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BARCELONA CONFERENCE EDITION

November 2019

05 Why product development is important 12 How crowdsourcing and AI help OTC brands make their retail execution perfect in every pharmacy 28 How to think about market attractiveness for african markets

A WORLD OF

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Thinking long term

Our new normal

For the future

CHINA

DISRUPTION

CONSUMER HEALTH INNOVATION


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WELCOME to the 14th Ceuta International Conference here in Barcelona. It is our pleasure to welcome back our existing alliance partners and the familiar faces from our network across the globe. We also extend a special welcome to our new members who are attending for the first time. I trust over the course of the conference that you will take the opportunity to meet and network with like-minded business people in this dynamic and ever changing industry, where outsourcing has become an integral part of the strategic plans of most manufacturing organisations. We look forward to exploring with you the opportunities that exist in driving sales and profit and the need to adapt and develop the services and solutions offered, to continually add value in creating mutual growth opportunities. Recent industry papers have highlighted the continuous growth and use of outsourcing within our industry, however this is balanced by the need for outsource providers to continually improve, adapt and offer flexibility in their service offerings. There is no one size fits all approach to this process, but manufacturers look for specific core elements to build a

Author:

Keith Garraty Ceuta International Director

platform for success in initially engaging with outsource providers delivering a suite of business services. Clients and customers both expect tangible benefits from the relationship in terms of both profit and levels of customer service. The vast majority of businesses working with outsource partners also see collaboration as an integral part of the process and therefore it is important to continue to develop and forge strong trust and develop open dialogues between all parties – Client / Partner / Customer. With this in place, new business development and agreed targets can be achieved with specific tailor made solutions encompassing more elements of the services offered. With the need to continually develop, add value and innovate, we believe the Ceuta International Alliance continues to offer the most cost effective outsource solutions in the world of Health and Beauty, delivering the incremental value added services that the industry demands. May I finally thank you all for your attendance and also extend my thanks to both our presenters and exhibitors for what promises to be a positive, interesting and enjoyable conference.


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CONTENTS 02 Welcome Keith Garrity, Ceuta International Director

05 Why product development is important Paul Widdop, Senior International Business Development Manager

06 Disruption: Our new normal Eleanor Winton, Founder

08 China: Thinking long-term Ellie Adams, Chief Executive Officer

12 How crowdsourcing and AI help OTC brands make their retail execution perfect in every pharmacy Andrey Eliseev, Chief Marketing Officer

16 Consumer Health innovation for the future Andy Tisman, Global Senior Principal Consumer Health

21 A manifesto: unlocking meaningful difference is the key to growing brands in health and wellbeing David Gray, Chief Executive Officer

24 Creating human-centred experiences Lizianne Bueno, International Business Development Executive

28 How to think about market attractiveness for African markets Ben Longman, Managing Director

30 Productivity matters for our future prosperity Hann–Ju Ho, Senior Economist

34 REVA Health, Our Story Francesc Roura, Chief Executive Officer

35 Thank you to our sponsors

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WHY PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT IS IMPORTANT Author:

Paul Widdop Senior International Business Development Manager

The long-term survival of an outsourcing business often hinges upon its ability to successfully introduce new products into its market place. These new products and their successful development can be the lifeblood of the company. Thus, NPD is a major consideration for most organisations. New products can provide the stimulus for the distributor to grow and produce profitable returns. Additionally, new products can gain new market shares and subsequently help to defend against competitive pressures. It is of little surprise that across our industry NPD is one of the leading areas for focus. At Ceuta we recognised this many years ago and have structured our 2 day International Conference to incorporate a key focus on NPD. The NPD session on day 2 of our annual conference, allows manufacturers the unique opportunity to present their brands to an international audience of brand building alliance partners covering over 100 international markets. It also allows our alliance partners to have one to one discussions with the manufacturers, to discuss the products in more detail and the launch opportunities in their defined markets. Once again, this year we have a stellar line up of brands looking to develop their international footprint. Manufacturers recognise the format of the Ceuta International Conference as a perfect platform to introduce, gain traction, and understand specific commercial criteria and local nuances to potentially launch their brand across multiple regions around the world. I look forward to welcoming all our alliance partners and manufacturers to this exciting part of the Ceuta International Conference.

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DISRUPTION

OUR NEW NORMAL Author:

Eleanor Winton Founder

The pace of change in the global environment is accelerating. Unprecedented geo-politics, exponential technologies, shifting demographics and new social norms are reshaping the business environment. At the heart of this evolving global landscape are consumers, who are becoming ever more powerful in driving the agenda. Those consumers demand more from the products they buy and the businesses that sell them. They expect the highest ethical and sustainability standards whilst also seeking the best possible convenience – and they reserve the right to switch loyalties on a whim. Organisations (whether B2B or B2C) need to be responsive and agile if they are to survive and thrive in this, the ‘new normal’. But in times of great change it can be tempting to slip into a reactive frame of mind, rolling with the punches of the 24 hour news cycle, fighting fires and focussing on the here and now. Many businesses fall into this pattern while they strive to preserve value today. But doing so raises the risk that potential new opportunities for value creation tomorrow are missed. Counter intuitive as it might seem, a period of volatility is actually the perfect moment to step out of business as usual and take a considered, longer term view. Why? Because that longer term perspective can form the basis of a lasting narrative around which all stakeholders can align. A meaningful expression of purpose, mission or vision which can survive shorter term market changes.

So where should you start? First, scan the horizon It’s really important to take the time to explore and understand the underlying trends shaping the global environment. Not predictions of specific events but patterns that indicate possible futures. How are those trends evolving? Where are there examples of innovation from other countries, sectors and businesses that could be applied to the challenges you face? For many organisations horizon scanning is at most a ‘once a year’ activity as part of a strategy or planning process but it belongs in business as usual. The accelerating pace of external change means that businesses must think about both short and long term.

Now get to grips with the ‘SO WHAT?’ for your business Which trends and changes most impact your business and sector and how will they evolve over the next two, four and eight years? It’s helpful to align the first time horizon to your existing planning cycle. Taking the long view now will help to mitigate the risks of unexpected developments in the future. Similarly, a sector wide perspective allows you to focus on the causes of change, not just the consequences.


