOUX CITY - The

t - scheduled for

ful local development include entre~reneurshin.housship, creativity and innovative youth involvement. Presentations will be made by representatives from several communities in the Davis three slates, including Hartington, Verdigre, Wayne and Butler County in Nebraska. Also represented will be Alta, castaim, Moville, Osceola ! unty and Sioux City in Iowa 1 and Centerville, Corsica, Eure- I ka, Parker, Plankinton, Tyndall, Vermillion, Volga and Yankton in South Dakota. "The conling together of many communities of like size and with similar issues, and within networkable distances, is the greatest value to me for attending this conference," said Sharon Schamber, development c,oordinator in Freeman. S.D. "Most of us can relate to some or all of the topics discussed in the break-out sessions. And the ideas shared and successes celebrated keep the rest of us plugging on with fresh objectives." Communities are encouraged to bring three or more representhtives to the conference . so one person can be at each of the three sessions that will run concurrently. During the afternoon program, Aaron Davis of Lincoln will present "Teamwork - Great Teams Don't Have Benchwarmers!" A member of the 1994 National Championship Nebraska football team, Davis is known as "The Enthusiator" because of his contagious enthusiasm to equip others to perform like champions. The planning committee for the Midstates conference includ~-:iUniversity of Nebraska 1,incdil-Extension;USDARural Development of Nebraska; and the Nebraska Loess Hills RC&D and Center for Rural . Affairs, based in Oakland and Lyons, respectively. Registration, including lunch, -is$35 before March 10 and $45 " after that date. ***

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Want t o know more? Contact Dewey Teel, University of Nebraska-l-incoln Extension educator in Neligh, a t 887-5414. On the Web, go t o antelope.unl.edu/midstates conference.htrn -

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UNIVERSAL

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STANDARD THURSDAY

WEEKLY

HUMBOLDT,NE Circulation= 1176

02/14/2008

peach A Young Entrepreneur "hey Will Eat For A Lifetime

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munities of Albion and erton apply for a BuildEntrepreneurial Comities Act (BECA) grant. of BECA is to economically disrural areas of acity to build and sustain

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many youth indicate that they would like to own their own business. Recently in the news was the story of 17 year old Nick : Graham from Truman, MN (population 1,259). Graham I bought the town's only grocery store which had !I recently closed. He is successfully running and managing the store while still I attending high school. Gra- harri is now 2 hero for saving the town's only grocery store and providing Truman citizens the luxury to shop at home. There are most likely many "Nick Grahams" in our communities -- imagine f what it would be like to empower them to assume leadership roles. E Marketplace and BECA are helping arm the Nick Grahams of Nebraska with 1 the essential tools to do just ' that. j For more information visit: :

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Success.

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Entrepreneurship is a strategy to reverse depopulation in rural communities. a strategy that has the capacity to attract and retain young people to rural www,cfila.ord.m_ar_ket.~l~a~.eL , bm _ m u n i t i.e s-. -When ~. asked, --..c.-.L.L b ~ ~ : - .. ~ .~ .- - . 24 - -

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UNIVERSAL

Information Services. Inc

STANDARD THURSDAY

WEEKLY

HUMBOLDT,NE Circulation = 1176

0211412008

# WBRASKA, THURSDAY,FEBRUARY 14, 2008

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~bmmunitiesEmpower Entrepreneurs Through Marketplace Small business drives job growth and economic development in rural areas. Several rural Nebraska communities have been proactive in assisting their small businesses and entreMy hometown of Imperial offered scholarships to attend Marketplace to any individual in the area who either owns or is considerstarting a business. The olarship covers the cost registration, fuel, hotel n and Fullerton are Building Entrepreeurial Communities Act ECA) funds to send stunts to Marketplace to outh retention in

ding someone the ance to attend Markete is both an opportufor the individual and investment in the comnity. When the particit returns from the conence they will have ned extra knowledge and tools needed to improve start their business suc--

cessfully. g Entrepreneurial and small $ business development serves rural people and rural com- * munities better than indus- \ trial business recruitment [ because in most rural com- r munities small businesses create most of the jobs, up , to 70% in some rural areas. 1 More towns should fol- ; low in the footsteps of Imperial, Albion e d B Fullerton and invest in \ their future by offering scholarships to their entrepreneurs and youth to attend Marketplace. Marketplace: Opening Doors to Success will be held in Columbus, Nebraska at the New World Inn on Wednesday, February 27, _ 2008. It will offer teach-ins focusing on financing, marketing, community capacity, innovative agricultural opportunities, small business development and public policy. Early bird registration ends January 27th. Register www.cfr-a20rd-marketat &acdLo-nx . -


UNIVERSAL

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CHIEFTAIN THURSDAY WEEKLY TECUMSEH, NE Circulation= 1824

02/07/2008

Letter to the Editor - Dear Tecumseh Chieftain: "

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If I was to say what was hitting and making more poor people in the world I would wonder if it wasn't huge corporations! It isn't fair in what they often sometimes do- for example, to hear what the Center for Rural Affairs says Smithfield Farms is trying to win control over all swine operations - from production, processing, to the end point (the consumer). Smithfieldnow has 1,227,000 sows. With the confinement stink, disease potential and non-supportofthe local businesses, , communities don't like the huge concerns in their neighborhoods. Jobs in the communities are diminished - people aren't proud of their communities any more! I have read where huge corporations like Cargill have corporate farms in other countries; I bet the tiny, small, dispossessed farmers in those countries are in greater poverty than before. With the coming of the somewhat small ethanol

plants (especially in Nebraska) and if it works out, I bet people, subconsciously at least, are afraid of the huge corporations taking over all the ethanol concern. I would say surely some corporations are better than others, concerned with more than the financial bottom line. Some huge corpora- 1 tions are needed perhaps like in the I auto manufacturing industry; it all depends on how they treat other ' people! As I gather, most new jobs come from small business. This is something we should react to! I I was proud and glad when Dr., Mr., Coach Tom Osborne in his bid for the Governorship said that he would not take contributions from corporations! It is good to visit with you about the dangers that are present in this" world. Please consider the little' that I can do. Sincerely,, Norman Leuenberger 1 Tecumseh, NE

