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NEBRiSIC4 FARhIER hfONTHLY

LINCOLN, NE Clrculatmn = 36513

02/00/2009

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www.NebraskaFarmer.com - February 2009

Newswatch

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February 10: NebraskaNo-Till Conference, UNL 11: Nebraska No-Till conference, Ag Agricultural Research and Development Center, Holdrege. Call 402-624-8030. Center, Mead. Call 402-624-8030. 13-14: Healthy Farms/Rural Advan10-11: 2009 Nebraska Beef Feedlot tage Conference, hosted by the Nebraska Roundtable: 10, Lifelong Learning Sustainable Agriculture Society and UNL Center, Norfolk; 11, Holiday Inn Express, Extension, Midtown Holiday Inn, Grand Lexington; 12, Prairie Winds Community Island. Call 402-639-2760 or visit www. Center, Bridgeport. Call 308-632-1397. nebsusag.org.

17-22: Annual Nebraska Cattlemen's 14-15: Horsin' Around Conference, RB Warren Arena, Animal Science Complex, Classic, Buffalo County Fairgrounds, University of Nebraska-Lincoln East Kearney. Call 308-237-7592 or 308-6276385. Campus. Call 402-472-641 1. 17-18: Nebraska Dairy Convention, 16-18: Nebraska Aviation Trades Association annual convention, Midtown New World Inn, hosted by the Nebraska Holiday Inn, Grand Island. Call 402-475- State Dairy Association, Columbus. Call 402-592-3355 or go to www.nebraska NATA. rnilk.org.

IS: Integrated Weed Management Workshop, East Union, University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Call 402-472-1 730 or e-mail Cathy Dickinson at cdickinson2Q urt/.edufor more information. Register at estore.adec.edu. ----

18-24: C o r n h s k e r ~ c o n o m i c gManagement and Outlook Conferences: 18, Buffalo County Extgension office, Kearney; 19, Grey Goose Lodge, Ogallala; 20. Panhandle Research and Extension Center, Scottsbluff; 23, Kimmel Education and Research Center, Nebraska City; 24, Dusters Restaurant, Columbus. For details, go to www.agecon.unl.edu/ resource/cernoc.hfrnl. 24-25: Central Plains Irrigation Conference, City Limits Convention Center, Colby, Kan. Call 785-462-7574. 25: Marketplace: Opening Doors t o Success, sponsored by the Lyonsbased Center for Rural Affairs, Sandhills Convention Center, North Platte. Call 402-687-2 103. 25-26: Nebraska Pork Industry Day, Cornhusker Marriott, Lincoln. Call 888627-7675. 25-26: Nebraska Poultry Industries annual convention, New World Inn & Conference Center, Columbus. Call 402472-2051. 26-27: Nebraska Women in Agriculture Conference, Holiday Inn, Kearney. Go t o wia.unl.edu/prograrns/conference.htrn1 for the program agenda.

March 4: Nebraska Soybean and Feed Grains Profitability Project On-F+rm Research Update, UNL Agricufiural Research and Extension Center, Mead. Call 402-6248030. 45: Governor's Ag Conference, Holiday Inn, Kearney. Call 800-8310550 o r 402-471-6856 or go to www.agr. ne.goo. 57: Nebraska Winery and Grape Growers Forum and Trade Show, Holiday Inn, Kearney. Call 402-472-8747 or 402472-5136.

April 2-3: "Ethanol 2009: Emerging Issues Forum," Magnolia Hotel, Omaha. Call 402-471-2941 or go t o www.neeffranol. org/forurn2009.

June 1419: 2009 Nebraska Water Tour of California Water Projects. Call 308-2373168.

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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

01/22/2009

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Center for Rural Affairs

Res~ondsto Gouer~ior's

Budget k..- Small Business and Rural Devel*.

opment Takes a Hit - Today the Center for Rural Affairs sharply criticized Governor Heineman's proposed budget. The Governor's budget slashes funding by two-thirds for both the Microenterprise Partnership Fund, ,,. Nebraska's small business and micro"enterprise devclopnient program, and :< the Building Entrepreneurial Commu,; .:' nities Act, thc state's rural community devclopinent grant program. "We understand the need for tightening bclts in difficult times. But we don't understand singling out small busiriess and rural development for disproportionate cuts at precisely the time we should be investing in proven strategies to reinvigorate the economy and revitalize rural con~munities,"said Chuck Hassebrook, Executive Director of the Center for Rural Affairs. In this time of economic downturn thcrc is no better way to invest our lii;litcd state dollai-sthan prograins that look towards thc future and build a niorc robust and resilient economy in our sniall towns. Nc1,raska Senators made a wise choice in 2007 when they doubled funding for the Building Entrepreneurial Cornmunitics Act to $500,000. With demand increasing for the @rog~atn,-a growing need and-demonstrated success, Nebraska senators-. should continue support for this program at least $500,000 annually. Microentcrprises and small businesscs are a rr~ajorpart of' Nebraska's economy. And in a time of economic Ilnrtiships, it is a wise investment to. provide opportunity and economic -growth to businesses that create new jobs and innovation in rural cornmuni= LYONS

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In 2007, Nebraska Senators wisely

dedicated $1.5 million to support the Nebraska Microenterprise Developrncnt Act. They should maintain the samc level of funding for the program even in these tight cconolnic times. "The Governor's proposed budget maintains funding for the Nebraska Value Added Agriculture Program at - $850,000 We applaud that move," stated Hasscbrook I? -

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MONITOR THURSDAY WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation = 1405

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-rTake Advantage of Early Bird Registration - Limited Registrations

"Entrepreneurship and small businesses are a major part of Nebraska's economy and especially important during times of economic hardships," said Chuck Hassebrook, executive director of the Center for Rural Affairs. "Marketplace is for those committed to creating their own opportunities and shaping their own destiny through entrepreneurship. It offcrs a space to share ideas and learn from each other."

Marketplace educational tracks in-

preneurs with ideas for start-up businesses, established businesses, agricultural businesses, and youth businesses will find topics of interest. There will also be sessions covering ideas for entrepreneurial communitics, and practical rural policy perspectives. Thrce pre-conference sessions are also being offered this year on Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains Cornmunity College. These focus on marketing, media, and promotion; think tanks and incubators for a community; and intellectual property. For more information on Market-

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COURIER-TIMES

Date:

Thursday, February 5,2009

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SUTHERLAND,Nebraska

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Center for Rural Affairs Provides Nebraska Legislative U ~ d a t e 1

Legislative Leadership. 0% of the initial tasks of the new Legislature was to elect its he ~ e ~ i s l a t u also r e elected leadership.-Sen. Mike Flood of Norfolk was re-elected Speaker. chairs for each of its committees. Among the elected committee chairs are: Agriculture, Sen. Tom Carlson of Holdrege; Appropriations. Se,n. Lavon Heidemann of Elk Creek; Education, Sen. Greg Adams of York; Natural Resources, Sen. Chris Langemeier of Schuyler; and Revenue, Sen. Abbie Cornett of Bellevue. Governor Proposes Status Quo Budget. Major Cuts in Rural Development Programs. On January 15, the Governor presented his budget proposal for the two-year biennium beginning July 1, 2009. Generally, the budget is a status quo one following the Governor's philosophy of no new spending and no tax increases. Obviously, the Governor and the Legislature have their eye on a worsening economy despite the fact that Nebraska has the largest reserve fund in history. The Governor did recommend some serious decreases in funding for important rural development programs. The Governor recommended eliminating the $1 million cash fund transfer appropriation to the Microenterprise Partnership Fund done in the last state budget. He did recommend maintaining the general fund appropriation of $497,500 per year for the Microenterprise Partnership Fund. Thus, the Governor recommends decreasing by half funding for the Microenterprise Partnership Fund. The Governor also recommended eliminating the $250,000 cash fund transfer to the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act program done in the last biennial budget and reducing the general fund appropr~ationof the program to $150,000 per year (from $250,000 per year). The Governor did recommend increased spending on a few big ticket items - $230 million to continue the property tax credit program; $100 million extra for K-12 state aid; $25.6 million additional for the University system; $4 million additional for the state and community college systems; and $5 million per year for several proposals to deal with family and children and behavioral health issues that came to light in the Save Haven law. Legislative Lingo. Throughout the course of these updates, we will be using certain terms that describe where a bill is in the legislative process. Here is a brief guide to those terms and some basic legislative procedure: Committees have a number of options for each bill - send as introduced to the full Legislature for General File, send to General File with amendments, Indefinitely Postpone (or kill) the bill, or hold the bill over to the 2008 session . Once a bill is sent to the full Legislature out of committee, it faces three stages of debate - General File, Select File and Final Reading. ' At the General File and Select File stages a bill can be amended; a bill cannot be amended at the Final Reading stage. As bills are killed in committee or become law through floor stages, they will be deleted from the Legislative Update.

http:llnews.universaI-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

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(402) 342-31 78

NEMAHA CO. HER4LD FRIDAY WEEKLY AUBURN, NE Circulation = 2628

01/29/2009

Nebraska Enterprise Fund Supports Feb. 24 Small ~usiness-conference in korth Platte The Nebraska Enterprise Fund (NEF) recently awarded the Center for Rural Affairs with a grant to help support Marketplace, a premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The funding "eceived by the Center for Rural Affairs from Nebraska E~terpriseFund is used primarily for the Center's Rural Entiqx-ise Assistance Project (REAP). a rural entrepre! neurial and small business development program. I "NEF envisions a Nebraska where every micro and small business owner has the opportunity and resources to realize his or her potential as a business owner," said Rose Jaspersen, Executive Director of the Nebraska Enterprise Fund. "Marketplace is an excellent resource for business owners and community leaders. The conference provides the latest information about business management and community-based programs for businesses." The third annual Marketplace will be held at the Sandhills Convention Center in North Platte on February 25. The conference will offer training, networking, and professional development opportunities for startup and existing small businesses, service providers, rural communities, and family farmers and ranchers. Early bird registration ends on Feb. 11. ,'

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Three pre-conference sessions are also being offered this year on Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains Community College. These focus on marketing, media, and promotion; think tanks and incubators for a community; and risk management. "We are so appreciative of the partnership with the Nebraska Enterprise Fund, said Kathie Starkweather, Center for Rural Affairs. "The work they do and the goals they strive to achieve are in line with goals set out to for the MarketPlace." Entrepreneurs may also want to display their products in the Nebraska Marketplace Store (www.cfra.org/marketplacefstore).The store is a cooperative effort between the Center for Rural Affairs' MarketPlace and GROW Nebraska, which will provide vendors with retail space, staffing and pay sales tax. Store participants are encouraged to register so they can take advantage of the day's sessions and network with other professionals. The store registration deadline is February 1. For more information on Marketplace or to register: http://www.cfra.org/marketplace/home . Or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org, (402) 614- 5558.

