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2015-16

FACT BOOK

The Salvation Army COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING AT CRESTMONT USA Western Territory


ACCREDITATION The College for Officer Training is accredited by the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (10 Commercial Boulevard, Suite 204, Novato, CA 94949, (415) 506-0234), an institutional accrediting body recognized by the Commission on Recognition of Postsecondary Accreditation and the U.S. Department of Education. Accreditation reports are available in the college library.


INDEX Quick Facts ..................................................................i The College .................................................................1 From the Training Principal ...................................3 History of the Institution ........................................4 Overview of the Institution ....................................5 Service Area ..............................................................5 Admissions ...............................................................6 Campus/Principal Timeline ..................................7 Mission ......................................................................8 Institutional Learning Outcomes ........................10 Institutional Support Goals ..................................11 Key Dates ................................................................12 Budget .....................................................................13 Campus Map ..........................................................14 The Cadets .................................................................15 Enrollment ..............................................................17 Cadet Diversity ......................................................19 Cadet Achievement Data......................................22 Two-Year Retention Data ......................................23 Graduation Data ....................................................23 Job Placement .........................................................25 Institution Set Standards ......................................25 Officer Retention....................................................26 Commitment to Student Life ...............................28 Financial Support ..................................................29

The Staff .........................................................................31 Staff Definitions .........................................................33 Officer-Staff Service ...................................................33 Staff Diversity.............................................................34 Faculty .........................................................................34 Faculty Diversity .......................................................35 Educator of the Year ..................................................36 Governance....................................................................37 Organizational Chart ................................................39 Administrative Leadership ......................................39 CFOT Council/Committee Structure .....................40 Crestmont Council ....................................................41 Appendices ....................................................................43 A. Glossary of Salvation Army Terms ....................45 B. Salvation Army Doctrines ....................................46


QUICK FACTS College for Officer Training at Crestmont Training Principal: Major (Dr.) Brian Saunders The Salvation Army, USA Western Territory 30840 Hawthorne Blvd., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 Accrediting Body: ACCJC (WASC) Phone: 310.265.6300 Web: www.crestmont.edu

Founded: ..............................................1921

2013-14 Operating Budget: ..........$10,725,033

Library Collections: ...........................45,000+

Land:...............................................43 acres

AA Degrees Awarded in 2015: .........38 Graduate employment placement: ...100%

Cadet Population 2015-16:

1st Year Residential.........55 1st Year Off-Campus ......0 2nd Year Residential .......51 2nd Year Off-Campus .....0

Total .............106

Officer Headcount 2015-16:

Majors ..............................11 Captains ..........................10 Lieutenants .....................3

Total .............24

Staff Headcount:

Officers ............................24 F/T Employees ..............39 P/T Employees ..............2 On-call/Temporary .......13

Total .............78

Faculty:

Permanent* .....................20 Adjunct ............................8

Total .............28

*Includes Officers and full-time employees

The College for Officer Training serves The Salvation Army’s USA Western Territory. In addition, the USA has 3 other Territories, each with its own College for Officer Training: USA Central Territory 770 West Brompton Ave Chicago, IL 60657 10901773.524.2000

2015-16 FACT BOOK

USA Southern Territory 1032 Metropolitan Parkway SW Atlanta, CA 30310 404.753.4166

USA Eastern Territory 201 Lafayette Ave. Suffern, NY 845.368.7200

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T HE C OLLEGE


THE COLLEGE

FROM THE TRAINING PRINCIPAL

We are pleased to produce another edition of the Fact Book of The Salvation Army Western Territory College for Officer Training. This book is a historical record of the training efforts that have occurred in the recent past. The purpose of the college continues to be to train individuals to become officers that are prepared and equipped for the opportunities of full time service that exist within the Salvation Army today. Keep in mind that the data on these pages represents more than just words and statistics. It represents the dedication of our training faculty and the receptivity of teachable students who are committed to the global mission of The Salvation Army to wins souls to Jesus Christ. We hope that you will find this information useful and encouraging as we continue to move forward in preparing individuals for future service in the ranks of Salvation Army officership.

Blessings, Major (Dr.) Brian Saunders 


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THE COLLEGE

HISTORY OF THE INSTITUTION The Salvation Army is one of the largest non-profit Christian humanitarian organizations in the world with permanent centers of operation in 126 countries. Founded in 1865, its objectives have remained constant and are emphasized in its mission statement: The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian church. Its message is based in the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination. Military language, dress and organization were adopted early on to encourage discipline, stewardship, and commitment to this mission. Members of Salvation Army congregations were called soldiers and ministers/pastors were called Officers. Like military Corps, local Salvation Army churches were identified as a Corps, Salvation Army soldiers who were studying to become Officers were referred to as Cadets in training. This terminology is still in use today. Within each geographic region around the world, The Salvation Army maintains schools and colleges for the purpose of training Cadets to enter full-time ministry as Salvation Army Officers. The College for Officer Training (CFOT), USA Western Territory, is one of four training schools/colleges in the United States. In the area now covered by the Western Territory, training in "Salvation Warfare" began with the arrival, from England, of the first Salvation Army Officers. A men's training garrison was established by the San Francisco No. 2 Corps in 1885. In 1890, a women's training garrison was also opened in San Francisco. About the same time, the "Salvation Castle Training Garrison" was opened in Oakland, California. Later, other "garrisons" opened in Portland, Oregon and Tacoma, Washington. This system continued until 1905 when all training of Officers from the western United States was moved to Chicago, Illinois. In 1920, the United States was divided into four administrative areas and the Western Territory was created. The Territorial Headquarters and School for Officer Training were established and situated in San Francisco, California. The School changed locations in 1927, moving to Silver Avenue in San Francisco. It was there eight years before returning to its original location at 101 Valencia Street. Again, the School moved in 1942 to 1450 Laguna Street in San Francisco, and was there until 1975 when it moved to its current location in Rancho Palos Verdes, California. Initially, the training program lasted one year. In 1960, The Salvation Army moved to a two-year training program. During the late 1970s, the Universal College Program was initiated as a joint program with Azusa Pacific College. Cadets successfully completing the approved course of study were awarded an Associate of Arts degree by Azusa Pacific College. In March 1986, CFOT was granted "full institutional approval" as a California Degree Granting Institution by the California State Department of Education, Private Post-secondary Education Division, pursuant to California Education Code Section 94311(d). CFOT is authorized to grant an Associate of Arts in Ministries Degree upon completion of the requirements of the prescribed program of instruction. Since 1990, CFOT has been accredited by the Accrediting Commission of Community and Junior Colleges, Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and has been authorized to grant an Associate of Arts in Ministries Degree since that time. CFOT is also approved for the training and education of veterans under provisions of Title 38, US Code. As the population of Cadets and Cadet-children increased, the College felt the need to do some major renovations. With Commissioner Phillip Swyers leading the way, The Salvation Army secured funding from the Siemon family to build a new addition and remodel the Cadet housing. This remodel and addition was to accommodate a more family centric environment versus the previous dormitory style housing that had been the Cadets’ home for over 30 years.

