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Passenger Transportation Development Plan

DMATS & RPA8 2009


Chapter 1

Introduction and Process Discussion

Introduction The Passenger Transportation Development Plan (PTDP is a creation of the State of Iowa to incorporate federal requirements for coordinated planning from the Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for users (SAFETEA-LU), along with Executive Order 13330; Human Services Transportation Coordination. The PTDP will provide needs-based project justification for all transit programs. The PTDP’s are to cover a minimum of four year period and provide a discussion of passenger transportation needs including recommended projects to be included in the local Transportation Improvement Program (TIP). The PTDP is designed to be created with joint input from Health and Human Service Agencies/Organizations and the Public Transportation Providers for the Dubuque Metropolitan Transportation Study Area (DMATS) and the Regional Planning Affiliation 98 (RPA8). The following sections are included in this plan:

• • • • • • •

Service Area and Demographics Existing Transportation Providers Existing Coordination Efforts Transportation Needs Possible Strategies Financial Resources Recommended Program and Consensus

The PTDP is a planning function of the DMATS and RPA8 and the PTDP is listed in the Transportation Planning Work Program for both DMATS and RPA8. MPO’s and RPA’s are the responsible parties required to complete and submit the completed PTDP to the Iowa Department of Transportation.

Chapter 1 - Introduction and Process Discussion

[1]


Process Discussion The PTDP process requires close interaction between health and human service agencies/organizations and transit systems. As stated in the PTDP guidelines, each MPO/RPA should strive to have a minimum of four advisory group meetings. The purpose of the meetings are to: 1. To get health and human service agencies/organizations, transit systems, private transportation providers, and the public actively involved in passenger transportation planning. 2.

Identify gaps and duplication in passenger transportation services.

3.

Prioritize passenger transportation needs.

4.

Provide consensus and sign-off on the draft PTDP document before it is presented to the MPO and RPA policy boards.

5.

Maintain a continuum of work sessions focused on improving passenger transportation services within the area.

Meeting Summary The following is a summary of the advisory group meetings, their date of occurrence and purpose: • August 19, 2008 Notify Human Service Agencies of PTDP meeting schedules and mailing of PTDP surveys. • September 17, 2009 Meeting #1 KeyLine Transit and Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson County Regional Transit Authority Identification of needs, gaps and duplication in services. • October 15, 2008 Meeting #2 Identification of Projects/Strategies to address needs, gaps and duplication in services. • November 19, 2008 Meeting #3 Prioritization of Projects/Strategies to address needs, gaps and duplication in services. • December 17, 2008 Meeting #4 Formal Consensus and Sign-off of draft PTDP. In addition to the advisory group meetings, individual efforts by the transit system managers were taken to glean further input from area human service organization. • Attendance and PTDP updates to the Dubuque County Mental Health Developmentally Disabled Stakeholders Group. • Attendance and PTDP updates to the Delaware County Advisory Board. • Attendance at staffing at DAC and Area Residential Care. • Meetings with Scenic Valley Area Agency on Aging staff in Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson County. • Attendance at Community Partnerships for Protecting Children networking meeting. Lastly, the City of Dubuque KeyLine Transit has hired a consultant to study the KeyLine transit services in the City of Dubuque and has included the operations by the Delaware Dubuque and Jackson County Regional Transit authority in their study analysis and final recommendations to identify opportunities for collaboration and coordination.

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Chapter 1 - Introduction and Process Discussion


Key PTDP Participants The following organizations were key participants through the PTDP process by either attending the PTDP meetings or local funding/ coordination meetings for specific human service program needs or by completing transportation provider surveys. West Delaware County Community School District G & G Living Centers Bellevue Community Schools Lincolnwood Assisted Living Edgewood Convalescent Home Maquoketa Care Center Regional Medical Home Care Ellen Kennedy Living Center Delaware County Community Services Penn Center Inc. The Meadows Assisted Living Crestridge, Inc. Mill Valley Care Center Maquoketa Valley Schools Maquoketa School District Backbone Area Counseling Center Jackson County Veterans Affairs Scenic Valley Area Agency on Aging Western Dubuque School District Preston Schools Unlimited Services, Inc. Manchester Medical Center Developing Alternative Choices (DAC), Inc. Home Instead Senior Care Andrew Schools Luther Manor Retirement Community Jackson County Mental Health Department Northeast Iowa Community College Jackson County Case Management Operation New View Community Action Agency East Central Community Delaware County Veterans Administration Office Hills and Dales Child Development Dubuque County Veterans Affairs Tri State Dialysis Sunnycrest Manor

Ron Swartz Lorrie Meier Mike Healy Cindy Snyder Melissa Kann Sharon Ehlinger Joan Kerns Kari Wittmeyer Peggy Pelton Diane Brecht Leslie Nussle Holly Ward Lyman Bailey Doug Tuetken Jerry Nelson Joan Funke Larry Bramer Kathy Carner Jeff Corkery Linda Skoff Angi Lawson

Dubuque Community Y Domestic Violence Program Crescent Community Health Center Foster Grandparent Program Good Neighbor Home Heritage Manor Hillcrest Family Services Dubuque County Case Management Iowa Workforce Development Workforce Investment Act Manor Care Health Services Stonehill Adult Daycare Area Residential Care Delaware County Health Department Iowa Legal Aid Northeast Iowa Regional Office Salvation Army Lutheran Social Services Hospice of Dubuque Hospice of Jackson County Iowa Vocational Rehabilitation Services

Christy Ficke

Jody Jansen Dave Leary Gerry Rea Jean Wuertzer

Lenae Owen Viva Betzner Kent Hammer Lynn Bopes Cindy O’Byron Jane Dubert Shiela Freiburger James House Sandy Ahrens Marilyn Althoff Charles Brimeyer Vickie Danner Lisa Culbertson

Chapter 1 - Introduction and Process Discussion

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!

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Passenger Transportation Development Plan

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Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation ! ! !

DMATS and RPA 8 Region

! !

Edgewood ! !

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3

! ( 13

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! Dundee

! ( 38

! !

! ! ( /

Masonville !

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( / 20

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Epworth ! !

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Ryan !

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! ( 136

! Dubuque ! ! ! East Dubuque, IL ! !

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DMATS

! ( 38

( / 151

Bernard !

Zwingle

!

JACKSON CO.

! !

Andrew !

Legend

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DMATS MPO ! ! ! Incorporated Places ! ! 0 - 999 people

! ( 62

Springbrook !

( / Maquoketa ! ! ! (

! Baldwin !

Monmouth !

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( / 52

64

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Preston

136

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Charlotte !

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Goose Lake !

Lost Nation

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! ! !!

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!

! ! ! 1,000 -! 4,999 people ! !

!

5,000 - 60,000 people

( / 61

De Witt

! Wheatland ! ! Calamus

Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared! !March 2009 by ECIA

( / 30

! Grand Mound

! ! ( /

Andover !

( /

!

67

! ( 136

!

Clinton !

( / ! ( /

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30

30

! Low Moor

!

67

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CLINTON CO.

Welton !

Toronto

! !

!

!

! !

! Sabula

! Miles

Delmar !

! (

!

!

!

64

!

! !

! !

! (

Spragueville !

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61

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!

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( / La Motte !

Bellevue

! !

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52

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!

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61

St. Donatus

Cascade !

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( /

! !

! !

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DUBUQUE CO.

!

! !

!

! Worthington

Hopkinton

!

!

! !

! Sageville

Centralia ! ! Peosta

Farley

Delhi !

DELAWARE CO.

!

Graf !

Dyersville

20

! (

Asbury

Bankston ! Earlville !

! ! !

! Durango

! New Vienna

!

13

52

Greeley

! !

Sherrill Holy Cross ! ! Rickardsville ! 3

( / ! (

Luxemburg !

Manchester

!

Balltown !

! Colesburg

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Camanche

! !

Chapter 1 - Introduction and Process Discussion

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Chapter 2

Human Environment

Introduction

This chapter summarizes the socioeconomic data forecast developed for the Public Transportation Development Plan (PTDP). This data is the primary input used to develop transportation requirements for the region. These forecasts and analyses are necessary both as a practical matter for quality long-range transportation planning and in compliance with federal transportation legislation. Since the Public Transportation Development Plan (PTDP) looks 5 years into the future, the information necessary for the plan includes not only current data, but also forecasts for future years. The process of acquiring and checking this data involves coordinated efforts by all the transportation and planning departments in the region.

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

[5]


Future Population Forecasts

Population analysis is very important to the transportation planning process in that knowledge of past and present population characteristics is essential to meaningful projections of future population levels and characteristics. Future population levels are important since they determine both the amount of land to be developed in the future and, to a large extent, the type of development (e.g., residential or commercial), which will soon occur. An understanding of the present population characteristics also help the community to determine the adequacy of existing transportation facilities, land use patterns, economic arrangements, and community facilities in terms of meeting existing needs. Changes can also be made in projected population trends by significant changes in economic development strategies and proactive land use planning processes.

Fig 2a - RPA 8 Population Projections RPA 8 Population projections

120,000

Fig 2b - DMATS Population Projections

107,040 100,000

80,000 Population

As seen in Figure 2a the first decade has shown a relatively small decrease in population and the last two decades showed a small increase in population when compared to 2000 census numbers. Over all the population within the region is going to increase by 2.99 percent in thirty years. Source: Census Bureau

107,088

6,112

6,041

5,257 5,049

5,082 5,176

27,772

105,069

106,202

109,181

6,215

6,234

110,251 6,295

5,346 5,134

5,362 5,150

5,415 5,200

28,240

28,327

28,605

5,999

6,064

5,160 4,956

5,216 5,009

27,319

27,261

27,555

14,184

14,217

13,923

14,073

14,423

14,468

14,610

18,191

18,894

17,856

18,049

18,498

18,555

18,737

13,147

12,982

12,905

13,044

13,369

13,410

13,541

17,328

17,377

17,009

17,192

17,620

17,675

17,848

2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

60,000

40,000

108,844

120,000 20,000

105,564

100,000

101,175 96,089

-

90,661 85,695 80,000

Years

81,284

Population

77,018

Clinton co

Delaware Co

Dubuque co

Jackson Co

Clinton

DeWitt

Manchester

Maquoketa

60,000

As seen in Figure 2b, DMATS is expecting a steady increase in population from 2000-2031. Overall the population within DMATS is projected to increase by 37.06 percent from 2000 to 2031.

40,000

Source: Census Bureau

20,000

0 2000

2005

2010

2015 1

2020

2025

Year

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Chapter 2 - Human Environment

2031


Fig 2c - RPA 8 Population and Age Distribution RPA 8 Composition Population composition ( 2000 - 2030) 70,000 60,000

62,385

62,438

62,372

59,319

61,554 58,522

56,662

50,000

Population

The age composition projections for the population of the RPA 8 region shows changes over the next thirty years that are aligned with Iowa trends. Figure 2c shows that a reduction of 15 percent over the thirty year period for 0-10 yr olds, where the second age bracket (20 – 64) has shown a reduction of 5 percent. On the other hand, the percentage of persons 65 years of age and over has increased by 62 percent and should continue to increase as the “baby boomer” generation reaches this age bracket. The percentage of persons over 65 years of age also reflects the trend of people living longer. Map 2.1 shows the location of populations 65+ within the RPA 8 region. Source: Census Bureau

40,000 30,000

30,842 27,602

25,445

25,028

25,770

27,320 26,270

26,075 24,584

21,521

20,000 16,879

17,101

17,186

18,802

10,000 0 2000

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2030

Years Age 0 to 19

Age 20 to 64

Age 64 and Above

Fig 2d - DMATS Population Composition and Age Distribution 80,000

8,581 70,000 2,870 3,235 60,000

Population

50,000

7,589

3,836

2,926 2,931 2,734 2,890

4,896

55 to 59

45 to 49 5,985

4,023

4,941

40 to 44

5,659

35 to 39

4,918

30 to 34

4,217

4,716 20,000

60 to 64

50 to 54

4,961 30,000

65 to 70

5,635

3,233 40,000

70 +

5,501

25 to 29

The age composition projections for the population of the DMATS region shows changes over the next thirty years that are contrary to Iowa trends. These changes are shown in Figure 2d. The 0-19 age bracket shows an increase of 18 percent over the thirty year period where the age bracket of 20 – 64 has shown an increase of 23 percent. The percentage of persons 65 years of age and over has increased by only 9 percent. Map 2.2 shows the location of populations 65+ within the DMATS region. Source: Census Bureau

20 to 24

5,039 6,010

15 to 19

5,387

10 to 14

4,748

5,321

5 to 9

4,279

4,967

0 to 4

4,873 10,000

4,463

0 1990

2000 Years

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

[7]


2.1

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

RPA8 - Population Age 65 and Up

( / ! ( 52

! ( 3

! ( 13

136

! ( 38

Manchester 20

20

DELAWARE CO.

! ( 13

52 3

( / DMATS

( / 20

( /

( /! (

! ( 38

! ( 136

DUBUQUE CO.

( / 61

( /

( / 52

151

! ( 62

Legend

52

( / 61

Census Tracts Population Age 65 and Up

( /

JACKSON CO.

DMATS MPO

Maquoketa

! (

! ( 64

64

( / 67

223 - 350 351 - 500

! ( 136

501 - 750

CLINTON CO.

751 - 900

( / 61

901 - 1300 Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

( / 30

! ( 136

Clinton De Witt

( / 30

( / ( / 30

67

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Chapter 2 - Human Environment

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2.2

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

WISCONSIN

DMATS - Population Age 65 and Up

M

Sageville

( /! ( 52

3

iss

i ss

ip pi

( / ( / 61

Ri ve r

151

! ( 11

! ( 32

Asbury

Legend

IOWA

Census Tracts

! (

Dubuque

35

East Dubuque

( / 20

Centralia

( / 20

ILLINOIS

Population Age 65 and Up 223 - 350 351 - 500 501 - 750

Peosta

( / 52

( / 20

751 - 900

ÂŻ

901 - 1300 Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

( / 151

( / 61

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

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Fig 2e - RPA 8 Racial Composition Two or More Races

698

Hawaiian

91

Asian

433

Native American

188

African American

893

Race

The racial compositions within the RPA 8 area are shown in Figure 2e. The region is nearly 98 percent Caucasian, with a small African-American population and an even smaller Hispanic population. In 2000 the racial breakdown of the region’s residents indicates that minority populations comprised only 2.1 percent of the total population. The region’s non-white population ranges from 0.07 percent in Delaware County, to a high of 3.22 percent in City of Clinton. Map 2.3 shows the locations of minority populations within the RPA 8 region. Source: Census Bureau

Caucasian

Fig 2f - DMATS Racial Composition

104,584

0.00%

20.00%

40.00%

60.00%

80.00%

Percentage

Other race

Asian or Pacific Islander

American Indian, Aleut, or Eskimo

African American

The racial compositions within the DMATS area are shown in Figure 2f. The region is 98 percent Caucasian, with a small African-American population..In 2000 the racial breakdown of the region’s residents indicates that minority populations comprised only 1.89 percent percent of the total population. Map 2.4 shows the locations of minority populations within the DMATS region. Source:

53

457

Census Bureau

133

807

Caucasian

0.00%

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75,068 20.00%

40.00%

60.00%

80.00%

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

100.00%

100.00%


2.3

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

RPA8 - Minority Population

( / ! ( 52

! ( 3

! ( 13

136

! ( 38

Manchester 20

20

DELAWARE CO.

! ( 13

52 3

( / DMATS

( / 20

( /

( /! (

! ( 38

! ( 136

DUBUQUE CO.

( / 61

( /

( / 52

151

! ( 62

Legend

52

( / 61

Census Tracts Percent Minority Population

( /

JACKSON CO.

DMATS MPO

Maquoketa

! (

! ( 64

64

( / 67

0 - 1% 1 - 1.5%

! ( 136

1.5 - 2%

CLINTON CO.

2 - 4.5%

( / 61

4.5 - 14.5% Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

( / 30

! ( 136

Clinton De Witt

( / 30

( / ( / 30

67

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

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2.4

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

WISCONSIN

DMATS - Minority Population

M

Sageville

( /! ( 52

3

iss

i ss

ip pi

( / ( / 61

Ri ve r

151

! ( 11

! ( 32

Asbury

Legend

IOWA

Census Tracts

! (

Dubuque

35

East Dubuque

( / 20

Centralia

( / 20

Percent Minority Population 0 - 1% 1 - 1.5% 1.5 - 2%

Peosta

( / 52

( / 20

2 - 4.5% 4.5 - 14.5% Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

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Chapter 2 - Human Environment

( / 151

( / 61

ILLINOIS

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Low Income Households

Household income plays a vital role in deciding the transportation and transit needs and projects in the area. Income below 20,000 for one person household, 23,000 for two person household, 25,000 for three person household and 30,000 for four or more person household is treated as low income. Over all 27 percent of the total households are below income level. FHWA policies dictate that specific transportation projects be assessed given their benefits and burdens on certain populations, whether they be minority or low-income. In spite of its status, a project programmed for construction (or advanced environmental study) must consider low income populations affected by each discrete project, regardless of municipal income averages. Figures 2g and 2h show a clear picture of the number of households in teh RPA 8 and DMATS regions that are considered low income based on the standards noted above. Map 2.5 shows median income for the RPA 8 region while map 2.6 shows median income for the DMATS region. Source: Census Bureau

Fig 2g - RPA 8 Low Income Households

Fig 2h - DMATS Low Income Households

Low income

Low income

31%

27%

69%

73%

High income

High income

Census 2000

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

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2.5

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

WISCONSIN

DMATS - Median Household Income

M

Sageville

( /! ( 52

3

iss

i ss

ip pi

( / ( / 61

Ri ve r

151

! ( 11

! ( 32

Asbury

Legend

IOWA

Census Tracts

! (

Dubuque

35

East Dubuque

( / 20

Centralia

( / 20

Median Household Income $20,000 - 27,000 $27,001 - 34,000 $34,001 - 41,000

Peosta

( / 52

( / 20

$41,001 - 48,000 $48,001 - 55,000 Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

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Chapter 2 - Human Environment

( / 151

( / 61

ILLINOIS

ÂŻ


2.6

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

RPA8 - Median Household Income

! (

( / ! ( 52

! ( 3

13

136

! ( 38

Manchester 20

20

DELAWARE CO.