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‘Predicting the future is a discouraging and hazardous occupation’ – Arthur C Clark

Finally, as a leadership team, align around the ‘NOW WHAT?’ Identify, agree and prioritise the innovation platforms for your business. These may relate to new opportunities or be a mechanism for mitigating the risks you identify. Focus first on the most meaningful in the context of your organisation’s purpose.

Following this three step process requires not just great insight but the commitment to act on the results. Engaging an external facilitator will enable you to be part of the process and part of the team. Having access to curated and ‘live’ data will make it easier for you to engage your people around the change that’s required, and to stay ahead of the external landscape.

A fast changing and volatile environment means that it’s all to play for – will you take up the challenge? ‘The best way to predict the future, is to create it’ - Anonymous

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CHINA THINKING LONG-TERM Set to account for c. 20% of world GDP by 2050, it’s hard not to be bullish about China. Yet despite the tremendous opportunities, many international businesses have struggled to gain a foothold. To sustain long-term growth and profitability, an organisation’s strategy and operations must be rooted in four crucial aspects - cultural, societal, political and technological – of life in China.

The prevalent mode of thought and its limitations: A quick Google search will pull up companies offering businesses a myriad of ‘solutions’; from building a .cn website, opening a WeChat account, finding a distributor to advertising via Chinese influencers (KOLs). China ‘experts’ are everywhere – just check LinkedIn – and while their services may sometimes provide a viable route for entry, what next? Are these services alone enough to convince customers who have likely never heard of your company or brand to trust that your service or product is the superior solution for their demands?

Trust: why you need to win it You will often hear people talk about ‘guanxi’ (relationships) and its importance for doing business in China. What’s most important, however, it trust. In a collectivist culture, trust is often measured not by contracts, but through the strength and stability of a person’s (or company’s / brand’s) connections and relationships. In the West where we have a deep-rooted legal system and relatively open media, we are far less scrutinising of the trustworthiness of companies, their products and services. But in a nation like China where officialdom is widely mistrusted, public discourse is closely controlled by the state and competition amongst businesses is ferocious,


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Author:

Ellie Adams Chief Executive Officer

trust is not something that gets taken for granted on any level.

Customers: why you need to know your Chinese customer

eBay never succeeded in gaining much traction in China, in large part due to an assumed level of trust between merchants and buyers that does not readily exist in China – certainly not amongst strangers. For those businesses that understand this facet of Chinese society, however, trust generation becomes a central component of their strategy and one that, enacted with care, can be enormously successful. Indeed, with over 800m active internet users spending over 50% of online time using social media to discover new products (c. 45% of consumers claim to use social media for product discovery) and validate product quality (c. 54% of consumers), not to mention the fact that over 60% base purchasing recommendations on the views of friends and family, the options available to international brands are surprisingly wide and varied.

‘Knowing one’s customer’ is so fundamental to doing business it seems absurd to question that a successful, international business might not do so. Yet in China we have found customer misconceptions to be one of the most prevalent problems facing international organisations. An insightful example involves protein products; widely used by gym goers as a means of adding muscle. Or so you thought. In China, societal pressures on women to be married by 25 (lest they join the unenviable club of ‘leftover women’) contribute to expectations that a woman should not weigh more than ‘three digits’ (100 ‘jin’ / c. 50Kg). Coupled with a diet structure that is traditionally lower in protein, a fierce working culture (‘996’ has become a popular abbreviation to describe the demands

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CHINA: THINKING LONG-TERM. CONTINUED...

on employees to work 9am – 9pm, six days/ week) that makes it harder for women to control their food intake, and national incentives to encourage participation in sport, women are in fact the dominant consumer for protein products; not to add muscle, but as a meal replacement. Many examples exist where traditional Chinese concepts of what is healthy (for example: balancing Yin and Yang) prevail over ‘Western style’ treatments and products. And the trick for international brands is discovering this early enough to ensure they are aligning their offerings to the right audience and in the right way – in this example, it turned out that body building was a far cry from customer demands.

Politics: why you need to understand the priorities of government

sometimes livelihoods depend on successful implementation of priorities set by the state. This becomes very important to international organisations when one considers several factors. Financing: it can be remarkably difficult to get money out of China, unless incentivised and approved centrally. Business culture: the Chinese often don’t like to be ‘sold to’, but where a back can be scratched where both parties win, the proposition is far more attractive. Reputation & trust building: influential and integrated with local business, government acts as a gate-keeper to new opportunities.

Technology: why you need to localise China has embraced elements of the capitalist your technology system whilst remaining authoritarian – it is a so called ‘adaptive authoritarian’ regime. For international organisations this carries many implications, but one that often gets overlooked is the advantage this creates in terms of knowing where priorities lie, and consequently associated funding and incentives. Let’s look at an example.

Encumbered by stark inequalities to healthcare access, rises in non-communicable diseases, an ageing society and unhealthy lifestyles, the Chinese Communist Party has made healthcare reform (Healthy China 2030) an inextricable component of its economic and social agenda. Unlike in the West where policy promises come and go with the wind, the Chinese government do what they say they’re going to do. Importantly, so too do the low-level cadres whose careers and

One cannot discuss technology in China without reference to the ‘BATs’ (Baidu, Alibaba and Tencent), who collectively own over 70% of online activity in China. Popular comparisons between the BATs and the FAANGs (Facebook, Amazon, Apple, Netflix and Google) are not just overly simplistic, but misleading given the interests of these organisations span everything from financial services, ecommerce, cloud technology, entertainment, groceries, to logistics. The availability of integrated services through the ‘BATs’, combined with concerns about publishing content, regulatory requirements (e.g. an ICP license) and the high associated costs of ‘going it alone’, means Chinese businesses seek to be part of an existing B2B network; a stark difference in terms of how the internet is approached.


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Myriad examples exist of international firms failing to adapt to consumer shopping preferences and technology – within the grocery sector, Tesco, Walmart, Dia and Metro all provide excellent case studies – but positive examples also exist. Aldi entered the Chinese market via cross-border ecommerce in 2017 before establishing stores equipped with cashless payment facilities (over 90% of people in China’s largest cities use WeChat and Alipay as their primary payment method) and 3km delivery options. The lesson, essentially, is that the success of international firms in China is heavily influenced by their ability to offer a Chinese experience, whilst safeguarding their international credentials (a topic deserving of its own article).

