Issuu on Google+

An ITP Business Publication

JULY 2012 / VOLUME 06 / ISSUE 07

NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC FEATURE Sounding out the latest trends in regional acoustic design

CASE STUDY Doha’s classic Al Hitmi complex gets a new residential section

DEEP PURPLE

Mubadala’s colourful campus for UAE University in Al Ain


Fastest dry time The Dyson Airblade™ hand dryer dries hands in just 10 seconds.

Lowest environmental impact It generates 72% less carbon emissions than paper towels.1

Most hygienic HEPA filter captures 99.9% of bacteria from the air drying hands.

The fastest, most hygienic hand dryer. Now available in the Middle East.

For more information please visit www.dysonairblade.com/middleeast 1. Source: T. Montalbo, J. Gregory, R. Kirchain. Life Cycle Assessment of Hand Drying Systems. A Dyson commissioned study, 2011.


FRONT | JULY

17,000 Student capacity of UAE University (Page 20)

QATAR ‘GHERKIN’ NAMED REGION’S BEST TOWER Aedas’ Abu Dhabi Dha h bi towers also so honoured at 2012 CTBUH Awards

25

TOP STORY

Burj Qatar (left);

Burj Qatar in Doha by Jean Nouvel was named best tall building in the Middle East and Africa at the annual awards of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). Al Bahar Towers in Abu Dhabi was also honoured, picking up CTBUH’s first Innovation Award for its intelligent solar skin. Nouvel’s cylindrical tower is similar in form to Foster + Partners’ 30 St Mary Axe in London, dubbed ‘the gherkin’.

2

Al Bahar Towers (right).

STOREYS IN AL BAHAR TOWERS

Unlike Foster’s building, the façade of Burj Qatar is constructed of multi-layered patterns which mimic traditional Islamic sun screens. Richard Cook, awards committee chairman and founding partner of Cook + Fox Architects, commented: “The skin of the building is a beautiful expression of the local culture, connecting this very modern tower with ancient Islamic designs.” Meanwhile, Aedas’ twin-tower project for Abu Dhabi Investment

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Council was praised for its computer-controlled ‘mashrabiya’ façade which responds to the sun. Peter Oborn, Aedas deputy chairman and project director, said: “We’re delighted that the Al Bahar Towers has been recognised, particularly as it reflects the Emirates’ commitment to innovation and sustainability.” The 25-storey project is on course for completion this summer, with the mashrabiya currently being commissioned, according to Oborn.


JULY | FRONT

84

US$11,000 Cost per unit of acoustic retrofit

Units in the new section n of Doha’s landmark Hitmi complex (Page 38) 8)

(Page 30)

Student’s eco mosque in i Abu Dhabi gets approved

DESIGNMENA.COM This month’s top stories • Qatar ‘gherkin’ named Middle East’s best tower

A contemporary eco-friendly mosque, designed by a graduating architecture student from ALHOSN Univerity, has been approved by the General Authority of Islamic Affairs and Endowments in Abu Dhabi. The proposal, by Suhail Moham-

The design received a Five Pearl Rating.

med Suleiman, received a Five Pearl Rating under Estidama and incorporates a mosque and Islamic centre on Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island. It is to be made from eco-friendly building materials and partly illuminated by natural lighting. Prof. Abdul Rahim Sabouni, vice chancellor and CEO, ALHOSN University, said: “[Suleiman’s] unique design reflects the bright future of Islamic architecture in the UAE. ALHOSN University is very proud of him and extends its full support for the transformation of his project from the drawing board to reality.”