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COURIER THURSDAY LVEEKLY CALLAWAY, NE

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01/29/2009

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CRA rural entrepreneurs grants available

LYONS - The Nebraska Enterprise Fund (NEF) recently . - awarded the Center for Rural Affairs with a grant to help support Marketplace,a premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The tiinding received by the Center for Rural Affairs from Nebraska Enterprise Fund is used primarily i for the Center's Rural Enterprise i AssistanceProject (REAP),arural entrepreneurialand smallbusiness development program. s--- The third annual Marketplace F: will be held at the Sandhills Convention Center in North Platte, Nebraska on February 25, 2009. The conference will offer training, networking, and professional development opportunities for 7 startup and existing small busi- : nesses, service providers, rural communities, and family farmers and ranchers. Early bird registration ends on Feb. 11,2009. Three pre-conference sessions are also being offered this year on Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains Community College. These focus on marketing, media, .: and promotion; think tanks and ; incubators for a community; and -- --'riskmanagenent. - - - -. ... i . Entrepreneurs may also want to display their products in the Nebraska Marketplace Store (www. t cf?a.orglmarketplace/store). The store is a cooperative effort between the Center for Rural Affairs' Marketplace and GROW Nebraska,whichwillprovideven- / dors with retail space, staffingand i pay sales tax. Store participants I are encouraged to register so they can take advantage of the day's sessions and network with other , professionals. The store registra- , tion deadline is February 1. For more information on , Marketplace or to register: http:ll i www.cfra.orglmarketplace/home i .Or contact Joy Marshall,joyrn@ I cfra.org, (402) 614- 5558.

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UNIVERSAL ' lnformatlon S e t v ~ c e sInc

RIECORD WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CHADRON, NE Circulation = 2673

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Rural Americans not as healthy nowadays '

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By Elisha Greeley Smith elishas@cfra.org -Center for Rural Affairs .?:- We have all heard our par-. ents or grandparents bragging -about ivalking uphill both ways to school. Though it itnay be a bit exaggerated, evidence shows that rural people were once better off in terms of physical activity, ntltrition and weight. A report by Ccnter for Rural Affairs found that rural Americans today, are more obese and less fit than urban Americans. N ~ ~ r n e r o uissues s contribute tp this situation. Forty years ago --

half of all s t ~ ~ d e n twalked s or bicycled to school. Today less than 15 percent do because of traffic safety concerns. Eniploy~nenthas affected our health as well. Fewer rural Americans are employed in rigorous occupations such as farming, fishing and fbrestry. 41so the percentage of multiple income families has grown. With their jobs. along with school and community acticities, rural people struggle to find time to exercise and prepare nutritious mcals. Even if individuals and Familics try to make better eating

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decis~ons, the availability of nutrit~ourfoods is often l ~ n i ~ r e d Many of the factors Involved 1 in worsening conditions regarding diet, activity and obcsity can be addressed through individual, family and comrnunlty action. As the new administralio~i and the new Congress hegin to debate health care rcfort-u. they need to keep in mind that the best long-term way to reform the health care systern is to help create healthier peoplc. Everyone has a stake in creating a healthier society and everyone has responsibility to do so.

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REPUBLICAN THURSDAY WEEKLY PAWNEE CITY, NE Circulation = 1320

01/29/2009

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T h e Pawnee Republican, Thursday, January 29, 2009

"rganic + Farming Transition Workshops in February I

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Tamela S. Timms present information on the basics Five Rivers RCdD C'ooldinutor Tlie -Fi\ie Ri-\7e-r-s..Reso-~-r-ceT7ii,i.~ of organic production and the certifying process as well as marketing servation and Development, Inc in options. Professionals fro111NRCS Tecun~schand the Nebraska Great and the UNI, Extension will explain Plains Resource Conservation and programs to support producers tryDevelopment, Inc in David City, NE ing to transition part or all of their are hosting a choice of two work- operation to organic production. Organic prices are usually 100shops on transitioning to organic fanning. The workshop in David 200% of conventional grains. But City is schcdulcd for Fcbrua~y3rd to sell products in the "organic" from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm at the market, farmers and ranchers must Nebraska Great Plains RC&D of- comply with certain restrictions and fice. The workshop in Tecumseh rules known as the National Organic is scheduled for February 4th from Rule. The biggest obstacle for many 10:OO am to 2:00 pm at the Nemaha farmers and ranchers is the 36Natural Resource District office. month transition period, where no Registration for both workshops unauthorized inputs can be applied, begin at 9:30 am with a $5.00 yet the product does not qualify for registration fee (includes lunch). the organic premiums. The USDA Natural Resource Conservation Experienced organic -. - farmers will

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Service EQIP program provides financial incentives to offset possible financial risks, from yield reductions, andlor lender/landlord agreements during the transition phase. Incentives can also Iielp offset expenses for additional machinery and facilities not now a part of manv conventional farms' ~ortfolio such as additional tillage 'or weed control equipment, storage facilities, and equipment needed to manage a more diverse crop mixture. Transition to organic production is much more than adding a single practice. It is about changing, the production system. To provide local expertise and instruction, applicallts to the EQIP Organic Incentive Program can participate in a three-year education program

sponsored by the Center for Rural Affairs, designed to provide detailed information on what is required to certify organic and the practices needed to qualify. For infonnation on the workshops, contact the Five Rivers RC&D at 402-335-3347. For details on the National Organic Program (NOP) rules, visit the USDA's home page: www.usd~oO\i, click on "Agriculture", then Organic Certification. For more information on the NRCS EQIP Program, contact your local NRCS office. David Welsch, dwel~ @ ~ w e s t b l u e f a r ~ q . ~402-826c_o~n i 5361 or Martin Kleinschmit at the Center for Rural Affairs, martink@ : .cfra.org .................. ,402-254-6893 can provide more details on transitioning to organic production. .

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community-based' programs for businesses." The third annual Marketplace will be held at the Sandhills Convention Center in North Platte. Nebraska on February 25, 2009. The conference will offer training, networking, and professional deveig opment opportunities for startup and existing small businesses, service pt.oviders, rural communities, F I, and family fa-mers and ranchInformation Sewlces, Inc I ers. Early bird registration ends on (402) Feb. 1 1,2009. ~. 342-31 78 Three pre-conference sessions I NEWS are also being offered this year on : THURSDAY WEEKLY I Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 24 at Mid: I ORCHARD, NE ; Plains Community College. These focus on marketing, media, and promotion; think tanhs and incubators for a comn~unity; and risk management. f "We are so appreciative of the Grant to Support Rural partnership with the Nebraska En1.. Entrepreneurs~ebr~~k~lterprise Fynd, said Kathie Stark-

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Enterprise Fund sz1pport.s Alr11.Xc1Place, a stnnll husines.c con$ci.c~r(.c, -. The --Nebraska Enterprise Fund ,..NEF) recently a~rardedthe Center g f i r Rural Affairs with a grant to help support IGlarkctPlace, a premier rural small busi~essand entrepreneurship event nuw in its third year. The funding received by the Centel; for Rural Affairs from Nebraska Enterprisc Fund is used primarily fol. the Center's Kural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP), a rural entreprrncurial and small business d.-.velopment

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"NEF envisions a Nebraska where every micro and small bwiness owner has the opportunity and esources to realize his or her pontial as a business owner." said ose Jaspersen, Executive Director f the Nebraska Enterprise Fund. Marketplace is an escellt.rrt rtsource for business owners and leaders. 'l'hc conference es the latest information ncss management and

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weather, Center for Rural Affairs. " l h e work they do and the goals they strive to achieve are in line with goals set out to for the MarketPlace." Entrepreneurs may also want to display their products in the NeMarketl'lace Store braska ,~(www.cfra.org~marketplace!store). .. The store is a cooperative effort between the Center for Rural Affairs' Marketplace and GROW Nebraska, which will provide vendors with retail space, staffing and pay sales tax. Store participants are encouraged to register so they can I take advantage of the day's sessions and network with other professionals. The store registration deadline is February 1 . For more information on Marketplace or to register: :h&~.:!!ww w .cfra,o_rg/mrna~ketplaceih_o nit: . Or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org. (402) 614- 5.558.


UNIVERSAL! lnformat~onServ~cesInc ' 8

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ENTERPRISE THURSDAY WEEKLY STAPLETON, NE Circulation = 625

01/29/2009

i Stapleton Area chamber

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~ l e c t 2009 s Officers

Stapleton Area Chamber of Commerce met for their annual meeting Monday, January 26, at the Veteran's Memorial Building in Stapleton. Eight were present. The secretary's minutes were approved as presented.

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A treasurer's report was pre sented. Dale Hollibaugh was elected president for the 2009 year. Cindy Frey will be vice president and Rae Johnson, secretary. Chamber is still in need of a treasurer. If you are interested, please contact -

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one of the above named offi cers. A treasurer will bw elected at the February meeting. Board of Directors will be j Tyler Stille, Ron Halsted, I Lewellyn Frey and Sara Barnum. The Easter Egg hunt was discussed. Tyler Stille reported that he is heading up the hosting of NUMB, the bicycle group that will be coming to! Stapleton. He will solicit , help from other chambed members even thoug9 Chamber did not choose to sponsor the event. This year's ride is sched uled to be held June 27 - Juld 1, and includes the c o m m u ~ nities of Ogallala, Brady,I Stapleton and North Platte. 1 For the past five years, thd Nebraska United ~ethodist! Bike Ride for Hunger ha annually raised close to, $40,000 to support hullgels projects i n Nebraska an around the world. A business of the montq will be selected next month* when a new list of member3 is obtained. , Dena Beck with the Cente for Rural Affairs ~ u r a $ Enterprise ~ssistancd Project (REAP) for over twy .years was a special speaker at the meeting. She serves the Southwest and Central regions of Nebraska enconlpassing 16 counties, operating from her home office north of Minden. Dena came to REAP from the Minden shamher of Commerce and Kearney County Economic Development Agency where' she served as Director for five years. Dena has a B.S. i n Horticultural Therapy from Kansas State University, graduated from Heartland Economic Development Institute, and received as Masters of Science degree i * Organizational managemen with minors in Entrepre neurship & Economic Devel I opment from Peru Stat 1 College. She offered advice on howl to market and sell your busi I ness. She offered tips on1 transferring and planning in advance so that a timeljl transition can transpire. 1

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UNIVERSAL! Information Services, I nc: MIRROR-SUN THURSDAY WEEKLY LYONS, NE Circulation = 735

01/29/2009

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Center receives grant to support rural entrepreneurs

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The Nebraska Enterprise Fund(NEF)recently awarded the Center for Rural Affairs with a grant to help support Marketplace, apremier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The funding received by the Center for Rural Affairs from Nebraska Enterprise Fund is used primarily for the Center's Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP), a rural entrepreneurial and small business development program.