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE COLLEGE

OVERVIEW OF THE INSTITUTION The Cadets at CFOT are richly diverse in age, socioeconomic background, previous educational experiences, and culture. All instruction at CFOT is given in English. A robust English Language Development program provides support, including English Intensives, to Cadets whose English proficiency scores indicate the need for additional English support. One of the unique features of CFOT is that married Cadets must complete the training program along with his/her spouse, because an Officer in The Salvation Army can only be married to an Officer. Thus married couples take the same courses and are graduated, ordained and commissioned together; and each individual then serves with equal rights and privileges. With rare exception, the training program at CFOT is fully residential. Cadets are required to sell their homes, furniture, and cars (as these are provided as part of an Officer’s compensation) and live on campus, with their spouses and school-aged children. Cadets are provided with a fully furnished apartment (which includes washer/dryers, refrigerator, and dishwasher). In the last five years CFOT has experienced a significant increase its enrollment size. This increase in Cadet population (and the number of children they bring with them) and the desire to provide Cadets and their families with more comfort and self-sufficiency, led to the major renovation of existing accommodations and the building of a new accommodation wing. These significant improvements were completed in June 2010. In addition, in the summer of 2012, CFOT’s 48-unit Conference Center was closed and redesignated as Cadet housing. Quality family care is also an integral part of the residential training program. A specially designed Family Care Center built in 1988 now complements these services, which are provided to the children of Cadets and CFOT Officer staff. Because CFOT is a wholly owned proprietary institution of The Salvation Army, some of the functions normally associated with a college are assumed by other corporate offices of The Salvation Army. The Training Principal, Assistant Training Principal, and Director of Personnel serve on the Territorial Candidates Council and provide input into the process of accepting candidates for training. Once a candidate is accepted as a Cadet, full responsibility for the Cadet's training rests upon CFOT staff. CFOT is privately endowed and funded, receiving no tax moneys of support.

SERVICE AREA CFOT supports the Salvation Army’s USA Western Territory. As such, its service area consists of: • • • • •

The 13 western states, The Territory of Guam, The Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, The Federated States of Micronesia, and The Republic of the Marshall Islands.

For administrative purposes, the Territory is divided into the following ten Divisions, each having its own Divisional Headquarters (DHQ) led by a Divisional Commander. Each DHQ has an Officer appointed to oversee the recruitment and admissions processing of potential Cadets from their division.

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THE COLLEGE

Division

Geography

DHQ Location

Alaska

Alaska

Anchorage, AK

Cascade

Oregon and southern Idaho

Portland, OR

Del Oro

Sacramento and north, California

Sacramento, CA

Golden State

San Francisco south to Bakersfield, California

San Francisco, CA

Hawaii/Pacific Islands

Hawaii, Guam, the Marshall Islands, and Micronesia

Honolulu, HI

Intermountain

Colorado, Wyoming, Utah, and eastern Montana

Denver, CO

Northwest

Washington, northern Idaho, and western Montana

Seattle, WA

Sierra Del Mar

Southernmost California

San Diego, CA

Southern California

Los Angeles and Orange Counties north to San Luis Obispo

Long Beach, CA

Southwest

Arizona, New Mexico, and southern Nevada

Phoenix, AZ

CFOT’s Cadet population is representative of all the socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds found in this vast service area.

ADMISSIONS RECRUITMENT A Cadet attends the College for Officer Training with the sole aim of becoming a full-time minister within The Salvation Army. As such, recruitment is restricted to those, residing in the 13 western States, who feel called by God to become a Salvation Army Officer. The primary responsibility for recruitment, therefore, rests with the individual’s Corps Officers (pastors). The administrative process is supported, initially, by the Divisional Candidates and Recruitment Secretary and ultimately by the Territorial Candidates and Recruitment Secretary at Territorial Headquarters. Admission to the College is granted by the Territorial Candidates Council. PRE-TRAINING Before entering the College, all Candidates (prospective Cadets) are enrolled in Salvationism 101, a ten-week on-line course taught by Officers from the College. The course provides instruction on topics such as the role of the Salvation Army Officer, women in ministry, and the organizational structure of The Salvation Army. Since 2010 this course has been offered on-line rather than through correspondence. Salvationism 101 Completion Rates: Year

Incoming Cadets

Course Enrollment*

Completions

Completion Rate

2014

52

52

52

100

2015

55

55

55

100

*Cadets whose application is accepted within 10 weeks of reporting to the College are not able to enroll in Salvationism 101

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE COLLEGE

CAMPUS/PRINCIPAL TIMELINE 2015

Major (Dr.) Brian Saunders (2015- )

2011

Major (Dr.) Tim Foley (2011-15)

2008

Major Steve Smith (2008-11)

2004

Major Donald Hostetler (2004-08)

2002

Lt. Colonel Raymond Peacock (2002-04)

1998

Lt. Colonel Doug O’Brien (1998-2002)

1994

Major Terry Griffin (1994-98)

1990

Lt. Colonel Bill Luttrell (1990-94)

1986

Lt. Colonel Peter Chang (1986-90)

1983

Major Harold Anderson (1983-86)

1981

Lt. Colonel Eugene Rice (1981-83)

1979

Major Ronald Irwin (1979-81)

1975

Major Kenneth Hodder (1975-79)

1971

Brigadier Willard Evans (1971-75)

1967

Lt. Colonel Victor Newbould (1967-71)

1957

Colonel Harry Larsen (1957-67)

1953

Lt. Colonel Richard Fitton (1953-57)

1945

Lt. Colonel Reginald Marting (1945-53)

1941

Colonel Frank Wilmer (1941-45)

1935 - 1940 Silver Ave., San Francisco

1935

Lt. Colonel Arthur Hopkins (1935-41)

1928 - 1935

1930

Colonel William Sansom (1930-35)

1928

Lt. Colonel Clarence Boyd (1928-30)

1925

Colonel George Davis (1925-28)

1920

Colonel Andrew Crawford (1920-25)

Hawthorne Blvd Rancho Palos Verdes 1975 - Present

Laguna St., San Francisco 1940 - 1975

Valencia St., San Francisco

Valancia St., San Francisco 1920 - 1928

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THE COLLEGE

MISSION The mission of the College is embedded in the International Mission of The Salvation Army. On its own, “the purpose of the College for Officer Training is to develop men and women in knowledge, capabilities, spirit and character, who will be able to sustain and advance the mission of The Salvation Army in the salvation of the world.”

INTERNATIONAL MISSION OF THE SALVATION ARMY The international mission posted on campus in concert with the College mission is as follows: “The Salvation Army, an international movement, is an evangelical part of the universal Christian church. Its message is based on the Bible. Its ministry is motivated by the love of God. Its mission is to preach the gospel of Jesus Christ and to meet human needs in His name without discrimination.

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE COMMITMENT In 2008 the College further adopted as part of its overall mission an academic commitment statement. “The College’s mission, curriculum, instruction and assessments are aligned and implemented in ways that reflect current knowledge about the learning process and the preparation Cadets need for officership in The Salvation Army Western Territory. To be considered excellent, these four elements are integrated with field training experiences and a pervasive commitment to spiritual formation and officer development. This is to develop in our Cadets conceptual understanding and appropriate cognitive and ministerial skills that Cadets will be able to utilize when faced with new situations and challenges in their assignments wherever located.