! ( 13

52 3

( / DMATS

( / 20

( /

( /! (

! ( 38

! ( 136

DUBUQUE CO.

( / 61

( /

( / 52

151

! ( 62

Legend

52

( / 61

Census Tracts Median Household Income

( /

JACKSON CO.

DMATS MPO

Maquoketa

! (

! ( 64

64

( / 67

$20,000 - 27,000 $27,001 - 34,000

! ( 136

$34,001 - 41,000

CLINTON CO.

$41,001 - 48,000

( / 61

$48,001 - 55,000 Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

( / 30

! ( 136

Clinton De Witt

( / 30

( / ( / 30

67

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

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Fig 2i - RPA 8 Employment Projections

Type of Employment & Employment Projections for 2030

Figure 2i shows the employment forecast for the RPA 8 area. The graph shows projected inrceases in the management and professional occupatinos, service, sales and office, construction, extraction, and maintenance, and the production, extraction ,and materials moving sectors through the year 2030. Farming, fishing, and forestry employment is projected to remain steady over the next 30 years. Source: RPA 8

16,000 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000

Management professional and related occupations Service 2005 2010 2015 2020 Sales and office Farming, fishing, and forestry Construction, extraction and maintenance Production, transportation, and material moving

2,000 2025

2030

0 2000

2005

2010

2015

Management professional and related occupations

2020

2025

2030

Service

Fig 2j - DMATS Employment Projections

Source : RPA 8

Sales and office

Farming, fishing, and forestry

Construction, extraction and maintenance

Production, transportation, and material moving

90,000.00

69,601.00

60,000.00 62,191.00

57,011.00 54,482.00

Employment

Figure 2j shows the employment forecast for the DMATS area. The graph shows projected inrceases and, in some cases, decreases by the year 2031. Total employment is expected to be 62191 by 2031, with steady growth in employment expected throughout the area. Overall, an increase in employment of 15,446 is expected to take place in such locations as the Dubuque Technology Park, Dubuque Westside Industrial Park, Asbury Square Mall, Downtown Dubuque riverfront area, Peosta Business Park, and the area of East Dubuque surrounding US Highway 20 and along the Mississippi River.

51,953.00 46,745.00

48,908.00

30,000.00

Source: Census Bureau

0.00 2000

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Chapter 2 - Human Environment

2005

2010

2015

2020

2025

2031


Fig 2k - RPA 8 and DMATS Travel Time Travel Time to Work (in minutes)to Work 953

90+

1,301

60-89

Time (in minutes)

Travel Time to work will help in analyzing the number of short trips and trips that can be catered with other modes of transportation and methods avoid peak hour congestion. Workers in City of Clinton, City of Manchester and City of Maquoketa generally have the region’s shortest commute times, with over 60 percent requiring less than 15 minutes to get to work. Only 23.5 percent have travel time more than 30 minutes to work. The graph to the left shows the number of workers and their trip length for the region. Source:

2,998

45-59

7,470

30-45

Census Bureau 16,543

15-30

20,642

5-15 4,294

<5 -

5,000

10,000

15,000

20,000

25,000

Workers Source : Census 2000

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

[17]


Mode of Transportation to Work Another key issue for the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation system is transportation modes that are being used by workers to get to work. Trips to work make up the largest single group of trips and, in most urban areas, account for about 25 percent of all trips on an average day. Work trips place the single largest demand on the transportation system. The mode choice made by workers for their trip to work is one of the best indications available of the modes that will be chosen for other types of trips.

Figure 2l displays that most of the commutes in RPA 8 are single-occupant vehicle (SOV) trips and carpool trips. SOV trips account for 78.3 percent of RPA 8 commutes, with Cities having the highest percentage of SOV trips with in the region on an average of 82.0 percent. Carpooling accounted for 10.2 percent of all commuting trips in RPA 8, with Jackson County reporting the highest rate (13.1 percent). Walking to work is uncommon in RPA 8, at only 3.5 percent of all trips. City of Clinton had the smallest percentage of walkers (2.7 percent). Jackson County had the longest mean travel time (21.9 minutes). Dubuque County had the shortest mean travel time, at 15.5 minutes. Mean travel time strongly correlates to commutation patterns, with those counties that retain more commuters having shorter mean travel times than those counties that retain fewer commuters. Source: Census Bureau

[18]

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

Fig 2l - RPA 8 Mode to Work


Fig 2m - DMATS Mode to Work Bus or Trolley 0.43% 203

Bicycle 0.11% 53

Motorcycle 0.06% 26

Other Means 0.25% Worked at Home Walked 117 2.27% 4.02% 1,061 1,877

Taxicab 0.06% 27

Carpool 8.88% 4,151

Figure 2m displays that most of the commutes in the DMATS region are single-occupant vehicle (SOV) trips and carpool trips. SOV trips account for almost 84 percent of DMATS commutes, Carpooling accounted for almost 9 percent percent of all commuting trips in the DMATS area. Walking to work is more common in DMATS than other alternatives to driving alone or carpooling, at 4 percent of all trips.

Drove Alone 83.92% 39,213

Mean travel time strongly correlates to commutation patterns, with those counties that retain more commuters having shorter mean travel times than those counties that retain fewer commuters. Source: Census Bureau

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

[19]


Commuter Patterns

Commuting patterns vary among the DMATS region and RPA 8 counties. This data provides a coarse indication of journey to work travel patterns. At nearly 90 percent, Dubuque County has the region’s highest percentage of workers employed within the county of residence. The county is also a net importer of workers from each surrounding RPA counties. Jackson County on the other hand exports nearly one third of its resident workforce – the highest such percentage in RPA 8. A majority of these trips are to neighboring Dubuque County, where approximately 1,804 workers commute from Jackson County. This number constitutes nearly 18 percent of Jefferson County’s resident workforce. Overall most of the residents in DMATS and RPA 8 do work within the region Maps 2.7 and 2.8 show intra-county commuting patterns across and throughout RPA 8. Source: Census Bureau

Conclusion

The entire region is experiencing steady economic and population growth with more increase in travel time to work. For any region it is important to have infrastructure to have a socio and economic development, having a good transportation system is key to the continued development of the area. Not only does this information demonstrate the need for continued improves to the infrastructure but also the need for continued improvements to the area’s transit systems to accommodate low-income, Minority and Senior population.

[20]

Chapter 2 - Human Environment


2.7 Passenger Transportation Development Plan

Outward Commutes by County 1 - 50

151 - 600

1,001 - 3,000

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

51 - 150

601 - 1,000

3,001 - 42,500

County to County Workflow - Outward Commutes

Outward Commutes from Dubuque County Allamakee

Winneshiek Allamakee

Crawford

Chickasaw

Floyd

Outward Commutes from Delaware County

Sauk

Richland

Dane

Iowa Fayette

Cerro Gordo

Grant

Clayton

Dubuque

Black Hawk

Winnebago

Jo Daviess

Buchanan

Delaware

Jackson

Jones

Linn

Tama

Story

Delaware

Buchanan

Clayton

Rock

Lafayette Black Hawk

Grant

Fayette

Jo Daviess Jackson

Jones

Linn

Story

Dubuque

Clinton

Clinton Lee

Cedar Johnson

Cedar Poweshiek

Polk

Scott

Johnson

Muscatine

Muscatine

Mahaska

Rock Island

Scott Rock Island

Outward commutes refers to the residents in a given county and which county they work in.

Outward Commutes from Jackson County

Outward Commutes from Clinton County Fayette

Dane

Green

Rock

Black Hawk

Buchanan

Delaware

Linn

Dubuque

Jones

Dubuque

Grundy

Jo Daviess

Benton

Carroll Johnson

Jackson

Stephenson

Boone Cook

Carroll

Kane

Whiteside

Whiteside

Lee

Scott Muscatine

Scott Muscatine

Wapello

Jones

Cedar

Clinton Johnson

Linn

Jo Daviess

Clinton

Jackson

Cedar Poweshiek

Kenosha

Grant

Clayton

Rock Island

Henry

Grundy

Louisa Rock Island

Henry

Henry

Wapello

Jefferson

Des Moines

Livingston Peoria

Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA, Data Source: U.S. Census 2000

Chapter 2 - Human Environment

[21]


2.8 Passenger Transportation Development Plan

Inward Commutes by County 1 - 50

151 - 600

1001 - 3000

51 - 150

601 - 1000

3001 - 42387

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

County to County Workflow - Inward Commutes

Inward Commutes to Dubuque County Howard

Winneshiek

Allamakee

Inward Commutes to Delaware County

Dane

Iowa

Butler

Grundy

Story

Fayette

Bremer

Black Hawk

Tama

Fayette

Delaware

Buchanan

Benton

Dubuque

Stephenson

Lafayette

Winnebago

Carroll

Jo Daviess Jackson

Jones

Linn

Benton

Tama

Dubuque

DeKalb

Clinton Whiteside

Cedar Johnson

Johnson

Scott La Salle

Muscatine Marion

Delaware

Buchanan

Black Hawk

Hardin

Jackson

Jones

Linn

Jo Daviess

Grant

Clayton

Walworth

Green

Lafayette

Crawford

Chickasaw

Grant

Clayton

Richland

Allamakee

Crawford

Rock Island

Rock Island

Inward commutes refers to the workers in a given county and which county they reside in.

Inward Commutes to Clinton County

Inward Commutes to Jackson County

Clayton

Grant

Clayton

Black Hawk

Delaware

Buchanan

Linn

Dubuque

Jones

Jo Daviess Jackson

McHenry Marshall

Dubuque

Delaware

Buchanan

Lafayette

Linn

Jones

Cedar

Carroll DeKalb

DuPage

Lee

Scott Muscatine

Rock Island

Whiteside

Cedar Johnson

Scott Louisa

Rock Island

Henry

Mercer Livingston

Des Moines

Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA, Data Source: U.S. Census 2000

[22]

Jackson

Winnebago

Clinton Carroll

Clinton

Keokuk

Jo Daviess

Chapter 2 - Human Environment


Chapter 3

Existing Providers

Introduction

Public transit is an important component in the transportation network. The public transit providers within RPA 8 and DMATS region provide access to opportunities that many riders might not otherwise have. The economic and social links provided by transit allows access to work, school, medical care, meal sites and leisure activities. It provides many individuals the mobility that allows them their continued self-improvement, independence and quality of life.

Access

Transit not only provides an alternative to the automobile but also provides the only available means of transportation to some youth, elderly, disabled and economically disadvantaged citizens (transportation reliant). Maps 6.1 and 6.2 show households without vehicles in RPA 8 and DMATS regions.

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

[23]


RPA 8 and DMATS Transit Providers RPA 8 and DMATS are served by four transit systems: Regional Transit Authority 8, Clinton Metropolitan Transit Aauthority, Keyline Transit, and Riverbend Transit.

Regional Transit Authority 8

Population 70,202 Population 70,202

Keyline Transit Regional Transit Authority 8

Population 57,686

Clinton MTA Keyline Transit

Population 57,686

Riverbend Clinton MTA Transit Riverbend Transit

Population 27,704 Population 22,347 Population 22,347

[24]

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

Population 27,704


Transit Provider Information Clinton MTA

Clinton MTA is responsible for providing safe, accessible, economic and efficient public transportation service within the Clinton city limits. See Map 3.1 for Clinton MTA fixed routes.

Clinton MTA Service • Fixed-route - There are six fixed-routes that the MTA operates. All routes except the Lincolnway Shuttle route meet at the central transfer point, located on 6th Avenue. The Main Avenue West Route and Camanche Avenue/South Clinton Route, Main Avenue North Route and Camanche Avenue Route along with the Lincolnway Shuttle meet at the shuttle transfer point located at the Home Depot parking lot near South 19th Street. • Para-transit door-to-door service for elderly and disabled - Requires an advanced reservation; reservations can be up to 14 days in advance. • Special event transportation The MTA operates from 6:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M. Monday through Friday and 8:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M. on Saturday, excluding the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, and July 4th, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.

Clinton MTA Fare Information Amount

Type

$1.00 $0.75 $3.00 $30.00 $25.00 $20.00 $65.00 $20.00 $15.00 $15.00

Adult Cash Senior Citizen/Disabled Cash, Shuttle Cash, Student (K-12) Cash* Day Pass Adult/Family Monthly Pass Senior Citizen/Disabled Monthly Pass Unemployed Monthly Pass, College Student Monthly Pass, Student (K-12) Monthly Pass* Student (K-12) Semester Pass* Adult Punch Card (21 rides) Senior Citizen/Disabled Punch Card (21 rides) Para Transit Punch Card (11 rides) * Students (K-12) ride free with a valid student ID

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

[25]


3.1 Clinton MTA Routes 200 ST

36TH AVE N

DR

IC K SC H N 11TH ST N 9TH ST

PERS HING BLVD N ROO SEVE 2ND ST LT ST

N 3R D ST

N 7T H N 6T ST N 5TH H ST ST

AN C L I HE BE RT AVE Y AV E

CA M

S 1ST ST RIVERVIEW DR

N 11TH ST

N5 H S TH ST T N 4T

9TH ST NW CRESTLINE DR S 9TH ST

MYRA PL

KENILWORTH CT ARGYLE CT S 10TH ST

S 8TH ST

N 14TH ST S 14TH ST

ORCHARD LN

S 18TH ST

S 19TH ST

S 21ST ST

HA RR IS ON

DR G IN UR FA CT M AN U

S 13TH ST

MILL CREE K PK WY

S 30TH ST

S 14TH ST BARKER ST

S 32ND ST

DUNN RD

S 40TH ST

N 12TH ST

425 AVE

BRANDEN HILLS DR

SARAH LN

30 ( /

11TH AVE S 12TH AVE S

15TH AVE S 16TH AVE S 17TH AVE S

S 3RD ST

ES AV E S TH AV 18 TH 19

67 ( /

S 2ND ST

E AV

136

N

S 3RD ST

5TH AVE S 6TH AVE S 7TH AVE S

S 5TH ST

Y RT BE LI

! (

12TH AVE N

S 4TH ST

T

E AV

IOWA 13 6

N

AVE N 14TH AVE N

1ST AVE 2ND AVE S 3RD AVE S 4TH AVE S

8TH AVE S 9TH AVE S 10TH AVE S 11TH AVE S

18TH AVE

15T H

3RD AV E

VD BL

S 6TH ST

400 AVE

DR

S 54TH ST

W ST N 7TH

LE DA

B

S 9TH ST

Y KW

F UF BL

S 8TH ST

C

LP

N

9TH A VE N 8TH A VE N 7TH AV EN 6TH AV EN 5TH AV EN

NG

E AV

ER AV BE

E NN HA

N

15TH AVE S

C PE OS PR

27TH AVE S

RI SP

FAIRWAY DR

E HANOVER AV

Y RT

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

22ND AVE S

BE LI

30 ( /

S 25TH ST

US 30

LINCOLN WAY

LN

HARTS MILL RD

EY

Main Ave W/Camanche Ave - South Clinton Line

16TH AVE S

N 10TH ST

Main Ave N/Camanche Ave Line

FF S T S BLU 13TH AVE S 14TH AVE S TH AVE S

F UF

D LV

T

5TH AVE N

PL TH L 17 P TH PL L 18 TH T P 19 1S PL 2 ND P L 22 RD 23

Lincolnway Shuttle

15

S

BL

WOR TH C

3RD AVE S

LAWNDALE DR S 12TH ST

12TH AVE S

VALLEY OAKS DR

S 16TH ST

Hill Line

[26]

GLENDALE RD

CAMERON DR

12TH AVE N

N 13TH ST

N 18TH ST

RD

Y

IDGE

D AN BR

MILL R

RANDY DR

Branch Line

LN

N

16TH AVE N

HON

11TH ST NW

N 18TH ST

AVE 8 TH

8TH AVE S

26TH AVE N 25 T H AVE

23RD AVE N 22ND AVE N

11TH AVE N 10TH AVE N

230 ST

32ND AVE N 31ST AVE N 30TH AVE N 29TH AVE N

BUELL AVE

16TH ST NW

420 AVE 13TH AVE N 220 ST

28TH AVE N

MAIN AVE

136

210 ST

13th Ave North Line

N 13TH ST

! (

IOWA 136

Legend

RD

W STOCKWELL LN

442 AVE

MTA Service

410 AVE

400 AVE

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

35TH AVE N 33RD A VE N

TOWER RD

MCKIN GA LEY S RFIELD S T T GRAN T ST

Passenger Transportation Development Plan

34TH AVE N

200 ST

¯


Region 8 Regional Transit Authority (RTA 8) The Region 8 Regional Transit Authority (RTA) was formed to improve, consolidate, and coordinate transportation services and provide accessible transportation to the underserved cities and rural areas of the State of Iowa Planning Area 8 including Delaware, Dubuque, and Jackson Counties. RTA provides many cities with daily service within their city as well as commuting to other cities, while other communities have service several times per week. Map 3.2 shows RTA fixed route services.