"NEFenvisionsaNebraska where every micro and small business owner has the opportunity and resources to realiyc his or her potential as a business owner," said Rose Jaspersen, Executive Director of the Nebraska Enterprise Fund. "Marketplace 1s an excellent resource for- busmess owners and co~nmunjtylenders. The conference provides the latest intormatlon about business management and community-basetl programs

for businesses." The third annual MarketPlace will be held at the Sandhills Coilvention Center in North Platte, Nebraska on February 25,2009. The conference will offer tra~ning, networking, and professional development opportunities-for startup and exist~ngsmall businesses, sel vlce providers, rural communities, and family farmers and ranchers. Earlybirdregislralionericls on Feb. 11,2009. Three pre-conference sesslons arc also being offered this year on Tuesday afternoon, Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains Comrnu~l~ty College. These focus on marketing, media, and promotion: think tanks and incubators for a community; and risk management. "We are so appreciative of the partnership with the Nebraska Enterprise Fund, said Kathie Starkkeather, Center

for Rural Affairs. "The work they do and the goals theystrivetoachieveare in line with goals set out to for the MarketPlace." Entrepreneurs may also want to display their products in the Nebraska Marketplace Store(www.cfra.org1marketplacelstore). The store is a cooperative effort between the Center for Rural Affairs' Marketplace and GROW Nebraska, which will provide vendors with retail space, staffing and pay sales tax. Store participants are encouraged to register so they can take advantage of the day's sessions and network with other professionals. The store registration deadline is February 1. For more information on Marketplace or to register: http:llwwwcfra.orglmarketplacehome . Or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra org, (402) 614- 5558.

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UNIVERSAL i l nformation services.

COURIER THURSDAY WEEKLIv CALLAWAY, NE Circulation = 580

01/29/2009

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Open the doors to rural success

by Elisha Greeley Smith Center for Rural Affairs Most Nebraska rural communities have something in common. They often have a shortage of bs and lack young people moving into the area. lso, rural communityresidents and leaders, someimes think that the answer to reviving main street s recruiting big business. But industry comes and oes, and it's not uncommon for a recruited busiess to abandon a community, leaving individuals bless and the town in despair. RuralNebraska's growth and prosperity depend n entrepreneurship and microenterprise. Most f the new jobs created in rural America in the ast decade have come from the creative efforts f entrepreneurs and small business. To help Nebraskans take control of their own tiny, create businesses and buildjobs, the Center Rural Affairs is again hosting Marketplace, a

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premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The Marketplace conference is a one-day event focusedon strengtheningsmallbusinesses and rural ! communities.Participants will learnessential busi- I! ness skills, discover new ideas for businesses and communities, and network with service providers and 0therentrepreneurs.Attendeesare guaranteed to come away from Marketplace equippedwith strategies on how to grow or start their own business. The event takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2009 at the Sandhills Convention Center in North Plattefiom7:30a.m.to 5:OOp.m.Educationaltracks . includesessions onmarketing, agriculture,business development, policy, community development, j Hispanic entrepreneurship, and technology. For more information visit www.cfra.org/ marketplacelhome or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org or (402) 614-5558. .,I

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STANDARD THURSDAY

WEEKLY

HUMBOLDT,NE Circulation = 1176

01/29/2009

OPEN THE DOORS TO SUCCESS thost -

Nebraska 'Omhave something in I gommon. They often have a Ortage of jobs and lack oung people moving into the area. Also, cornmunit^ residents and leaders, wmetimes think that the answer to reviving main street is recruiting big business. But industry comes ,and goes, and it's not ' uncommon for a recruited 'business to abandon a corn- p , munity, leaving individuals i

a,cg-iculture, business development, policy, community development, Hispanic entrepreneurship, and technology. For more information visit www.cfra.org/marketplace/ home or Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org or

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.have come from the creative efforts of entrepreneurs and small business. To help Nebraskans take control of their own destiny, create businesses and build jobs, the Center for Rural '2

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small business and entre-preneurship event now in its third year. The Marketplace conference is a one-day event focused on strengthening small businesses and rural communities. Participants will learn essential business skills, discover new ideas for businesses and communities, and network with service providers and other entrepreneurs. Attendees are guaranteed to come away from Marketplace equipped with strategies on how to grow or start their own business. The event takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 25,2009at the Sandhills Convention 1 , Center in North Platte from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Educational tracks include sessions on marketing,

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DAILY NECI'S EVENING NORFOLK, NE

DAILY

Circulation = 17282

02/06/2009

NORFOLK DAILY NEWS Friday, February 6, 2009

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Entrepreneurship cus for leaders

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By LINDA WUEBBEN regionalQnorfolkdailynews.com

A Leadership Academy is defined by:

HARTINGTON - A convergence of three area leadership academies here recently offered 60 high school students a look at entrepreneurship from several different angles. Michael I-Iolton, Plainview's city administrator, took a risk last year and was successful in receiving grant monies from the Rural Community Advancement Program to establish a youth leadership ;+cadem):in his conlmunity. He in\. i t 4 I'lainview High School to partici!wte in his dream. An open applic,a?ion proccss was offered for students with certain qualifications, including a specific grade-point average. The Plainview Academy of Leadership, or PAL, was born. The pp!)gratn was set for the 2008-0') schal;l year, ~ a!sf~u! with the members ~lantitrgf r talk the future of their small community,

A style of leaders in high school; either by grade point averages or a sports standout; already a leader in their school. A student who takes the next step; moves above self. Willing to lead others on an untraveled path. H Willing to learn what it takes to become an effective leader. Has qualities of ethics and values. Can be self-sustaining and find ways to further that strength.

LIbI!lR WllFBBTlu: COf?FiELPONUF_N-r

DURING THE nine-month prngrarn, TYLER HOU'BN (left, monthly meetings have been planned; "hot" discussion topics - like moral:; starlding in photo above) of Plair~viewand Jessica Wle- covered; and ways to develop good belhaus (r;erlter) of F'ordycc leadership qualities explored. lnodel their new Leader-Three other Nor-tl-re;~st Nebraska st-lipAcarlc~~iy 1--shirts. schools decided to conle on board: Tilden E1kho1.nValley, Hart ington PubMichael tiolton (right) of lic and Hartington Cedar Catholic. P1ainvit.w and lane A r m The Hartington Academy, which strong (in back) assisted combined the public and Cedar Cathowith a recent leadership lic high schools, involves their student event in klartington ir~volvcouncil members. ing four area h~gllsr:hoc!ls. -- . These students h.ave been organized - 'SUSAN FANTA (left)colr--. :=forthree years, working through the ducts a workshop where Leapster program. variolr%advcl.l.isir~glnes The Elkhorn Valleji Acadc~nj~ invitc:d sages are taped to T~ldc:n their National Honor Socicty students Elkhorn V;~llcyH~ghSchr!c,l to participate. At the all-day leadership session in studen1 KyIt:igh Parh?rnI. Hartington, social entrepreneurs hi!^ hrr a: little as $40 and other online Web was explored by Susan Fanta of the all over her bocl~..h n t a rc,m!r~dt>d and the rest oL' t hr s11rdc.nts that dir: s1tr.s t h t l tackle such important human Niobrara Valley House of Renewal in Lynch. Fanta used im;ges about her could hmt, rt:fusctl :jny nl' thc rn:~tt~rit~lissuc?sas the mudern-day slave trade. Thrl Center, which was organiwd life to introduce hel.st:If to the studt:~~ts. objects "ttrgetl" lo her - b~rrshe* didn't. Slrr Ict ott1c1.swith ~~;rtr~-i:~ligtic tll-tt;~n~s117 1973 when poverty work was being As she pulled a s~riall!.ractor, flag, lit- sell he1 111eir liti: cli-eani. done in Northca.;t Nebraska, now has tle T-shirt and cross from a I-)ox,h n t a "'L'oll hr711t: 1 1 ) lakc' risks antl focl Ihr a $2 nill lion budget and enlploys 25 described her life as being involved in farming, a patriot, having c21ildrenand freeclom to hr.: vourst?lf, to rc;rc!l !)ut 1.0 pcoplc It 1v;is a dream of two men the role religion plays. In turn, she told others," Fal?.t:r mir! "No dl-c:l!rl \vllr.tll to strengthen small commul~ities by while Iivil~g h e ea:;y'' She aaldrb!l working on soc~aland economic issues, the students that they advrrtisr a!,uut the I ( I ; Y ~ will btt 1111ll.ave1cd and a trtlxv F'raa:; said themselves in what they weal .$I : I l ho\v path has to be ~tr;rtle 'Tire arc unapolog~tically rural," they act. he s a d "And 1L.e know we can make a Fanta then used magazine ads and FANTA CIIAIJ .ENGEU the groull to difference. In 35 years, we have seen added props to show the studenl-s how ! others see them. A volunteer, Elkhorn take their f.;~lents(>I. gift:?and use !.I-tern, changes and we are not finished makValley High junior Kyleigh Parhum, to take their vision a n d what i~~tc.t.!;:;ts Ing this a better place for Americans." them alxl usrt ;I to be life chatlgir~g -aided Fanta with the visual display. Jane Armstrong. a Un~versityof NeFanta pulled printed ads out of a box for the I!!,ttv). ;!lJ the present s w r is bra$>ka-LincolnExtension educator in and asked P;urhutn to tape them on her 110t ill; !.:oc)d a:; i t C O I J I ~ he, tab: t h t risk Cedar ('ot~rity, told the students that to gel where it is Iw:ttcr,^'SIIP r;ai<l, entrcprencurs are needed today, espebody. with thc current state of financial \,f'yi~!t !"~:l:iS Of !Ill? ~ ~ P ! ~ ! .fO! c I ' ~<LI!~!~J c1.~11v One showc:d a beautiful model with ::perfect hair, :lnothr.t Lhr pci Iect make- ASS,krrs a,,!~ c ; dwith F'anf~alld shoi~ed- crisi\ in the world. *.up;just the right shampoo; tltr bcrjl thc r;lllclentq: I:!w perlpl~c h:wc becn AR.MSFTRONGENCOURAGED the trendy clothes; the sportictst car fol-. looki~~g bt:)ot,d t lrc dollars and c.erits to successful people; and just the right makc cl-~:mp,tr::irr ?he \.vorlrl.Me gaJrcex- hi[:h ~;choolstudents to think outside of beer and cigarette. amplcs of sucr:e:i?;f~ulbusintls.: vt+~ltilres the box to find unique ways to develop As KyIeigh stood with the ads taped that st;~r.t.t:rlI I I I ~ 1sitE1an il!\restrnent of new businesses in their communities.