CAMPUS CORE VALUES In 2009 the College adopted a set of core values that represent our collective values and guide our teaching and decision-making. The core values include: • • • • • • • • •

love for God, compassion, faithfulness, a commitment to proclaiming Salvation and Holiness, responsibility, integrity, servant ministry, kindness, and stewardship.

These values serve as constants and consistency markers in our ever-changing world. These core values represent our lifelong commitments to the College and to The Salvation Army.

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE COLLEGE

COMMITMENT TO PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT The College, as part of its WASC–ACCJC accreditation, is committed to an inclusive and comprehensive planning process which takes the form of a three year Strategic Plan for the College. The plan guides the resource allocation and budgeting process and allows the College to thoughtfully and intentionally fund the programs and projects that are most important to the campus. The Strategic Plan also allows for projects to be tracked and funded, or in those cases where funds may not yet be available, reassigned to another plan year or modified in line with the resource reality or removed from the plan. The College also is invested in documenting the academic and co-curricular learning and the growth in spiritual, character and leadership assets that occurs on the campus and at continually improving the academic and student life programs based on feedback from Cadets, the faculty and staff, and input from the officers in the field. The College maintains an up-to-date Course Outlines of Record File, a set of Student Learning Outcomes for each course offered at the College, quarterly assessments of such outcomes, and uses this course data to assess the interrelated program or departmental outcomes and the total institutional outcomes. The faculty and staff meet annually with the Cadets to review the reported outcomes for each class of students, and the Crestmont Council, the College governing authority, also meets with representative Cadets to converse about the College’s intentions and the actual perceptions and experiences of the Cadets. The Crestmont Council has taken an active role in the program review and effectiveness process on the campus. The council and the College is dedicated to ensuring the College’s programs are fully accredited and that the College is effective in collecting and using assessment data as part of a continuous cycle of enhancement of the programs at Crestmont.

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THE COLLEGE

INSTITUTIONAL LEARNING OUTCOMES The purpose of the College for Officer Training is to develop men and women in knowledge, capabilities, and spirit and character, who will be able to sustain and advance the mission of The Salvation Army in the salvation of the world. To that end the College has adopted the following 11 institutional student learning outcomes and a concurrent set of four institutional support goals that undergird the desired learning outcomes. In addition, the College promotes the need for continuous learning and has an extensive network of professional development opportunities as evidence of its commitment to lifelong learning. 1. Knowledge. Upon graduation, Cadets will demonstrate the knowledge necessary to “sustain and advance the mission of The Salvation Army in the salvation of the world.” This will require comprehensive knowledge of the following areas: 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4

The Bible and its application The theology of the Christian church and Salvation Army distinctives. The Salvation Army administrative and business principles, practices, procedures and policies. Policies and practices regarding The Salvation Army’s worship traditions, Corps programs and evangelical practices.

2. Capabilities. Upon graduation, Cadets will demonstrate the capabilities necessary to “sustain and advance the mission of The Salvation Army in the salvation of the world.” This will require capabilities in the following areas. 2.1 Communicating in written, spoken, visual and artistic forms to diverse audiences. 2.2 Locating, evaluating, and using print materials, personal communications, observations, and electronic media to solve problems. 2.3 Effectiveness in Christian leadership that reflects multi-cultural sensitivity, global awareness and community building for the development of self and others. 2.4 Developing and managing resources (fiscal, human, physical and technology). 3. Spirit and Character. Upon graduation, Cadets will demonstrate the spirit and character necessary to “sustain and advance the mission of the Salvation Army in the world.” This will require that graduates demonstrate: 3.1 A continuing and disciplined commitment to personal, spiritual and leadership development and Bible study. 3.2 The integrity and ethics and skills set necessary for effective decision-making. 3.3 A commitment to wellness and self-care that promotes a healthy lifestyle and officership.

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE COLLEGE

INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT GOALS 1. Vital Christian environments built upon Wesleyan Holiness Principles The College for Officer Training provides a pervasive Christian environment that fosters the integration of academic and Cadet-life programs as well as experiential field training. 2. High Quality Integrated Spiritual Development, Learning and Living Programs Consistent with the College’s mission and purpose, it promotes academic excellence and spiritual maturity by offering high quality programs and services. 3. Mission-Driven Classroom and Field-Training Experiences The College has a mission congruent with the international mission of The Salvation Army and undergirded by a formal Academic Excellence Commitment and Campus Core Values. The mission is evident in all aspects of the college and a particular focus in classrooms and field-training programs. 4. Strategic Plan-Based Budget and Resourcing of Programs to Support the Mission The College has a Board-approved three-year Strategic Plan that matches goals with resources on a priority basis to adequately support the ongoing academic and spiritual mission, purposes, and programs at the College.

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THE COLLEGE

KEY DATES Summer 2015 Summer Intensive Ends .................................August 3 Summer Break ............................................August 4-16 First-Year Cadets Arrive (by 12pm) ............August 18 Second-Year Cadets Return (by 8pm) ........August 18 Orientation ................................................August 19-28 Fall Quarter (11 Weeks) Fall Quarter Begins .......................................August 31 Labor Day Holiday....................................September 7 Welcome Banquet ....................................September 11 Welcome of Cadets ..................................September 12 Fall Blitz....................................................October 16-19 Fall Quarter Ends ....................................November 12 Interim Period (5 weeks) Interim Period Begins .............................November 16 Christmas Intensive ......November 17 - December 23 Interim Period Ends .................................December 23 Christmas Break ...................December 24 - January 1 Cadet’s Return ................................................January 2 Winter Quarter (11 Weeks) Winter Quarter Begins ...................................January 4 Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday ..................January 18 Future Officer’s Fellowship (1st Yrs) .....February 5-7 Retreat (2nd Yrs) .......................................February 5-7 President’s Day Holiday ...........................February 15 Winter Quarter Ends ......................................March 17 Spring Quarter (10 Weeks) Spring Quarter Begins ....................................March 21 Good Friday .....................................................March 25 Easter Sunday ..................................................March 27 Spring Campaigns .....................................April 15 - 20 NAOC ...........................................................April 21-24 Memorial Day Holiday/Picnic ........................May 30 Spring Quarter Ends ............................................June 2 Graduation/Commissioning Covenant Service (2nd Yrs) ................................June 5 Commencement & Silver Star Banquet ...........June 10 Commissioning ...................................................June 11 Summer Intensive Begins (New 2nd Yrs) .......June 15 New Lieutenants Depart ...................................June 15


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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE COLLEGE