RTA Routes Dubuque to Iowa City - Times vary (1st Thurs., 2nd Wed., last Tues.) Dyersville to Dubuque (4th Thursday) Manchester to Cedar Rapids (Last Wednesday) Manchester to Dubuque (1st, 2nd & 3rd Wednesday)

In-Town Manchester In-Town Dubuque In-Town Maquoketa Bellevue to Dubuque (2nd & 4th Thursday) Bellevue to Maquoketa (days vary) Cascade to Dubuque (1st Mon., 3rd,Thurs.) Colesburg/Greeley/Edgewood to Manchester (1st & 3rd Thursday)

Maquoketa to Davenport (By Request) Maquoketa to Dubuque (2nd & 4th Thurs.) Peosta to Dubuque

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday 6:00am

8:00am

10:00am

Noon

2:00pm

4:00pm

6:00pm

8:00pm

10:00 pm

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

[27]


3.2 RTA 8 Routes

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

RTA Service

! ( 3

Edgewood

! (

Sherrill

Holy Cross

Luxemburg

Rickardsville

Greeley

Dundee

New Vienna

38

Dubuque

Manchester

Masonville

Balltown Colesburg

Earlville

Dyersville

( / 20

Delaware

Bankston Graf

Farley Epworth

( /

ÂŻ

20

Delhi

( / 52

Worthington

! ( 13

Ryan

DELAWARE CO.

DUBUQUE CO. Hopkinton

( / 151

( / 61

St. Donatus

Zwingle

La Motte

Bernard

Cascade

Bellevue

Legend

! ( 62

RTA Routes

Springbrook

Bellevue to Dubuque

Andrew

Bellevue to Maquoketa

( /

Cascade to Dubuque

JACKSON CO.

61

Colesburg/Greeley/Edgewood to Manchester

Dyersville to Dubuque

Baldwin

Manchester to Cedar Rapids Manchester to Dubuque Maquoketa to Davenport

County Boundary

Maquoketa to Dubuque

Incorporated Places

Peosta to Dubuque

Cities with In-Town Service

Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

[28]

Spragueville

Monmouth

Dubuque to Iowa City

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

Maquoketa

Preston

Sabula Miles


Keyline Transit Keyline Transit strives to provide a safe, timely, and comfortable mode of public transportation for citizens to and from their destinations on fixed routes and door to door services. Fixed route service provides transportation to Dubuque citizens so that they may access various services, shopping, entertainment, community functions, and employment opportunities within the City. Map 3.3 shows Keyline fixed route service. Mini-bus promotes independence for seniors and persons with disabilities by providing Origin to Destination transportation and passenger assistance when accessing the demand response service.

Keyline Routes Green Line East Bound - Asbury Plaza to 32nd & Saunders Green Line West Bound - 32nd & Saunders to Goodwill

Red Line East Bound - Mt St. Francis to WalMart Red Line West Bound - Warren Plaza to Mt St. Francis Grey Line East Bound - Warren Plaza to Point Grey Line West Bound - Point to Kennedy Mall

Orange Line South Bound - Dubuque Greyhound Park to Mt Carmel Orange Line North Bound - Mt Carmel to Dubuque Greyhound Park

Monday - Saturday

6:00am

8:00am

10:00am

Noon

2:00pm

4:00pm

6:00pm

8:00pm

Riverbend Transit

River Bend Transit provides door to door transportation within Clinton County. River Bend Transit is on a priority call system, first serving disabled and elderly on a first come, first served basis, with general public space as available. Service operates in different portions of the county each day of the week. For that reason, riders must plan their trips for that one day of the week when the vehicle comes to their area. The service day is the same day each week, however pick-up times may very. River Bend Transit also provides rides to University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics as well as other Iowa City destinations.

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

[29]


3.3 Keyline Routes

( /

St

rg Av e

n so ck Ja

Keyline Transit Service

Windsor Ave

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

! (

Rh om be

32

Kaufmann Ave

NW Arterial

Asbury Asbury Rd

/ ( /( 61

e Av

Asbury Rd

St

al ntr Ce

e Kan

Ke rp er Bl vd

52

Passenger Transportation Development Plan

Clarke Dr Asb ur

yR d

W

t tS cus Lo

Dubuque

Hillcrest Rd Gra

Chaney Rd

iew ndv

rs Unive

e ity Av

Devon

Seippel Rd

Dr

Hi ll S

t

JFK Rd

Ave

Pennsylvania Rd

d Blv as Lor

vene ll

e Rd

Dod

ge S

t

( / 20

( / 20

Bryant St

Cha

St dge Do e Av and vel Cle

Legend Gray Line

Orange Line

Limited Access Gray Line

Limited Access Orange Line

Green Line

Red Line

Limited Access Green Line

Limited Access Red Line

Trolley Route Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

[30]

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

( / ( / ( / 52

61

151

ÂŻ

151


Private

cei v Av es F ail ed ab era Cl le lF int to u t o De n C he P ndin law ou g u b nt y S lic Du are C bu ou ervi nt Ja que y S ce A Co ck erv rea so u n Iow n C ice ty S o aS un erv Are e t a i y IA rv ice Ser ce A ,I L, r v ea MN Area ice 48 Ar ,W US ea I St Fl ate Serv ee ic sS tS erv e Ar ize ea ice Ar ea

Re

Sunday

Saturday

Friday

Thursday

Wednesday

Tuesday

Monday

Existing Transit Providers

Bradley Jo Charter E & R Taxi Early Learners Child Develoment E-Z Taxi Service of Dubuque Frog Hollow Hawkeye Stages Starlight Limousine & Taxi Tri-State Travel Trolleys of Dubuque Young-Uns Child Care Center

Public

Human Services

Clinton MTA Burlington Trailways RTA 8 East Dubuque Transit Heartland EMS KeyLine Transit Hills and Dales Child Development Bethany Home Ellen Kennedy Living Center Good Neighbor Home Hillcrest Family Services Mount Saint Francis Oak Park Place Riverbend Retirement Community Stonehill Franciscan Services Veterans Affairs Transportation

1 2

2 1

29 2 27 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers

[31]


Existing Coordination Efforts Region 8 RTA and KeyLine Transit Coordinate the RTA’s subscription services with KeyLine ADA Paratransit service by combining the two transit services to accommodate passenger trips needs. KeyLine transit has paratransit consumers they can provide transportation to work at the end of the KeyLine service day and the RTA can return the passenger to their place of residence on an evening route the RTA provides in the City of Dubuque. Discussions are underway between the RTA and KeyLine to advertise and promote the RTA direct shuttle service from downtown Dubuque Northeast Iowa Community College to their Peosta campus that can also provide KeyLine passengers with a more direct and shorter headway service from KeyLine’s downtown transfer to the west end Kennedy Mall with stops at KeyLine’s Delhi transfer. The RTA has been assisting the local cab company (E-Z Taxi) in becoming a Medicaid eligible transportation provider to accommodate those ride requests that neither KeyLine nor the RTA can accommodate on evenings and weekend services. While the application has not been completed, discussions continue between the RTA and E-Z Taxi to complete this coordination effort. Goodwill Industries readjusted their second shift work schedules to line up with an existing RTA evening route that allowed the RTA to pick up additional riders at Goodwill and deliver them to their homes under Medical Waiver billing, bringing a significant savings to families otherwise paying for cab service and reducing strains on families who needed to provide the transportation themselves for their adult dependents. The service also increased efficiency within the KeyLine route as KeyLine bargaining agreement requires a two hour minimum payment to drivers. Prior to adding the Goodwill riders, the route provided about 1.25 hours of actual service but cost the RTA 2 hours. The additional riders can be added to the route and still keep the service at the 2 hour minimum. Area Residential Care coordinated an additional RTA route that eliminated approximately 3 private vans operated by ARC, and consolidated the passengers onto a single RTA bus, providing the RTA approximately 60 rides daily. The Regional Transit Authority regularly participates in other standing Human Service Committee meetings throughout the year to garner information regarding developing issues and opportunities for coordination. Those programs include the Dubuque Mental Health Stakeholders Committee, the Delaware County Community Services Advisory Committee, Scenic Valley Area Agency on Aging Board, the Community Partnerships for Protecting Children, Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Service and the Regional Planning Affiliation and staff meetings with Developing Alternative Choices (DAC). As a result the RTA has identified needs to including expansion of early childhood services to accommodate growing childcare needs, evening drop-in programs for consumers suffering from mental illness, expanded evening transportation employment for persons with disabilities, direct billings to the MR Waiver and Elderly Waiver programs to relieve consumers of the financial burden of paying fares out of pocket or paying for cab services.

[32]

Chapter 3 - Existing Providers


Chapter 4

Gap Analysis and Progress

Introduction Staff conducted workshops with transit operators and the public and did gap analysis. The gap analysis helped the systems to look at deficiencies and future requirements for their respective areas. The systems provided information on the success they had from previous project lists. This process showed that the projects being recognized by the public have been implemented in a systemic fashion. The following information is organized by transit provider and seperated into three sections: (1) gap analysis map discussion, (2) gap analysis map, and (3) project list.

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[33]


Clinton Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) 200 ST

36TH AVE N

IC K SC H

26TH AVE N

25TH AVE N

BUELL AVE

16TH AVE N

UR FA CT

S 1ST ST RIVERVIEW DR

N 5T H ST

S 8TH ST CA M AN C L I HE BE RT AVE Y AV E

KENILWORTH CT ARGYLE CT S 10TH ST

S 13TH ST

S 9TH ST

N 12TH ST

N 11TH ST

MYRA PL

S 14TH ST

ORCHARD LN

S 14TH ST BARKER ST

S 19TH ST

S 21ST ST

DR HA RR IS ON

DR IN

G

MILL CREE K PK WY

M AN U DUNN RD

S 40TH ST

S 18TH ST

BRANDEN HILLS DR

SARAH LN

S 32ND ST

S 30TH ST

S 54TH ST 400 AVE

30 ( /

11TH AVE S 12TH AVE S S 3RD ST

Extend service to Camanche, IA

S 2ND ST

27TH AVE S

E HANOVER AV

LINCOLN WAY

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

67 ( /

15TH AVE S 16TH AVE S 17TH AVE S

ES AV E S TH AV 18 TH 19

Extend service to Fulton, IL

N

S 3RD ST

LI

S 5TH ST

T

E AV

12TH AVE N

S 4TH ST

C PE OS PR

Y RT BE

S 6TH ST

30 ( /

8TH AVE S 9TH AVE S 10TH AVE S 11TH AVE S

15TH AVE S

E AV

5TH AVE S 6TH AVE S 7TH AVE S

136

AVE N

9TH A VE N 8TH A VE N 7TH AV EN 6TH AV EN 5TH AV EN

3RD AV E

S 9TH ST

[34]

VIRGINIA AVE

FAIRWAY DR

B

T

LOCUST PL 1ST AVE 2ND AVE S 3RD AVE S 3RD AVE S 4TH AVE S S 8TH ST

HARTS MILL RD

22ND AVE S

F UF

N 10TH ST

16TH AVE S

FF S T S BLU 13TH AVE S 14TH AVE S S E AV TH

BL

5TH AVE N

PL TH L 17 P TH PL L 18 TH T P 19 21S PL ND P L 22 RD 23

Main Ave W/Camanche Ave - South Clinton Line

15

S

D LV LAWNDALE DR S 12TH ST

VALLEY OAKS DR

Main Ave N/Camanche Ave Line

US 30

N 13TH ST

12TH AVE S

Lincolnway Shuttle

8TH AVE S

GLENDALE RD

CAMERON DR

Hill Line

S 16TH ST

Y

RD

D AN BR

LN

IDGE

Branch Line

230 ST

MILL R

13th Ave North Line

RANDY DR

Legend

N 18TH ST

425 AVE

WOR TH C

! (

N 4T

220 ST

N5 H S TH ST T

14TH 13TH AVE N

N 3R D ST

420 AVE

N 7T H N 6T ST N 5TH H ST ST

23RD AVE N 22ND AVE N

Expand service to Ashford University and new subdivisions

32ND AVE N 31ST AVE N 30TH AVE N 29TH AVE N

PERS HING BLVD N ROO SEVE 2ND ST LT ST

N 13TH ST

MAIN AVE

136

28TH AVE N

N 11TH ST N 9TH ST

! (

16TH ST NW

IOWA 136 210 ST

RD

W STOCKWELL LN

400 AVE

MTA - Gap Analysis

N 12TH ST

410 AVE

442 AVE

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

35TH AVE N 33RD A VE N

TOWER RD

MCKIN GA LEY S RFIELD ST T GRAN T ST

Passenger Transportation Development Plan

34TH AVE N

200 ST

¯


MTA Transportation Needs and Status Number

1

2

Service Need

Agency(s)

Evening Service to midnight/Weekend Service/Holiday Service

Expanded Hours and Days of Service

Camanche - Fulton Route

Project

Residents in Camanche, Clinton and Fulton

Extend existing routes to connect them with the cities of Camanche and Fulton

Previously Identified

Status

X

Not approved for funding by City of Clinton City Council

X

Not approved for funding by City of Clinton City Council; insufficient equipment and drivers

X

Not approved for funding by City of Clinton City Council; insufficient equipment and drivers

3

Expanded Routes

Expand existing routes within the City of Clinton

4

Increase Administrative Support

Expand Administrative Staff

X

Administrative position was added

5

Increase Maintenance Support

Expand Maintenance Staff

X

No increase in mechanics dut to budgetary constraints

6

Existing Fleet Operating Beyond Useful Life

Provide for more timely bus replacement with increased funding to Iowa Transit

X

(2) buses ordered through State earmark and sub allocation

7

Existing Fleet unable to accommodate inClinton MTA

Purchase used buses as available

X

No equipment available in condition necessary for service expansion

8

Maintenance Shop Heater Operating Be Clinton MTA

Purchase replacement shop heaters

X

No funding available

9

Concrete floor in shop in need of repair Clinton MTA

Repair shop floor concrete

X

No funding available

10

Maintenance Shop Garage Doors operating beyond useful life

Replace maintenance shop doors

X

No funding available

Clinton MTA

AGENCY/CONSU

Clinton MTA

Page 1

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[35]


MTA Transportation Needs and Status Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Project

Previously Identified

Status

11

Public not fully aware of available services

Increase education, marketing and outreach of available service

12

Driving staff in need of training

Clinton MTA

Increase training on first Aid/CPR, Defensive Driving & Passenger Assistance

13

State Transit Assistance

Clinton MTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Annual formula allocation

14

Federal Operating Assistance

Clinton MTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Annual formula allocation

15

Job Access Reverse Commute

Clinton MTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Competetive grant

16

New Freedoms

Clinton MTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Competetive grant

17

STA Special Projects

Clinton MTA

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

X

Competetive grant

18

ICAAP Funding

Clinton MTA

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

X

Competetive grant

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

[36]

Page 2

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

AGE


Keyline Transit

( /

St

rg Av e

n so ck Ja

Keyline Transit - Gap Analysis

Windsor Ave

Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

! (

Rh om be

e Kan

Dubuque âââ

âââ

â

âââ

âââ

t Hi ll S

ââ

ââ

East Dubuque

ââ â

âââ

Devon

Dr

â

â â â â â â âââ â ââââ t

( / 20

( / 20

Extend evening service from 5:55 PM to 9:45 PM (not including Orange Line)

Bryant St

ge S Dod

ââââ âââââ âââ ââ ââ ââ ââ âââ âââ e Rd

âââ

e ity Av

âââ

rs Unive

ââââââ

as Lor

Proposed Intermodal Facility

d Blv

ââ

Hillcrest Rd

Ave

Seippel Rd ââââââââââââââââââââ

t tS cus Lo

ââ

W

iew ndv

vene ll

yR d

JFK Rd

âââ

Cha

â â â â ââ

Add West End Tripper

Asb ur

Gra

Pennsylvania Rd

151

Clarke Dr

Chaney Rd

ââ

61

âââ

âââââââââââ ââ â ââ

Kaufmann Ave

â â â â â âââ â â â â â

NW Arterial

Asbury Rd

/ ( /(

e Av

Asbury Rd

â ââ â â â â â â â â â â â â â ââ ââââ â â Asbury â â â

St

al ntr Ce

ââ âââ

ââââââ

32

â

Ke rp er Bl vd

52

Passenger Transportation Development Plan

vel Cle

St dge Do e Av and

Add Downtown Shuttle

Legend Gray Line

Orange Line

Limited Access Gray Line

Limited Access Orange Line

Green Line

Red Line

Limited Access Green Line

Limited Access Red Line

Trolley Route

( / ( / ( / 52

61

151

¯

Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[37]


AGENCY/CONSUMER SERVICE NEEDS

KeyLine Transit Transportation Needs and Status Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Previously Identified

Project

Status

1

Expanded hours and days of service

PTDP Stakeholders

Evening, Weekend (Sunday), Holiday Service

X

Transit Study in progress to examine need and options to meet need

2

Equalize AM and PM Pullouts

KeyLine Transit/Drivers

Adjust pullout schedules to deploy service equally throughout the city

X

Transit Study in progress to examine need and options to meet need

3

Reduce ride times on routes

PTDP Stakeholders

Shorten routes or add additional buses to existing routes

X

Transit Study in progress to examine need and options to meet need

4

Knowledge of routes, schedules and service options to consumers

PTDP Stakeholders

Implement Marketing Plan

X

Marketing Plan scheduled for FY 2010

5

Greater geographic coverage of routes PTDP Stakeholders

Downtown Work Shuttle, Keywest, West End Expansion, County Fairgrounds, Cedar Cross Road, Dubuque Arboretum

X

Transit Study in progress to examine need and options to meet need

6

Greater Accessibility to Service

PTDP Stakeholders

Shorten wait times, adjust route pickup times, increase number of bus stops

X

Transit Study in progress to examine need and options to meet need

7

More affordable Service

PTDP Stakeholders

Reduce or eliminate fares

X

Pilot project with Middle School implemented to eliminate fares for students

8

Passenger Rail Service Between Chicago and Dubuque

City of Dubuque

Passenger Rail Service Between Dubuque and Chicago

X

Interest groups still meeting and efforts to lobby state/federal support ongoing

9

Staff support to assist in coordination of KeyLine Transit & PTDP service stakeholders