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Ways youths can help their communities: Start after-school clubs. Organize groups against drugs and alcohol. Conduct fundraising activities for school needs. Make an impact with school classes. Work with elementary children after school. B Job shadow, watch, learn and remember. B Complete survey of community needs and wants. Participate in extracurricular activities. Initiate service projects.

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creativity can be unlimited and helping people to make a comnlunity better is what it is all about, she said. Entrepreneurship curriculum in Nebraska schools is at a low point, said.. Armstrong, introducing the students, to a learning guide developed by UN1, for entrepreneurship investigation that is available to schools in the state. She:. challenged the students to return to. their respective schools and work t$ make these classes available in their. business departments. Other speakers included successful.^ Hartington-area entrepreneurs. Holton had two students model the new Leadership Academy T-shirts with this message on the back: Leadership. is not about position --- Leadership i s about action. Holton told the students: 'You car: .make a- difference; you can drive the; future OTwhat happensin your commu: nity. Take what we learn in this Lead:: ership Academy project and go to your1 local leaders; identify community proj-. ects and be a part of them."


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STANDARD OXFORD, Nebraska

Thursday, January 29,2009 WEEKLY 819 15.67 sq. inches $3.73 7

Rural Americans, less fit and more obese than urban Americans Rural people were once better off in terms of physical activity, nutrition and weight. However, according to a report released by the Center...h...RuraI B f f a i today, rural residents generally fare worse that their urban counterparts in regards to obesity, which is opposite to the situation that existed prior to 1980. The Cen~farlhuLM%irs, in collaboration with Dr. Joe Blankenau, Professor of Politics at Wayne State College, Wayne, Nebraska, has undertaken the task of evaluating crucial health care issues in rural America, The report, "Nutrition, Physical Activity, and Obesity in Rural America," first in a series of reports analyzes available research relating

to nutrition, physical activity and obesity and their impact on the health of rural residents relative to their urban counterparts. Crucial findings: Exercise 40 years ago, half of all students walked or bicycled to school, today less than 15 percent do. Employment -- fewer rural residents are employed in rigorous occupations such as farming, forestry, and fishing. Availability rural residents have limited access to healthy food choices. Demographics -- rural residents are older, less educated and poorer than urban residents, all contributing to increased-obesity.

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WORLD-HERALD EVENING DAILY OMAHA, NE

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seeks health coverage for more low-income kids .$

1,INCOLN - If Nebraska were like most states, Janene Rutt wouldn't be working four jobs to afford health insurance for her childrert. She might not have spent three years papirig the bills for -,. per daughter's kidney stone treatment, or faced $2.000 in deductible~and cc>~pavmentsfor -i

her son's broken finger. She could have improved her family's lot by continuing her studies to become a licensed practicalnurse. "Maybe if I didn't work hard, it wouldn't feel so bad," said Rutt, who lives in the Franklin County town of Campbell. "I have always worked because I thought some day I'll get ahead." Rutt and her family are struggling partly because Nebraska

limits its health insurance program for low-income children, called Kids Connection, to families making 185 percent of the federal poverty level or less. Only six other states set eligibility levels a t that level or lower. The rest cover children in families making 200 percent or more of the federal poverty Level. Iowa provides coverage up to the 200 percent level of the

federal poverty level and in July will expand its program to 300 percent. Rutt's three children qualified for the program about five years ago, after a head injury cost her husband his farming job and the family insurance that came with it. H e r husband is disabled, and his needs are covered by Medicare. The Kids Connection coverage ended when their oldest

iInsure: State HHS has opposed expanded coverage Continued,from /luge 1 In between those jobs, Rutt earns money working for two elderly women rnaking sure they take their nledi(.;\tionsproperly. "I am getting a little tired,"

- T,r:gisla!ive Kill 136, introduct:d by Stat(: Sen. Bill Avery of Id raise the eligibilKids Connection to percent of the federal povlevel. He offered a similar ast year, hut it died in conl-

Jennifer Carter, an attorney ith the Nebraska Appieseed 'Centerfor Law in the Public Interest, saidthe reauthorizationof the federal State Children's I-Iealih Insurance P r o g r a m (SCHIP) gives Nebraska opportunities to cover many rnore children. President Barack Obama signed the legislation Feb. 4. The federal bill will mean more money for Nebraska's Kids Connection program - an 86percent increase for the fiscal year ending Svpt. 30, according to an estimate by the Georgetown University IlealthPolicy Institute. The bill also offers bonuses for states that enroll more uninsured

children and makes it easier for states to set up programs that help families pay private health insurance premiums. "We need to go to 200 percent br:cause 200 percent is really the best measure of families that cannot afford coverage," Carter said. "They're choosing between food and taking their child to the doctor." Federal poverty guidelines for 2009 say that a family of four with an income of up to $22,050 is poor. At 185 percent of the poverty level, a family of four with income up to $40,793 would qualify for Kids Connection. At 200 percent, the same family with income up to $44,100\vould qualify. Jon Bailey, an analyst with the Center for Rural Affairs in Lyons, Neb., said making health coverage more available for chiidren would especially benefit rural families. People in ruralareas often work for small businesses or are self-employed and don't have access to affordable health coverage. "Health insurance may be in some cases the single largest expense for farmersandranchers,"

child reached 19. Rutt was told her income was $100 too high for the other two children to stay on the program. So Rutt quit her nursing studies and now works 32 hours a week, for $9.52 an hour, at a local nursing home. That allows her to get family health coverage for $450 a month. She also works one 12-hour day each week at a beauty shop. See Insure: Page 2

Chaumont downplayed the he said. But expanding any program value of additional federal fundmay be a hard sell in a year when ing. because of requirements for the econcbmy is struggling and state matching funds. Nebraska state tax revenues a r e expected would have to pay at least 28 percent of the cost for any expansion to lag. Vivianne Chaumont, director of the children's health insurof Medicaid and long--term care ance program. Others have philosophical obnt for the Nehraskrr D e p a r t ~ r ~ eof Health and Human Services, said jections to expanding the prothe agency's policy is not to com- gram. Sen. 'Tony FuIton of Lincoln ment on I~illsbefore they have a said: "The way 1look at it is 185 public hearing. . -. percent of poverty is a pretty The agency opposedlast year's bill, and Chaumont souncted high number I am concerned doubtful about whether the state that this is a step toward universal health care, and 1 have grave - - j would challgeitsmixd this year. "In the past, Nebraska has concern about that policy ." I ~ g i s l a t i v e fiscal staff last been clear, through Medicaid reform, that it was not expanding year estimated that expanding eligibility categories, because the program would provide covthe (Medicaid) prograrn is not erage for about 5,400 additional i children. The program currently fiscally sustainable," she said. i The state children's health in- covers about 23,000 children. U.S. Census figures show that surance program is treated as an expansion of thc state Medicaid there were 45.000 uninsured children in the state in 2007. About 60 program. La\.vmakcrs budgeted f o r percent were in families making 2.9 percent average increases in les; than 200 percent of the povMedicaid for the two-yearpc~~iod erty level. Most lived in families where at least one person was ending June 30. The ave. . ~ g inc crease in the children's health in- working. Cor~tactthe write!: surance program was4.2 percent 402.4739583, martha.Uuddard@owll.com for the same period. -

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Employment transition -: workshop set for Tuesday -.

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lndividuals who have recently been laid off or would like to upgrade their employment skills and/or situation should plan to attend the Employment Transition Workshop from 2 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, at North Platte Community College's North Campus. The "opcn house" type workshop will allow participants to come and go as their schedules allow. Workshop topics include Going Back to School, Organizing Your Finances, Business Start-up, Job Search Skills, and much more.

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Representatives from Mid-Plains Community College, Nebraska Workforce Developn~ent,Nebraska Business Development Centel; Consumer Credit Counseling, the Center for Rural Affairs/REAP, and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services will be on hand to provide information, as well as offering guidance and assistance. For more informatiolr about the workshop, please contact the MPCC Career Services Center at (308) 5353618 or (800) 658-4308, Ext. 3618; Karin Lange at 5358023; or email careerservices&3npcc.edu.

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1 Six million dollar milestone reached I

Eugene Rahn, Senior Business Spccialist for the Center for Rural AfYairs' Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP), recently reached a milestone of loaning and leveraging over six mill ion dollars to rural Nebraska startup and existing small businesses. "Gene has a passion for working with rural small businesses and helping them succeed and has made a ,major impact as evidenced by reaching this milestone," said Jeff Reynolds REAP Program Director. Rahn joined the REAP program in November 1996 and covers the north central area of Nebraska. Since that time, he has been responsible for placing 142 loans totaling over $1.5 M while also leveraging 86 loans totaling over $4.6 M due to his assistance for a total of over $6 M in loans and leverage. Rahn has also been responsible for countless hours of business counseling and facilitation of many small business trainings in his region. He has worked with close to 600 startup and existing entrepreneurs and helped train close to 2,000 entrepreneurs. "We applaud Eugene for achieving such a milestone. The commitment and support

that he has demonstrated time and again directly correlates with the success rate of entrepreneurs and small business owners here in rural Nebraska," said Richard Baier, director of the Nebraska Department of Economic Development. "Successful small businesses are an essential component of our state's overall economic development effort. We are pleased to have proJided resources to support the good work that Eugene has done in his role with REAP. We look forward to his continued success in the future." One example of a small business recently assistedby Gene is Sandhill Glass & Garage Doors in Ord, Nebraska, owned by Bradley and Gina Babb. "In 1998, wc were asked by our step-father if we would consider moving to Nebraska, work for his glass and garage door business. and learn to take it over when he decided to retire," stated the Babb. "We decided to take the opportunity, and began working in the spring of 1998." In 2007, the Babbs' step-father died unexpectedly, without any plan in place for a business transition. The Babbs decided to purchase the business assets and re-open it as