BUDGET FUNDING/INCOME 2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15

Endowment

$

4,322,680 $

5,620,757 $

6,641,541 $

6,316,389 $

7,443,357

THQ General Fund

$

2,245,856 $

2,556,890 $

3,156,924 $

3,094,238 $

2,844,676

Donations

$

17,057 $

5,518 $

45,000 $

4,282 $

10,000

Fundraising

$

2,726 $

0 $

5,000 $

0 $

0

Auxiliary Enterprise

$

193,777 $

219,053 $

8,700 $

158,159 $

177,000

Tuition & Fees

$

123,781 $

50,684 $

0 $

51,330 $

0

Miscellaneous

$

50,957 $

60,014 $

62,000 $

125,487 $

250,000

$

6,956,834 $

8,512,916 $

9,919,165 $

9,749,885 $

10,725,033

TOTALS

EXPENDITURES* 2010-11

2011-12

2012-13

2013-14

2014-15*

Academic/Instruction

$

839,312 $

871,744 $

1,005,742 $

922,903 $

961,966

Student Services

$

1,898,175 $

1,889,020 $

2,498,828 $

1,929,237 $

2,070,262

Property Maintenance

$

2,284,722 $

2,788,123 $

2,865,567 $

3,470,580 $

3,954,034

Operations

$

1,413,002 $

2,458,049 $

3,179,055 $

2,969,768 $

3,294,219

Auxiliary Enterprise

$

189,411 $

227,994 $

9,640 $

131,471 $

120,098

Field Training

$

312,294 $

277,986 $

360,333 $

325,926 $

324,454

$

6,936,916 $

8,512,916 $

9,919,165 $

9,749,885 $

10,725,033

TOTALS

*Budgeted expenditures - actual data not available at time of publication.

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THE COLLEGE

CAMPUS MAP

!

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


T HE C ADETS


THE CADETS

ENROLLMENT Enrollment at CFOT occurs once a year with Cadets moving through the training program as a cohort (session). The academic year begins in late August with either new Cadets beginning the twoyear training program or Cadets continuing into their second year. On rare occasions the number of Cadets in the second-year session is augmented by the return of Cadets who left the program before completion. Though not duplicated in enrollment data, these Cadets are included in the data for Cadets eligible for graduation and Commissioning. INTERNATIONAL CADETS CFOT has a history of receiving Cadets from the Korean Territory. These Cadets join the secondyear session to complete the second half of their training experience and typically return to Korea for their appointments as Salvation Army Officers. The class of 2013 had two Cadets from the Korean Territory join during their second-year. In addition, the Western Territory has recently agreed to assist the Denmark Territory by providing the complete training experience for some of its future Officers. In 2013 this resulted in International Cadets being included for the first time in the incoming first-year session. However, neither the current incoming first-year or returning second-year sessions have international students. ENROLLMENT DATA CFOT’s enrollment data are detailed in the following charts and tables. Total enrollment as of the Fall of each given year:

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Incoming first-year Cadets

19

15

30

43

46

61

62

44

52

55

Returning second-year Cadets

16

13

15

26

43

45

59

57

39

51

Additional second-year Cadets

0

0

3

2

3

1

3

0

0

0

TOTAL ENROLLMENT

35

28

48

71

92

107

124

101

91

106

Total enrollment as of the Fall of each given year.

71 35

28

2006

2007

2015-16 FACT BOOK

92

107

124 101

91

106

48

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

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THE CADETS Number of incoming (first-year) Cadets in the Fall of given year.

62

61 43

46

2009

2010

52

55

2014

2015

44

30

19

15

2006

2007

2008

2011

2012

2013

CFOT’s service area (the USA Western Territory), is divided into 10 geographic regions (Divisions). The table and chart below detail enrollment by Division. Number of incoming (first-year) Cadets in the Fall of given year, by location:

DIVISION

2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015

TOTALS

Alaska

2

0

0

2

2

0

0

2

3

1

12

Cascade

1

2

4

4

2

0

5

2

5

2

27

Del Oro

1

1

0

8

5

10

7

12

7

9

60

Golden State

4

4

2

2

7

6

9

4

6

5

49

Hawaii/ Pacific Islands

0

1

0

1

2

6

4

4

2

3

23

Intermountain

0

2

1

5

5

7

1

4

2

1

28

Northwest

8

1

4

7

6

6

8

0

3

4

47

Sierra Del Mar

0

0

0

3

4

8

7

6

8

3

39

Southern California

2

1

11

4

5

6

12

5

7

20

73

Southwest

1

3

8

7

8

12

6

5

9

7

66

Denmark Territory

-

-

-

-

-

-

3

0

0

-

3

19

15

30

43

46

61

62

44

52

55

427

Number of 1st year Cadets in Fall 2015

20

12

9

8 4

Average number of 1st year Cadets for 2006-15

7.3

6 1

1.2

2

5

4.9 3

2.7

2.3

1

2.8

4.7

4

7

6.6

3.9

3

es t w So ut

A C rn he So ut

M ar D el a rr

N

or t

hw Si e

In t

er

m ou n

ta

es t

in

PI ai aw H

ol de n G

i&

St a

te

ro O D el

as ca de C

A la sk a

0

Division

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

CADET DIVERSITY Cadets come to CFOT for the singular purpose of being trained and prepared for full-time ministry as a Salvation Army Officer, in response to the calling they feel God has placed on their lives. Cadets hear and respond to this call at all stages of life, further contributing to CFOT’s rich diversity. Cadets come to CFOT with differing levels of educational experience and preparedness (as detailed below), and various employment backgrounds and life-experiences. The following data is based on the 55 incoming first-year Cadets and 51 returning second-year Cadets (who live on Campus). The numbers in parentheses refer to the accompanying pie chart. Gender Incoming Session

Returning Session

#

%

#

%

Combined %

Male

25

45.5

24

47.1

46

Female

30

54.5

27

52.9

54

Male 46%

Female 54%

Marital Status Incoming Session

Returning Session

#

%

#

%

Combined %

Single (1)

10

18.2

13

25.5

22

Single w/ children* (2)

2

3.6

2

3.9

4

Married no children* (3)

22

40.0

27

52.9

46

Married w/ children* (4)

21

38.2

9

17.6

28

1 22%

4 26%

2 4%

3 48%

* Includes only children living on campus

Age Incoming Session

Returning Session

#

%

#

%

Combined %

Youngest Cadet

10

-

21

-

-

Oldest Cadet

10

-

54

-

-

Average Age

33

-

33

-

-

Aged 24 or younger

15

27.3

10

19.6

24

Aged 25 or older

40

72.7

41

80.4

76

Aged 18-20 (1)

3

5.5

0

0.0

3

Aged 21-24 (2)

12

21.8

10

19.6

21

Aged 25-34 (3)

17

30.9

20

39.2

35

Aged 35-44 (4)

16

29.1

12

23.5

26

Aged 45-54 (5)

7

12.7

9

17.6

15

2015-16 FACT BOOK

1 3% 5 15% 4 26%

2 21% 3 35%

!19


THE CADETS

4 7%

Highest Level of Education Completed Incoming Session

Returning Session

#

%

#

%

Combined %

HS Diploma/GED (1)

34

61.8

33

64.7

63

Associate (2)

5

9.1

4

7.8

8

Bachelors (3)

12

21.8

11

21.6

22

Masters (4)

4

7.3

3

5.9

7

3 22% 1 63%

2 8%

Salvationist Generation* #

%

#

%

Combined %

1st

39

70.9

39

76.5

74

80

2nd

4

7.3

6

11.8

9

60

3rd

4

7.3

0

0.0

4

4th

2

3.6

2

3.9

4

5th

4

7.3

2

3.9

6

20

6th

2

3.6

0

0.0

2

0

7th

0

0.0

2

3.9

2

100

74

40

4

6

4

2

2

5th

6th

7th

3

4

7 Mixed

9

Pacific Islander

Returning Session

African American

Incoming Session

1st 2nd 3rd 4th

* The number of generations of the Cadet’s family that have been Salvationists.