Mobility Manager Position

X

No current funding available Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

Page 1

[38]

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

AGENC


AGENCY/CONSUMER SERVICE NEEDS

KeyLine Transit Transportation Needs and Status Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Project

Previously Identified

Status

10

Driver Training

KeyLine Transit

Secure funding to provide additional defensive driving, customer service and passenger assistance training to drivers

X

Customer Service training provided in FY 2008 and Defensive Driviing to be coordinated with Region 8 in FY 2009

12

Bus Replacements

KeyLine Transit

Replace 35' HD buses

X

No federal funding available to fund 83% federal share

13

Bus Replacements

KeyLine Transit

Replace 22' MD buses

X

No federal funding available to fund 83% federal share

14

Improve customer fare collection system

KeyLine Transit

Electronic fareboxes

X

No federal funding available to fund 80% federal share

15

Improve security on buses

KeyLine Transit

Install security systems on buses

X

Security cameras being installed as funding is available

16

Improve fleet dispatch efficiency

KeyLine Transit

Install GPS and MDT systems

X

GPS installations ongoing as funding is available

17

Rehabilitate existing in-ground maintenance pits

KeyLine Transit

Rehabilitate existing in-ground maintenance pits

X

No federal funding available to fund 80% federal share

18

Improve facility security

KeyLine Transit

Upgrade existing security system

X

No federal funding available to fund 80% federal share

19

Repair and rehabilitate transit facility interior

KeyLine Transit

Repair and rehabilitate transit facility interior

X

No federal funding available to fund 80% federal share

AGENCY

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete Page 2

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[39]


AGENCY/CONSUMER SERVICE NEEDS

KeyLine Transit Transportation Needs and Status Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Previously Identified

Project

Status

20

Connect various transportation modalities in central location

City of Dubuque

Downtown Intermodal Facility

21

State Transit Assistance

KeyLine Transit

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

Annual formula allocation

22

Federal Operating Assistance

KeyLine Transit

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

Annual formula allocation

23

Job Access Reverse Commute

KeyLine Transit

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

Competetive grant

24

New Freedoms

KeyLine Transit

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

Competetive grant

25

STA Special Projects

KeyLine Transit

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

Competetive grant

26

ICAAP Funding

KeyLine Transit

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

Competetive grant

X

No federal funding available to fund 80% federal share

AGEN

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

[40]

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

Page 3


Regional Transit Authority 8 (RTA 8)

Passenger Transportation Development Plan Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study | Region 8 Planning Affiliation

RTA - Gap Analysis Add Regional Route Service to Dundee and Edgewood

! (

Edgewood

! (

Rickardsville New Vienna

38

Manchester

Earlville

( / 20

Delaware

Continue Service to Eleanor Roosevelt Middle School

Sherrill

Holy Cross

Luxemburg

Greeley

Dundee

Masonville

Balltown Colesburg

3

Expand Regional Route Service to Northern Dubuque County

Dyersville

Dubuque - Increase 1st Shift Contract Service - Increase Evening Service

Bankston Graf

Farley Epworth

( /

ÂŻ

20

Add In-Town Evening Service

Delhi

( / 52

Worthington

! ( 13

Ryan

DELAWARE CO.

DUBUQUE CO. Hopkinton

( / 151

( / 61

St. Donatus

Zwingle

La Motte

Bernard

Cascade

Bellevue

Legend RTA Routes Bellevue to Dubuque

- Increased Trips per Month - Increased Frequency of Intercity Routes - More User-Friendly Route and Schedule Info - Continue Peosta to Dubuque Service FY2010

! ( 62

Springbrook Andrew

Bellevue to Maquoketa

( /

Cascade to Dubuque

JACKSON CO.

61

Colesburg/Greeley/Edgewood to Manchester

Spragueville

Monmouth

Dubuque to Iowa City Dyersville to Dubuque

Baldwin

Maquoketa

Preston

Sabula Miles

Manchester to Cedar Rapids Manchester to Dubuque Maquoketa to Davenport

County Boundary

Data Source: U.S. Census 2000 Maquoketa to Dubuque Incorporated Places Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA Peosta to Dubuque

Increase Capacity of In-Town Service

Cities with In-Town Service

Map prepared March 2009 by ECIA

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[41]


RTA Transportation Needs and Progress

Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

1

Dyersville to Dubuque

Area Residential Care and Ellen Kennedy Living Center and Tri State Dialysis

2

Maquoketa to Dubuque

3

Dubuque In Town Evening Service

4

Manchester to Cedar Rapids Saturdays Penn Center

5

Manchester In Town Evening Service

6

Project

Mon-Fri Round Trip

Previously Identified

Status

X

Service implemented

Mental Health America of Dubuque M-W-F Round Trip County

X

Service to be implemented April 1, 2009

Goodwill Industries

8:30-9:30 Th-F-Sat One Way

X

Service Implemented

Saturdays 12:00-5:00

X

Service implemented

Delaware County Advisor Committee

Mon-Sun Evening 6:30-10:30

X

Project still pending due to funding constraint

Dundee to Manchester

Dundee residents

8:00-5:00 Mon-Sat

X

Project still pending due to funding constraint

7

Dubuque In Town 1st Shift Service

Four Mounds and Hills and Dales and Area Residential Care

M-F Round Trip 7:30-6:00

X

Service expanded on ARC routes

8

Dubuque to Peosta

NICC

M-F 7:30-5:30

X

Service implemented

9

Bellevue to Dubuque

Senior Center

1X Per Week Round Trip 9:30-1:30

X

Service implemented

10

Bellevue to Jackson County

Senior Center

1X Per Month Round Trip 9:30-1:30

X

Project still pending due to funding constraint

11

Cities Northern Dubuque County to Dubuque

Tri State Dialysis

M-W-F Round Trip 9:00-2:00

X

Project still pending due to funding constraint

12

Bellevue In-Town First Shift

Mill Valley Nursing Home and Senior Center

M-F 8:00-4:00 Round Trip

X

Project implemented

AGE

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

[42]

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress


RTA Transportation Needs and Progress

Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Previously Identified

Project

Status

13

Points in Dubuque, Delaware and Visiting Nurses Association Jackson County to Iowa City Hospitals

4X Per Month Round Trip 6:00-6:00

X

Service expanded to 3X Per Month

14

Maquoketa In Town Service

Senior Center

Evening and Weekends 2X Per Month

X

Project still pending due to funding constraint

15

Education Marketing and Outreach of Available Services

Consensus of all PTDP stakeholders

Newspaper, Radio Community Access Programming, Brochures and Presentations

X

Newspaper, Radio Community Access Programming, Brochures and Presentations

16

User Friendly Route and Schedule Information

Consensus of all PTDP stakeholders

Post route/schedule information on website

X

All route schedule information posted on RTA website

17

Increased Frequency of existing Intercity Routes

Tri State Dialysis scenic Valley Area Agency on Aging

Market service to employers & fund with JARC funding, NF funding

X

Project still pending due to local funding constraint

18

Increased Capacity on Dubuque InTown Routes

Area Residence Care

Market service to employers & fund with JARC funding, NF funding

X

Project pending delivery recently ordered buses from Stimulus funding and 5309 grant

19

Increased Capacity on Maquoketa InTown Routes

Scenic Valley Area Agency on Aging (DAC)

Market service to employers & fund with JARC funding, NF funding

X

Project still pending due to local funding constraint

20

School Shuttle Service Dubuque and Asbury

Eleanor Roosevelt Middle School

Create neighborhood route in Asbury

X

Service implemented

21

School Shuttle Service Bellevue

Bellevue community

contract with Bellevue community schools

X

Service terminated due to cancellation of contract with Bellevue Community Schools due to budget constraints

AGENC

22

Accessible Cab Service

Region 8 RTA

X

Project still pending

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[43]


RTA Transportation Needs and Progress

Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Project

Previously Identified

Status

23

State Transit Assistance

Region 8 RTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

24

Federal Operating Assistance

Region 8 RTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

25

Job Access Reverse Commute

Region 8 RTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

26

New Freedoms

Region 8 RTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

27

STA Special Projects

Region 8 RTA

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

X

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

28

ICAAP Funding

Region 8 RTA

Service Expansions Identified in PTDP

X

Current ICAAP Grant expended

29

Medicaid

Region 8 RTA

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

X

Operating Assistance for Day-To-Day Operation

30

(4) Wheelchair Capacity Buses for Dialysis

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Buses with (4) Wheelchair Capacity

X

(3) buses purchased from fundraising efforts of RTA/ECIA + (2) additional buses funded from Stimulus funding w/delivery approximately June/July 09

31

Low Floor Accessible Minivan

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Low Floor Accessible Minivan

X

Light Duty bus ordered from Stimulus funding to be delivered approx. July 09

32

16+ Passenger Accessible Buses

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Accessible Buses with 16+ Passenger capacity

X

See #30 above

AG

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

[44]

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress


RTA Transportation Needs and Progress

Number

Service Need

Agency(s)

Project

Previously Identified

Status

33

Maintenance Equipment

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Maintenance Equipment capable of providing Transit System with In-House Maintenance Capacity

X

Project not funded under Stimulus but pending consideration under FY 09 Appropriations

34

Portable Bus Wash Equipment

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Portable Bus Wash Equipment

X

Project not funded under Stimulus but pending consideration under FY 09 Appropriations

35

Bus Storage Facility Dyersville

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Land and Construct Bus Storage Facility

X

Project still pending due to local funding constraint

36

Bus Storage Facility Manchester

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Land and Construct Bus Storage Facility

X

Project still pending due to local funding constraint

37

Electronic Fareboxes

Region 8 RTA

Purchase Electronic Fareboxes

X

Project dropped

38

Driver Training First Aid/CPR Defensive Driving, Sensitivity, Passenger Assistance

Region 8 RTA

Schedule Driver Training First Aid/CPR Defensive Driving, Sensitivity, Passenger Assistance

X

On Going

AGENC

Project Dropped Project in Progress Project Complete

Conclusion

While transit systems have made some progress implementing projects previously identified in prior years PTDP, there clearly remains a funding gap preventing many if not most of the projects identified as solutions to unmet needs. Funding also continues to depend heavily on the transit systems and their limited state and federal transit sources. There remains an absence of alternative human resource revenue sources other than some Medicaid and Agency Contract revenues to implement the identified projects.

Chapter 4 -Gap Analysis and Progress

[45]


Chapter 5

Project Prioritization

Recommended Plan The projects identified within the table below were unanimously recommended to be incorporated into the 2010 Region 8 Regional Transit Authority Passenger Transportation Development Plan recommended program via electronic proxy vote, and the vote from the PTDP committee at their December 17, 2008 Formal consensus and sign-off meeting. As a result of this vote, these recommended projects and the draft PTDP document will be submitted to the Iowa Department of Transportation for comments. In addition, the PTDP will be presented to the Dubuque Metropolitan Area Transportation Study (DMATS) and Regional Planning Affiliation for their final approval in their April meetings. These projects reflect the identified needs of the communities that have been discussed through the PTDP process for the past two years. Those priority transportation needs were identified through last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s PTDP which all related to service. The previous priority needs were also updated as to status and taken into consideration as to whether the project remained a priority or whether it has been met or otherwise no longer considered an unmet need due to a change in circumstances. The following information is organized by transit provider and seperated into two sections: (1) project list, and (2) explanation and justification.

[46]

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


Clinton MTA

z

2

Expand existing routes within the City of Clinton

O,C

Expanded service to new west side Request local funding and seek startup funding subdivisions and around Ashford from other competetive sources University

$250,000

z

z

z

3

Extend service to 10:00 p.m. Evening Service to midnight/Weekend Service/Holiday Request local funding and seek startup funding Monday through Friday, to 6:00 O, C Service from other competetive sources p.m. on Saturday and add a dial-a ride service for Sunday

$250,000

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z



z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z



Public

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z

z

z



z

z

Clinton MTA

RTAP



Iowa Public Infrastructure

5309

z

STP

z

Costs

5311

$500,000

Projects

ICAAP

Add routes to Camanche and Fulto Request local funding and seek startup funding that connect with the existing from other competetive sources system

Possible Strategies

Local Property Tax

O, C

Type

Federal Operating Assistance

Extend existing routes to connect them with the cities of Camanche and Fulton

Project Description

JARC

State Transit Assistance Special

1

No

Medicaid

State Transit Assistance

Possible Source of Funding New Freedoms

Clinton MTA

Agency(s) Thaht Provided Public Input

Top Service Priorities

z

Public

Ashford inquiry

System Maintnance Needs 1

Timely Bus Replacement

C

2

Bus Expansion

C

3

Maintenance equipment

C

4

5

6

7 8

9

Maintenance Garage Door Replacements

Shop Floor Concrete Replacement

Replacement Shop Heaters

Additional Maintenance Staff

C

C

C

Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants Work with Iowa Public Transit Association to increase funding to Iowa Transit from federal and state sources and apply for competetive grants

Compete for statewide funding to replace buses through PTMS process $375,000/bus 35 Compete for statewide funding to expand fleet through PTMS process and apply for other competetive grants $364,000/bus 35 Compete for statewide funding through PTMS process and apply for state infrastructure grants

$

Compete for statewide funding through PTMS process and apply for state infrastructure grants

50,000.00

$30,000

Compete for statewide funding through PTMS process and apply for state infrastructure grants Compete for statewide funding through PTMS process and apply for state infrastructure grants

$25,000

$

20,000.00

Continue to work with Clinton City $ Council

50,000.00

O

Request local funding

Driver training; First Aid/CPR, Defensive Driving, Sensitivity and Passenger Assistance

O

Apply for training grants and partner with other Partner with other systems and systems and human service agencies for human service agencies for training. training.

$10,000

Education, Marketing and Outreach

O

Apply for training grants and partner with other Create Mobility Manager position systems and human service agencies for and disseminate marketing training. materials; advertise

$20,000

TYPE : O = Operations, C = Capital, P = Planning

Possible Strategies: How to implement the priority

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z



z

z

z

z

Clinton MTA

z



Clinton MTA

Projects: Projects designed to implement the priority

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

[47]


Camanche Route and Fulton Route: This would be a cooperative effort by the MTA, City of Clinton and each of these cities to assist

in funding, developing and implementing new routes. Each route would be designed to link up with the existing MTA transit system, so citizens from all three entities could travel throughout the area by public transit.

Expanded Service: A few years ago the Clinton MTA felt the effects of losing the Machinery and Equipment tax. At that time service

hours and routes were cut to reflect the reduction in the budget. The Clinton MTA plans to continue to improve routes and extend service hours as the budget allows. This would increase hours during the week, weekends and some night time hours.

Revise Routes: Millcreek area near 13th Ave. North and the Ashford University is experiencing growth. The City of Clinton has received

inquiries about the avaibility of transit in this area. A revision of the current 13th Avenue North route and development of an additional route will be considered.

Increase Maintenance staff: This is a budgetary issue that will be need to be considered by the City Council when funding becomes available at the local level. With additional staff, projects could be completed at a more efficient rate.

Existing fleet beyond useful life: typically buses are in service for years after they have met the replacement criteria that IDOT has

adopted years ago. Transits systems in Iowa will continue to work with IDOT and legislators to obtain and maintain funding for replacing vehicles on schedule.

Facilities Heaters: Budgeting locally or applying for grants the heater systems will be replaced in the original building which includes the maintenance and storage area. New more efficient heating systems will be installed for the most reliable and efficient systems that is affordable.

Concrete Repair: Areas around the facility are in need of repair. As budgets allow damaged areas will be replaced as planned and bud-

geted for.

Facility Garage doors: The original building was built in 1983. Most of the garage doors and openers are original. The current garage

door openers do not allow the doors to open if there is any type of failure with the opener. This will be addressed through the budget process along with a competitive grant through the PTMS process.

Public Awareness: A marketing campaign to advertise what transit services available to the public. To promote transit to the citizens of

Clinton. Funding through City Council budget process.

Driver Training: To enhance the driver training program and provide more frequent training. Covering all aspects of the job of transit drivers. To first aid, CPR, defensive driver and passenger assistance training to name a few programs. Funding will be obtained through the City of Clinton budget process.

[48]

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


Keyline Transit

Expanded hours and days of service

O, C

Add hours of service or contract out for additional hours of service from another provider

Start routes earlier in day and extend service into evenings, add Sunday service and service on holidays

$66/hour

z

z

z

3

User Friendly Route and Schedule Information

Redesign current ride guide and website

Redesign ride guide and website

$5,000

z

z

4

Education, Marketing and Outreach of Available Service

Public Presentations, City C,O Channel 8, Advertising, Press Releases

$8,000

z

z

5

Greater Geographical Coverage of Routes

C,O

Realign and/or extend routes to more areas of City

West End Tripper

$60,000

z

z

6

Shorter Headways

O, C

Reduce routes or increase frequency

Downtown Shuttle

$140,000

z

z





5309

2

STP

z

5311

z

ICAAP

z

Costs



z

z

z

z

z

z



z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

PTDP Group

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Public









RTAP

$66/hour

Projects

Iowa Public Infrastructure

Add hours of service or contract out for additional Extend Service into evenings hours of service from another provider

Possible Strategies

Local Property Tax

O, C

Type

Federal Operating Assistance

Dubuque In-Town Evening Service

Project Description

JARC

State Transit Assistance Special

1

No

Medicaid

State Transit Assistance

Possible Source of Funding New Freedoms

KeyLine Transit

Agency(s) That Provided Public Input

Top Service Priorities

C

System Maintenance Needs

C

1

Replace 35' Buses

C

2

Replace Medium Duty Buses

C

3

Driver Training

O

4

Connect Transportation Modalities in a Central Location

C

5

Repair and rehabilitate transit facility

C

6

Improve Facility Security

C

TYPE : O = Operations, C = Capital, P = Planning

Secure funding and replace buses Secure funding and replace buses Contract training in collaboration with human service organizations and Region 8 RTA

z

z



PTDP group

Public

z

PTDP Group

PTDP Group



Secure funding and replace buses

$2 Million

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

KeyLine Transit

Secure funding and replace buses

$525,000

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

KeyLine Transit

z



z

z





KeyLine Transit

First Aid/CPR, Defensive Driving, Sensitivity and Passenger Assistance

Secure Congressional earmark Intermodal Facility and construct central facility





z



$17 Million

z

z

z

z

z

z

KeyLine Transit

Replace roof, parking lot, resurface maintenance pits, paint exterior trim and replace windows

$18,000

z

z

z

z

z

z

KeyLine Transit

Secure funding and upgrade existing security systems

Secure funding and upgrade existing security systems

$80,000

z

z

z



z

KeyLine Transit

Possible Strategies: How to implement the priority

Projects: Projects designed to implement the priority

z



Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

[49]


Dubuque In-Town Evening Service: Currently Keyline stops service by 6 P.M. Monday through Friday. Keyline wishes to extend

the operating hours of the fixed route schedule until 9:45 P.M., Monday through Friday, fifty-two (52) weeks. The extended hours would offer improved quality of life for Keyline customers by offering transportation to community events that are in the evening along with transportation to and from employment.