GAJ wins contract for new Emaar housing project Local firm GAJ Architects has been appointed as concept and full service consultants for Emaar’s housing project in The Views, Dubai. The Panorama development, overlooking the fairways of the Emirates Golf Course, will contain four buildings at 15 floors, with 224 apartments. GAJ’s consultant services on the project include architecture, interior design, structure, MEP and landscape. It was reported to almost sell out within three hours of opening. Jason Lloyd Taverner, GAJ partner and lead design consultant, said: “We are delighted to be involved in this landmark project which signals

• Aedas’ Abu Dhabi towers win Innovation Award • 25 essential iPad apps for interior design students • Dolum launches the Aluna bed • Pictures: Best tall buildings of 2012 • Top 5: Audacious stadium designs

WEIRD PROJECT OF THE MONTH

Danish collective pinkcloud shared its futuristic vision of Shanghai which scraps the horizontal cityscape in favour of the vertical. Entitled ‘flip/city’, the project reorganises footprints of the existing urban landscape.

DATASTREAM LOCATION OF TALLEST TELECOM TOWERS

2 (5%) OCEANA Panorama, the Views, Dubai.

the re-emergence of the residential property sector in Dubai.” Described by Emaar as “both stylish yet functional” it’s arranged in the shape of an unfinished ‘W’, with the majority of apartments to enjoy a golf course and Marina skyline view.

19 (53%) ASIA

2 (5%) NORTH AMERICA

2 (5%) MIDDLE EAST

11 (31%) EUROPE

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

(Data from CTBUH)

3


FRONT | JULY

PEOPLE

60 SECOND INTERVIEW

Ex-Aecom chief joins HDR Middle East

Hadid gets title for services to architecture.

Zaha Hadid made a dame by Queen Elizabeth Iraqi-British architect Zaha Hadid was made into a dame in Queen Elizabeth’s Birthday Honours list. Dame Zaha, designer of the Sheikh Zayed Bridge in Abu Dhabi, was awarded the title for her services to architecture. She said: “I have met the Queen on several occasions, in Istanbul and here in London, but of course this is quite a different matter and I am sure one will be nervous.” Now one of the world’s most famous architects, Hadid won the Pritzker Prize in 2004 as well as the Stirling Prize in 2010 and 2011. She is also behind the Aquatic Centre, one of the major venues for this year’s Olympic Games in London. Dame is the female equivalent of knighthood in the British honours system.

Reducing heat islands can significantly lower cooling costs, through avoiding the use of dark , non-reflective surfaces for parking, roofs, walkways and other hardscapes.” Samer Al Hamdan, senior architect , LEED AP BD+C, PMDC

4

Former Aecom healthcare principal Randy Edwards has joined HDR Architecture as vice president and healthcare principal for the Middle East. Working out of HDR’s Dubai office, Edwards joins with more than 30 years experience in the healthcare and higher education industries. Prior to Aecom, he was the managing director of Ellerbe Becket’s Middle East, Asian and European markets. His portfolio includes the King Fahd Specialty Hospital masterplan and King Khalid Medical City in Dammam, KSA, as well as the University Hospital and American Hospital in Dubai. “Having lived in Dubai for more than four years, Randy brings a unique understanding of the local culture, business climate and infrastructure needs of the region,” said Ahmad Soueid, HDR senior vice president and director of development, Middle East.

AMMAR AL ASSAM, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, DEWAN

How is business for Dewan?

The last year was very good for us and we have a much more diverse portfolio. We have projects in Abu Dhabi, Dubai and Qatar, but Iraq and Saudi are particularly busy.

What projects are you working on in Iraq and Saudi? In Iraq, we’re working on the Basra Governorate HQ ernorate e o t H ar hotel o and a 5-star in Basra forr y the Ministry of Sports & Youth. We are providing the structural urban plan a for Qadisiya province in o on collaboration m. We m W with Aecom. esign e g work w will start design on a 20-storey tower with hotel and residential components in Dammam, KSA and designed a 150m tower in Dammam for AlAbdulkarim Holding.

Is work picking up in Dubai? Dubai was quiet for a few years but in the last six to nine months we have had more requests. Old faces are coming back and large developers are calling us. Healthcare specialist Randy Edwards.