Ethnicity #

%

White

27

49.1

28

54.9

52

Hispanic/Latino

12

21.8

11

21.6

22

Asian

8

14.5

3

5.9

10

African American

1

1.8

2

3.9

3

Pacific Islander

2

3.6

2

3.9

4

Mixed

5

9.1

2

3.9

7

Native American

0

0.0

3

5.9

3

! 20

100 80 60

52

40

22

20 0

10

3 Native American

%

Asian

#

Combined %

Hispanic/Latino

Returning Session

White

Incoming Session

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

LANGUAGES SPOKEN In addition to English, the following languages are spoken by one or more Cadets at CFOT: • • • •

Chinese Greek Lao Tagalog

• • • •

French Spanish American Sign Language Portuguese

• • •

German Marshallese Korean

Language Ability Incoming Session

Returning Session

#

%

#

%

Combined %

English Only (no)

37

67.3

35

68.6

68

Bilingual (yes)

18

32.7

16

31.4

32

No 68%

Yes 32%

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE The following number of Cadets have received instruction and assistance each year from the College’s English Development Specialist:

14

15 12

12 10 8

9 6

5

4

2

3 0

8

6 0 2006

2007

2015-16 FACT BOOK

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

!21


THE CADETS

CADET ACHIEVEMENT DATA GRADE POINT AVERAGE The average GPA for the last ten years of graduating Cadets is: 4 3.13

3.19

3.16

2.96

2007

2008

2009

3.29

3.49

3.49

3.51

3.46

3.56

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

3 2 1 0

2006

Graduating Year

Course Success The table below details the course success rates for the previous five academic years. Grades Awarded Academic Year

All

P

A

B

C

Success

2010-11

2089

271

1167

511

99

98.0

2011-12

2610

280

1367

715

175

97.2

2012-13

2975

367

1469

859

212

97.7

2013-14

2486

178

1432

710

141

99.0

2014-15

2148

140

1195

651

136

98.8

Overall

10160

1096

5435

2795

627

98.0

*Course success is defined as the percentage of students enrolled in a course who receive a grade of P, A, B, or C.

The overall course success rate for 2010-15 is 98%

COURSE COMPLETION The table below details the course completion rates for the 2014-15 academic year Units

Units

Attempted

Awarded

Completion Rate

Fall

1277

1273

99.7

Winter

1183

1183

100.0

Spring

1372

1367

99.6

3832

3823

99.8

Quarter

Overall

Completion Rate = Total Units Awarded as a percentage of Total Units Attempted

! 22

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

TWO-YEAR RETENTION RATE Though every effort is made to avoid it, inevitably each year a small number of Cadets leave the College. The table below details, for each graduating year, the retention rate for Cadets completing the two-years of the training program. Class of: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Overall Initial Number of Cadets in Session*

16

16

19

15

30

43

46

61

62

44

352

Cadets Commissioned/Graduated**

12

16

16

13

25

43

40

55

57

40

317

Retention Rate

75

100

84

87

83

100

87

90

92

91

90

*data in this table does not include those joining the Session as second-year Cadets **includes only Cadets who graduate/are Commissioned after two years.

Two-year retention rates

100 100 75 80 60 40 20 0 2006

2007

84

87

83

2008

2009

2010

100

2011

87

90

92

91

2012

2013

2014

2015

Graduating Year

Of the 352 Cadets enrolled as first-year Cadets in the last ten years, 317 graduated and were commissioned on time (after two years of training), giving a two-year retention rate of 90%.

GRADUATION DATA Cadets who join a Session as a second-year Cadet, graduate after an additional third year, or resign and reenroll within 10 years are reflected in the graduation data below. Graduation Year: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Overall Initial number of Cadets in Session

16

16

19

15

30

43

46

61

62

44

-

Cadets continuing for third-year*

1

0

2

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

-

Additions to session

0

0

0

3

2

3

1

3

0

0

-

Cadets eligible for graduation

15

16

17

18

31

46

47

64

62

44

360

Cadets graduating

12

16

16

16

27

46

41

58

57

40

329

80

100

94

89

87

100

87

91

92

91

91

Graduation Rate

*and Cadets who resigned but re-enrolled within ten years. To avoid duplicated data these Cadets are considered eligible for graduation only once.

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!23


THE CADETS Eligible for Graduation 65 52 39 26 13 0

Graduated 64 46 46

15 12

16 16

17 16

18 16

2006

2007

2008

2009

47

31 27

2010

2011

62

58

57 44 40

41

2012

2013

2014

2015

Graduating Year

Of the 360 Cadets eligible for graduation in the last ten years, 329 graduated and were commissioned, giving a graduation rate of 91%.

The primary purpose of CFOT is to prepare men and women for full-time ministry as Salvation Army Officers. As such, all Cadets who successfully complete the Officer training program receive a Certificate of Salvation Army Officer Training and are Commissioned and Ordained as a Salvation Army Officer. In addition, most Cadets also receive an Associate of Arts Degree in Ministry.

Graduation Year: 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Overall Cadets Eligible for Graduation

15

16

17

18

31

46

47

64

62

44

360

Cadets graduating

12

16

16

16

27

46

41

58

57

40

329

Cadets receiving Certificate only

0

3

6

5

5

3

1

2

7

2

34

Cadets receiving AA (& Certificate)

12

13

10

11

22

43

40

56

50

38

295

% Graduates Receiving AA

100

81

63

69

81

93

98

97

88

95

90

Degree Completion Rate

80

81

59

61

71

93

85

88

81

86

82

Graduated with AA and Certificate of Completion

56 58

60 40 20 0

Graduated

16 16

12 12

13 16

2005

2006

2007

10

16

2008

11

16

2009

22

43 46

40 41

2011

2012

50

57 38 40

27

2010

2013

2014

2015

Graduating Year

! 24

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

Of the 329 Cadets who graduated in the last ten years, 295 (90%) received an Associates Degree.

Of the 360 Cadets eligible for graduation in the last ten years, 295 received an AA degree, giving a degree completion rate of 82%.

JOB PLACEMENT Upon successful completion of the Officer Training program at CFOT, graduating Cadets are Commissioned and ordained as Salvation Army Officers and provided with an appointment in fullministry at a Salvation Army Corps or other facility. As such...

...100% of graduating Cadets receive job placement.

2014-15 INSTITUTION SET STANDARDS The following table details CFOT’s achievement of its Institutional-Set Standards for the 2014-15 academic year. Standard

Target

Achievement

Course completion

85%

99.8%

Exceeded

Course success

85%

98.8%

Exceeded

Student retention*

85%

91%

Exceeded

Degree completion**

80%

95%

Exceeded

Job placement

100%

100%

Met

* Percentage of 1st year Cadets enrolled in Fall 2013 who returned Fall 2014 ** Percentage of incoming Cadets in 2013 and Cadets joining the cohort in its second year who received an AA degree.