Expanded hours and days of service: Currently Keyline begins service at 6 A.M. Monday through Friday. Keyline wishes to expand the operating hours of the fixed route schedule by offering service at 5:30 A.M. for all fixed route buses, Monday through Friday, fifty-two (52) weeks. This would offer transportation to employment for more than just first shift employees.

User Friendly Route and Schedule Information: The fixed route user guide and map design needs to be updated. Keyline needs to offer materials in multiple dialects as part of the limited English program.

Education, Marketing and Outreach of Available Service: Keyline needs funding to properly market the existing and expanded

services. This can be accomplished through public meetings and presentations, utilization of the City’s cable network (channel 8) and press releases.

Greater Geographical Coverage of Routes: Keyline needs to expand operational coverage to keep pace with the economic growth within the City limits of Dubuque. The creation of a West-end Tripper service is required so that transportation is available for new employment opportunities.

Shorter Headways: Currently Keyline operates on 45 to 60 minute headways (frequency). With the current frequency, round trips

can take up to 4 hours to complete. The creation of a Downtown Shuttle Service is required so that citizens can get to and from their destinations in a timely manner.

Replacement of 35’ heavy duty buses: Keyline needs to replace four Heavy duty buses that have passed their useful life. Keyline and the City of Dubuque would like to purchase buses with a Hybrid Diesel –electric and reduce the carbon emissions in Dubuque.

Replacement of Light duty buses: Keyline needs to replace eight (8) Light duty buses that have passed their useful life. Connect Transportation Modalities in a Central Location: Keyline is in need of a Intermodal facility that would offer a centralized

facility for Intracity public transit, County transit, Interstate transit, Rail and taxi cab services. The City of Dubuque has secured the funding for the Feasibility and Engineering Design for the Intermodal Facility and upon completion will seek funding for the construction of said facility.

Repair and Rehabilitation of Keyline Facility: The Keyline facility currently houses the administrative offices, 100 percent vehicle storage, and partial maintenance facility. The facility is over 100 years old and is in need of structural and cosmetic updating.

Improvements of Facility Security: The Keyline facility currently houses the administrative offices, 100 percent vehicle storage, and partial maintenance facility. The current security system is antiquated and does not meet the necessary needs of today’s environment.

[50]

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


Region 8 Regional Transit Authority

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

STP

Agency(s) That Provided Public Input

5311

5309

z

ICAAP

z

RTAP

$10,000

Iowa Public Infrastructure

z

Local Property Tax

z

Federal Operating Assistance

492/trip $65,000 per bus

Costs

JARC

Projects

Medicaid

Type Possible Strategies

State Transit Assistance

Project Description

New Freedoms

No

Possible Source of Funding State Transit Assistance Special

Region 8 RTA

z

z

z

Visiting Nurses Association

z

z

z

PTDP group

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

PTDP group

z

RTA 8

NICC

Top Service Priorities 1

Increased Service to University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics

2

User Friendly Route and Schedule Information

3

4

5 6

7

O, C

C

Increase frequency from 3 to 4 Add 1 additional route per month trips per month Create easy to read print ads and brochures and posting schedule/route information on RTA website and on local cable programming channels

Create easy to read print ads and brochures and posting schedule/route information on RTA website and on local cable programming channels

$172/day (4) hrs); $65,000/bus $43.00 per Increased Capacity on 2nd shift Dubuque inPlace additional buses into Extend 1st shift routes into 2nd shift O, C hour $65,000 town service for disabled passengers service service per bus $43/hour; Increased frequency on existing intercity Increase frequency of existing Purchase buses increase frequency O, C $65,000 per routes service of existing service bus Continue existing service to Continue existing service to Asbury $164 per day (4 Dubuque & Asbury school shuttle service O, C Asbury schools schools hrs) Increased Capacity on 1st shift Dubuque intown sheltered workshop routes

Accessible Cab Service

O, C

O, C

Place additional buses into service

Purchase buses and add additional routes into daily service

Purchase new equipment and lease Acquire accessible equipment to cab company or sell surplus for local cab services buses.

z

z

$5,000

Four Mounds and Hills and Dales and Area Residential Care Four Mounds and Hills and Dales and Area Residential Care Goodwill Industries

Medium Service Priorities 1

$410 per day (10 hours)

z

z

$10,000

z

z

$172 per day (4 hrs)

z

z

z

z

Purchase bus and add driver to Purchase bus and add route M-W-F$172/day (4hrs) create a new route to Dubuque Round Trip 9:00-2:00

z

z

z

z

Route between Dubuque and Peosta

O, C Maintain existing service

M-F 7:30-5:30

2

Education, Marketing & Outreach of Available Services

Create easy to read print ads and brochures and posting O, C schedule/route information on RTA website and on local cable programming channels

Create easy to read print ads and brochures and posting schedule/route information on RTA website and on local cable programming channels

3

Dyersville to Dubuque

Increase service from monthly O, C to daily by incorporating it into M-F 9:30am-1:30pm existing Head Start route

4

Cities in Northern Dubuque County to the City of Dubuque

O, C

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

PTDP Group

z

z

z

z

Area Residential Care and Ellen Kennedy Living Center and Tri State Dialysis

z

z

z

z

Tri State Dialysis

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[51]


Federal Operating Assistance

Local Property Tax

5311

STP

Existing service has capacity but public is unaware of the service and too use to relying on volunteer drivers.

Advertise and market the service and be sure to operate the service regardless of how few passengers sign up early on.

$172/day (4) hours; $500 regular local advertising

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Senior Center

6

Maquoketa to Dubuque

O, C

Existing service has capacity but public is unaware of the service and too use to relying on volunteer drivers.

Advertise and market the service and be sure to operate the service regardless of how few passengers sign up early on.

$172/day (4) hours; $500 regular local advertising

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Mental Health America of Dubuque County

7

Manchester to Cedar Rapids (Saturday)

Add another trip per month to Advertise and market the service as O, C Cedar Rapids from system has capacity to add route Manchester from 12:00-5:00.

$215/day (5 hours)

z

z

z

z

z

Penn Center

8

Bellevue to Points in Jackson County

O, C

$172/day (4) hours; $500 regular local advertising

z

z

z

z

z

z

Senior Center

$172/day (4) hours; $500 regular local advertising

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Penn Center

$43.00/hour

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Mill Valley Nursing Home and Senior Center

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

z

Senior Center

z

z

z

z

z

PTDP Group

z

z

z

Projects

Costs

5309

JARC

O, C

Type Possible Strategies

ICAAP

Medicaid

Bellevue to Dubuque

Project Description

RTAP

State Transit Assistance Special

5

No

Iowa Public Infrastructure

State Transit Assistance

Possible Source of Funding New Freedoms

Region 8 RTA

Agency(s) That Provided Public Input

Medium Service Priorities

Existing service has capacity but public is unaware of the service and too use to relying on volunteer drivers.

Advertise and market the service and be sure to operate the service regardless of how few passengers sign up early on.

z

z

z

z

Low Service Priorities

1

Manchester to Cedar Rapids (Thursday)

Add another trip per month to Advertise and market the service as O, C Cedar Rapids from system has capacity to add route Manchester from 12:00-5:00.

2

Dundee To Manchester

O, C

3

Bellevue In-town 1st shift

4

Increased Capacity on Maquoketa In-Town

Existing service has capacity but public is unaware of the Advertise and market the service. service and too use to relying on volunteer drivers.

Purchase bus and staff with RTA $43/hour; Expand existing volunteer driver and merge volunteer ridership $65,000 per O, C driver service from minivan to into this directly operated RTA bus RTA operated light duty bus service Purchase bus and staff with RTA $43/hour; Add another RTA bus and driver and merge volunteer ridership $65,000 per O, C driver route to existing service. into this directly operated RTA bus service

5

Bellevue School Shuttle

Expand existing volunteer driver service from minivan to O, C RTA operated light duty bus and add school service to route

6

Manchester In-Town Evening Service

System has capacity to add a O, C route with existing fleet and drivers.

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Purchase bus and staff with RTA $43/hour; driver and merge volunteer ridership $65,000 per into this directly operated RTA bus service

z

z

Advertise and market the service and be sure to operate the service regardless of how few passengers sign up early on.

z

z

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

$43.00/hour; $500 regular local advertising

z

z

z

Public

Public


z

$65,000/bus

z

z

60,000/year

z

z

5309

z

STP

$42,000

5311

z

z

z

z

Public

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

ICAAP

z

z

RTAP

$260,000

z

Iowa Public Infrastructure

z

Local Property Tax

z

Federal Operating Assistance

$500 regular local advertising

Costs

JARC

Projects

Medicaid

Type Possible Strategies

State Transit Assistance Special

Project Description

State Transit Assistance

No

Possible Source of Funding New Freedoms

Region 8 RTA

Agency(s) That Provided Public Input

Low Service Priorities

7

Edgewood to Manchester

Existing service has capacity but public is unaware of the service and too use to relying O, C on volunteer drivers. Need to coordinate scheduling with existing routes

Advertise and market the existing route and schedule. Meet with medical and nursing home staff to discuss coordination of scheduling

Apply for any available funding Apply for any available funding Apply for any available funding

Purchase (4) wheelchair capacity buses for dialysis Purchase Low Floor Accessible Minivan Purchase 16 passenger accessible buses

Apply for any available funding

Professional with Human Service background to assist in outreach, coordination & identification of funding sources

z

System Maintnance Needs 1

(4) wheelchair capacity buses for dialysis

C

2

Low Floor Accessible Minivan

C

3

16+ passenger accessible buses

C

4

Transportation Solutions coordinator

5

Maintenance equipment

6 7

8

9

10 11

O

Apply for any available Purchase maintenance equipment funding Apply for any available Portable bus wash equipment C Purchase portable bus wash funding Apply for any available Purchase land and construct facility Bus storage facility in Dyersville C, O funding to build facility or find or lease suitable facility suitable lease facility Apply for any available Purchase land and construct facility Bus storage facility in Manchester C, O funding to build facility or find or lease suitable facility suitable lease facility Apply for any available Schedule driver training in funding and coordinate with coordination with other transit Driver training; First Aid/CPR, Defensive O area agencies to provide Driving, Sensitivity and Passenger Assistance systems and area agencies capable training and with area transit of providing training systems to hold joint training Apply for any available Radio tower replacement in Dubuque C Purchase radio tower funding Apply for any available Dumpster Screen Dubuque garage C Purchase dumpster screen funding TYPE : O = Operations, C = Capital, P = Planning

C

Possible Strategies: How to implement the priority

z

z

z

$25,000

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

$20,000

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

$300,000 to construct

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

$300,000 to construct

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

$5,000

z

z

$5,000

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

$15,000

z

z

z

z

z

RTA 8

z

z

RTA 8

Projects: Projects designed to implement the priority

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

[53]


Increased service to University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics: The Regional Transit Authority currently provides 3 trips per month

to the U of I Clinics and Hospitals from consumers in all three counties. The Crescent Community Center has opened recently and provides limited medical care to low income individuals and families. The center is also limited on procedures that they can provide at the clinic and relies on the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics for patient care. The opening of the center has directly resulted in an increase rate of referral for the Iowa City service. However, with three trips per month, the transit system is limited in its ability to balance efficiency of the service against convenience to the consumers. Often times the transit service requests passengers to cancel an appointment and reschedule on another day where there is a greater concentration of appointments in the earlier or latter part of the day. Depending on the type of appointment the consumer is making, this may not be in option. In some of those instances the bus travels to Iowa City with one or two passengers and consumes the better part of an 8 hour day or the service is either cancelled entirely. By having a 4th route to Iowa City, the transit system could have greater flexibility to create efficiencies without compromising the convenience or the medical care for the consumer and would also be able to increase capacity to accommodate the increase in demand.

User friendly route and schedule information: As the Regional Transit Authority service trends towards client centered services,

the complexity of the funding, availability and eligibility of services has grown exponentially. Unlike a fixed route operator, the regional systems rely on a wide variety of funding sources in addition to passenger fares and they constitute the majority of the transit systems revenue. It is complex enough to explain to passengers what services are available to them in their community, but even more complicated to explain payment and eligibility to various funding programs (Medicaid, Medicare, Title XIX, Elderly Waiver, MR-Waiver, BI-Waiver). A more sophisticated interactive website would reduce the confusion and the limited time the dispatchers have steering consumers through this complex web of funding. Also, because the system is operating in a wide variety of communities, it is necessary to have communityspecific route information to reduce consumer confusion. Previous attempts to put all route information into a single website or brochure have not been effective so more printed materials, more local advertising and a more interactive website are necessary to make the route and schedule information user friendly.

Increased capacity on 1st shift Dubuque in-town shelter workshop routes: The Regional Transit Authority currently dedicates 5

daily routes to Area Residential Care, the largest organization representing persons with disabilities in Dubuque and Dubuque County. ARC has indicated that they are finding it increasingly difficult to operate their own fleet of equipment with the costs of maintenance and the limits of staff availability to drive. ARC has indicated they would more than double our current level of service to their program if we could accommodate their request. The shifts typically operate for two hours in the AM and two hours in the PM and are all operating at the same time. To expand the service to another 5 or more routes would require another 5 buses. JARC or New Freedoms funding to support teh first 2 years of operating expenses.

Increased capacity on 2nd shift Dubuque in-town service for disabled passengers: The Regional Transit Authority currently

provides limited evening transportation for Area Residential Care, the largest organization representing persons with disabilities in Dubuque and Dubuque County and for Goodwill Industries. As consumers have become aware of the second shift service, especially because it is accessible and operated by the RTA, the number of requests have grown beyond the original schedules set up for ARC. We have also been requested by a newly elected legislator Chuck Eisenhart to communicate with the local Substance Abuse Services and the Correctional Services to coordinate service for consumers who are unable to driver due to legal restrictions. The local cab services are not

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Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


eligible providers for waiver reimbursement and their fares often exceed the consumerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to afford the transportation. The RTA has not advertised or promoted a second shift route due to the lack of funds to support the service as private paid fares cannot offset the costs. At the current rate of growth with the disabled community, it will become necessary soon to add another bus onto the service at night to cover the territory and schedules requested. Any additional growth for consumers with legal restrictions on driving or for general public employment transportation will require additional subsidy.

Increased frequency on existing intercity routes: As part of the Regional Transit Authorities efforts to make the public transit

service more accessible and affordable, the RTA requested and received New Freedoms funds to design regular route services connecting smaller communities with larger communities that could provide essential services such a medical, retail, etc. due the limited funding and the consumers limited ability to pay the fares, most routes serve the smaller communities no more than twice a month and some only once a month. Especially with the demand for dialysis treatment, and the limited outlets for treatment in Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson counties, increased frequency on these types of routes is the most cost efficient solution to the demand. Volunteer driver services that supplement the route service are not accessible vehicles and are not the most efficient method of scheduling transportation, so increased frequency on existing intercity routes is necessary.

Dubuque and Asbury school shuttle service: the Regional Transit Authority currently provides a shuttle service from the town of

Asbury to Eleanor Roosevelt Middle School so that students do not need to walk on streets without sidewalks or cross a four land arterial highway 32. This service has been very successful since inception and has been served using an old school bus for capacity. This bus is more than 20 years old and should be taken out of service and replaced with two light duty buses. However, two light duty buses are more expensive to operate than the single school bus so greater utilization is necessary. While the RTA has been gradually reducing its intown Dubuque daycare service due to budget constraints, there continues to be a demand for the service. If funding could be secured, the ridership demand for in-town Dubuque daycare service could supplement the expansion of equipment accommodating the Asbury shuttle, making it necessary to secure another bus and additional revenue to support the service.

Accessible Cab Service: In the past year, A-OK Yellow Cab went out of business, and the only accessible cab service ended. The smaller

taxi operators that have come along do not have accessible equipment nor the resources to acquire same. There have been discussions between the RTA and the local taxi services over contracting with the RTA and leasing accessible equipment, but insurance requirements have been a stumbling block for lease options. The Regional Transit Authority operates limited service Monday through Sunday till 10:00 P.M. at night but there remains a gap from 10:00 P.M. to 6:00 A.M. Monday through Friday and from 10:00 P.M. to 8:00 P.M. Friday to Saturday and from Saturday to Sunday with accessible cab services.