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UNIVERSAL Informatic n Services. I nc (402) 3 12-3178

MIRROR-SUN THLrRSDAY WEEKLY LYONS,NE Circulation = 735

02/07/:!008

,IArming Nebraska's youth By Elisha Greeley Smith elishasOcfra.org

This year the Center for Rural Affairs helped the communities of Albion and Fullerton apply for a Building, Entrepreneurial Communities Act (BECA) grant. The purpose of BECA is to support economically distressed rural areas of Nebraska through grants that will create community capacity to build and sustain programs to generate and retain wealth in the community and region. These two communities will use the BECA grants to send students, teachers, andcommunity leaders to Marketplace: Opening Doors to Success. The conference offers educational, and varied hands-on programs designed for entrepreneurs of all caliber. Entrepreneurship is a strategy to reverse depopulation in rural communities, a strategy that has the capacity to attract arid retain young people to rural communities. When asked, many youth indicate that they would like to own their own business.

Elisha Greeley Smith Recently in the news was the story of 17 year old Nick Graham from Truman, MN (population 1,259). Graham bought the towns' only grocery store which had recently closed. He is successfully running and managing the store while still attending high school. Graham is now a hero for saving the town's only grocery store and providing Truman citizens the luxury to shop at home. There are most likely many "Nick Grahams" in our communities -- imagine what it would be like to empower them to assume leadership roles. Marketplace and BECA are helping arm the Nick Grahams of Nebraska with the essential tools to do just thal. For more information visit: www.cfra.org/marketplace/ home


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NlVtIRSAL

lnformatic n Services. Inc

ST-4R-MAIL THURSDAY Li7EEKLY MADISON, N13 Circulation= 111

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Small business conference i :will be held in Columbus p --." 0

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For the second year in a row, the Center for Rural Affairs will host --"Marketplace: Opening Doors to Success," which will focus on building jobs and the rural economy from within. The conference will be held on Wednesday, Feb. 27, at the New World Inn in Columbus. This year, along with similar sessions from last year, the conference will feature several sessions in Spanish, including topics such as marketing strategies, business star[-up, using the Internet as a marketing tool, and bookkeeping. "Marketplace Hispanic Track is an effort to bring resources and support to Hispanic business owners which play an important role in Nebraska's economic development," said Adriana Dungan, Center for Rural Affairs, REAP business specialist and Hispanic Business Center director. Facilitating the sessions will be ~ u n g ~ ~Freytez ~ ~ nwith ~ the e lMexican-American Commission, Daniel Padilla with Pinnacle Bank, and public accountant Javier Arizrnendi. Freytez will present a session on

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i e-business strategies. "The session will provide assistance in developing and maintaining a bilingual website I that will strongly reflect the image and purpose of the e-business," Freytez said. Marketplace will feature booths filled with successful small business men and women, service providers, and other conference sponsors. The conference offers training, networking. and professional development for startup and existing small businesses, service providers. rural comn~unities and family farmers and ranchers. Registration is available at www. cfra.org/marketplace/horn.

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NIVERSAL Information servicesTc

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blONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOhfFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

02/07/2008

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Entre~~reneurs Through Marketplace By Ellsha Grecley Smlth, ~shas@cfraorg. Center for Rural fairs Small buaness drlves job growth and economlc development In rural , areas Several rural Nebraska commu- 1 nities have been proactive in assisting their small businesses and entrepreneurs. My hometown of Imperial offered scholarships to attend Marketplace to 1 any individual in the area who either owns or is considering starting a business. The scholarship covers the cost of registration, fuel, hotel and mcals. Albion and Fullerton are using Building Entrepreneurial Communities 1 Act (BECA) funds to send students to :A Marketplace to help with youth reten2 tion in their communities. Providing someone the chance to at$a tend Marketplace is both an opportu$ nity for the individual and an invest- I $; ,, ment in the community. When the partlcipant returns from the conference $ they will have gamed extra knowledge and the tools needed to improve or start rk their business successfully. fi Entrepreneurial and small business development serves rural people and, rural communities better than industrial = !busings recruitmenr because in most : ,. rural communities small businesses ! create most of the jobs, up to 70% in p some rural areas. Mol-e towns should follow in the 7 f

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otstcps of Imperial, Albion and Fullerton and invest in their future by offer% ; . ;.$- lng scholarships to their entrepreneurs and youth to attend MarketPlace. MarketPlace: Opening Doors to I.$$ Success will be held in Colu~nbus, $Nebraska at the New World Inn on ~ e d n e s d a February ~, 27, 2008. It will .%,offer teach-ins focusing on financing, marketing, community capacity, inno$$vative agricultural opportunities. small @business development and public pol#. !*-icy. Several sessions will be taught in Spanish. Early bird registration ends January 27th. Register at 3 www.cfra.org/n~arketplace/homc. 'I'he Center for Rurd Affairs was established in 1973 as an unaffiliated nonprofit corporation under IRS code " 501(c)3. The Center for Rural Affairs was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and rural communities. and we work to ., strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communi- ,,,&.* ~.$ l '. e s . +.

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CFRA March 05, 2008 REAP  

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