CFOT met or exceeded all of its Institution-Set Standards for the 2014-15 Academic Year  

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!25


THE CADETS

OFFICER RETENTION The purpose of CFOT is to prepare men and women for their ministry as Salvation Army Officers. How long a person remains an Officer is therefore, in a small part, a measure of the success of the College. Using increments of five years from graduation, the tables and charts below illustrate the number of Officers who resigned or have been terminated over the last 29 years.

Grad. Year

Number Graduating

1986

Number terminated/resigning after... 0-5 years

6-10 years

11-15 years

16-20 years

Total

%

33

4

7

7

0

18

55

1987

28

1

6

5

2

14

50

1988

35

7

8

4

0

19

54

1989

33

4

3

3

2

12

36

1990

32

11

7

7

0

25

78

1991

48

13

13

4

0

30

63

1992

46

12

6

2

0

20

43

1993

33

6

7

5

0

18

55

1994

62

14

12

4

4

34

55

1995

41

7

13

2

0

22

54

1996

40

8

1

6

5

20

50

1997

30

6

4

0

2

12

40

1998

37

6

10

3

0

19

51

1999

27

7

4

2

0

13

48

2000

26

4

1

4

-

9

35

2001

31

6

3

0

-

9

29

2002

25

7

2

0

-

9

36

2003

36

11

0

0

-

11

31

2004

32

4

7

2

-

13

41

2005

16

0

1

-

-

1

6

2006

12

5

0

-

-

5

42

2007

16

1

0

-

-

1

6

2008

16

2

2

-

-

4

25

2009

16

4

1

-

-

5

31

2010

27

1

-

-

-

1

4

2011

46

4

-

-

-

4

9

2012

41

1

-

-

-

1

2

2013

58

3

-

-

-

3

5

2014

57

1

-

-

-

1

2

Totals

980

160

118

60

15

353

36

% of Graduates

16

12

6

2

% of resignations

45.3

33.4

17.0

4.2

! 26

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

45.3% of resignations/terminations occur within the first five years of Officership. 33.4% of resignations/terminations occur between six and ten years of Officership. 17.0% of resignations/terminations occur between 11 and 15 years of Officership. 4.2% of resignations/terminations occur between 16 and 20 years of Officership.

Of the 229 Cadets who graduated within the last 5 years*, 96% are still Officers. * as of June, 2015

OVERALL STATISTICS* Graduating Classess

Total Commissioned

Total Leaving

Retention %

left within 5 years

1986-2014

980

160

84

left after 5 years but before 10

1986-2009

751

118

84

left after 10 years but before 15

1986-2004

675

60

91

left after 15 years but before 20

1986-1999

525

15

97

* as of June, 2015

98

95

2013

98

2014

91

2012

58

96

2011

2003

69

2009

2002

75

2008

2001

59

2007

69

94

2006

64

2005

71

2004

65

2000

46

52

1999

45

49 1998

45

60

1997

38

1996

1990

1989

1988

1987

1986

22

1992

46

50

1995

57

1994

64

1991

45

50

1993

94

2010

Percentage of graduated Cadets not resigned/terminated*

Graduating Year

*Does not include those who have been reinstated

Of the 980 Cadets who graduated between 1986 and 2014, 353 have resigned or been terminated, giving an Officer resignation/termination rate of 36%.

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!27


THE CADETS

COMMITMENT TO STUDENT LIFE The mission of the Personnel (Cadet Services) Department is to mentor, minister and model wholeness within the Crestmont community in order to prepare Cadets to become blood and fire officers, ready to meet human needs in His name without discrimination. This vital unit within the College is responsible for: •

promoting spiritual direction, development and spiritual leadership,

facilitating the development of knowledge and skills needed for Christian service,

modeling accountability in administrative operations and management, and

providing a comprehensive range of student services, including pastoral care, counseling, childcare, residential housing, nutrition and food services, and financial aid for Cadets.

The staff in this area are skilled in working with Cadets and their families and providing regular advising regarding decision-making and Council participation, grievances, disciplinary proceedings, Cadet conduct in terms of dress standards, use of scheduled and unscheduled time, attendance, chapel, campus relationships, health, pastoral care, counseling and mental health, Cadets councils, activity centers, the Cadet Wellness program, the Fitness Center, Cadet finances including loans and scholarships, safety, security, emergencies, food services, family care and teen programs. The Personnel Department staff are committed to Cadet assessment and outcomes in the College academic and co-curricular programs and have been so engaged over an extended period of time. The staff has high respect among Cadets for their authenticity and integrity as well as confidentiality, availability and general support for Cadets and their families. The development of officers of good character and the nurturing of Christian compassion and ministry are core goals of the institution. To that end, the staff in modeling for Cadets, play an essential role in the broader and more specific areas of Cadet education and training.

! 28

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE CADETS

FINANCIAL SUPPORT Cadets are not permitted to seek employment while enrolled at the College. Financial support (including payment of tuition) comes from numerous sources including the Cadet’s previous Corps (church), Divisional and Territorial administration, and the sources detailed below. Cadets are provided with all required texts. SCHOLARSHIPS Scholarships are available to Cadets whose parents are Salvation Army Officers and to Cadets who participated in certain Salvation Army Programs at their local Corps. Other donor-funded scholarships are also available. FINANCIAL AID Cadets who are veterans are eligible to receive financial aid. SALVATION ARMY LOANS Cadets who qualify may receive a Cadet loan and/or a Second Year Cadet loan. These are repaid in monthly installments following Commissioning.

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!29


THE CADETS

Page left blank intentionally

! 30

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


T HE S TAFF


THE STAFF

STAFF DEFINITIONS The permanent staffing of the College is broken down into the following groups: Officers*

Full-time employees

Part-time employees

On-call/ Temporary

Total

#

24

39

2

13

78

%

31

50

3

17

Temp Officers 17% 31%

PT 3%

FT 50%

*ordained pastors, assigned to the College by Territorial Headquarters

OFFICER-STAFF SERVICE 10

0

4

6

%

4

8

4

8

33

0

17

25

2 0

*as of July, 2015

Officer CFOT Appointment Length:* <1 year

1 year

2 years

3 years

4 years

5 years

6 years

7 years

#

9

2

1

8

0

4

0

0

%

38

8

4

33

0

17

0

0

# of Officers

10

16-20 years

21-25 years

26+ years

#

29

11

2

6

2

4

%

54

20

4

11

4

7

# of Employees

<5 years 5-10 years

11-15 years

2015-16 FACT BOOK

2 0

9

8 4

4

2

2 <1

1

1 2

0 3

4

5

29

24 18

11

12 6 0

*as of July, 2015

1

6

30

Employee Service at CFOT:*

2

8

0

*as of July, 2015

1

26+

8

2

6

2

4 26+

2

21-25

1

16-20

2

21-25

1

4

4

11-15

#

6

6

16-20

26+ years

6-10

21-25 years

3-5

16-20 years

11-15

11-15 years

1-2

6-10 years

5-10

3-5 years

<1

1-2 years

8

8

<5

<1 year

# of Officers

Officer Active Service Length:*

!33


THE STAFF

STAFF DIVERSITY Gender Employees*

Officers

Total

Male

22

12

34

Female

32

12

44

Female 56%

Male 44%

Ethnicity Employees

Officers

Total

African American (AA)

1

1

2

Asian

4

2

6

Hispanic/Latino

19

4

23

Multiracial

2

0

2

Native Alaskan (NA)

0

1

1

12

White

28

23

51

0

60

51

36

1 White

2

NA

Hispanic

6 Asian

2

Multiracial

23

24

AA

# of Staff

48

FACULTY The teaching responsibilities at the College are carried out by the qualified officers and employees (who teach in addition to their administrative responsibilities) and adjunct faculty. Other Officers and employees provide classroom support.