Medium Service Priorities Route between Dubuque and Peosta: Under a grant from the Iowa Clean Air Attainment Program, the RTA has been providing daily

shuttle service from the downtown campus of the Northeast Iowa Community College (NICC) to their Peosta Campus. While the service has seen steady ridership, the amount of ridership has not grown to the levels necessary to make the service self-supporting without the ICAAP grant. For the 2009-2010 school year, NICC is considering funding the service, but even with the proposed funding the service will

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

[55]


need to be cut in half and fares raised to $1.50 per one-way ride. With IBM opening their offices in Dubuque and having training at the community college as part of their business plan, the continuation of this service is essential.

Education, marketing, and outreach of available services: Under the new management of the East Central Intergovernmental

Association, the RTA has received more support and assistance with promotion and outreach than the service every experienced under previous management. However, even with the thousands of dollars spent in radio, print and brochure ads there still remains a large part of the population in the 3 county service area who do not know what the RTA services can mean to them or someone in their family. As stated in the top priority category, user-friendly route and schedule information would be very useful in expanding the general publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knowledge of the RTA services, and increased education, marketing and outreach using those user-friendly tools would greatly enhance the communities understanding of the benefits and opportunities the RTA has to offer.

Dyersville to Dubuque: The Regional Transit Authority provides daily service between Dyersville and Dubuque with a transfer in

Farley to transport Head Start Children and disabled adults. This service is at capacity and cannot accommodate more general public ridership in its current form. The RTA also provides a once-a-month shuttle from Dyersville to Dubuque for Dyersville residents and any residents interested in the service along Highway 20 between Dyersville and Dubuque, and has received numerous requests to expand the service especially due to increased need for dialysis transportation. By dividing the current daily route and adding an additional vehicles and marketing employment transportation, the RTA could have the capacity to provide daily service between Dyersville and Dubuque but would require some additional funding and another bus to accommodate this expansion, accomodating these expansions with JARC and New Freedom funds.

Cities in northern Dubuque County to the city of Dubuque: Most of the Regional Transit Authority service is connected to the main

highways of US 20, US 61 & US 151. The communities in northern Iowa are not directly on US 52 (the largest highway in that portion of the county) and are located on secondary roads or smaller. The largest populated areas in Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson counties are located along US, 20, 61 & 151 so service along those routes has a greater ability to serve more consumers. However, with the increase demand for dialysis treatment and that the nearest dialysis treatment center is in the city of Dubuque, the need for accessible equipment on a regular basis (3 times per week) is greater than the means to fund the service. Limited volunteer driver service has accommodated some of the ambulatory passengers, but demand for regular accessible equipment is growing. It will be necessary to create a regular weekly route at 3 trips per week to accommodate dialysis patients with an accessible bus.

Bellevue to Dubuque: Since redesigning the Regional Transit Authority services under the management of East Central Intergovernmental Association and establishing regular route services under New Freedoms grants, the RTA still has seen little interest in consumers accessing the regular route service in favor of setting up rides using the volunteer driver program. Effective April 1, 2009 a new policy approved by the RTA will strictly prohibit access to the volunteer driver service on ride requests that could be accommodated on the regular route. However, additional public awareness in the service would be beneficial. In addition, IBM has indicated an interest in transportation service from Bellevue to Dubuque for their future workforce with their opening of their office in Dubuque so the route needs to continue to be made available and be made more visible in the Bellevue community using JARC and New Freedom funds.

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Maquoketa to Dubuque: Since redesigning the Regional Transit Authority services under the management of East Central

Intergovernmental Association and establishing regular route services under New Freedoms grants, the RTA still has seen little interest in consumers accessing the regular route service in favor of setting up rides using the volunteer driver program. Effective April 1, 2009 a new policy approved by the RTA will strictly prohibit access to the volunteer driver service on ride requests that could be accommodated on the regular route. However, additional public awareness in the service would be beneficial. In addition, IBM has indicated an interest in transportation service from Maquoketa to Dubuque for their future workforce with their opening of their office in Dubuque so the route needs to continue to be made available and be made more visible in the Maquoketa community using JARC and New Freedom funds.

Manchester to Cedar Rapids (Saturday): Since redesigning the Regional Transit Authority services under the management of East Central Intergovernmental Association the RTA has seen limited success with the addition of a monthly weekday route from Manchester to Cedar Rapids. It is believed that increased marketing and advertising would produce greater interest and utilization of the service. It was also believed that offering a weekend service might attract more interest from consumers for recreational, social and retail interests. Bellevue to Points in Jackson County: Since redesigning the Regional Transit Authority services under the management of East Central

Intergovernmental Association and establishing regular route services under New Freedoms grants, the RTA still has seen little interest in consumers accessing the regular route service in favor of setting up rides using the volunteer driver program. Effective April 1, 2009 a new policy approved by the RTA will strictly prohibit access to the volunteer driver service on ride requests that could be accommodated on the regular route. However, additional public awareness in the service would be beneficial. In addition, IBM has indicated an interest in transportation service from Bellevue to Dubuque for their future workforce with their opening of their office in Dubuque so the route needs to continue to be made available and be made more visible in the Bellevue community using JARC and New Freedom funds.

Low Service Priorities Dundee to Manchester: In the town of Dundee there is a group home service adults with mental illness who wish to have access to

employment and recreational/social services within the town of Manchester. Although the passengers are ambulatory, it is preferred to accommodate the service on an existing RTA route for efficiency. If the service could attract more than the two to three riders interested in the service it is possible that the RTA could make a route adjustment to add Dundee to an existing route. In the absence of more ridership, the RTA may need to rely on some additional subsidy to get the service started with marketing/advertising and general operating assistance.

Bellevue in-town 1st shift: The Regional Transit Authority currently leases a low floor minivan to the city of Bellevue who then operates the dial-a-ride service with local volunteers screened and approved by the RTA. The capacity of the minivan is very limited and local daycares, nursing homes and schools have needs for group transportation that far exceed the capabilities of the minivan. The cost of setting up a charter service is often prohibitive and is not necessarily desired by the transit system due to the charter regulations. However, by replacing the current volunteer service with an RTA operated accessible bus, the needs of both the dial-a-ride users, nursing homes, daycares and schools could be accommodated.

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

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Increased capacity on Maquoketa in-town route: The Regional Transit Authority provides in-town dial-a-ride service to the town

of Maquoketa Monday through Friday. One bus is dedicated to the service and two others are called in after they complete their sheltered workshop routes as needed. With the increase in medical appointments and dialysis, consumers are often turned down for ride requests less than 24 hours in advance. As the only transit service in their community, it would be desirable to have the capacity to expand beyond current capacities as needed to accommodate spikes in demand or unplanned but urgent medical transportation requests that are currently forced into the system but cause numerous delays and customer complaints. Increased capacity on the in-town route as needed would elevate this problem. Current service supported with JARC funding will need to continue to maintain existing capacity.

Bellevue school shuttle: The Regional Transit Authority currently leases a low floor minivan to the city of Bellevue who then operates the dial-a-ride service with local volunteers screened and approved by the RTA. The capacity of the minivan is very limited and local daycares and nursing homes and public school have needs for group transportation that far exceeds the capabilities of the minivan. The cost of setting up a charter service is often prohibitive and is not necessarily desired by the transit system due to the charter regulations. However, by replacing the current volunteer service with an RTA operated accessible bus, the needs of the dial-a-ride users and the nursing homes, daycares and schools could be accommodated. Manchester in-town evening service: Local mental health professionals have created an evening drop-in service that has relied on volunteers to transport residents from group homes to the programs as needed. Some residents are forced to walk at night a great distance and in inclement weather to attend the drop-in service. Because the demand for the service is unpredictable and evening service does not exist for any other program, start up funds would be necessary to get a viable evening service started. Edgewood to Manchester: The convalescent home in Edgewood frequently has consumers who require doctor’s appointments on short

notice and have experienced difficulty forcing their service requests into the RTA’s route schedules. To the extent the nursing home has the ability to plan ahead, it is the RTA’s intent to train nursing home staff into grouping doctor’s appointments into a time slot the RTA will dedicate to them on a weekly basis.

System Maintenance Needs 5310/5311 Special Needs/Non-urbanized Area Formula Funding: This funding supports the operations of the Regional Transit Authority operations that provides service throughout the Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson counties. This formula funding provides for 50% local match and supports approximately 15% of the RTA’s overall budget.

Job Access Reverse Commute Funding(5316): This funding supports the operations of the Regional Transit Authority operations that provide employment and job readiness training transportation throughout the Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson counties. This funding currently provides 13% support of the RTA’s overall budget. As directed by the DOT, the RTA has aggressively started a program to reduce ongoing dependence on the JARC program by replacing the subsidy with other ongoing funding such as Medicaid waiver funding, county subsidy and fares. Employment transportation within the City of Dubuque, within Dubuque and Delaware Counties, within city

[58]

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


of Maquoketa and Jackson County depends on JARC funding until the service can be transitioned completely away from dependence of JARC funds.

New Freedoms Funding (5317: This funding supports the operations of the Regional Transit Authority operations that provide

transportation for persons with disabilities throughout the Delaware, Dubuque and Jackson counties. This funding currently provides less than 1% support of the RTA’s overall budget. As directed by the DOT, the RTA has aggressively started a program to reduce ongoing dependence on the New Freedoms program by replacing the subsidy with other ongoing funding such as Medicaid waiver funding, county subsidy and fares.

(4) Wheelchair capacity buses for dialysis: As indicated in the priority service needs above, the demand for transportation for dialysis

patients has been exploding. Many of the consumers are in wheelchairs and most of the RTA buses have a (2) wheel chair capacity. By having the ability to transport more than (2) wheel chair customers at a time, the RTA can more efficiently and conveniently provide the consumers this vital service.

Low floor accessible minivan: The RTA currently operates a bus purchased used from another transit system in the town of Bellevue

to provide dial-a-ride volunteer driver service. The RTA has also been in discussions with local taxi operators to partner with them to get 24/7 accessible transportation service in the city of Dubuque. In either application, the unique design and economical style of the low floor minivan would be the most appropriate vehicle for either service.

16+ passenger accessible buses: The RTA average fleet age is 6.22 years and 107,799 miles. 68% of the fleet beyond federal useful

life standards by years and 60% of the fleet is beyond federal useful life standards of 100,000 miles. 28% of the fleet is 10 year old or older. The maintenance costs of the older fleet have gone from $95,373 in FY 2008 to a projected $136,714 in FY 2009 for a 43% increase. While the stimulus funding will replace 3 buses, the RTA still lags behind in adequate bus replacements. The high costs of maintenance are also eroding the transit system’s ability to set aside the required 17% local match making the transit system’s way out of the problem even more difficult. In FY 2009, the RTA did conduct a fund raising campaign and has raised more than $34,000 to date and will continue to seek out other means of funding to secure local match until operating costs go down to a point where capital reserves can be replenished.

Maintenance equipment: The RTA average fleet age is 6.22 years and 107,799 miles. 68% of the fleet beyond federal useful life

standards by years and 60% of the fleet is beyond federal useful life standards of 100,000 miles. 28% of the fleet is 10 year old or older. The maintenance costs of the older fleet have gone from $95,373 in FY 2008 to a projected $136,714 in FY 2009 for a 43% increase. While the stimulus funding will replace 3 buses, the RTA still lags behind in adequate bus replacements. The high costs of maintenance are also eroding the transit system’s ability to set aside the required 17% local match making the transit system’s way out of the problem even more difficult. The RTA has two maintenance bays in their newly constructed facility in Dubuque but little or no equipment to perform even basic maintenance in-house. With the RTA paying for facility overhead for their own facility, the shop rates of private service is essentially a duplication of expense for building maintenance, operation, and insurance. In FY 2009 the RTA anticipates spending approximately $75,000 on hourly shop charges to outside businesses to maintain RTA vehicles. Under the ECIA current wage and benefit plan, the estimated cost per hour with benefits for a full time mechanic would be less than $50,000 annually. With an adequate supply of

Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization

[59]


spare buses, a preventive maintenance plan could be implemented that would rotate all vehicles in the three county service area through the Dubuque facility for preventive maintenance. Routine maintenance could be performed on all of the Dubuque fleet and much of the fleet in the counties with some planning. The RTA has consulted a retired City of Dubuque KeyLine Transit mechanic who provided us the recommended list of tools and equipment necessary to complete the maintenance bays which we have estimated to total $25,000.

Portable bus wash equipment: The RTA currently operates two high pressure portable bus washers that were purchased under a previous federal grant under the previous administration. While the power washers are useful, they require a significant amount of time to adequately clean the exterior of the bus with only high pressure water and drivers using scrub brushes and buckets to break loose the oil residue. An average bus wash for an RTA driver paid $12.65 per hour wage takes approximately 30 minutes. The portable brush systems available today can reduce that time to 5 minutes and clean the bus better than the manual approach currently in use. Bus storage facility in Dyersville: Currently the RTA stores (3) buses outdoors in Dyersville as we have been unsuccessful at locating a facility that we could afford the rent to store them in. The drivers need to drive to Manchester to deliver their paperwork and pick up their schedules and manifests for the next week. A basic storage facility in Dyersville would protect the buses from the harsh elements of the Iowa weather as well as provide drivers a better environment to thoroughly inspect their vehicles. Dyersville is also more than 20 miles from either Dubuque or Manchester making it impractical for them to store the buses at either garage in those cities.

Bus storage Manchester: Currently the RTA stores (3) buses in a garage that has recently been purchased by FEMA due to the location of the garage along the Maquoketa River. In the two years the RTA has been storing the bus at this location, we have had to relocate the equipment to higher ground on 6 occasions. The owner of the facility is working on constructing another facility but it is uncertain as to when that will be accomplished. A basic storage facility in Manchester would protect the buses from the harsh elements of the Iowa weather as well as provide drivers a better environment to thoroughly inspect their vehicles. Manchester is also more than 20 miles from either Dyersville and 45 miles from Dubuque making it impractical for them to store the buses at either garage in those cities. Driver training; First aid/CPR, Defensive Driving, Sensitivity and Passenger Assistance: It is essential for public transit professionals

to maintain a comprehensive training program for their transit operators. Given the limited amount of funding and the scheduling constraints of maintaining such a program in this industry, training often needs to be broken down into small groups, multiple sessions and at multiple locations making the cost of training higher. Local agencies have qualified staff certified to conduct much of the required training necessary and RTAP funds greatly reduce the cost of trainers and travel. However, the overtime pay necessary to perform the training under the scheduling constraints is often the difference in whether training is kept current so adequate funding to support the costs of training is essential.

Radio tower replacement in Dubuque: Since completing construction of the Dubuque transit facility, the city of Dubuque excavated

the property above the transit facility and raised the site by more than 30 feet. With the construction of any facility on that site, it is likely that the line of sight for the current RTA tower would be impeded and that a taller tower will be necessary. While no facility is currently planned for the site, it is only a matter of time that this problem will present itself so purchase of a larger tower is essential to the two way communications of the RTA.

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Chapter 5 - Project Prioritization


Dumpster Screen: The City of Dubuque ordinance requires all businesses to screen any outside dumpsters. Due to the budget constraints

of the construction of the Dubuque facility, an outdoor dumpster screen was dropped from the original specifications. Two dumpsters are stored in the garage and essentially take up the space for 1 van or bus. As the RTA has acquired buses through stimulus funding and private fundraising, the capacity to store buses in the current facility is quickly diminishing.

Transportation Solutions Coordinator: The success and failure of identified projects relies heavily on coordination, outreach and

funding. Because the transit system management is an operational management position by budget necessity, it is difficult to say the least to focus the amount of time and energy necessary to work with the multitude of human service organizations to educate and train staff and identify a access alternative revenue streams. A Transportation Solutions Coordinator would provide the transit agency a dedicated staff person to bring the identified projects from a planning stage to implementation and would be a tremendous asset to the sustainability of the transit system as grant revenues continue to decline and/or become more competitive.

Conclusion While many projects have been identified as means to meet unmet need, there remains significant funding barriers that will prevent many of these projects from being implemented. Continued coordination between transit providers to reduce duplication of service and inefficiency of the service is essential as is identification and access to funding sources other than traditional state and federal transit support.

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Introduction There are several federal, state and local sources dedicated to funding of transportation services. A report from the General Accounting Office (GAO-03-697) provided an inventory of all federal programs that were using federal funds to provide transportation services for the transportation disadvantaged. This report identified 62 sources in 18 federal departments, including the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). However, the primary source of funding for public transit programs comes from the USDOT and the Highway Trust Fund. The Highway Trust Fund provides funding for the federal grant programs authorized SAFETEA-LU. The Iowa Department of Transportation (Iowa DOT) also has several transit funding programs that help support public transit agencies. Human service agencies within the area also provide funding for clients to have services or contract services with a public transit provider. USDOT, FTA, Iowa DOT and know human service funding will be described in this chapter. Funding sources for Keyline, RTA and MTA Funding sources

Planning

Operating

Capital

Large Urban (Over 50,000 Population)

Small Urban (Less than 50,000 Population)

Recipient Eligiblity Non-profit Regional System

28-E Regional System

Metropolitan Planning Orginizations (MPO)

Regional Planning Affiliation (RPA)

Federal Metropolitan Transportation Planning Program (Section 5303)

z

z

Statewide Transportation Planning Program (Section 5304) Urbanized Area Formula Program (Section 5307)

z

z

Capital Investment Program (Section 5309) Special Needs Formula Program (Section 5310) Non-urbanized Area Formula Program (Section 5311)

z

Rural Training Assistance Program (RTAP) (Section 5311(b)(3)) Intercity Bus Assistance Program (Section 5311(f)) Job Access/Reverse Commute (JARC) Program (Section 5316) New Freedom (NF) Program (Section 5317) Iowa Clean Air Attainment Program (ICAAP) Surface Transportation Program (STP)

z

z z z z z z z z

z z z z z z z z z

z z z z z z z z z

z z z z z z z z z

z z z z z z z z z

z z z z z z z z z

z z

z

z z

Temporary Assistance For Needy Families (TANF) Welfare-to-Work (WtW) Commubnity Services Block Grant Program (CDBG)

z

State STA Formula Program STA Coordination Special Projects

z

z z

Public Transit Infrastructure Grant Program Capital Match Loan Program (Amoco Loans) Iowa Power Fund (new program in 2008)

z z z z z

z

z

z

z

z z z

z z z

z z z

z z z

z z z z

z z z z

z z z z

z z z z

z z z z

Local Passenger Revenues Contract Revenue Local Taxes Advertising Revenue

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z z z z

z z z z

z

z


Federal Funding Programs

Metropolitan Planning Program (Section 5303):

This is a FTA program to support planning activities in metropolitan areas on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal basis. By law, the state is the direct recipient of the funding. In Iowa, these funds are administered by the Iowa DOT’s Office of Systems Planning and are distributed to each of the state’s Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs). Annual allocations of 5303 funds are based on a formula that distributes 1/3 of the funds based on the 1990 urban area population, 1/3 based on the 2000 urban area population and the last 1/3 is equally distributed. The 5303 funds are administered jointly with Metropolitan Planning “PL” funds available through the Federal Highway Administration as part of a Consolidated Planning Grant. The 5303 and PL funds can support MPO costs related to intermodal transportation planning activities for the urbanized area.