Summary: The opportunities presented by the Chinese market are compelling and international organisations, particularly in the health and beauty industry, carry many advantages over their Chinese rivals. That being said, such advantages are often squandered by short-termism, an unwillingness to return to a start-up mindset (The Entrepreneur’s Cycle) and a fixation on quick fixes (e.g. find a distributor, launch a WeChat shop). Longterm growth and profit are eminently achievable to those organisations where strategy and operations are rooted in the cultural, societal, political and technological realities of China.

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HOW CROWDSOURCING AND AI HELP OTC BRANDS MAKE THEIR RETAIL EXECUTION PERFECT IN EVERY PHARMACY Author:

Andrey Eliseev Chief Marketing Officer

Likewise other go-to-market strategies – Brand Recommendation (advice given by pharmacists on specific brands when consumers ask for a recommendation for medicine) is one of the most crucial elements for any pharmaceutical brand wishing to increase market penetration and sales, yet only a few manufacturers are actively focusing on implementing valuable strategies alongside this growth driver.

Brand Recommendation - Make Pharmacists Your Brand Advocate According to recent shopping behaviour studies about 70% of purchase decisions are driven by pharmacists’ advice on a specific product. As a consequence, this has a massive impact on brands market shares and sellout performances. Despite this, many OTC Pharma brands are still failing to implement effective strategies to inform the majority of pharmacists on key features and benefits of their products. The challenge of monitoring this kind of information is certainly huge: the retail execution landscape is nowadays extremely fragmented, especially when it comes to the pharmaceutical channel, where nearly 100% of European pharmacies are classified as a small or independent point of sale.

Today, all major players are using their internal or external field teams to collect in-store data to measure their performance KPI during their visits to the pharmacies to do the detailing. However, this data collection method has its obvious downsides. First is the cost. Involving field teams in data collection means distracting them from their primary function, which is detailing. Second, is the coverage, which is limited to the pharmacies that they have on the route. And the last by not least, is the objectivity of this data, especially when it comes to Brand Recommendation. This type of information should be collected objectively using the mystery shopper type of approach. The use of market research agencies is not perfect either, due relatively small size of the samples they used to extrapolate insights to the entire universe. But the biggest issue


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is data delivery lead time. Brands usually obtain the data a few weeks after the data collection happened in the pharmacy. By that time, it is already too late to solve the problem. As a result, clients receive very generalized data (very often this info is not provided on pharmacy level), with a critical delay, and cannot use it to efficiently action on identified issues. Luckily today, OTC brands can leverage a totally new technological approach by using Crowdsourcing in combination with Artificial Intelligence to collect, process and deliver this data in near real-time to field team to optimize their routes and intelligently direct them into the pharmacies they can make the most impact, and eliminate wasted calls to the “compliant pharmacies�.

Simple, Fast and Accessible Tool A few years ago, we realized at BeMyEye that in order to solve these problems of actionability and objectivity of field data we need to unite two key elements — collective activity and technology. On the one hand, the ability to collect data at a low cost, in all retail channels is crucial. On the other, it is important to analyse this information quickly and turn it into a map of activities for the clients to make data-driven decisions faster. At the moment, there are more than 2 million data gathers, so-called Eyes, at BeMyEye involved in data collection. These are ordinary people who installed BeMyEye mobile app on their smartphones to make some extra money by going to retail locations to take pictures of products on the shelf or to check what brands

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pharmacists recommend the most. Some people do this work from time to time while others treat it as a full-time job and visit dozens of stores every day. Thanks to game elements integrated into the app, many users take it as a fun quest and therefore can accomplish these missions for the lower cost, involving new Eyes in this activity. When data is collected by the crowd, AI technologies automatically validate it and translate the numbers into KPIs instantly to present it in the online dashboards for the Clients’ HQ users and in the mobile devices to the field teams. This service is currently available in 20 European countries and Russia, which allows manufacturers to have a single international view at once using the same methodology. Today, BeMyEye helps pharmaceutical companies and distributors to translate brand recommendation data into actions. The insights collected by the BeMyEye’s crowd are directly put into the hands of field sales management, which can easily track through a dashboard what happens - in real-time across the entire retail estate. Sales managers are empowered with the recommendation rate of their brands at the country, region, territory or pharmacy level. Moreover, they can monitor performances by single field rep and understand the strengths and weaknesses of the members of their field team, for coaching, training and driving remuneration schemes. Alongside field management insights, we provide field reps and pharmaceutical detailers with a list of prioritized pharmacies where brand advocacy is high, low or nonexistent, to dynamically plan their visits to the pharmacies with low brand recommendation scores. They see a map with the pins of different colours, depending on score. For example, an orange pin indicates there are mild problems, and the issues can be solved by calling the pharmacy and asking their staff

to do something. The red pin stands for more complex issues which usually can be resolved only by visiting the pharmacy. This information allows to dynamically optimize field resources and intelligently directing them to the pharmacies that most need visiting, so they can focus 100% of their time on building relationships with pharmacy managers and ensuring their detailing messages are coming across well. Fields reps and pharmaceutical detailers are also empowered with a list of reasons why their product is (or is not) recommended, so they can have all the information they need to educate pharmacists before even entering the pharmacy.

Lean Go-to-Market By empowering field forces with brand recommendation data, manufacturers can now implement a Lean Go-to-Market strategy. Exactly like Lean Manufacturing, Lean Go-to-Market reflects a process of continuous performance improvement and progressive elimination of waste, segregating those who monitor and those who act. This approach boosts field team performance because field reps are liberated from data collection tasks so they can focus 100% on selling and taking remedial action. It also eliminates “waste” as they are empowered with the data needed to prioritise their visits to the least compliant stores and, crucially, know what to do once they get there. This process offers a much higher ROI on the field force investments, provides more visibility and a stronger presidium of your retail estate as well as a massive improvements of the field productivity, since field forces are no longer burdened with data collection tasks, instead, they’re empowered with granular insights that can help them prioritize where to go and what to do.