Officer Faculty ................................13 Employee Faculty...........................7 Adjunct Faculty ..............................8

Permanent Faculty Education: Bachelors .........................................3 Masters ............................................13 Doctorates .......................................4

! 34

Adjunct 29%

Officer 46% Employee 25%

Doctorate 20% MA 65%

BA 15%

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


THE STAFF

Adjunct Faculty Education: Bachelors .........................................2 Masters ............................................5 Doctorates .......................................1

Doctorate 13%

MA 63% BA 25%

FACULTY DIVERSITY Faculty Gender: Male..................................................13 Female ..............................................7

Female 35% Male 65%

Permanent Faculty Ethnicity: African American ...........................0 Asian ................................................1 Hispanic...........................................0 Native Alaskan (NA) .....................1 White ................................................18 Multiracial .......................................0

NA Asian 5% 5%

White 90%

Permanent Faculty Language Ability: In addition to English, the following languages are spoken by the permanent faculty: •

Spanish

German

French

Portuguese

Korean

American Sign Language

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!35


THE STAFF

EDUCATOR OF THE YEAR Each year, the College participates in the Palos Verdes Peninsula Rotary Club’s ‘Educator of the Year’ program which recognizes educators from schools and colleges on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. In 2014, Major Ivan Wild received this distinguished award. Other current and past faculty to have been honored are:

! 36

Ms. Sheila Chatterjee (2013)

Major (Dr.) Brian Saunders (2012)

Major (Dr.) Brian Jones (2011)

Major (Dr.) Tim Foley (2010)

Captain (Dr.) Nigel Cross (2009)

Captain Kevin Jackson (2008)

Dr. Duncan Sutton (2007)

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


G OVERNANCE


GOVERNANCE

ORGANIZATIONAL CHART The Salvation Army

BOARD OF DIRECTORS USA Western Territory

CRESTMONT COUNCIL INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND ACCREDITATION

PRINCIPAL/CEO

CAMPUS CHAPLIN

ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL

PERSONNEL • Cadet Services • Cadet Health • Counseling • Campus Diversity • Family Care Center • Spiritual Formation

FIELD TRAINING

BUSINESS ADMIN.

• On-campus practicums • Off-campus practicums • Spring and Fall Campaigns • Supervised Ministry Courses

• Budgets and Resource Allocation • Financial Counseling • IT • Property • Campus Security • Transportation • HR (Nonofficers) • Development, PR, and Marketing • Graphic Design/ Website

CURRICULUM • Academic Services • Academic Records • Music Ministries • Library • Seminars • Museum • Linguistic Services • Educational Specialist • Tutoring • Pre-training

CAMPUS SERVICES • Cadet Housing • Food Services • Special Events • Conference Center

CFOT ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP Major Brian Saunders (Dr.) .....................Training Training Principal Major Robert Birks ...................................Assistant Training Principal Major Jeff Martin ......................................Director of Personnel Major Brian Jones (Dr.) ............................Director of Curriculum Major Nancy Helms-Cox ........................Director of Field Training Captain Kelly Nolan ................................Director of Business Administration Major Stacy Birks .....................................Director of Campus Services Dr. James Hartman ..................................Director of Institutional Planning and Accreditation

2015-16 FACT BOOK

!39


GOVERNANCE

CFOT COUNCIL/COMMITTEE STRUCTURE CFOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision-making process is based on its Council/Committee structure. Councils and Committees are collegiate and collaborative and membership is representative of all constituents of the institution. EXECUTIVE COUNCIL The Executive Council is the final approving body for internal decisions. It is comprised of the following members: Major Brian Saunders (Dr.) .....................Training Principal Major Robert Birks ...................................Assistant Principal Dr. James Hartman ..................................Director of Institutional Planning and Accreditation Major Brian Jones (Dr.) ............................Director of Curriculum Captain Ragina Halverson ....................Family Care Director Captain Kelly Nolan ................................Director of Business Administration Major Jeff Martin ......................................Director of Personnel Major Nancy Helms-Cox ........................Director of Field Training Major Stacy Birks .....................................Director of Campus Services

OTHER COUNCILS/COMMITTEES The internal decision-making process is informed by the following Councils and Committees: Council/Committee

Chair

Catalog Review Committee

Major Brian Jones, Director of Curriculum

Catering Council

Major Stacy Birks, Director of Campus Services

Command Finance Council

Major Brian Saunders, Training Principal

Coordinating Council

Major Robert Birks, Assistant Training Principal

Curriculum Council

Major Brian Jones, Director of Curriculum

Employee Committee

Captain Kelly Nolan, Director of Business Administration

Family Care Committee

Captain Gina Halverson, Family Care Director

Human Resources Committee

Major Brian Saunders, Training Principal

Institutional Effectiveness Committee

Dr. James Hartman, Dir. Institutional Planning & Accreditation

IT Committee

Captain Kelly Nolan, Director of Business Administration

Library Council

Sheila Chatterjee, Director of Library and Museum Services

Personnel Council

Major Jeff Martin, Director of Personnel

Property Subcommittee

Captain Kelly Nolan, Director of Business Administration

Review Council

Major Brian Saunders, Training Principal

Strategic Planning Council

Major Brian Saunders, Training Principal

! 40

THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


GOVERNANCE

ADMINISTRATIVE LEADERSHIP INVOLVEMENT Membership of all councils consists of administrators, faculty, staff and Cadets. All senior administrative leaders (who are mostly also faculty) sit on more than one of CFOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main councils, as detailed below: Executive/ Strategic Planning

Command Finance Council

Principal*

C

C

Assistant Principal*

X

X

Director of Curriculum*

X

X

Director of Personnel*

X

X

Director Campus Services

X

Director of Business Admin.*

Curriculum Council

Personnel Council

Coordinating Council

Review Council

X

C

X

C

X

C

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

Director of Field Training*

X

X

X

X

X

Director of Institutional Planning & Accreditation*

X

X

X

X

C

C = Chair *also faculty

CRESTMONT COUNCIL Governance of CFOT is provided by Crestmont Council. The Council is a diverse group of corporate, educational, and religious leaders, both local and from throughout the USA Western Territory. The Council meets four times annually. EXECUTIVE/NOMINATING COMMITTEE Mr. William Flinn, Chair