Eugene Rahn

their own. "Without the help of Eugene Rahn and the support of REAP, we would not have been able to keep the family business alive and complete our long term goals. Eugene was extremely supportive and enjoyable to work with. Eugene was referred to us by our local Chamber of Commerce. They called him a "wizard" that helpedsmall businesses in rural Nebraska. He is beyond a doubt a Wizard." That "wizard definitely enjoys what he does. Gene Rahn calls entrepreneurs and small business people some of the greatest indiviuals to work with. "Assistingentrepreneurs and small business owners has proven interesting and rewarding," said Rahn, REAP Senior Business Specialist. "lt has been an honor and

privilege assisting entrepreneurs and small business owners that had an idea, then a dream and then the reality of starting or expanding their own business." REAP is Nebraska's largest microenterprise program and operates on a statewide, rural basis through regionally based Business Specialists. REAP provides lending, training, networking, and technical assistance/counseling opportunities for startup and existing small microenterprises (businesses with 5 or fewer employees). REAP operates Nebraska's only Women's Business Center (WBC) and also operates the REAP Hispanic Business Center (HBC). "The milestone that Eugene Rahn has reached is an excellent example of the commitment of REAP,staff in assisting startup and existing small businesses in rural Nebraska. This commitment coupled with dedicated funding sources and partners is a recipe for total success," said Jeff Reynolds. REAP Program Director. "This milestone says a lot about the need for and success of our program." Over 85% of the businesses in Nehraska are microenterprises

(5 or fewer in size). That is why the Center for Rural Affairs believes it is so vital to providc access to lending and technical assistance. REAPcollaborates with many other individuals arld organizations and also participates with the Nebraska Enterprise Fund (NEF). NEF is a leading provider of financial resources for community-based organizations that offer financial and technical assistance to Nebraska's small and micro businesses. A complete listing of microenterprise service providers in Nebraska can be found at http:// www.nebbiz.org/gsearch.php. Rose Jaspersen, Executive Director of the Nebraska Enteiprise Fund said, "Microenterprise and small business development generates income, builds assets and supports local economies by providing a proven pathway to business ownership for low and moderate income entrepreneurs. They are the base of our economy. Eugene Rahn's accomplishments are outstanding foranindividu:il working in ihis field. He is not only making a difference for businesses, but also for communities in North Central Nebraska."

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CEDAR CO. NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY HARTINGTON, NE Circulation = 2091

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classes , h tul e l p area people step ( into an important role I

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The last several ye&s we have scen immense volunteer efforts on behalf of our community. This speaks volumes for

fective meeting, and how to understand our community and our economic developnlent needs. The annual Leadership

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velopment Com- phases. --the d l a g e s ~f - -Adults Of all ages and 'and Wynot, t h e *-youth (9-12 grade) are all Hartington, and encouraged to attend all .lington Eronomic three phases. We need plnent. we were youth involved because c~tstcrvll~ze aseries they are not just our

velopcd ant1 dcsigned tu grow personally, profesenco~~ragep~opletolearn sionally, and to learn about thrniselves, others, about the community. and the community/reAct now a n d learn gion on a leadership level. about yourself, others. This will enable then1 and how to lead your to become even better community or organization. For a tmchure or own personality. The sccond and third phases lead into unclerstanding others, how to lead an ef-

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Informatton Serv~cesInc' (402) 342-3178

NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CREIGHTON, NE Circulation = 1310

CENTER for RURAL AFFAIRS Values. Worth. Action. 'Ask Not What Your Country Can Dof

BY John Crabtree,johnc@cfra.org, Centerjbr Rural Affairs

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There are questions about our national economic malaise: will the bailouts and stimulus work, can we afford to spend federal money, can we afford notto? But little attention has been paid to what can be done for rural America,@ and, more importai~tly,few have asked what rural America can do for thew rest of the nation. The best rural development results from rural people creating their own small businesses and entrepreneurial value-added agriculture. Grass-i entrepreneurship puts profits into local wallets and maintains control community's future by its members. Too often rural entrepreneurs depend on savings and credit cards to fund, their business starts. Federal policy can help. The Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program funds loans and training for owner-operated businesses with 10 or fewer employees (businesses that make up the backbone of rural

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The Value Added Producer Grant Program helps farmers and ranchers und feasibility studies, market research and business planning necessary to aunch value-added agricultural enterprises. The Farmers Market Promotion ogram and Community F w d Projects Grant I'rogram create opportunities =9 r small farmers in local markets. , These programs are at the back of the line for federal investment. Ensuring that legislatio~~ to jump start the economy with new federal spending vestments in each of the grassroots entrepreneurship programs would cost ennies (or less) on the stimulus dollar and would not only make a difference rural Main Streets, it would help rural America contribute significantly to economic revival of the American economy. For further information visit www.cfra.org. The Center for Ri1ru1Afjillirs was estahlisl~~d irl 1973 as an unajfiliated nonprofit corporarion ur~tlerIRS corlc 5Cll(c)3.Thc Cerrterlor Rural Ajfairs was Ji)rined I?\. rrrr-a1 Nc~bruskur~s corlcerrled clbout Ja~uily jarrlzs and rurul conlnl~rr1ities,crrld M Y )1.0r,4to stre11gther1.si~ictllbrlsinesses, jirmily Ji7r11zsand rar~c~hcs, u11dri{r.ulco~~~/ill~ilitie.s. .

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Developing renewable energy the right way

By John Crabtree, johnc@!cfra.org Center for Rural Affairs In the future; rural America will provide an increasing share of America's energy needs. A recent Dcpvrtrnent of Energy study reports that wind could provide one-fifth of the nation's electricity by 2030, with Midwest andGreat Plains states capable of providing the lion's share. Congress and USDA should help rural communities build lasting ecollomic opportunities from the resulting energy boombydevelopingpolicesthat support local ownership ofwind turbines by fanners, ranchers, rural communities and rural workers who maintain wind energy systems. Throughout the Twentieth \.

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Century,owner-operatedfarms, to build the biofuels industry! ranches and rural businesses . .using flawcd, unsustainable~ strengthened rural ec6iiomies appl-~aches,all of Americas, and provided a better rural will suffer the consequences quality of life. We can take the eventually. Renewable energy develop. same approach this century by enabling those involved with the meid has reached a watershc4 new energy economy to share in moment. The cl~oicesof the new President, Secretary ofAgthe benefits of ownership. I However, boo111 and bust ricultureand Congress will help, cyclesare good for no one. Corn- dcterlnine whether America's; munities with wind resources renewable energy hture will.. will need help transitioning bring vpportu~lityor economic' their econoinies frorn the boom pain to rural America. to lasting vitality. 1. Finally, we must find, and 1 government must encourage, the right approach to biofuels. Intensive cropping systems and . practices that strip too much crop residue from the land release organic matter that should g stay in the soil. If we continue Z

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Monday, February 16,2009 DAILY 5903 14.10 sq. inches $10.95

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Employment Transition Workshop set for Tuesday NORTH PLATTE - Individuals who have recently been laid off or would like to upgrade their employment skills and/or situation should plan to attend the Employment Transition Workshop from 2 to 5 p.m. on Tuesday at North Platte Community College's North Campus. The "open house" type workshop will allow participants to come and go as their schedules allow. Workshop topics include Going Back to School, Organizing Your Finances, Business Start-up, Job Search Skills, and much more. Representatives from Mid-Plains Community College, Nebraska Workforce Development, Nebraska Business Development Center, Consumer Credit Counseling, the C e n t e r h r RuralAffairs/REAP, and the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services will be on hand to provide information, as well as offering guidance and assistance. For more information about the workshop, please contact the MPCC Career Services Center at (308) 535-3618 or (800) 658-4308, Ext. 3618; Karin Lange at 535-8023; or email careerservices@mpcc.edu.

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STANDARD OXFORD, Nebraska

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Thursday, January 29,2009 WEEKLY 819 15.85 sq. inches $3.73 1

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60 attend entrepreneurs meet; told of importance to rural economy Nearly 60 inventors, innovators, investors, and entrepreneurs participatcd in the first I~lventorsand Entrepreneurs Club held Monday. Jan. 19, at the Mindcn Fire Hall, sponsored by the PK Partnership, South Central Economic Development District, and C.cn&rfn~RuralAffiits-Bural Enterprise Assistance Project IREAP). The purpose of the I&E Club is to bring people together to learn the proper steps to explore an idea, motivate each other, tap into each other's networks, and get educated. According to Wisconsin Econmomic Development Corporation founded Terry Whipple, 49% of new jobs are created by I&E type businesses, "but you can't win if you don't play!" "You are important!" was the message he brought to attendees, "you are important to our economy as we .livi in this world of rapid &u&" "Marketing on a Shoestring" was the educational topic presented by the owners of Marketing Happens! in Hastings, Kenzie Choquette and Kristen Pavelka. They shared ideas for marketing to targeted audiences without investing high dollars and internet marketing tips. If you missed this opportunity be sure to attend the I&E Club next month! It will be held Monday, Feb. 16, starting at 6 p.m. in Holdrege in tile ~iieetingroom of the Super 8 Motel; 420 Broadway Street. Monday, March 16 the l%E Club will return to the Minden Fire Hall.

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INDEX MITCHELL, Nebraska

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Wednesday, January 28,2009

WEEKLY 893 26.33 $4.5 A1

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Small Business Opportunity The ~ebraska Enterprise tion ends on Feb. 1 1,2009. Fund (NEF) recently awarded Three pre-conference sesthe C.c..nt.e~for......R.II~&!......L?.ffa.ir_~ sions are also being offered with a grant to help support this year on Tuesday afterMarketplace, a premier rural noon, Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains small business and entrepre- Community College. These neurship event now in its third focus on marketing, media, and year. The bnding received by promotion; think tanks and the m t ~ k d u r a Affairs l incubators for a community; from Nebraska Enterprise and risk management. Fund is used primarily for the "We are so appreciative of Center's RuralEnteqr.ise..As- the partnership with the Nesj~ancs Project (RE%??, a braska Enterprise Fund, said rural entrepfene~rialand small Kathie Starkweather, Center business development Pro- &r Rural Affairs. "The work gram. they do and the goals they "NEF envisions a Ne- strive to achieve are in line braska where every micro and with goals set out to for the small business owner has the Marketplace." opportunity and resources to Entrepreneurs may also realize his or her potential as a want to display their products business owner," said Rose in the Nebraska Marketplace Jaspersen, Executive Director S I 0 r e j w w w .c f r a . o r g 1 of the Nebraska Enterprise marketplace/store). The store is Fund. "Marketplace is an ex- a cooperative effort between cellent resource for business the &ter for RuraLAflCairs' owners and community lead- Marketplace and GROW Neers. The conference provides braska, which will ,provide the latest information about vendors with retail space, staffbusiness management and ing and pay sales tax. Store, community-based programs for participants are encouraged to businesscs." register so they can take adThe third amual Market- vantage of the day's sessions Place will be held at the Sari- and network with other profesdhills Convention Center in sionals. The s t o e North Plane, Nebraska on Feb- deadline is February 1. ruary 25,2009. The conference For more information on will offer training, networking. Marketplace or to register: and professional development h :I l . fra. r 1 opportunities for and marketplacehome . Or contact existing small businesses, set- Joy Marsha[[, j~ym@~fia.org, vice providers, rural communi- (402) 614- 5558. ties, and family farmers and ranchers. Early bird registra-