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PLACEHOLDER IMAGE

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CONSUMER HEALTH INNOVATION FOR THE FUTURE Author:

Andy Tisman Global Senior Principal Consumer Health

Introduction Innovation has long been the lifeblood of the consumer healthcare industry. However, the changing demands of consumers, coupled with interest in the sector from the FMCG industry and nimble, ambitious start-ups, has exposed a need to shake-up the traditional innovation structures that have served the industry so well for so long. There are worrying signs on the horizon, especially for the big, traditional OTC players. Whilst they have portfolios filled with wellloved and trusted brands it is becoming more difficult to differentiate in an increasingly crowded market place, with most of the new products emerging from these firms smaller line extensions offering only modest new benefits to consumers. However, this trend is playing out in an environment where evolving consumer needs and behaviours are calling for more innovative products and has exposed the need for consumer healthcare firms to adapt their overall innovation approach. Historic innovation approaches remain key contributors to growth for all OTC markets. But it looks like now that these typical, routine approaches are stifling “real” innovation which provides meaningful benefits. The consumer environment is changing rapidly, with empowered, health-focused and well-

informed consumers sitting in the driver’s seat aided by a “digital revolution” which is challenging previous approaches. Furthermore, different types of competitors from start-ups to science-based fast-moving consumer-goods (FMCG) players are challenging the traditional OTC players with new ways to innovate. This, coupled with a lack of regulatory harmonization globally and local regulatory systems which are becoming more demanding, is complicating market access. Evolving mega-trends such as sustainability, “clean label” and natural product approaches are causing headaches for some established OTC players, with certain consumer groups avoiding chemical-based healthcare products as part of a desire to live a healthier, cleaner life. But it is not just outside forces that could be hampering innovation. Internal research and development (R&D) strategies and operational structures may lack the imagination or flexibility to compete with smarter, smaller start-up firms. While changing these structures might seem straight forward, firms could then be confronted with a lack of cultural readiness to make these new structures pay off.


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Legacy technologies may no longer be “best in class” and less flexible organizational setups and complicated processes are not in sync with the future consumer health world.

There is also another factor affecting the selfcare market today - the disruption coming from new approaches, such as technology and digital health.

It is time to break current routines, change innovation culture and strategies and usher in a new era of innovation delivering products and services consumers expect in a rapidly evolving world.

These developments are having a big impact on innovation and again, while many large companies do understand this, in many cases it is smaller companies and new entrants to the market who find it easier to fully embrace these approaches, since they may be less embedded in more traditional ways of working.

No industry is safe from disruption. Waiting and observing can be dangerous. Would it not be better to shape the future, instead of being surprised by it?

Who is driving innovation today? Every business – big and small – clearly recognizes the importance of innovation. Equally, larger companies may have rather heavy, long-established and bureaucratic processes for driving and managing innovation, which can lead to them bringing fewer innovations to market as there may be more internal hurdles to overcome. Smaller companies sometimes have a more entrepreneurial approach, looking to try many things and see what can work in the market. Overall it is smaller local and regional players who are driving more of the growth.

The evolving healthcare consumer The lessening impact of line-extension based innovation can be seen as a reflection on the evolving healthcare consumer which has emerged over the past decade. Demographic and socio-economic changes have revealed a growing interest from consumers in “prevention and wellness” compared to a previous focus on reactive treatment approaches. The population worldwide is getting older which is leading to a higher incidence of agerelated diseases In parallel, we are also seeing more life-style triggered health issues and consumers are interested in solutions that help to prevent and treat those conditions.

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Consumers are now much more engaged in managing their health needs. This has mainly been triggered by the availability of digital platforms providing access to information and allowing direct interaction between different stakeholders. This is allowing them to get advice and exchange opinions on health issues and related product solutions. Interestingly, consumers have also developed a stronger interest in natural health products and, as this trend has developed, are demanding more evidence that these products deliver on their claims. Around this trend we are also seeing consumers demand evidence that natural products work as promised but also are entirely free from man-made or chemically tainted ingredients. As natural as possible is a big thing.

CHANGES TO THE CONSUMER HEALTH ENVIRONMENT

Changing demographics and lifestyles

Engaged consumers and evolving needs

Future proofing your business It is clear that consumer health companies are very aware of the changes in the marketplace and also the need to do things differently compared to the past. However, the catalyst to actually implementing change might not only be changing consumer behaviour and demands but also something that really hits home to any business – slowing sales. Only in the past few years have consumer healthcare companies started to see sales growth slow, prior to that sales had been growing steadily which reduces the pressure to change the model. Yet if you look at adjacent industries and what has happened in those markets, it becomes clear that consumer healthcare needs to speed up the rate of change.

Can current Consumer Health innovation approaches tackle these challenges and capture the opportunities?

External industry challenges

Internal challenges in a fast moving environment


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Conclusion

No industry is safe from disruption

The consumer healthcare industry must adapt its innovation focus and also its innovation culture to remain at the heart of the evolving healthcare ecosystem.

The “Fourth Industrial Revolution” will have a major impact on the relationship between the different OTC stakeholders. Technology and digitisation while an opportunity for the consumer healthcare industry, can also threaten the current commercial model by challenging control over the product value narratives.

Internally, companies need to start optimising true consumer centric innovation strategies fostering strong scientific evidence to support new claims and innovations. Furthermore, applying de-risking models will be very important. This means stronger and more flexible external collaboration models allowing for better integration of technologies for example. Industry needs to align its organisational structures with the right cultures to ensure it happens. In a nutshell, this means doing things better than before and many of the OTC players are already on this journey. The industry needs to orchestrate the integration of new technologies and health data with a broader group of stakeholders leading to advanced and more holistic innovation models. Further transformational steps could lead to systems where the health outcome rather than the product is front of mind. RWE-based approaches with smart digital tools may finally become the intellectual property of a company instead of simple product formats or brands. This does mean doing things differently and creating a new role for consumer healthcare in the health and wellness ecosystem.