Using BIM is a massive advantage. The integration of BIM will also help to change the mentality of both the office and site worker.” David Crowder, head of MEP, Atkins

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

The historic and cultural value of Downtown Doha is nothing compared to what we have at Al-Balad in Jeddah.” Dr Ziad Aazam, director of projects at ABAM


FRONT | JULY

MENA PROJECT SNAPSHOT 2

1

3

2

1 ABU DHABI

2 ABU DHABI

Abu Dhabi Corniche set for major revamp

World’s highest penthouse bridge in place

TURKEY Minimalist stone mosque proposed for Istanbul

London-based Markus Jatsch Partners won a contract with Abu Dhabi Urban Planning Council to re-develop 4km of beachfront along the Corniche. This involves turning existing promenade, beach and parkland into multi-use and flexible space, it was reported in The Architects’ Journal. Amenities will include restaurants, beach clubs, sports areas, snack bars, sports facilities and children’s areas.

Abu Dhabi-based developer Sorouh has completed the world’s highest penthouse bridge structure for Gate Towers, at a height of 245m. The fourth and final section was lifted to sit at the top of the 65-storey residential development on Shams Abu Dhabi, Al Reem Island. The completed structure is now built across all three towers and is cantilevered 25m beyond the last tower.

This simple yet daring mosque design by Emre Arolat Architects is proposed for a site outside Istanbul. It is located in a prairie landscape separated from surrounding houses by a busy highway. Stone stairs follow the natural slope and the thin reinforced concrete slab spans over six metres to form the canopy. Its interior contains slits along the Qiblah wall allowing daylight to filter in.

6

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

3


JULY | FRONT

GLOBAL PROJECT SNAPSHOT 2

1

3

12

3

1 POLAND

2 DENMARK

3 FAROE ISLANDS

Euro 2012 stadium wins two awards

3XN and Arup to design Copenhagen Arena

Henning Larsen wins Faroe Islands megaproject

Poland’s National Stadium in Warsaw, a key venue for the 2012 European Football Championship, picked up two prizes at the World Stadium Congress held in Doha. Designed by gmp and Skidata, it won ‘Best multi-functional stadium design’ and ‘Innovative technology in design’. An honourary award for outstanding contribution to sporting development in Qatar went to the Qatar 2022 Supreme Committee.

A team comprising 3XN, HKS Architects, Arup, ME Engineers and Planit has won the design competition for the new Copenhagen Arena. Expected to be completed in late 2015, the design features a semi-transparent yellow terracotta and glass façade. The glass between the terracotta fins is said to make the building appear open and accessible, while the foyer areas receive natural light.

Henning Larsen Architects has won the competition to develop a 150,000m2 complex comprising a cultural house, museum, residences, offices and shops. Situated in Faroe Islands’ second largest city, Klaksvík, the proposal is based on a star-shaped structure where the centre of the star constitutes the new city square. The city’s municipality will prepare a district plan for its development.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

7


CPD MODULE

METAL CEILINGS

This CPD module takes a look at the design, specifi cation, integration and performance of suspended metal ceilings across the Middle East. It is sponsored by SAS International

C

eilings are an element that is often undervalued by the occupants of a building however they play an important role in their comfort. Meeting occupant demands for a modern office environment requires consideration to be given to acoustics and space flexibility. Low maintenance costs and product durability are factors that also need Acoustic to be addressed, while architects Performance Data. and clients will be looking for the

8

optimum aesthetic finish. Suspended ceilings are traditionally installed to provide acoustic comfort and service integration. The choice of tile provides the desired acoustic performance. Metal ceiling tiles are supplied with factory-formed apertures for luminaires and other services, reducing on-site waste and installation time. Engineered systems can also ensure that product quality is significantly better. Working closely with project teams and coordinating

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

service options, prefabrication can lead to on-site cost savings. There are a number of different design and performance options that need to be considered when specifying a ceiling including: MATERIAL TYPE: A range of different ceiling materials are available on the market including mineral wool, gypsum and metal. In addition to meeting the requirements of LEED and Estidama, the long-term environmental benefits of metal meet the sustainability demands of modern projects. With a 25-year life cycle and minimal on-going maintenance, metal provides the durability that clients want. It is specified on numerous construction projects for its performance and, unlike other materials, it has a closed life cycle loop, as it can be recycled into new steel. With 40% recycled content, steel is the most recycled material globally. Offering significant value to the client there are no disposal costs at end of life with a retained residual value contributing toward future refurbishment. Steel can be used for applications such as cladding, soffits and ceilings especially in locations where humidity and proximity to the sea must be considered. Steel is being supplied to