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COURIER MINDEN, Nebraska

Wednesday, January 28,2009 WEEKLY

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PK I&E Club Met Jan. 19 Nearly sixty inventors, innovators, investors, and entrepreneurs participated in the first I&E Club held Jan. 19, at the Minden Fire Hall, sponsored by the PK Partnership, Southcentral Economic Development District, and Center farRural Affairs-Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP). Terry Whipple, Executive Director of the Juneau County (Wisconsin)Economic Development Corporation and founder1 brainchild of the Juneau County's Inventors and Entrepreneur's Club, provided insights and encouragement to attendees as he told of the positive outcomesthey have experienced in Wisconsin as a result of the l&E Club. "You are important!" was the message he brought to attendees, "you are important to our economy as we live in this world of rapid change!" "Marketing on a Shoestring" was the educational topic presented by theownersofMarketing Happens! in Hastings. Kenzie Choquette And Kristen Pavelka. They shared ideas for marketing to targeted audiences without investing high dollan and internet marketing tips. The purpose of the I&E Club is to bring people together to leam the proper steps to explore an idea, motivate each other, tap intoeachother's networks,and get

educated. According to Whipple, 49 percent ofnewjobs are created by I&E type businesses,"but you can't win if you don't play!" If you missed this opportunity be sure to attend the I&E Club next month. It will be held Monday, Feb. 16at,6 p.m. inHoldrege in the meeting room of the Super 8 Motel, 420 Broadway Street. On Monday, March 16 the I&E Club will return to the Minden Fire Hall.

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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY ALBION, NE Circulation = 3200

02/04/2009

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Renewable energy the 'right way' By Johrr Crabtree,johnc@cfra.oi-g, Certturfor Rural Affirs In tile future, rural America will provide an increasing share of: America's energy needs. A recent Departmcnt of Energy study reports! that wind could provide one-fifth of the nation's electricity by 2030, with Midwest and Great Plains states capable uf providing the lion's shai~e.Congress and USDA should help rural communities build lasting economic opportunities from the resulting energy boom by developing polices that support local ownership of wind turbines by farmers, ranchcrs, rural communities and rural workers who maintain wind , energy systelns. Thloughout the Twentieth Century, owner-operated farms, ranches and rural businesses strengthened rural economies and provided a better rural quality of life. We can take the same approach this century by enabling those involved with the new energy economy to share in the benefits of ownership. However, boom and bust cycles are good for no one. Communities with wind resources will need help transitioning their economies from the boom to lasting vitality. Finally, we must find, and government must encourage, the right approach to biofuels. Intensive cropping systems and practices that strip too much crop residue from the land release organic matter that shonld stay in the soil Jf we continue to build the biofuels industry u \ i ~ ~flaueJ ; ur~~ustainahlr approacheq, all of America will suffer the cousequcnueb cvcntually ~encvrnhleenergy development has reached a watershed moment. The choices of the new President, Secretary of Agriculture and Congress will help determine whether America's renewable energy future will bring oppol.lunity or economic pain to rural America. ,

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ROCK COUNTY LEADER WEDNESDAY WEEKLY BASSET, NE Circulation= 1413

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Conference to energize ; usinessesandnetwork '.

Looking for a great opportunity learn new ways to energize eople business, network with other small business owners from the state or looking to be1f 1.- across come an entrepreneur by starting business? The Center for Rural Affairs has the answer, the third annual Marketplace Small Business conference. This conference is open to anyone with interest in learningways to improve their existing businesses, individuals looking to start their business, individuals interested in agricultural entrepreneurship opportunities, teachers who would like to share information with their students or youth looking to learn more about en-

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The conference is being held on Feb. 25, a t the Sandhills Convention Center in North Platte, NE. : The local Bassett Economic De- I velopment Committee would like ' to encourage everyone to attend this conference. In order to help everyone to do this, they are offer- f ing to cover the registration fee for the event. If interested in more information or would like to attend, con- i. tact Debbie Seberger a t 684-3319 before Feb. 9.


JOURNAL THURSDAY WEEKLY PLATTSMOUTH, NE Circalabon= 4379

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1 opening the doors to success in rural America I

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~ 7 Most Nebraska rural communities .: Y'c7rc=elcy have something in common. -They often have a &mit h shortage of jobs and lack yiung people Center for moving into the Rural Affairs area, Also, rural cornmunity residents and leaders, sornetimes think that the answer to reviving main street is recruiting big business. But industry comes and goes, and it's not uncomrnon for a recruited business to abandon a community, leaving individuals jobless and the town in despair. .&-

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~ Rural~ Nebraska's growth and prosperity depend on entrepreneurship and microenterprise. Most of the new jobs created in rural America in the past decade have come from the creative efforts of entrepreneurs and small business. To help Nebraskans take control of their own destiny, create businesses and build jobs, the Center for Rural Affairs is again hosting Marketplace, a premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its t h ~ r dyear. The Marketplace conference is a oneday event focused on strengthening small businesses and rural comn~unities. Participants will learn essential business skills, discover new ideas for businesses

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and communities, and network with service providers and other entrepreneurs. Attendees are guaranteed to come away from Marketplace equipped with strategies on how to grow or start their own business. The event takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 25,2009 at the Sandhills Convent~on \ Center in North Platte from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Educational tracks include scssions on nrarketing, agriculture, business development, policy, comnlunity development, Hispanic entrepreneurship, and technolo-

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For more information visit www.cfra.org/marketplacelhome or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org or

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BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation= 1405

01/29/2009

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By Elisha Greeley Smith, elrg, Center for Rural Most Nebraska rural commun~ties:

it's not uncommon for a recruited

-*icroenterprise. Most of the new jobs -%rested in rural America in the past decade have come from the creative efforts of entrepreneurs and small business. To help Nebraskans take control of their own destiny, creatc businesses and build jobs, the Center for Rural Affairs is again hosting Marketplace, a premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The Marketplace conference is a one-day event focused on strengthening small businesses and rural communities. Participants will learn essential business skills, discover new ideas for : ' businesses and communities, and network with service providers ,m$pther -+ zntrepreneui-5. Attendees are gitiiranecd to come away Erom Marketplace :quipped with strategies on how to ; row or start their own business. The event takes place on Wednesay, Feb. 25, 2009 at the Sandhills , onvention Center in North Platte from 30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Educational ' jcks include sessions on marketing, riculture, business development, licy, community development, His- ' nic entrepreneurship, and technolY For more information visit .w cfra org/rnarketplace/home or tact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org 102 614.5558 t --__ _ -

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ENTERPRISE THURSDAY WEEKLY ARTHUR, NE Circulation = 357

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--center for Rural Affairs Mar e lace opens doors to success, annual Marketplace at NP Sandhills Convention Center Feb. 25

Most Nebraska rural communities have something in common. They often have a shortage of jobs and lack Young people moving into the area- Also*rural community residents and leaders, think that the answer to reviving main street is \ . recruiting big business. But 2 ~ndustrycomes and goes, and it's no! uncommon for a recruited business to abandon a communitY7 leaving individuals jobless and the town in despair.

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Rural Nebraska's growth and prosperity depend on entrepreneurship and microenterprise. Mort of the new jobs created in rurnl America in the past decade have come from the creative

efforts of entrepreneurs and small business. T, help Nebraskans take control of their own destiny, create businesses and build jobs, the Center for Rural Affairs is again hosting Marketplace, a premier mral small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. The Marketplace is a One-day event focused On strengthening small businesses and rural communities. Participants will learn essential business skills, discover new ideas for businesses and communities, and network with service providers and other entrepreneurs. Attendees are guaranteed to come

away from Marketplace equipped with strategies on how to grow or start their own business. event takes place on wdnesday, ~ ~25,2009 b . at the = sandhills convention center in

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North Platte from 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Educational tracks include sessions on marketing, agriculture, business development, policy, community development, Hispanic entrepreneurship, and technology.

more www.cfra.org/marketplacehom e or contact JOY Marshall, joym@cfra.org or 402-6145558.


UNIVERSAL

Information Servrces - - , .I .E,(402) 342-3 178

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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CREIGHTON, NE Circulation = 1310

CENTER for RURAL AFFAIRS Values. Worth. Action.

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'Chew The Fat' By Elisha Grccley Snzith, elishas@cfi.org, Center Jor Rzlral Affairs

We have all heard our parents or grandparents bragging about walking I 1 uphill both ways to school. Though it may be a bit exaggerated, evidence sho\vs Ilia[ rural people were once better off in terms of phqsical activity, nu[riiion and \wight. A 1.~11o1.t h) ('cntcr 1.01. l<[lral Al'f'ail-st'oilnd [hat rural Amcl-icans toda! arc ~norcoljcsc and I c ~ sl i ili;ln ~ urhan Americans. Nurncro~~s issucs contsihutc lo this situi~thn.Fort!, ycars ago. half of all studc~its\\:alkcd 01. bicyclctf lo school. .170dayless than I5 percent do because 2 of tral'lic sarcty concerns. Em[>loymcnthas affected our health as well. Fecver rural Americans are employcd in rigorous t~cupationssuch as fanning, fishing and forestry. Also the percentage or ~nultipleirlconic farnilies has grown. With theirjobs, along wit11 school and community acii\~ilics,rural pcople struggle to find time to escrcisc and Ixcparc nutritious meals. Evcn if individuals and families try to make better eating decisions, the availability of nutritious foods is often limited. Many of the factors involved in worsening conditions regarding diet, act i v i t ~ pand obcsity can bc addressed through individual, family and community aclion. As the new administration and the new (_'ongress begin to debate health $ care rcform, they necd to keep in mind that the best long-term way to reform $ the health care system is to help create healthier people. Everyone has a stake in creating a healthier society and everyone has responsibility to do so. { i The full report is available online at http://www.cfra.org. The Center for Rural Affairs was established in 1973 as an unafiliated norlprojl corporation under IRS code 501(c)3. The Center for Rural Ajfairs wa.s forrned by rural Nebraskans coticerried crbour family farms and rural comnlrtnitirs, and we work to strengthen small businesses,jamily farms and rutrches, and rural conznzurzities.