As the information flow becomes multidirectional, stakeholders are evolving from consumers to collaborators, requiring different approaches to value creation and engagement. And these engagements must create value on consumers’ terms – or the classical OTC business model may be leapfrogged. Business models must evolve to reflect and support consumers’ objectives, recognizing that digitization, data proliferation, and evolving ecosystems are challenging the status quo. The time has come for the consumer healthcare industry to change its innovation habits and learn to innovate today to ensure that it wins tomorrow.

This article is an abstract of an IQVIA published White Paper, Consumer Health Innovation for the Future. For a copy of the full White Paper, please contact IQVIA Consumer Health: consumer.health@iqvia.com

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A MANIFESTO:

UNLOCKING MEANINGFUL DIFFERENCE IS THE KEY TO GROWING BRANDS IN HEALTH AND WELLBEING Author:

David Gray Chief Executive Officer

Growing health and wellbeing brands is tougher than ever – competitive intensity; fragmented media; digital disruption; retailer power; regulatory constraints; disengaged consumers; category commoditisation; innovation challenges; investment pressure, where do we start? But, before we cry into our cough syrup, we still live in a world full of opportunities. In wellbeing categories, the growth in ‘free-from’, super-ingredients, vegan products etc. reflect an intense interest – especially from younger consumers – in investing in being well. In selfmedication whilst growth is only ‘steady’ in most categories, even some of the really established categories still have a gap between suffering and treating, which means there are still prizes to win here.

So, what to do? Simple. We need to get back to the difficult process of brand building. The aim must be to build an asset that establishes what we refer to as a Meaningful Difference versus its competitive set. Meaningful because it is relevant and engaging. Different because brands need to be extraordinary to win in our complex, cluttered environment. The only meaningful outcome is to grow penetration, consumption, sales and profit and build brands.

The health and wellness brands we see winning are all delivering Meaningful Difference– whatever they might call it! If you’re a new brand you might not know what this is yet, if you’re an old brand you might have had it but lost your way so here’s our quick guide to establishing meaningful difference. You don’t have to be spending millions of pounds for this process to work, it can be incremental small steps that push you over the line and make meaningful difference.

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RELEVANCE.

THE CORE OF MEANING. • It starts with people and the barriers to penetration. People have complex and ambivalent relationships with illness, medication and wellness. People aren’t failing to treat because they lack needs or are stupid. Most of us use a highly personal equation of learned behaviours often that balances the severity and familiarity of the problem against the solutions available and modified by a set of emotional/ behavioural barriers to treating or not treating. No two segments are the same. • In a regulated world with little uniqueness you must define why you are more relevant to meet the basic needs of the category than the next brand or, increasingly, own label. This might seem obvious, but time after time brands don’t start here. • This requires you to sweat your deep understanding of the category; the adjacencies; the competitive set; the product/ indication science; the expert perspective; consumer insight and the barriers in their real, not idealised behaviour. The mindset is broadly the same whether it’s an OTC, a cosmetic skincare or VMS product. Our mantra – ‘never turn on the Mac until you’ve defined the relevance’. • You need to force yourself to make hard choices. The more you leave behind the greater your potential to be meaningfully relevant. We ask two questions: how do we intend to persuade people to enter the category [penetration] and then why will they choose us [preference]? Until you have defined this, no amount of creative genius or marketing investment will really move the needle.


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2 DISTINCTIVNESS.

THE CREATIVE COMPONENT. • In healthcare genuine difference is unicorn rare, so we try to think about how to magnify our relevance platform in a way that stands out and engages. This is hard, because given the long established ‘rules’ in many health categories being different for its own sake rarely works – you need to balance rule breaking with a need to embrace some of the relevant category rules/codes. Tricky. • This is the fun bit! The exploration of distinctiveness through a range of creative platforms is where your brand idea morphs into an actionable, deliverable entity. Be brave because we are defining the brand’s long term visual, verbal and behavioural DNA. And this is where a great partner agency can help.

3 CREDIBILITY.

THE MOMENT OF TRUST. • Which brings us to the element that really differentiates self-care and consumer healthcare from other categories. You must define, and use, the source of your credibility to do the job at hand. All brands need credibility, healthcare brands need it to the nth degree. Do you need pharmacists to drive selection? Do you need to dislodge a long-established brand leader etc? To do this you need to deliver your Moment of Trusthabit drives much behaviour, so consider how to ensure our relevant and distinctive offering is not just credible, but anchors this in the mind of HCPs and consumers. This can often in healthcare be driven by claims.

The symbiotic relationship between these 3 elements is never easily unlocked. We believe it needs specialist expertise. After 20 years working in consumer healthcare, skincare and wellbeing, we can say with confidence that when a brand unlocks its Meaningful Difference two things have consistently happened: sales go up and longer-term brand health is improved… and that is purpose enough for us!

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CREATING

HUMAN-CENTRED EXPERIENCES Experiencing life in all possible ways is enriching. Author:

Lizianne Bueno International Business Development Executive

Experiences shape our lives - the way we view the world, things and the view we have about ourselves. Experiences live on in our memories, in the stories we tell, the conversations we have and the connections we make with others. For decades, brand owners have tried effortlessly to create positive experiences by building bridges between their brand and consumers. Today this remains the goal; however, the way the bridge is built and the materials used to build it have evolved. They no longer need to be so theoretical. Thanks to curiosity, advances in technology and the power of data, the building materials we have to work with are more observational, authentic and factual. We have witnessed the information period, and it continues to fuel us with data. We are now experiencing an age of integration, the integration of that data alongside behaviour and observation. A more human-centric era is upon us. For brand builders, one of the primary challenges is how best to utilise this to increase brand value. To achieve this, brands need to acknowledge the abundance of information and research that’s been made available, utilise it ethically and learn from it, all with a view to creating brand experiences that are aligned to what consumers (aka humans) value today. Let’s call these ‘human-centred experiences’.