Statewide Planning and Research (Section 5304):

These funds are intended to support transit planning in addition to what is conducted by the individual MPOs. By law, the state is the direct recipient of the funding. Iowa uses these funds, along with 5311 funds set aside specifically for planning, to support a system of Regional Planning Affiliations (RPAs). The RPAs are responsible for local intermodal transportation planning in areas of the state not included in a Metropolitan Planning Organization. Iowa DOT’s Office of Systems Planning serves as the direct recipient of these funds. The combined 5304 and 5311 planning funds are allocated among the state’s 18 RPAs based on half of the funds being evenly distributed among the RPAs, 25% distributed on the basis of population and 25% on the basis of the number of counties within the region.

Urbanized Area Formula Program (Section 5307):

This is a federal program for support of urban transit systems serving communities with more than 50,000 population. In all urbanized areas, 5307 funds can be used for capital improvements, including preventive maintenance activities, or planning activities on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal basis. Purchase and installation of special equipment or features required by the Americans with Disabilities Act or the Clean Air Act Amendments, and certain bicycle accommodation projects are eligible for 90% federal assistance. FTA has allowed revenue vehicles with required ADA and clean air equipment to be purchased at a blended participation rate of 83% federal, 17% non-federal. Transit systems may use up to 10 percent of their total 5307 funds to pay for ADA paratransit costs on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal basis. Each area over 200,000 population receives its own 5307 allocation directly from FTA. The allocations are based partially on population and population density, and partially on performance factors, including passenger miles of service provided. Each state receives a single allocation of 5307 funds for use in the smaller urbanized areas (with population from 50,000-200,000). This ‘Governor’s Apportionment’ includes a base allocation calculated strictly on population and population density of the state’s communities in that size range, plus a “growing states” allocation, based on projected population growth. There is also now a “small transit intensive cities” tier that provides additional funding if any of the small urbanized areas in the state exceed the average performance of the larger communities across the nation on one or more of six specified performance measures. The state is responsible for deciding how 5307 Governor’s Apportionment funds are distributed. Ames, University of Iowa’s Cambus, Cedar Rapids, Coralville, Dubuque, Iowa City,

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Sioux City, and Waterloo all receive funding from the Iowa Governor’s Apportionment. The Iowa DOT determines the allocation of the 5307 Governor’s Apportionment funds after the federal appropriation process is completed (usually sometime from October to December). In addition to capital and planning uses, funding for these smaller urbanized areas can also be used to support operating deficit. Funds for operating support must be matched by non-federal funds (other than passenger revenues) on a dollar-for-dollar basis.

Capital Investment Program (Section 5309):

This is a federal program for support of transit capital needs that exceed what can be funded under the federal formula programs. All public transit systems are eligible for these funds. Public agencies may receive these funds directly. Private non-profit transit agencies may not apply directly, but can be part of a statewide application. This federal program provides discretionary funding of transit capital improvements on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal matching basis (83% federal, 17% non-federal for vehicles equipped to meet ADA and Clean Air standards). In most recent years, all 5309 funding has been earmarked by Congress through the authorization or appropriation processes. Iowa’s Congressional delegation has been successful in capturing a portion of these funds for both individual system earmarks and a statewide bus earmark. The statewide funds are allocated to rollingstock replacement/rehabilitation projects in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) using a ranking process based on the age and accumulated mileage of vehicles being replaced/rehabilitated.

Special Needs Program (Section 5310):

This is a federal program for support of transit services serving elderly and disabled persons. These funds are allocated to Iowa on the basis of the number of persons who are elderly or have disabilities within the state compared to other states. By law, the state is the direct recipient of the funding. Public agencies responsible for coordinating human service transportation are eligible, as are private not-forprofit agencies. Because Iowa requires the designated public transit systems to coordinate all publicly-funded passenger transportation services, Iowa distributes these funds to the public transit agencies. The funds may be used for the cost of contracted operations, equipment and passenger or vehicle shelters on an 80% federal, and 20% non-federal basis. Purchase of vehicles equipped for access by persons with disabilities can be funded at 83% federal participation. Facilities other than passenger or vehicle shelters are not eligible. The Iowa DOT’s Office of Public Transit (OPT) is the recipient of the 5310 funds from FTA. Seventy percent of the annual funding is distributed to Iowa’s large urban transit systems to support services to qualifying persons living in urbanized areas. These funds are distributed based on the same formula used for the rural systems, but with each transit system developing its own eligible project. The remaining 30% of the funds are administered and distributed in conjunction with Non-urbanized Area Formula Program 5311 funds. To simplify administration, the 5310 funds going to rural systems are only distributed to transit systems that purchase contracted transportation services. All projects using 5310 funding must derive from the Passenger Transportation Development Plan (TPDP) prepared by the respective metropolitan or regional planning agency through their joint public transit/human service transportation planning process. All services supported with 5310 funding must be operated open to the general public. (Complementary ADA paratransit meets this requirement, so long as it matches up with an urban transit system’s fixed-route hours and service area.)

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equipment and passenger or vehicle shelters on an 80% federal, and 20% non-federal basis. Purchase of vehicles equipped for access by persons with disabilities can be funded at 83% federal participation. Facilities other than passenger or vehicle shelters are not eligible. Non-Urbanized Area Formula Program (Section 5311): This federal program supports transit activities in rural areas and communities with less than 50,000 population. These funds are allocated to Iowa based on the number of persons living outside urbanized areas compared to other states. By law, the state is the direct recipient of the funding. Iowa DOT serves as the direct recipient of the funds, through both the Office of Public Transit (OPT) and the Office of Systems Planning. The OPT administers the bulk of the 5311 funding that is provided to small urban and regional transit systems, as well as the 15% of the annual apportionment, that in conformance with federal law, is utilized to support intercity bus services. The Office of Systems Planning administers that portion of the 5311 funds that are combined with the 5304 funding to support rural transit and intermodal planning activities. The portion of the 5311 funds used for support of public transit services in Iowa is administered in conjunction with the rural portion of the 5310 funding. The 5311 funds may be used to support operating deficits (potentially on a 50% federal, 50% non-federal match), capital purchases (on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal match or 83% federal, 17% non-federal for vehicles meeting ADA and Clean Air standards), or planning activities (on an 80% federal, 20% non-federal match). State policy does not allow local transit administration costs for public transit systems to be treated any differently than operating expenses. The Iowa DOT formula allocating 5310 and 5311 funds uses the past year’s performance statistics. The amount of formula funds to be distributed to small urban systems versus regional systems is determined by comparing the “net public deficit” (unrestricted tax support) for all urban systems to that for all regional systems. The individual allocations to small urban systems are then determined on the basis of 50 percent of the percentage of total small urban ridership accomplished by that system and 50 percent of the percentage of total small urban revenue miles provided by the individual system. Individual allocations for regional systems are based on 40 percent of the system’s percentage contribution to total regional transit ridership and 60 percent on the system’s percentage contribution to total regional revenue miles. The formula apportionment funds received by each system must be used to support services open to the public. This would include eligible transit capital operating expenses as defined by the federal government. The decision of how the formula funds are programmed is a part of the local transportation planning and programming process conducted through the regional planning affiliation. OPT provides a projection of the formula funding that will be available to each system for the coming state fiscal year in early December, in order to facilitate integration of the 5311 programming process with the annual preparation of the Passenger Transportation Development Plan (PTDP) and the Regional Transportation Improvement Program (RTIP). The OPT decides which agencies will receive 5310 funds versus 5311 funds, based on how the transit systems will use the monies. At present, most transit systems choose to use their formula funds for support of transit service costs. The 5310 funds are targeted to systems that purchase services from sub-providers, and 5311 funds are targeted first to systems that provide their services directly. To the extent that any system proposes to use its 5310/5311 allocation for purchase of rolling stock to operate within an urbanized area, 5310 funds will be used (and the project will be included in that urbanized area’s Transportation Improvement Program (TIP).) If facility improvements

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are programmed with the formula funds, 5311 funding will be used. Rural Transit Assistance Program: This federal program provides a source of funding to assist in the design and implementation of training and technical assistance programs and other support services tailored to meet the specific needs of transit operators in non-urbanized areas (less than 50,000 in population). By law, the state is the direct recipient of the funding. In Iowa, the DOT’s OPT serves as the recipient of these funds. Iowa’s RTAP funds are mainly used to provide local transit agencies with training fellowships. The fellowships pay 50 percent of the cost for Iowa’s small urban and regional transit systems and their planners to attend Iowa DOT sponsored seminars, as well as transit-related courses or conferences sponsored by other groups. Transit systems may also be reimbursed for training held in-house. A parallel program funded with state transit assistance (STA) funds pays for costs incurred by large urban systems and their planners.

Intercity Bus Assistance Program:

A minimum of 15 percent of each year’s non-urbanized formula funds allocated to Iowa under the 5311 program is required to be set aside to support intercity bus transportation. Iowa’s Intercity Bus Assistance Program is intended to support intercity bus service in rural and small urban areas. Private-for-profit companies, private non-profit corporations, or public entities may apply for this funding. Eligible bus service must make convenient connections to the existing national intercity bus network. Connections to Amtrak or passenger air service terminals are desirable. Service strictly for commuter purposes is not eligible. Projects may include operating assistance, capital assistance, planning, or administrative costs such as marketing and insurance. The Iowa Intercity Bus Assistance Program includes funding for four categories of projects: Category 1 is support for continuation of existing services. Funding is available for providers of existing intercity bus service that apply and agree to reporting requirements. Category 1 projects pay $0.10/revenue mile of scheduled route service that is justified based on preventive maintenance costs. Category 2 is support for new and expanded intercity bus service or feeders connecting to existing intercity bus services. It is not intended to support duplication of existing services. Projects pay up to $0.50/mile based on preventive maintenance, insurance and administrative costs, and operating support for a maximum of two years. After two years, the service may receive support under Category 1. Category 3 is support for marketing of existing and new services. Preference is for cooperative projects with involvement by communities served. Projects may pay up to 80% of project administration/marketing costs.

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Category 4 supports facility improvements or equipment purchases necessary for the support of existing or new intercity bus services. Projects pay up to 80% of approved project amounts (83% for purchase of accessible vehicles or 90% on accessibility retrofits of existing vehicles) based on actual costs.

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The Intercity Bus Assistance Program is included as a statewide total funding amount in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP). Annual intercity bus assistance applications must be received by OPT by the first business day of October for projects to begin in January. Project selections are finalized by December.

Job Access and Reverse Commute Program (JARC):

This is a federal program established to provide transportation services to access employment opportunities and support services (such as training and child care) for welfare recipients and low-income individuals. Services designed for these purposes may be used by the general public for any trip purpose. Each urbanized area over 200,000 population receives a separate annual apportionment of funding, and each state receives both an apportionment for use in urbanized areas under 200,000 population and a second apportionment for use in non-urbanized areas. The federal apportionments are based on census data concerning the number of low income individuals in each area, but the law requires that a competitive project selection process must be administered for each of these apportionment areas. All projects must derive from the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Passenger Transportation Development Plan (PTDP), developed through collaboration of public transit and human service interests. Required match (50% of net cost for operating projects and 80% for capital [83% for ADA vehicles]) can come from any non-DOT federal funds, as well as from state or local government or from private sources. The OPT accepts applications for JARC projects under the small urbanized areas apportionment or the non-urbanized areas apportionment as part of its Consolidated Transit Funding Application due the first business day of May each year. If any funding remains unobligated after those applications are processed, a second round of applications may be solicited. The competitive application process in the Des Moines, Omaha-Council Bluffs and Quad Cities areas are each administered locally. For more information contact DART (Des Moines Area Regional Transit), MAPA (Omaha/Council Bluffs MPO) or Bi-State (Quad Cities MPO).

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The majority of the grants in Iowa are for transit agencies to extend hours into the evenings and weekends. Other projects established new services to connect employment centers not previously served by transit, or purchased vehicles used for service expansions.

New Freedom Program (Section 5317):

This is a federal program established under SAFETEA-LU to support new services or accommodations for persons with disabilities that go beyond the minimums established by the rules implementing the Americans with Disabilities Act. “New” is defined as projects that were not implemented or programmed prior to the signing of SAFETEA-LU (August 10, 2005). As with the JARC program, each urbanized area over 200,000 population receives a separate annual apportionment of funding, and each state receives both an apportionment for use in urbanized areas under 200,000 population and a second apportionment for use in nonurbanized areas. The federal apportionments are based on census data concerning the number of persons with disabilities in each area, but the law requires that a competitive project selection process must be administered for each of these apportionments. All projects must derive from the area’s Passenger Transportation Development Plan (PTDP), developed through collaboration of public transit and human service interests. Required match (50% of net cost for operating projects and 80% for capital [83% for ADA vehicles]) can come from any non-DOT federal funds, as well as from state or local government or from private sources. The OPT accepts applications for New Freedom projects under the small urbanized areas apportionment or the non-urbanized areas apportionment as part of its Consolidated Transit Funding Application due the first business day of May each year. If any funding remains unobligated after those applications are processed, a second round of applications may be solicited. The competitive application process in the Des Moines, Omaha-Council Bluffs and Quad Cities areas are each administered locally.

Iowa Clean Air Attainment Program (ICAAP):

This program is one of the five core funding programs of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) that can be flexed between highway, transit or bicycle/pedestrian uses. Nationally, the Congestion Mitigation/Air Quality (CMAQ) program is intended to fund transportation projects to assist metropolitan areas in violation of Clean Air Act standards. In those states with areas in violation, much or all of the CMAQ monies must be spent in the affected areas for projects conforming to a state air quality implementation plan. Because Iowa does not have any area in violation of transportation-related federal clean air standards, the state receives a minimum allocation of CMAQ funding that can be used anywhere in the state for any purpose for which STP funds can be used on the same 80% federal, 20% non-federal basis. In Iowa, funds are programmed for highway or transit projects through a statewide application process based on the project’s anticipated air quality or congestion relief benefits. Applications are due the first business day of October for projects to begin the following federal fiscal year. Project selections are determined in February. When ICAAP funds are programmed for transit projects, funding is transferred from FHWA to FTA for administration through the statewide grant under either the 5307 or 5311 programs depending on whether the projects are in urbanized or non-urbanized areas. Clinton MTA is planning on applying for an ICAAP grant in 2008. The proposed ICAAP project is to develop a new route that would expand services out to the new college located on Mill Creek Parkway. Clinton MTA would also like to expand service hours on Saturdays, that were cut a few years ago due to budget issues. A new route from the City of Camanche to Clinton is also a possibility for these funds.

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The Cities of Cmanache and Clinton would have enter into a 28E agreement to share operational costs for this route to happen.

Surface Transportation Program (STP):

This is another of FHWA’s core programs. These funds come to the state based on a number of factors including vehicle miles of travel, highway lane miles and the number and size of bridges. The funds can be used for roadway, transit capital projects, pedestrian/bikeway projects, or intermodal planning projects on an 80% federal, 20% local basis. In Iowa, a portion of these funds is programmed by local governments acting through metropolitan or regional planning agencies. Nearly all Iowa RPAs and some MPOs fund a portion of their intermodal transportation planning activities from STP funds. Most transit systems have also been successful in receiving STP funding from their local MPO or RPA. When programmed for transit or planning projects, these funds are transferred from FHWA to FTA for administration, either through a direct 5307 grant for large urban transit systems, through a statewide 5311 grant for small urban or regional systems, or through the statewide consolidated planning grant for planning projects. OPT administers the statewide grant for individual small urban and regional transit systems. The Office of Systems Planning administers the planning grant.

Over-the-Road Bus Accessibility Program (OTRB):

Grants are provided directly from FTA to operators of over-the-road buses to help finance incremental capital and training costs to implement the final accessibility rule under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Providers of intercity fixed-route service, commuter service, and charter and tour service may apply directly to FTA for annual grants. FTA announces it’s solicitation for applications each year through a notice in the Federal Register.

State Programs:

State Transit Assistance (STA):

All public transit systems are eligible for funding under the STA program, which began in 1976. Since 1984, STA funding has been derived from a dedicated portion (currently1/20th) of the first four cents of the state “use tax” imposed on the sale of motor vehicles and accessory equipment. STA funds are provided to support public transit services and may be used for either operating or capital projects. The majority of the state transit assistance funds received in a fiscal year are distributed to individual transit systems on the basis of a formula using performance statistics from the most recent available year. Each month, the dollars received in the fund during the prior month are allocated to the transit agencies. These funds can be used by the public transit system for operating, capital or planning expenses related to the provision of open-to-the-public passenger transportation services. The STA formula funds are first split between urban and regional systems on the basis of total revenue miles of service provided by each group. The funds are then split among individual systems in each category, 50 percent on the basis of locally determined income (LDI), 25

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percent on the basis of rides per dollar of expense, and 25 percent on the basis of revenue miles per dollar of expenditure. OPT calculates LDI by subtracting FTA and STA formula funds from the system’s operating expenses.