CPD MODULE

projects in the region because of its durable and versatile qualities which offer a cost-effective and sustainable solution. It can withstand weathering and applied with a powder paint coating is guaranteed for 40 years. The leading suspended ceiling manufacturers are able to provide full ISO 14025 Environmental Product Declarations for their ceiling systems. ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE (Figure 1): The versatility of metal provides unrivalled acoustic properties while maintaining a continuous aesthetic appearance. A number of different acoustic backing materials can be used with perforated metal panels, providing acoustic attenuation of up to 49dB and acoustic . absorption of 0.90 To provide the ideal levels of occupant comfort it is important to ensure the correct acoustic performance is specified and installed, on many projects this will include a mix of sound absorbing tiles in open plan spaces and sound attenuation tiles for modular offices. Sound Absorption (Fig 2): Acoustic absorption is a measure of

the ability of a surface to absorb sound, minimising the amount of reflected sound back into a space. High performing acoustic pads installed in the rear of a perforated metal tile can overcome this reflected noise within an environment. Tested under BS EN ISO 11654 the results are reported in three different ways as: • Sound Absorption Rating: , based A single figure rating, quoted as upon octave frequency bands, ranging from 0.0 for total reflection, to 1.0 for total absorption. • Sound Absorption Class (Figure 3): There are five categories of sound Figure 2 absorption ranging from Class A to Class E, with Class A offering the higher level of sound absorption. Sound Absorption Class . can be roughly equated to the value of • NRC – Noise Reduction Coefficient A more traditional method of defining sound absorption is Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC), which is an arithmetic average of octave band absorption over a limited frequency range. Sound Attenuation / Insulation (Fig 4): Acoustic attenuation is used to describe the reduction in sound between two spaces separated by a dividing element, for example a wall or partition between two rooms.

Figure 3

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

9


CPD MODULE

tiles are not limited to a fi xed number of wash cycles and can be cleaned regularly. With a 25 year product life guarantee the costs associated with metal tiles are significantly lower. TYPE OF METAL CEILING SYSTEMS: When designing for any project, different options can affect the aesthetic finish of a suspended ceiling, complementing and reflecting other architectural features. It is not necessary to take a ‘best-fit’ solution, each ceiling is different and requires a tailored approach, projects and buildings are not always square, demands from users vary and have to be taken into account. The majority of ceiling systems either have a concealed or exposed grid. Exposed grids can be flush with the ceiling plane or recessed, tiles can be modular or manufactured to planning modules. Concealed grids can produce a monolithic ceiling plane. Clip-in Tiles (Figure 5): With ease of cleaning and secure ceiling voids, SAS System 150 clip-in tiles are ideal for hygienic environments and public spaces where void security is a requirement. Tiles, available in 600 x 600mm or 1200 x 300mm, are supported by a concealed suspension grid and can be demounted from the grid or hinged downwards. As upward pressure can be applied, strict cleaning schedules, including deep steam cleans, can be adhered to. Lay-in Tiles (Figure 6): Traditional modular lay-in tiles, SAS System 130, can be customised by utilising differing grid options. Tiles are generally provided in 600mm x 600mm cassette form complete with acoustic fleece and pad. The range of grid options includes traditional tee grid to flush aluminium finishes, with tiles laid directly in. Providing flexibility for locating partitioning a linear thread form allows partitioning heads to be fi xed without causing any

Having read this CPD module and made use of the references, you should be ready to select the correct answer to each question below.