Brands need to deeply consider concepts such as wellbeing, happiness, warmth and competence, since these connection-building attributes are intrinsic to the brand experience as a whole. By using these concepts, brands have an opportunity to secure a more significant position in consumers’ daily lives and take on the role of ‘guide’ on the consumer’s journey to wellness. Whilst a brand is trust, a great brand is a metaphorical story that connects with something deeper than physical needs alone. These stories create the emotional context people that need to locate themselves into a larger experience. By creating more human-centred experiences and by telling stories that empathetically encourage positive emotions such as joy, happiness, wellbeing and success, brands give themselves the best possible opportunity to form longer-lasting, deeper connections. All brands have the opportunity to adopt the human-centred approach. Within the world of Food & Drink, the opportunity is hugely exciting. Some tremendous advances in neuroscience have been acquired to date, particularly in fields such as psychology, behavioural sciences, food sensory science, the understanding of physiological and chemical brain commands, and the changes that occur in the body when experiencing pleasure and happiness. Food cognitive


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neuroscience is a field that remains in an infant state as it investigates how we perceive and respond to food and beverages and allows us to discover how our brain processes food cues and directs our food choices. We all know that food is essential since it provides us with the energy needed to keep us alive; however, it’s also associated with emotional wellness as a result of its effects on pleasure, satisfaction and mood, as well as on an individual’s health. Happiness and wellbeing are also essential. Conceptually, they have been viewed as requiring at least two determining ingredients - positive affect or pleasure, and a sense of meaningfulness or engagement in life. Basically, our most basic needs transcend physical satisfaction in much the same way as wellness extends beyond health, encompassing physical, spiritual, mental and emotional states, among others. To feel happy, healthy, complete, or fulfilled, humans should have a holistic approach to finding balance. In the physical aspect, health and wellness are dependent on the everyday products we use. Consumers are more conscious about their food choices, especially Millennials and Generation Z; however, they are driven by reasons of which we are not fully aware. The decision-making process about food is influenced by a complex set of emotions, feelings, attitudes, and values that are

impossible to assess simply by using traditional techniques to gather information, mainly to measure the rational reactions to a certain type of food or advertising. For food brands, wellness culture is a disruptive force. Companies face a challenge when it comes to developing methodologies that enable the measurement of feelings of wellness associated with food consumption before applying these to the design of foods that increase health and wellbeing, thereby causing many of them to re-orient their core values to reflect those of consumers. Every industry has been disrupted by changing consumer attitudes... and technology. The branding and design industry is no different. Recently, there has been a mushrooming interest in the multidisciplinary field of “neuromarketing”, which takes advantage of neuroscientific techniques to study consumer behaviour. Neuromarketing applies food cognitive neuroscientific methods and tools that allow the measurement of consumers’ emotional and spontaneous reactions in a more objective and observable way. Recent studies have shown that measuring emotional response to sensory properties offers us a deeper insight into our relationship with food and beverages. Growing consumer

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CREATING HUMAN-CENTRED EXPERIENCES. CONTINUED...

“brands are moving from selling a product to selling an experience.”

fears over health, coupled with increasing interest in nutrition and sustainability, has resulted in the launch of a host of new FMCG categories - low-GI, paleo, high-protein, gluten-free and other ‘free-from’ foods, beauty and household products, according to a recent report by Nielsen. These shifts in behaviour, expectations, and experiences provide incredible opportunities for business growth, but keeping up with them poses new challenges. One of the most critical ways to turn change into growth is by building and constantly developing a strong brand. In marketing, sensory science can help ensure sensory properties work in synergy with brand communication and advertising and is also used to support sensory-based marketing claims. Increasingly, food and beverages innovative brands are moving from selling a product to selling an experience. The wellness experience doesn’t stop at clean products and positive experiences. Consumers expect brands themselves to be healthy too. Ethics, transparency and honesty is the DNA of a brand and a measure of its wellness. The opportunity to link sensory-gratification marketing with human drive points will encourage consumers to perceived brands as caretaker of their enjoyable wellness. Food and beverage brands have an ethical responsibility to adopt a lifestyle that prioritises holistic wellbeing and requires products to support it, to build authentic and long-term

connections with their audience. Today’s consumers value experiences more than material goods and expect those experiences to speak to them on a personal level, and to respond to their needs for a balanced life in mind, body and spirit. Brand experiences that satisfy these needs, that are meaningful and engaging, lead to consumer loyalty and brand advocacy. As a result, brand experiences that are personalised should be at the centre of any well-conceived marketing strategy. We live in a truly connected world. Brands have the ability to connect through their audience via more empathetic communication planning, by designing an experience that meets the consumer’s needs and expectations, by understanding and getting to know what they want, how they behave and create an emotional connection to them. All are critical components of any brand’s success and tall sit at the heart of that brand’s marketing. Inside companies, wellbeing is tempting territory for Food and Beverage brand marketers motivated by the school of thought that business needs to articulate a social purpose experience. A customer journey is an infinite loop (see figure 1). In its rawest form, it captures an ideal process that brands can utilise to uncover touchpoints and opportunities to interact, influence and persuade consumers.


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Figure 1. Traditional Experience Loop

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Thanks to advances in technology, shared data and science, this can be fed with additional insight and intelligence, making it even more relevant and beneficial. See Figure 2

Figure 2. The New Human Centred Experience

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By actively monitoring psychological behaviors, both on and offline. Brands can influence through empathetic understanding during both the research and selection stages.

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LEARNING AND OBSERVATIONAL TACTICS & TECHNIQUES TO RETAIN

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At the point of purchase brands can analyze the purpose of the purchase with the consumer and identify what basic drive points led to this ‘particular purchase’.

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We reduce the need to buy or achieve loyalty through promotional gimmicks. By empathically recognizing the need in the first place and by learning through out the process, a positive social currency is achieved that’s worth sharing.

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6. Every aspect of this human centered process will feed the brand with the insight, data & learnings it needs to recognize the relationship between core emotional drive points, individual human values and customer type. This will support the brand to recognize the need more accurately in future and help to reach an empathic status quicker.

Elements of psychological behaviour, neuroscience, personalisation, data analysis, digital communication can all contribute to building a customer experience that is capable of capturing more than before and that utilises real observational drivers and emotional such as wellness. The exciting moment comes when FMCG brands start embracing brand experience thinking, invest in challenging the norms of what’s gone before, and learning from service or digital-first brands. Brands start with humans on the inside and are ultimately delivered to humans on the outside, using technology as a primary means of interaction and a powerful platform for engagement. At a time when speed to market, customer centricity and cultural alignment are more important than ever, brands are the key to change, and to growth.