STA Special Projects:

Each year up to $300,000 of the total STA funds are set aside to fund “special projects.” These can include grants to individual systems to support transit services which are developed in conjunction with human service agencies, or statewide projects to improve public transit in Iowa through such means as technical training for transit system or planning agency personnel, statewide marketing campaigns, etc.

Coordination Special Projects:

The Coordination Special Projects are considered an “immediate opportunity” program by the Iowa DOT, meaning that these funds can be applied for at any time of the year as an opportunity arises, provided that funding is still available. Projects are intended to assist with start-up of new services that have been identified as needs by health, employment or human service agencies participating in the Passenger Transportation Development Planning process. Most projects are small in scope and typically will fall within the $5,000-$25,000 range. Operating projects may be for up to a two-year duration, with maximum STA participation of 80% of net project cost in the first year and 50% of net project cost in the second year. Capital project may have maximum 80% STA share. Priority is given to projects which include a contribution from human service agencies as well. A major component of the state-wide Special Projects is a program of transit training fellowships that parallels the RTAP fellowship program described previously. The STA fellowship program focuses on training costs for Iowa’s large urban transit systems and metropolitan planning organizations that are not eligible under RTAP. The statewide project funds can also be used on statewide transit marketing and projects exploring new transit technologies. The administrative rules provide flexibility for use of the funding. If not needed for special projects, the money set aside for that purpose may be moved back into the STA formula program for distribution to all systems.

Public Transit Infrastructure Grants:

In 2006, the Iowa Legislature established a new program to fund some of the vertical infrastructure needs of Iowa’s transit systems. Applications are accepted as part of the annual Consolidated Transit Funding Program. Projects can involve new construction, reconstruction or remodeling, but must include a vertical component to qualify. They are evaluated based on the anticipated benefits to transit, as well as the ability to have projects completed quickly. The infrastructure program participation in the cost of transit-related elements of a facility project is limited to 80% and cannot, in combination with federal funding, exceed that number. Also no single system can receive more than 40% of the available infrastructure funding in a given year. Capital Match Revolving Loan Fund (AMOCO Loan): The capital match revolving loan fund was created by the Iowa Legislature in the early 1980’s with funds from Iowa’s share of the

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federal government’s petroleum overcharge settlement against the American Oil Company (Amoco.) The loan program is subject to an intergovernmental agreement between the Iowa DOT and the Iowa Department of Natural Resources (DNR). All public transit systems are eligible for loans under this program. The intent of the program is to increase the inherent energy conservation benefits of public transit by expediting the implementation of transit capital projects. The program allows “no interest” loans to transit systems, which the transit system uses towards the required local match on a federallyfunded capital project, paying it back over a negotiated time period as local funds become available. The loan can be used to temporarily fund the entire local match on capital equipment projects or 50% of the required non-federal match on facility projects. Loan recipients may be required to report project energy savings annually to OPT until the loan is repaid. A project is eligible if it is a transit capital project that is approved for federal funding. The project should be targeted at energy savings.

Local Funding:

Passenger Revenue:

Fees paid by the passengers is one of the most common sources of local support. This can include monies collected on-board the transit vehicle (usually called “farebox receipts”), as well as prepaid fares from sale of passes or tickets, or fares billed to the passenger after the fact. FTA requires that all passenger revenues be subtracted from the total cost of operating transit service to identify a net operating cost, before eligibility for federal financial support of operations can be calculated. Contract Revenue: Human service agencies, local communities, as well as private businesses are often willing to pay a part or all of the cost for certain types of rides provided as part of the open to the public transit operation. Such subsidies are classified as contract revenues and can count toward the required local match on federal projects.

Local Taxes:

Municipal Transit Levy:

Iowa law authorizes municipalities to levy up to 95 cents per $1,000 assessed valuation to support the cost of a public transit system. Most of Iowa’s larger communities levy for support of their urban transit systems. A number of smaller communities use this authority to generate funding used to support services contracted from their designated regional transit system. (This is something that can be implemented with a simple vote from the city council).

Regional Transit Levy:

In 2005, the Iowa legislature authorized Iowa’s two largest counties to form special taxing districts, under the control of the county, for support of area-wide public transit services. Once formed, adjacent counties can become part of the district, or municipalities in non-

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participating adjacent counties can join. The district can levy up to the 95 cents per $1,000 assessed valuation; but, unlike the provisions in the municipal levy, the regional transit districts can set differing levy rates across their territory. As of July 2007, only Polk County has chosen to form a district, and has, so far, limited its geographic coverage to just their county. Nearly all municipalities within the county have opted to participate.

General Fund Levy:

The cost of supporting transit services is an eligible use of general fund revenues for all Iowa governments and is the primary source of funding to support transit for counties who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the option of a transit levy, as well as for cities which chose not to use the transit levy.

Trust and Agency Levy:

The Trust and Agency Levy can be used by cities and counties to support employee benefit plans. As such, it can be used to help support the cost of a city operated transit system.

Other Local Sources: Student Fees:

Mandatory student fees established by a college or university are similar to a tax levy in that all members of the particular community contribute.

Advertisting Revenues:

Sale of on-board advertising or advertising space in brochures, etc., can provide some additional revenues to the transit program.

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Member

MTA

Type of Funding

2009

Section 5311 New Freedom Local Tax Passenger Revenue State Transit Assistance (STA) Contracts Advertising Total Funding

$444,460 $4,363 $572,097 $220,000 $178,973 $18,500 $9,000 $1,419,893

2010 $462,238 $4,537 $572,097 $220,000 $186,131 $20,000 $9,000 $1,445,003

2011

2012

$480,727 $4,718 $572,097 $220,000 $193,576 $20,000 $9,000 $1,471,118

$499,956 $4,906 $572,097 $220,000 $201,319 $20,000 $9,000 $1,498,278

2013 $499,956 $4,906 $572,097 $220,000 $201,319 $20,000 $9,000 $1,498,278

Clinton MTA FY 2009 funding Break Down Contracts, 1.3% Advertising, 0.6%

Finance Writeup for Clinton MTA

$ 18,500 $ 9,000

State Transit Assistance (STA), 12.6%

Section 5311, 31.3%

$ 178,973 Passenger Revenue, 15.5%

$ 444,460 $ 220,000

$ 572,097

New Freedom, 0.3%

MTA has an existing budget of $1,445,000 per year to meet the needs of the existing services. However, MTA needs $ 1,000,000 in addition ever year to implement unmet service needs and $ 944,000 to meet the additional system maintenance needs. The table above shows funding sources for MTA from Fiscal year 2009 -2013. The graph to the left shows the percentage breakdown of funding sources for fiscal year 2009. Overall, MTA gets the majority of its revenue, 40.1%, from local taxes.

$ 4,363

Local Tax, 40.3%

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Member

Keyline

Type of Funding Passenger Revenue Contract and other revenue Local Tax (Operating) Local Tax (Capital) Section 5307 Section 5309 State Transit Assistance (STA) JARC Total Funding

2009 $192,093 $25,000 $1,253,638 $54,000

2010 $195,000 $30,000 $1,342,782 $177,990

2011 $198,000 $40,000 $1,442,800 $38,250

2012 $201,000 $40,000 $1,567,800 $0

2013 $203,000 $40,000 $1,817,800 $0

$826,000 $1,292,310 $211,912 $29,000 $3,883,953

$826,000 $311,250 $178,000 $32,000 $3,093,022

$1,442,800 $0 $178,000 $32,000 $3,371,850

$1,567,800 $0 $178,000 $32,000 $3,586,600

$1,817,800 $0 $188,000 $4,066,600

Keyline FY 2009 funding Break Down Keyline FY 2009 funding Break Down JARC , 0.7%

Passenger Revenue, 4.9%

$29,000

$192,093

State Transit Assistance (STA), 5.5% $211,912

Section 5309, 33.3%

Finance Writeup for Keyline Contract and other revenue, 0.6% $25,000

$211,912

$1,253,638

$1,292,310

Local Tax (Operating), 32.3%

$29,000 has an existing budget of $192,093 Keyline $3,093,000 per year to meet the needs of existing services. However, Keyline needs $ 937,200 in addition ever year to implement unmet service $25,000 needs and $ 19,623,000 to meet the additional system maintenance needs. $1,253,638 The table above shows funding sources for Keyline from $1,292,310 Fiscal year 2009 -2013. The graph to the left shows the percentage breakdown of funding sources for fiscal year 2009. Overall, Keyline gets the majority of its revenue, 33.2%, from Section 5309 funds. $826,000

$826,000

Section 5307, 21.3%

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Chapter 6 - Finance

Local Tax (Capital), 1.4% $54,000

$54,000


Member

RTA 2009

Type of Funding Section 5311 New Freedom JARC Passenger Revenue State Transit Assistance (STA) Contracts Total Funding

$220,367 $10,147 $248,000 $142,122 $263,423 $545,579 $1,429,638

2010 $228,800 $10,552 $248,000 $142,122 $273,959 $545,579 $1,449,012

2011

2012

$237,600 $10,974 $248,000 $142,122 $284,917 $545,579 $1,469,192

$246,400 $11,412 $248,000 $142,122 $296,313 $545,579 $1,489,826

2013 $246,400 $11,412 $248,000 $142,122 $296,313 $545,579 $1,489,826

RTA 8 FY 2009 funding Break Down

Passenger Revenue, 9.9%

JARC, 17.3% New Freedom, 0.7%

$ 248,000

$142,122

$10,147 $ 263,423

$ 220,000 Section 5311, 15.4% $ 545,579

State Transit Assistance (STA), 18.4%

Finance Writeup for RTA

RTA has an existing capital budge of $1,449,000 per year to meet the needs of the existing services. However, RTA needs $312,504 in addition every year to implement unmet service needs and $1,597,424 to meet the additional system maintenance needs. The table above shows funding sources for RTA from Fiscal year 2009 -2013. The graph to the left shows the percentage breakdown of funding sources for fiscal year 2009. Overall, RTA gets around 38.2% of its revenue from contract services.

Contracts, 38.2%

Chapter 6 - Finance

[75]


Conclusion

As is clearly portrayed in the chapter of transit system funding, the sources of funding for public transportation relies heavily on traditional transit sources, with minimal support from human service sources other than Medicaid and Agency contracts. It is essential to the sustainability of the transit system and to implement identified projects that alternate revenue sources be identified and accessed.

[76]

Chapter 6 - Finance


Chapter 7

Recommendations

Introduction To determine gaps in service and corresponding projects to eliminate thes gaps, each transit operator, Clinton MTA, Keyline Transit, and Region 8 Regional Transit Authority should work with non-profit organizations and/or local human service providers. The goal of these discussions will be to utilize the existing relationships between these service providers and low-income/underserved populations to become aware of needed services and hear â&#x20AC;&#x153;real worldâ&#x20AC;? applications and situations faced by clients of the organizations. This increased communication would also promote goodwill between the service agencies, their clients and the transit operators.

Chapter 7 -Recommendations

[77]


Sec 5311

Capital

Computer

Replacement

3,300

6,000

2,640

4,800

Clinton MTA Federal Fund Type

Type of Expenditure

Clinton MTA Sec 5311 Operating STIM Capital STIM Capital STIM Capital STIM Capital STIM Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital Sec 5309 Capital

Description

General Operations Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus Light Duty Diesel Bus Van Light Duty Diesel Bus Light Duty Diesel Bus Service Truck -Diesel 4x4 GPS Technology/AVL Locator Vehicle Hoist Dispatching Software

Type of Project

Vehicle ID

Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Expansion Expansion Replacement

2010

831,142 364,000 364,000 364,000 364,000 364,000 364,000 352,000 352,000 352,000 93,000 83,000 93,000

403 4 434 435 436 470 471 472 473 427 562 560 563 564 593 640 150 457

Total Estimated Cost 2011 2012

831,142

831,142

Federal Aid 2011 2012

2013

2010

831,142

415,571 302,120 302,120 302,120 302,120 302,120 302,120 292,160 292,160 292,160 77,190 68,890 77,190

84,240

415,571

2013

415,571

415,571

2010 STA

168,000

69,919 84,240

69,919

30,160

24,128 96,720

80,278

86,320 41,600

71,645 33,280 260,000 40,000 75,000

208,000 32,000 60,000

Keyline Transit Federal Fund Type

Type of Expenditure

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

Sec 5303 Sec 5303 Sec 5307 Sec 5310 Sec 5307 Sec 5316 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309

Planning Planning Operating Operating Capital Operating Capital Capital Capital

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24

Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309

Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital

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Description MPO Planning/Coordination (IL side) MPO Planning/Coordination General Operations Preventative Maintenance Associated Capital Maintenance JARC Projects Facility Security Cameras/ Proximity Readers Vehicle Digital Video Security System Administrative office Rehab Keyline Administrative/Maintenance Facility Roof Replacement Facility Parking Lot Resurfacing Maintenance Pits Rehab Downtown Transportation Center Intermodal 35' Heavy Duty Bus 2558 35' Heavy Duty Bus 2559 35' Heavy Duty Bus 2561 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2581 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2582 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2578 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2583 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2584 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2585 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2586 (Diesel) 176" wb Light Duty Bus 2587 (Diesel)

Chapter 7 -Recommendations

Type of Project Planning Planning

2010

Replacement Replacement Expansion Replacement Expansion Rehabilitation

$1,611 $32,065 $2,685,564 $42,000 $130,000 $61,250 $20,000 $60,000 $50,000

Replacement Replacement Rehabilitation Expansion Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement

$114,000 $51,000 $15,000 $17,000,000 $349,000 $349,000 $349,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000 $75,000

Total Cost 2011 2012

$32,065 $2,885,600 $42,000 $146,000

$32,065 $3,135,600 $42,000 $162,000

2013

$32,065 $3,335,600 $42,000 $178,000

2010 $1,289 $25,652 $1,342,782 $33,600 $104,000

Federal Aid 2011 2012

$25,652 $1,442,800 $33,600 $116,800

$25,652 $1,567,800 $33,600 $129,600

2013

$25,652 $1,667,800 $33,600 $142,400

2009 STA

$178,000

$30,625 $16,000 $48,000 $40,000 $91,200 $40,800 $12,000 $13,600,000 $289,670 $289,670 $289,670 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250 $62,250


Region 8 Regional Transit Authority Federal Fund Type

Type of Expenditure

Description

Type of Project

ECIA Sec 5304

Planning

RPA Transportation Planning

Planning

RTA Sec 5311 Sec 3037

Operating Operating

General Operations JARC Operations

Expansion

STIM

Capital

(12) 158"wb Light Duty Buses

Replacements

STIM

Capital

Bus Maintenance Equipment

Expansion

STIM

Capital

Radio Tower

Replacement

STIM

Capital

Dumpster Screen

Sec 5309

Capital

Sec 5317 Sec 5311

Operating Capital

Vehicle ID

2010

Total Estimated Cost 2011 2012

2013

26,375

1,385,000 632,000 318,144,649 650, 666,384,94,28,29,107

2010

2013

205,452 248,000

205,452 248,000

2010 STA

21,100

1,385,000 632,000

1,385,000 632,000

1,385,000 632,000

205,452 248,000

780,000

780,000

216,000

20,000

5,500

5,500

Expansion

15,000

15,000

Iowa Clean Air Program

Expansion

20,000

20,000

20,000

New Freedoms Computer

Expansion Replacement

20,800 3,300

20,800 6,000

20,800

Conclusion Federal Type of

Federal Aid 2011 2012

20,800

205,452 248,000

10,000

10,000

10,000

10,400 2,640

10,400 4,800

10,400

246,005

10,400

As isType identified all three transitType systems, remains a2010backlog draw on2013the systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Fund Expenditure in the TIPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Description of Project there Vehicle ID 2011 of replacement 2012 2013 vehicle 2010 needs 2011 that 2012 STA operating budgets through high fuel and maintenance costs, and prevent the transit systems from expansion of service. Timely replacement Clinton MTA 5311 Operating Operations 831,142 831,142 415,571 415,571 415,571 and 415,571 168,000 ofSecvehicles wouldGeneral allow transit systems to expand service to meet unmet831,142 needs through lower 831,142 fuel and maintenance costs by allowing Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) STIM Capital Replacement 403 364,000 302,120 some vehicles with reasonable remaining useful life beyond federal standards be used for expansion where appropriate. Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) STIM Capital Replacement 4 364,000 302,120 STIM STIM STIM Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309 Sec 5309

Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital Capital

Total Estimated Cost

Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (35' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus) (security) Heavy Duty Bus (30' low floor HD bus)(security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus (security) Light Duty Diesel Bus Light Duty Diesel Bus Van Light Duty Diesel Bus Light Duty Diesel Bus Service Truck -Diesel 4x4 GPS Technology/AVL Locator Vehicle Hoist Dispatching Software

Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Replacement Expansion Expansion Replacement

434 435 436 470 471 472 473 427 562 560 563 564 593 640 150 457

364,000 364,000 364,000 364,000 352,000 352,000 352,000 93,000 83,000 93,000

Federal Aid

2010

302,120 302,120 302,120 302,120 292,160 292,160 292,160 77,190 68,890 77,190 84,240

69,919 84,240

30,160

69,919 24,128

96,720 86,320 41,600

80,278 71,645 33,280

260,000 40,000 75,000

208,000 32,000 60,000

Chapter 7 -Recommendations

[79]


PTDP 1st Draft