QUESTIONS 1) What is the typical product life guarantee you would associate with a metal ceiling tile? a) 5 years b) 25 years c) 10 years 2) What dB level of acoustic attenuation can you achieve with a metal ceiling tile? a) 32dB b) 49dB c) 66dB 3) What is the optimum acoustic open free area for perforated metal tiles? a) 15% - 22% b) 2% - 65% c) 30% - 41% 4) How long can the polyester powder paint Þnish be guaranteed for? a) 5 years b) 25 years c) 40 years 5) What is the average global recycled content Þgure for steel? a) 60% b) 40% c) 20% Your answers to this CPD module should be sent via email to Kirsty Bird, CIOB. kbird@ciob.org.uk

damage to the ceiling plane. Linear and Tartan Grid Tiles (Figure 7): Offering the facility to manufacture tiles in millimetre increments and mega panels, sizes up to 1500 x 1500mm, SAS System 330 provides functionality and outstanding performance with a range of cost effective design options. This system is ideal for offices - both new and refurbishments - due to their ability to meet any building’s grid size. To meet design requirements the supporting profile and tiles can be provided in a range of shapes to allow waveform or radial designs to be created. Bespoke Ceilings: Building and ceiling design is not limited to square and rectangular; radial, vaulted and

even waveform ceiling design can be accommodated. Bespoke ceilings can provide a visually effective ceiling design while maximising space. WORKING WITH A MANUFACTURER Understanding that all projects are unique, many manufacturers ensure solutions provide for the long-term whilst meeting environmental credentials and offering greater design flexibility. If architects and contractors work closely with manufacturers like SAS International it is easier to ensure their design and performance specifications are met.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

11


NEWS ANALYSIS | ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

Cities across the Middle East are moving back to their architectural roots, proving that old is definitely gold. Devina Divecha and Gerhard Hope weigh in ANALYSIS

Traditional architecture provides an insight into life in a city during any period.

12

A

midst the gleaming towers and shiny façades lining the busy cities of the Middle East lie pockets of traditional architecture which evoke memories of days long gone. And if some people have their way, those days will return. With the region seeing a resurgence in restoring properties and

districts to their former glory, the Architectural Heritage department of Dubai Municipality is certainly playing its part. Eng. Rashad Bukhash, director of the Architectural Heritage Department, opines that architecture is the “mirror of history”. He adds: “Starting with the pyramids, the Taj Mahal, the Great Wall

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

of China, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, architecture has been the mirror of civilisations for more than 8,000 to 9,000 years.” This is why he believes architectural heritage conservation is important, both internationally and locally. Traditional architecture is not just about stones and buildings, he says, rather it aids in interpretation of the


ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE | NEWS ANALYSIS

social, economic and political life of the city at the time. The Architectural Heritage Department was founded in 1991, and in the last 21 years has restored 170 structures in Dubai, along with prestigious projects in other emirates like Al Bidiya Mosque in Fujairah and the Ajman Fort. Other restored projects include watch towers,

mosques, souqs, houses and schools. In many cases, the buildings have been restored for their original use. With the rest, the department has converted them into museums, restaurants, boutique hotels, galleries and office spaces. It has completed restoring 54 houses in Bastakiya and 60 in Shindagha, with another 60 to be finished in the latter area in the next five years. Similarly, the historic district of Jeddah presents an opportunity to become a lasting legacy for Saudi Arabia, akin to Msheireb Properties’ Downtown Doha project in Qatar. A consequence of the Arab Spring has been a renewed interest in cultural heritage and attempts to preserve it, according to Dr Ziad Aazam, director of projects at Al-Balad Al-Ameen Development & Urban Regeneration Company (ABAM). Dr Aazam is also a part-time consultant at the Jeddah Development & Urban Regeneration Company (JDURC). Despite UNESCO’s rejection of Saudi Arabia’s application to have AlBalad declared a World Heritage Site, Dr Aazam is forging ahead to have the area preserved as a historic legacy. He is being aided in these efforts by Mohammed Shukri, who runs a private architectural consultancy. “It is not about concrete and dollars; it is about what is equally important in the Arab world today, people and places, which is what construction is really about,” says Dr Aazam. The methods of construction in decades gone by were different, but perhaps better suited to the climate of the region. Bearing this in mind, contemporary architects can learn a lot of useful techniques from tradi-