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HOW TO THINK ABOUT

MARKET ATTRACTIVENESS FOR Author:

Ben Longman Managing Director

One of the most common questions for any company targeting Africa is:

Which are the best markets to go after? In this article we’d like to share some of Trendtype’s way of thinking about market attractiveness. Most companies tend to build a data model to assess market attractiveness, with information such as the size of the economy, population, income levels, ease of doing business etc. In fact, Trendtype has a similar data model. Although our business is built on data we don’t publish a market attractiveness ranking for Africa. Why? Because there is no one size fits all index for the best markets to go after. There are lots of types of risk: political risk, economic risk, legal and regulatory risk, supply chain risk, corruption risk, currency exchange risk. No market in Africa is low risk. Sure, a country’s risk profile is less important if you’re shipping goods into a market as opposed to, say, signing a contract with a government to develop an oil field. But they can burn even experienced players. Shoprite, the leading South African supermarket chain that operates in 15 countries, has seen revenues in Angola fall by 38% even though sales are increasing. Why? Currency devaluation. Not all risks are as catastrophic. Most consume time, energy, and profit margin and have the capacity to bog you down. When we talk about risk we’re asking how much time you want to spend managing risk and how important it is for your Africa strategy to play in a high risk market.

Figure 1: a traditional, but basic, market attractiveness model

From a practical perspective, the main considerations for fit are things like how easy it is for you to operate in a country, whether you already trade in markets that speak your language, whether you have to change a product’s packaging or marketing materials, whether your markets are in the same trading bloc or region. Fit also comes down to whether a commercial team are familiar with a country, comfortable travelling there, and if the head office ‘likes’ a market. When we talk about fit, we’re asking a company to analyse its reasons for wanting to play in a specific market and its own strengths, weaknesses and institutional preferences. The internal conversation about “what is our Africa strategy for the next five years?” is critical.


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AFRICAN MARKETS Figure 2: Market attractiveness as a function of risk, opportunity, fit and competition

Competition is more comfortable territory and perhaps the easiest thing to factor. Nonetheless, our experience is that the granular analysis of competition tends to come too late. There are good reasons for this. Data is hard to come by. Brand sales and channels are fragmented. Parallel trade and ad hoc importing are rife. Brand owners have to wait for a distributor to work through a value chain analysis to establish how price competitive a brand will be. When we talk about competition, the two points we’d make are “in which channel” and yes, while it is important to know who the main competing brands are it is critical also to gauge the extent of parallel trade and ad hoc routes to market.

Which brings us back to opportunity and market attractiveness. Most clients want to know about reasonably well travelled, medium risk markets like South Africa, Egypt, Morocco and Kenya. There are still risks and route to market challenges, including a more open competitive landscape. The largest immature markets we get asked about most – Nigeria, Ethiopia and DRC – all carry significant commercial risks and are high friction markets. There are several small markets with lower risk profiles, among them Mauritius, Botswana and Rwanda. And there is a long list of small, high risk markets where opportunists and specialists thrive. The list of ‘best’ markets is not objective – their attractiveness has to be considered within the context of a brand owner’s internal capabilities, resources, and appetite for Africa specifically and risk more generally.

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PRODUCTIVITY MATTERS FOR OUR FUTURE PROSPERITY Author:

Hann–Ju Ho Senior Economist

DISAPPOINTING DECADE Thirty years ago, Nobel Prize-winning American economist Robert Solow said,

“You can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics.” His comments seem just as relevant today. We appear to be on the cusp of the so-called Fourth Industrial Revolution, encompassing advances such as artificial intelligence, 3D manufacturing, robotics, the ‘Internet of Things’ and big data – things which not so long ago would have been the stuff of science fiction. Yet productivity growth in advanced economies since the global financial crisis a decade ago has been disappointing. It is arguably the single biggest economic issue we face, alongside increasing attention on sustainable growth. When we talk about the trade war between the US and China, or

even Brexit, we should think about them in terms of the impact that they might have on productivity growth. Why does productivity matter? It matters because there are only two ways for an economy to grow: a bigger labour force or a more productive one. Since Victorian times, productivity has been the main driver of prosperity. Without it, our income levels would be much lower today. According to the Bank of England, UK income levels today in the absence of productivity growth would only be twice higher than in 1850 rather than twenty times higher.


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Chart 1: Productivity growth has slowed in the past decade

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Chart 1: Productivity growth has slowed in the past decade

In the G7 advanced economies, productivity measured by output per hour worked has increased by less than 1% per annum since the global financial crisis. That compares with over 2% growth per annum between 1970 and 2007. Among the G7, productivity growth has been particularly weak in Italy and the UK (see charts 1 and 2). Had productivity continued to rise at pre-crisis rates, the average output per hour worked in the UK economy would be about 25% higher than it is today.

Despite that, the UK economy has remained resilient and has been able to grow in the past decade, largely thanks to strong job creation. Looking ahead though, with the unemployment rate now at the lowest levels since the 1970s, the economy can no longer depend on an abundant supply of labour. In all likelihood, economic growth in the next decade and beyond will have to be less reliant on workforce growth and more reliant on productivity growth – i.e. more output per hour worked (or per worker).

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PRODUCTIVITY MATTERS FOR OUR FUTURE PROSPERITY. CONTINUED...

HOPES FOR THE FUTURE How do we achieve stronger productivity growth? It partly depends on why we think it is so weak. That is subject to intense debate and is far from resolved. The longstanding view of US economist Robert Gordon is a pessimistic one: he believes that the productivity slowdown predates the global financial crisis. His assessment is that current technological advances are far less revolutionary than the great inventions of the past such as the steam engine and electricity. If you had to live without clean water or an iPhone, which would you choose? Perhaps that is being too pessimistic. While recent technological advances seem be having a bigger impact on the way we consume (and therefore less impact on

productivity), it should only be a matter of time before they make a more indelible imprint into the way we work. As technology costs fall, more and more firms across different industry sectors – ranging from agriculture, manufacturing, retail and services – are expected to adopt new technologies. According to our Lloyds Bank Business Barometer survey, 40% of UK firms with turnover above £100m say that new technologies such as artificial intelligence and big data will revolutionise the way they do business in the next five years (see chart 3). Even for firms with less than £5m turnover, about a quarter say such technological changes will revolutionise their businesses.