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MONITOR THURSDAI' WEEKLY BLOOMFIELD, NE Circulation= 1405

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Center Receives Grant to Entreoreneurs

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Nebraska Enterprise Fund supk ~ t Marketplace, s a small business

LYONS - The Nebraska Enterprise und (NEF) recently awarded the Cenr for Rural Affairs with a gray! to I@ ~ ~ ~ ~ - ~ i r k i k e ?--8 ~ pl rq~ ct ren ,~ ~ t 2 ral small business and entrepreqelr- i p event now in its third year. e funding received by the Center for ral Affairs from Nebraska Enterprise nd is used primarily for the Center's ural Enterprise Assistance Project : (REAP), a rural entrepreneurial and small business development pro, .'jj gram. "NEF envisions a Nebraska where ! every micro and small business owner has the opportunity and resources to realize his or her potential as a business 1 owner," said Rose Jaspersen, Executive Dircctor of the Nebraska Enterprise I Fund. "Marketplace is an excellent i resource for business owners and i community leaders. The conference j provides the latest information about i business management and community- ! based programs for businesses." Thethird annual Marketplace will held at the Sandhills Convention ter .in, North. P!at!P, Neeska,..on: , p&y25,2009. T h ~ ~ o f i t e r e n ~ ~ ~ W i l l r training, netwot-king, and profes1 ional development orpur:unities for up and existing sn~ailbusinesses, ice providers, rural communities, family fanners and ranchers. Early gistration ends on Feb. 1 1, 2009. ree pre-conference sessions are o being offered this year on Tuesday ernoon, Fcb. 24 at Mid-Plains ComCollege. These foc~ison rnar, media, and promotion; think and incubators for a community;

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"We are so appreciative of the partnership with the Ncbraska Enterprise Fund," said Kathie Starkweather, Center for Rural Affairs. "The work thcy do and thc go;lls thcy strive to achicvc are in line with goals set out to for the MarketPlace." Entrcprcncurs may also want to dis1; I

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play their products in the Nebraska i Store (www.efra.org/marketplace/store). The store is a cooperative effort between the Center for Rural Affairs' Marketplace and GROW Nebraska, which will pro- : vide vendors with retail space, staffing ' and pay sales tax. Store participants are encouraged to register so they can take advantage of the day's sessions , and network with other professionals. ) The store registration deadline is Fcb- , ) For more information on Marketor to register: 1 http:llwww.cfra.orgimarkctplace/home. ? Or contact Joy Marshall, I Joyrn@cfra.org, (402) 614- 5558.


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GAZETTE McCOOK, Nebraska

Tuesday, February 10,2009 DAILY 5903 11.04 sq. inches $1 0.95 14

BEBE announces February hours Deda Beck, central and southwest Nebraska Business Specialist with the -rfarg3ualPrsEaJss , Rural Enterprise Assistance Project will hold office hours in McCookonFeb. 17. Hours willbe 10 a.m.- 2:45 p.m. McCook Ecm nomic Development Corp. (MEDC) will handle the appointments; (308) 345-1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Noms Avenue, Suite 200. The Center b B m l A f f a k i ' Rural Enterprise Assistance Project (REAP) and its services are available to rural communities acrossNebraska. REAP offers technical assistance, educational

and networking opportunities, and a loan program for small businesses:BEAP is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer employees, self-employed fulltime,part-time, home-based, farmbased, start-up, and store-front has six regionbusinesses. ally based Business Specialists acrossNebraska. These Business Specialists can get involved in assisting entrepreneurs at various stages of their business progress. MEW is pleased to partner withBEAein order to offer an expanded list of services to businesses of all sizes.

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NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY CREIGHTON, NE Circulation = 1310

ENTER for RURAL AFFAIRS Values. Worth. Action.

'Governor Walks Away From Rural Mainstreets:

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By Brian Depew, briand@cffa.org, Center for Rural ~ f f a i r s Last wcck, Governor Heineman proposed slashing funding for importan rura1,development andrural .small business programs, His budget would c u c a full two:?hi;ds fr6mlhe MidGent5rp6ise Partnership Fund, our state's small, business development program, and the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act (BECA), rural Nebraska's community development grant program. During this national economic downturn, these are exactly the type of proven rural revitalization strategies that deserve the investment of our limited state tax dollars. ~ n d ' t h i sis exactly the time to invest in rural entrepreneurship and innovative rural development that can reinvigorate the rural economy and revitalize rural communities. I Tightcning our budgetary belt in difficult times is important. But the Gov- 1 ernor singling out small businesses, rural mainstreets and innovative rural development for disproportionate cuts makes no sense whatsoever. I ; BE,CA andthe;Microenterprise .. . -,.*. Partnership Fund are two programs that, ldok towar3 the-future arid%elp build a more robusi5Gd resilient economy in our small towns and across the state. Luckily, the Governor's proposal can be changed by our state senators. In 2007, they stood up for rural Nebraska when they doubled funding for the! Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act to $500,000 and dedicated $1.5 million to the Nebraska Microenterprise Development Act. Nebraska sena-I tors should, at least, continue support for both programs at those levels. For further information visit www.cfra.org. The Center for Rural ASfairs was established in 1973 as an unaflliated; nonprofit corporation under IRS code 501(c)3.The Centerfor Rural Affairs = was formed by rural Nebraskans concerned about family farms and rural communities, and we work to strengthen small businesses, family farms and ranches, and rural communities.

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STANDARD OXFORD, Nebraska

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January REAP office hours in McCook Dena Beck, central and southwest Nebraska Business Specialist with the Center for Rural Affai~' Rural Enteee --Assistance Project will hold oftice hours in McCook on January 30. Hours will be 10-1 1 :30 a.m. then 1 :15-3 p.m. McCook Economic Development Corp (MEDC) will handle the appointments: (308) 345-1200. MEDC office is located at 301 Norris Avenue, Suite 200. -REAP.offers technical assistance, and ' networking educational opportunities and a loan program for small businesses. REAP is designed to assist all types of small businesses, including businesses with 5 or fewer employees, self-employed fulltime, part-time, home-based, farrnbased, start-up and store-front businesses.

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Transition to Organic Farming Workshop in Tecumseh An organic transition informational meeting is scheduled for Wednesday, February 4, from 10:OO a.m. - 2 0 0 p.m. at the Nemaha NRD office in Tecumseh, NE, located a t 62160 Highway 136. Sponsored by the !2e&x ~QZ Rural Affairs, the Five Rivers Resource Conserva& Development tion (RC&D), Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), and UNL Cooperative Extension and funded through the Nebraska Environmental Trust, this meeting will focus on what is needed to qualify for organic premiums, how to make the transition, and how to apply for the NRCS Organic Transition Incentives. Lunch will be served and included in the $5 registration fee a t the door. 'With commodity prices falling while crop expenses are accelerating, once again producers are searching for

options to cut expenses or Incentives Program (EQIP) increase market prices," said to reduce financial risk durMartin Kleinschmit with ing the three-year transition the l Z . a & x f ~ r R u ~ a i m . .period. Since EQIP allows "If you fall in this category, for local control to meet attending the informational local needs, some details of meeting may provide the the program may vary answers you are looking between counties and Natufor." ral Resource Districts. Organic prices are m u - Application deadline for the ally 100-200%of conven- program is February 14th tional grains. But, to sell 2009 at your local NRCS products in the "organic" office. For details on the National market, farmers and ranchers must .comply .with cer- Organic Program WOP! tain restrictions and rules rules, visit the USDA's known as the National home page: www.usda.gov, Organic Rule. The biggest click on "Agriculture," then obstacle for many farmers Organic Certification. For and ranchers is the 36- more information on the NRCS EQIP Program, conmonth transition period, where no unauthorized tact your local NRCS office. inputs can be applied, yet David Welsch, dwelsch@ the product does not qualify westbluefarm.com, 402-826Martin 5361, or for the organic premiums. Kleinschmit, Center. .--for To help farmers and ranchRurd Affairs, martink@ ers manage some of the risk cfra.org, 402-254-6893, can of changing management systems, USDA is providing provide more details on incentive payments through transitioning to organic prothe Environmental Quality duction.

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Governor Walks Away From Rural Mainstreets L a s t week, Governor communities. Heineman proposed slashing Tightening our budgetary Tundine for imvortant rural belt in difficult times is imdeveloiment aid rural small business programs. His budget would cut a full two-thirds from the Microenterprise Partnership Fund, our state's small business development program, and the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act (BECA), rural Nebraska's community development During this national economic downturn, these are exactly the type of proven rural revitalization strategies that deserve the investment of ur limited state tax dollars. And this is exactly the time to invest in rural entrepreneurship and innovative rural development that can reinvigorate the rural , . economy and revitalize rural

rural development for disproportionate cuts makes no sense whatsoever. BECA and the Microenterprise Partnership Fund are 2 two programs that look to- -2 ward the future and help build --a more robust and resilient economy in our small towns and across the state. Luckily, the Governor's proposal can be changed by our State Senators. In 2007 they stood up for rural Nebraska when they doubled funding for the Building 3 Entrepreneurial Communities Act to $500,000 and dedicated $1.5 million to the Nebraska Microenterprise , Brian Depew Development Act. Rural Organizing and Nebraska Senators should, Outreach Program Director at least, tontinue support portant. for both programs at those I But the Governor singling levels. i out small businesses, rural For further information 1 mainstreets and innovative visit: www.cfra.org.

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%overnor walks away om rural mainstreets by Brian Depew, briand@cfra.org, Center for Rural Affairs Last week, Governor Heineman proposed slashing funding for ortant nlral development and rural small business programs. budget would cut a full two-thirds fro111 the Microenterprise nership Fund, our state's small business develop~ncntprogram, the Building Entrepreneurial Comlnunities Act (BECA), rural. Nebraska's coinmunity developmeht grant program. During this national economic downtunl, these are exactly the type of proven rural revitalization strategies that deserve the investment of our limited state tax dollars. And this is exactly the time to invest in rural entrepreneurship and innovative rural ' developlnent that can reinvigorate the rural economy and revitalize rural com~nunities. Tightening our budgetary belt in difficult times is important. But the Governor singling out small businesses, rural mainstreets and innovative rural development for disproportionate cuts makes ]no sense whatsoever. BECA and the Microenterprise Partnership Fund are two pro;grams that look toward the fuh~reand help build a more robust and resilient economy in our small towns and across the state. Luckily, the Governor's proposal can be changed by our State Senators. In 2007 they stood up for rural Nebraska when they doubled fimding for the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act to $500,000 and dedicated $1.5 million to the Nebraska Microentelprise Development Act. Nebraska Senators should, at least, continue support for both programs at those levels.