tional architecture in the Middle East region, according to Bukhash. He added the ‘green architecture’, propagated by municipalities nowadays and by Masdar in Abu Dhabi, is present in buildings that existed 50 years ago. “We have a very harsh, hot and humid climate; I believe that traditional architecture suited 90% of the climate in various ways,” he adds. He points to the use of porous coral stones, which worked as an insulated wall to provide a cooler space internally. Another cooling material is mud bricks, especially used in Hatta and the inner regions of the UAE. Gypsum, according to Bukhash, is a better option than concrete or reinforced iron, as the latter can rust in 30 or 40 years. “Traditional buildings can stay for 100 or 200 years easily with a little bit of maintenance, but many modern buildings, especially those built in 1960s or 70s, will have to be demolished because they cannot resist the hot and humid climate,” he adds.

Rashad Bukhash, Architectural Heritage Department (below).

“Traditional buildings can stay for 100 or 200 years easily with a little bit of maintenance, but many modern buildings...cannot resist the hot and humid climate. Rashad Bukhash, director, Architectural Heritage Department, Dubai

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

13


NEWS ANALYSIS | ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE

170

RESTORATIONS BY DUBAI’S HERITAGE DEPT Earlier methods of architecture suited the harsh local climate.

The same principles are echoed in Al-Balad. Shukri comments: “You did not have air-conditioning, so it was very hot in summer. But they survived living out in the elements, so you have an added value from the green side — how they adapted to the environment.” Shukri says the principle of rainwater harvesting was common at this time. “We can learn from such examples, which show that Al-Balad is still living, and is not a ghost town.” Dr Aazam said the Jeddah Heart Group has adopted a distinct approach to the restoration of Al-Balad.

“If you notice this hotel, it has mashrabiya or Arabic screens over the windows. This school of thought, of transferring heritage culture into the modern so it becomes symbolic, is not our school. Our aim is to integrate and progress. We must always feel linked to the past, and looking to the future.” Shukri says there is some ongoing debate on the best approach to preserve Al-Balad. “Are the existing, crumbling structures valuable or not? Do you leave everything as it is, or do you make up your mind to reuse it?”

It is not about concrete and dollars; it is about what is equally important in the Arab world today, people and places, which is what construction is really about.” Dr Ziad Aazam, director of projects, ABAM

14

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

The local building materials at the time were coral stone, mud from the sea and active lime used for plastering, with wood from local sources for framing. “This is as simple as it gets here in terms of components. However, these are very sustainable elements,” he remarks. Such has been the quality of the construction that many of the buildings have been standing intact for 200 years — although UNESCO did state that the area was “neglected” rather than of historic value. Commenting on the construction methods used at the time, Shukri says the wall widths were wide to provide deep insulation inside the building. Most of the elevations were open for deeper air penetration into the building. Recesses were carved out of the walls, which not only made for storage space, but also turned the walls into structural columns by reducing their load-bearing weight.


ARCHITECTURAL HERITAGE | NEWS ANALYSIS

tĹ?ĚĞ^ĞůĞÄ?ĆšĹ?ŽŜŽĨÄžĆ?Ĺ?Ĺ?ĹśĆ?ĂŜĚ ^ĆľĆŒÄ¨Ä‚Ä?ÄžĆ?&Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ć?ŚĞĆ?͘