Chart 2: The UK and Italy have experienced particularly sharp productivity growth slowdowns

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Chart 2: The UK and Italy have experienced particularly sharp productivity growth slowdowns

Chart 3: Hopes for the future

What technology will revolutionise your business in the next 3-5 years? % firms (turnover above £100m) 50 45 40 35

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POLICY PRIORITIES

Chart 2: The UK and Italy have experienced particularly sharp productivity growth slowdowns

Average growth in output per hour worked (% per annum)

If past industrial revolutions are anything There has also been increasing recognition to go 4.0 by, the transition to the brave new that major central banks in recent years have 1970-97 1998-2007 2008-2018 world will have consequences. In particular, been overburdened. Slashing interest rates 3.5 some jobs (or parts of jobs) will be replaced to record lows and quantitative easing have by technology. The Bank of England, for supported economic growth, but have not 3.0 example, estimates that the proportion of revived productivity growth to previous levels. 2.5 jobs at high risk of automation is around 10%. There is now greater impetus than before While 2.0 technological advancements are likely that fiscal policy will have to play a bigger to provide a welcome boost to productivity role in supporting growth, including through 1.5 growth, policymakers will also have to be increasing investment on infrastructure and 1.0that such transitional effects could mindful supporting innovative firms. At stake is whether lead to some ‘technological unemployment’ the fruits of the Fourth Industrial Revolution are 0.5 for those affected. fully realised.

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Chart 3: Hopes for the future

What technology will revolutionise your business in the next 3-5 years? % firms (turnover above £100m) 50 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

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Chart sources

Chart 3: Hopes for the future

Charts 1 & 2: OECD, Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking Chart sources Chart 3: Lloyds Bank Business Barometer Charts 1 & 2: OECD, Lloyds Bank Commercial Banking

Chart 3: Lloyds Bank Business Barometer

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REVA HEALTH OUR STORY Author:

Francesc Roura Chief Executive Officer

After long careers in multinational FMCG and OTC companies, the six founders of Reva decided in 2011 that we would build our own OTC business and that we would do it our way. We had been working together for many years already and naturally got along very well as a team. Based on what we had learned throughout our careers, we saw an opportunity in developing some shared beliefs and values: 1. We spotted opportunities for product innovation, based on the evolving consumer trends 2. We believed in a stronger, more collaborative model of working together with our customers, offering them the set of tools they need to build sell out for the brands managed by Reva 3. We wanted to abide by our own corporate culture, based on the values that we consider true; we wanted to build the best place to work, for our employees and for ourselves Over our 8 years of existence, we have built long lasting partnerships with brand owners that want their assets to be managed with care, professionalism and ambition. We are proud to count, among our partners, with

HRA (Compeed, ellaOne, Norlevo), Trimb Heathcare (Nailner, Wortie, Hemoclin), DisRas (Otostick), M4 Pharma (BaĂąoftal) and Katjes Fassin (Vicks hard candies). And we have developed a portfolio of own brands based on natural and highly performing products: Pharysol (Cough & Cold, developed in partnership with Vitrobio and SIIT) and Dexin (Insect Repellents). We cover exclusively the pharmacy channel in Spain, 8.000 pharmacies have an ongoing direct relationship with Reva through our Sales team of 37 people. The Reva wider team is made of 54 people. Our journey has made us better people and better professionals: we have learned what entrepreneurship is like and we have learned how to face the challenges that come along with starting from scratch. And these events have made us even stronger as a team. Today, some of us have been part of the same team throughout 25 years and 3 different companies... and look forward to the next 25 years and the challenges that lie ahead of us, to keep building the company that we want to shape: competent, innovative and human.


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THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS Quintiles and IMS Health have come together to become IQVIA, The Human Data Science Company™. ​

Our philosophy, ‘The Science of Natural WellBeing’, has driven our activity over the past 28 years.​

Inspired by the industry we help, IQVIA commits to providing solutions that enable life sciences companies to innovate with confidence, maximize their opportunities and ultimately drive human health outcomes forward. ​

Today, Pharma Medico Group is a global organisation based on a strong Scandinavian tradition of research excellence and scientific documentation.This has resulted in the discovery of breakthrough natural ingredients, formulations and technologies.​

We provide actionable solutions by tapping into the power of the IQVIA CORE™: ​

Pharma Medico’s brands provide OTC/OTX solutions for hair growth disorders, normal and accelerated skin ageing, and skin damage and disorders.​

Domain Expertise. Institutional knowledge and domain expertise across diseases, geographies and scientific methods.​ Advanced Analytics. Faster, more precise decision-making generated by advanced analytics designed for healthcare.​

Our brands, Nourkrin®, Nourella® and DermaNova® reflect the forefront of scientific innovation, are leading in their category and offer effectivesolutions in a safe, drug free and ethical manner.

Unparalleled Data. One of the world’s largest curated healthcare data sources with innovative privacy protections.​ Transformative Technology. Leading technologies to provide real-time access to operations-critical information.​

HRA Pharma is a fast growing, innovative consumer healthcare company, empowering people throughout the world to improve their lives by developing accessible, value added, self-care solutions. ​ Historically centered on women’s health, the company has become the European leader in emergency contraception and in compromised skin. With ambitious projects in the pipeline, including innovative Rx-to-OTC switches, HRA Pharma is committed to bringing

a range of innovative products and services to market, particularly in areas of unmet customer needs. ​ Headquartered in France with direct operational presence in 11 European countries and partnerships that have extended its products’ availability to over 71 countries worldwide, the company has a proven structure, the skills and experience to capture new consumer healthcare businesses and deliver high quality brands on a global scale.​

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Ceuta International Conference - One Magazine - A World Of Insight - Conference Edition  

Ceuta International Conference - One Magazine - A World Of Insight - Conference Edition