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During this national economic downturn, these are exactly the type of 1 proven rural revitalization strategies : that deserve the investment of our limited state tax dollars. And this is exactly the time to invest in rural entrepreneur- ' ship and innovative rural development that can reinvigorate the rural economy and revitalize rural communities. Tightening our budgetary belt in difficult times is important. But the Governor singling out small businesses, rural mainstreets and innovative rural development for disproportionate cuts makes no sense whatsoever. BECA and the Microenterprise :

changed by our State Sena2007 they stood up for rural

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bansition to organic Workshops Cater to Local Farmers Interested in Organic Farming YONS - An organic transition inational meeting is scheduled for sday, January 29, from 10:00 a.m. 0 p.m. at the Northeast Nebraska , D office in Plainview, NE located at 702 East Park Avenue. Sponsored by the Center for Rural Affairs, the Northeast Nebraska Kesource Conservation & Development 1 (RC&D), Natural Resources Conservatlon Service (NKCS), UNL Cooperative Extension and funded through the Nebraska Environmental Trust, this; !' meeting will focus on what is necded to 1 qualify for organic premiums, how to' make the transition and how to apply ' I for the NRCS Organic Transition In- ; centives. Lunch will be served and included in the $5 registration fee at the door. "With commodity prices falling ' while crop expenses are accelerating, onct: again producers are searching for options to cut expenses or increase market prices," said Martin Klein-i schmit with the Center for Rural Af-: fairs. ''If you fall in this category, attending the infomiational meeting may i provide the answcrs you are looking for." Organic prices are usually 100-200 percent of conventional grains. But, to sell products in the "organic" markct, ! farmers and ranchers must comply with I' certain restrictions and rules known as the National Organic Rule. The biggest obstacle for many farmcrs and ranchers j?~. _the..J6-mon_th transition _period, : . where no uritiiithorized inputs can be 1 applied, yet the product does not qualify for the organic premiums. To help farmers and ranchers manage some of thc risk of changing management systems, USDA is providing 1 incentive payments through the Environ~ncntalQuality Incentives Prograrn QIP) to reduce financial risk during

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yhe three-year trantiition period. Since ~ Q I Pallows for locrrl control to meet local needs, so~rledetails of the program may vary between counties and , Natural Resource Districts. Application i deadline for the program is Fcbruary 14th 2009 at your local NRCS office. For details on the National Organic :Program (NOP) rules, visit the USDA's -home page: www.usda.gov, click on "'Agriculture", then Organic Ccrtifica- j tion. For more information on the NRCS EQlP Progra~:~,contact your local NRCS office. David Wclsch, dwelsch@westbluefarm.com 402-826- ' 5361 or Martin Kleinschmit, Center for Rural Affairs, martink@cfra.org , 402254-6893 can provide more details on transitioning to organic production._

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Date: Wednesday, January 21,2009 Frequency: WEEKLY Circulation: 893 Clip Size: 18.04 sq. inches Ad Rate: $4.5 Pagelsection: 3

INDEX MITCHELL, Nebraska

Center for E:.~~r.a.I~~.Affir.i.r.s Governor Walks Away From Rural Mainstreets By Brian Depew, Center for Rural Affairs Last week. Governor Heineman proposed slashing finding for important rural development and rural small business programs. His budget would cut a full two-thirds from the Microenterprise Partnership Fund, our state's small business development program, and the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act (BECA), rural Nebraska's community development grant program. During this national economic downturn, these are exactly the type of proven rural revitalization strategies that deserve the investment of our limited state tax dollars. And this is exactly the time to invest in rural entrepreneurship and innovative rural development that can reinvigorate the rural economy and revitalize rural communities. Tightening our budgetary belt in difficult times is impor.

tant. But the Governor singling out small businesses, MI mainstreets and innovative rurdl development for dispre portionate cuts makes no sense whatsoever. BECA and the Microenterprise Partnership Fund are two programs that look toward the future and help build a more robust and resilient economy in our small towns and across the state. Luckily. the Governor's proposal can be changed by our State Senators. In 2007 they stood up for rural Nebraska when they doubled funding for the Building Entrepreneurial Communities Act to $500,000 and dedicated $1.5 r.ll:a" +&- 1 1 h-." I: LU U I ~ ; I ~ ;L.:iei~~ enterprise Development Act. Nebraska Senators should, at least, continue support for both programs at those levels. For further information visit: www.cfia.org. IUII

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http://news.universal-info.com Universal Information Services , Inc. Profile: 111 - Center for Rural Affairs Recipient: John Crabtree

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GAZETTE WEDNESDAY WEEKLY WAUSA, NE Circulation = 753

02/04/2009

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Center for Rural Affairs receives grant to support rural entrepreneurs -1

1 h'cbrti;;ka I-:rlf~tprisr Fund s r r p p n r i MarketPlace, a . ! ; l r : t ~ ! I l>i!ci)l~.~s conference -

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The Nebraska EnFur-(: recently awarded ti?< Ct.r!li':- f i i r K ~ ~ r Affairs al with a pi.,, I c help support Marketplace, a pi-crnler rul-:\I > , t ~ i ; r l l business and c!?t~epr.cncu~-hl!ili cvrnt now in its third ye:!r-. Thc f~lrldingreceived by t l i ~Ccntcr fol- Ktrl-ill Affairs from NcI.~t.askaEnterprise Fund is used 1"-inlorily for the (:enter's Rural Enterl)~iscAssistanieProjcct,arural ei~trel>wfic~~rid and small business developn~entprogram. "NEI: e~r\;isionsa Nebraska whcrc every micro and small business owner has thc opportunity and rcsourcc.; to realize his o r her potcriti;ii as a busincss ownel.,'' said Rosc Jaslierscn, Executivc Director

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of the Nebraska Enterprise Fund. "Mar-ketplacc is an excellentresource for business owners and c o m m u ~ i t y leaders. The conference provides the latest information about business managenicnt and community-based programs for businesses."

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The thirdannual Marketplace will be held at the Sandhills Convention Center, North Platte, Feb. 25. Theconference will nffcrtl-aining, networking, and professional devclopment opportunities for startup and existing small businesses, service providers, rural communities, and family farmel-s and ranchers. Early bird registration ends Feb. 1 1 . Three prc-conference sessioris arc also being offered this year Feb. 24 at Mid-Plains Community College. These focus on marketing, media, and promotion; think tanks and in-

cubators for a community; and risk management. "We are so appreciative of the partnershipwith theh'cbl-ash;; Entcrprise Funti, saidKathie Stal-hwcather, Center for Rural Affair-s. "The work they do and the goals they str-ivc to achieve arc in line with goals set out to for the MarkctPlace." Entrcprcncurs may also want to display their products in theNebraska Marketplace Store (\vww.cfra.org/ marketplaceistore). The storc is a coopcrative effort bet\vccn the Ccntcr for Rural Affairs' MarketPlacc and GROWNcbraska, which will provide vendors with retail space, statfingand pay sales tax. Store participants are encouraged toregistersothey can take advantage of the day's sessions and nctwork with other professionals. The storc registration deadline is Feb. 1.


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CEDAR CO. NEWS WEDNESDAY WEEKLY HARTINGTON, NE Circulation = 2091

Discover your ucolorr9in Learning to bead program LYON2:- The first phase of the Learning to Lead in Cedar County Program'will begin Feb. 17, at 6 p.m. with "Real Colors" presented by Jane Armstrong, UNL Extension Educator for Cedar County. This program will help participants explore their own personality as well a s discover the personalities of others. It will assist in learning how to work with individuals with a wide range of personalities. "Real Colorsis asimple, effective way to learn about temperaments ant1 personality,"saidArmstrong. "When we learn about our own strengths and temperaments and how they differ from others', we can communicate better and create teams which are successful because they include team members with a variety of talents, strengths and personalities, yet can work effectively together because they understand each others' preferences and work styles. Real Colors helps all participants gain insights into their own personality and enables them to communicate and work effectively with family members and team members whether in organizations or at their workplaces." The first phase of the Learning to Lead in Cedar County program will wrap u p March 3 with Leadership Styles presented by Dr. Anita Hall, UNL Extension Educator from Antelope County. She will assist participants. in exploring different leadership styles. Hall will share examples in history of each type of leadership style and how it affected the decisions that have been made. There will also be opportunities for each person to personally study their own leadership style and how it is demonstrated in the work they do. "The Center is delighted to help bring this leadership series to Cedar County." said Stephanie Fritz, Center for Rural Affairs. "It's a great opportunity to gain skills and help the community." Outside grant funding is helping to finance the costs of these programs. The deadline to register for Phase 1 is Feb. 13.Registrations can be dropped off or mailed to the City of Hartington, Economic Development, 107 W. State St;, PO Box 427,Hartington NE 68739.The registration fee covers meals and material costs. Checks should be made payable to Hartington Economic Development. Future meeting dates are: March 17, ~ o n n e c t i n g ~ e n e r a t i o nMarch s; 3 1, Collaboration and Networking; April 14, Conflict Management; April 28, Entrepreneurial and Innovative Leadership; May 12, Community Growth Matters; May 26,Leading Local Economic Development. For more information, contact Carla Becker, devcoor@hartel.net or call 402-254-6357; or Elaine Arens, dearens@hartel.net or call 402254-6505or 402-254-3507. This project is funded in part by grants from the Nebraska Department of Economic Development and USDA Rural Development administered by the City of Hartington Economic Development, Village of Fordyce and the Center .for. Rural Affairs.


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NEWS THURSDAY WEEKLY ORCHARD, NE Circulation= 6654

01/28/2009

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Open the Doors to Success By Elisha Grecley Smith, elishas@cfra.org, Center for Rurn! Affairs Most Nebraska rural communities have something in common. They often have a shortage of jabs and lack young people moving into the area. Also, rural community residents and leaders, sometimes think that the answer to reviving main street is recruiting big h i ness. Rut industry cotrles and goes, and it's not uncommon for a recruited business to abarldorl a community, leaving individuals jobless and the town in despair. Rural Nebraska's growth and g~losperltyd e p e ~ ~ond entrepreneur-. ship and microenterprise. Most of the new jobs'created in rural Amcrica in the past decade have come from the creative efforts of entre.. psenctirs and small business. To help Nebraskans take corltrol of their own destinj-, create businesses and build jo!~s. the Center for Rural Affairs is again hosting Marketplace, a premier rural small business and entrepreneurship event now in its third year. ' The Marketplace conference is a one-day event foc~tsedon strenythening smali businesses and rural communities. Participants will [earn essential business skills, discover new ideas for businesses and communities, and network wit11 service psoviders and other entie-. preneurs. Attendees are guaranteed to come away from MarkctPlace equipped with strategies on how to grow or start their own business.

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The event takes place on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2009 at the Sandhills Convention Center in North P!atre from ?:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.n!. Educational tracks include sessions on marketing, agriculture, business development, policy, con~munitydevelopment. Hispanic entrepreneurship, a ~ t dtechnology. For more information visit www.cfra.org~inarketylace!home or contact Joy Marshall, joym@cfra.org or 402.614.5558

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