**Major Brian Saunders

**Major Robert Birks

Colonel Dave Hudson, Vice Chair

*Dr. Dean Colli

**Major Stacy Birks

TBD, Treasurer

*Captain Stacy Cross

**Dr. James Hartman

*Dr. Steven Gray, Secretary *Committee Chairs

*Mr. John Schuricht

**Ex-Officio

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE Dr. Dean Colli, Chair .....................................Director, Professional Personnel Leasing, Inc. Dr. David Nystrom, Vice Chair ....................Provost and Senior Vice President, Biola University Dr. James Adams ...........................................President, Life Pacific College Mr. Lou Drobnick .........................................Executive Vice Chancellor, Pepperdine University Dr. Ruth Mulnard .........................................Associate Professor/Nursing Program Director, UC Irvine Major Brian Jones (staff support) ..................Director of Curriculum, CFOT Major Robert Birks (staff support) ................Assistant Training Principal, CFOT

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GOVERNANCE

CADET LIFE COMMITTEE Captain Stacy Cross, Chair ...........................Corps Officer, The Salvation Army Lt. Col. Shawn Posillico, Vice Chair ............Divisional Commander, The Salvation Army Ms. Elsa Cisar ...............................................Social Services Director, The Salvation Army Mr. Bill Ott, III ...............................................Senior Director, Bank of New York Mellon Ms. Julia Parton .............................................Director of Development, Palos Verdes Art Center Cadet Larry Carmichael (ex-officio) ............Cadet, CFOT Major Nancy Helms-Cox (staff support) .....Director of Field Training, CFOT Major Jeff Martin (staff support) ...................Director of Personnel, CFOT

FINANCE AND PROPERTY COMMITTEE Mr. John Schuricht, Chair .............................President, Palos Verdes Engineering Colonel Dave Hudson ..................................Chief Secretary, The Salvation Army Major Clement Leslie ....................................Area Coordinator, The Salvation Army Mr. Tom Melott .............................................Territorial Finance Director, The Salvation Army Mr. Dean Reuter ............................................Architect Principal, Reuter & Reuter, Inc. Mr. Viktor Rzeteljski ....................................Area Managing Partner, KPMG LLP Major Stacy Birks (ex-officio) ........................Director of Campus Services, CFOT Captain Kelly Nolan (staff support) .............Director of Business Administration, CFOT Captain Catherine Nolan (staff support) .....Finance Officer, CFOT

PLANNING AND ACCREDITATION COMMITTEE Dr. Steven Gray, Chair ..................................Superintendent, Pasadena Christian School Dr. Carolyn Inouye, Vice Chair ....................Dean of Math, Science, Health, & Athletics, Oxnard College Mr. Eric Rodrigues ........................................Banking Professional, Porter Ranch, CA Dr. James Hartman (staff support) ...............Director of Institutional Planning and Accreditation, CFOT Dr. Duncan Sutton (staff support) ................Coordinator of Research & Institutional Effectiveness, CFOT TBD (ex-officio) ...............................................Cadet, CFOT

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


A PPENDICES


APPENDICES

APPENDIX A: GLOSSARY OF SA TERMS Term/Phrase

Definition

‘Blood and Fire’

The Army’s motto; refers to the blood of Jesus Christ and the fire of the Holy Spirit. Synonymous with the spirit of Salvationism.

Board of Directors

Corporate Officers for The Salvation Army Western Territory USA.

Cadet

A Salvationist in training for Officership

Candidate

Individual making application to enter the College for Officer Training program.

Candidate’s Council

Council designated to determine an individual’s suitability for entrance into the Training College as a cadet.

CFOT

College for Officer Training

Corps

Local Salvation Army church and community service center.

Crestmont Council

The Board of Governance of the College for Officer Training at Crestmont.

Division

Smaller geographic area within a Territory under the command of a Divisional Commander.

Divisional Headquarters

Administrative offices for a Division (DHQ).

The General

The Officer elected to the supreme command of the Army throughout the world. All appointments are made, and all regulations issued, under the General’s authority.

Instructors

Resident instructors are faculty members whose full-time appointment or employment is at the College. Non-resident instructors are not employees of the College.

Officer

A Salvationist who has left secular concerns at God’s call and has been trained, commissioned and ordained to service and leadership. An officer is a recognized minister of religion.

Officer - ranks

Lieutenant, Captain, Major, Lt.-Colonel, Colonel, Commissioner, General.

Salvationist

Member of a Salvation Army Corps (church).

Session

Term used to refer to individuals matriculated in the same year. Always given an identifying name of reference: the Heralds of the Good News session of cadets, 2005-2007.

Territorial Commander

Chief ecclesiastical and administrative officer within a Salvation Army territory: President of the Board of Directors and chief corporate officer.

Territorial Headquarters (THQ)

Administrative offices for a territory. The Western Territory USA includes 13 western states, the Marshall Islands, Guam and Micronesia. The Salvation Army in the USA is divided into four such geographical territories, each with its own College/School for Officer Training.

Territory

A country, part of a country or several countries combined, in which Salvation Army work is organized under a territorial commander.

Training Principal

Chief Executive Officer (President) of the CFOT. The designation “Principal” is terminology employed by The Salvation Army for the head of all of its Colleges for Officer Training throughout the world.

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APPENDICES

APPENDIX B: DOCTRINES OF THE SALVATION ARMY We believe that the Scriptures of the Old and New Testaments were given by inspiration of God, and that they only constitute the Divine rule of Christian faith and practice. 
 
 We believe that there is only one God, who is infinitely perfect, the Creator, Preserver, and Governor of all things, and who is the only proper object of religious worship. 
 
 We believe that there are three persons in the Godhead - the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost, undivided in essence and co-equal in power and glory. 
 
 We believe that in the person of Jesus Christ the Divine and human natures are united, so that He is truly and properly God and truly and properly man. 
 
 We believe that our first parents were created in a state of innocency, but by their disobedience, they lost their purity and happiness, and that in consequence of their fall, all men have become sinners, totally depraved, and as such are justly exposed to the wrath of God. 
 
 We believe that the Lord Jesus Christ has by His suffering and death made an atonement for the whole world so that whosoever will may be saved. 
 
 We believe that repentance toward God, faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and regeneration by the Holy Spirit are necessary to salvation. 
 
 We believe that we are justified by grace through faith in our Lord Jesus Christ and that he that believeth hath the witness in himself. 
 
 We believe that continuance in a state of salvation depends upon continued obedient faith in Christ. 
 
 We believe that it is the privilege of all believers to be wholly sanctified, and that their whole spirit and soul and body may be preserved blameless unto the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ. 
 
 We believe in the immortality of the soul, the resurrection of the body, in the general judgement at the end of the world, in the eternal happiness of the righteous, and in the endless punishment of the wicked.

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THE SALVATION ARMY COLLEGE FOR OFFICER TRAINING


The Salvation Army

C OLLEGE FOR O FFICE T RAINING at Crestmont

30840 Hawthorne Blvd., Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 310.265.6300 www.crestmont.edu

Office of Institutional Planning and Accreditation Dr. James Hartman Dr. Duncan Sutton

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