In terms of restoration, Shukri says the best method is to reuse the existing wooden framing, take out the walls, rebuild these, and then return them to the structure. The key is to use local materials and knowledge, which will also provide training and up-skilling opportunities for locals. This view is echoed by Bukhash who says, according to UNESCO and international laws, architects are instructed to keep the buildings as is and use the traditional materials in conservation. He also points to the concept of the wind tower, which helped bring air into enclosed spaces. “I’m not saying we should go back to that [form of architecture] — now we have electricity, but we have to develop ideas,â€? he adds. Bukhash mentions Arizona, USA, which has a similar climate. “There they have developed some kind of wind towers, but that is much more established through universities, municipalities, and ministries of housing.â€? The Architectural Heritage Department, with the aim of spreading awareness on the issue, has set up the International Architectural Conservation and Exhibition, with the third edition to take place on December 17-19, 2012 in Dubai. The theme is ‘Architectural Conservation: Present and Future’. The ďŹ ve main topics it will cover include: policies, strategies and decision making in historic environment; economics of conservation and sustainable environment; cultural development and awareness; management of cultural heritage in historic areas; and project implementation and practical aspects of urban conservation. In addition, students from local and international universities will be participating in the event. Local universities slated to attend include American University in Dubai (AUD), American University of Sharjah (AUS), UAE University and Sharjah University. Bukhash says: “It’s a very good participation, and many experts on conservation will be there. HRH Prince Sultan bin Salman bin Abdulaziz, chief of the General Authority for Tourism and Antiquities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, is attending.â€? “We have sent an invitation to Prince Charles of Britain, to Queen Rania of Jordan, and Sheikha Mai Bint Mohammed Al Khalifa from the Ministry of Culture,â€? he adds. The growing trend of regeneration was summed up by Eng. Issa M. Al Mohannadi, CEO of Msheireb Properties: “I suspect Gulf states will look back to the hearts of their cities, and eventually all capitals of the region will start to regenerate their downtowns.â€?

KE>d,Z

Bedienen Sie sich aus einer Vielzahl von 'HNRUHQ XQG 2EHUĂ€lFKHQ HUKlOWOLFK LQ YHUVFKLHGHQHQ3ODWWHQVWlUNHQ

WK>z'>K^^͘^ZKZ^dKEĎ­

KZ^t/d,' ĆľÄ?Ä‚Ĺ?KĨĨĹ?Ä?Ğ͝ƾĆ?Ĺ?ŜĞĆ?Ć?sĹ?ĹŻĹŻÄ‚Ĺ?Ğ͝ KĨĨĹ?Ä?ÄžϳϭϹÍťWĹ˝ĆŒĆš^ĂĞĞĚÄžĹ?ĆŒÄ‚ ĆľÄ?Ä‚Ĺ?Íťh͘͘͘ÍťW͘K͘ŽdžĎ­Ď­ĎŻĎŹĎ´Ďą ÍťdнϾϳϭϹϹϲϹϳϴϯϳϯ ŽŚĂKĨĨĹ?Ä?Ğ͝'ĂƚĞϭϴϹ͝ ^ĆšĆŒÄžÄžĆšĎŻÍť/ŜĚƾĆ?ĆšĆŒĹ?Ä‚ĹŻĆŒÄžÄ‚ÍťŽŚĂÍťYÄ‚ĆšÄ‚ĆŒ W͘K͘ŽdžϹϭϴϳÍťнϾϳϰϰϰϲϏĎ°Ď­ĎŹĎ°

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

15


COMMENT | EDITOR’S LETTER

TOWER POWER EDITOR’S LETTER

Did Burj Qatar deserve to win its CTBUH award?

GOT A COMMENT? If you have any comments to make on this month’s issue, please e-mail oliver. ephgrave @itp.com

L

ast month, Jean Nouvel’s Burj Qatar was crowned the best tall building in the Middle East and Africa by the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat (CTBUH). Yet did Nouvel’s 232m-high tower deserve to be lauded at the annual awards? The facade is certainly among the region’s best. By taking the mashrabiya screen as inspiration, Frenchman Nouvel has created a skin that is both spectacular, unique and rooted in its context. However, in terms of the form, it is nothing new. We saw the cylindrical ‘gherkin’ shape way back in 2004 with Foster’s 30 St Mary’s Axe in the centre of London. The following year Nouvel himself celebrated the opening of the 144mhigh Torre Agbar, in Barcelona, which is a more elegant version of Foster’s icon. Burj Qatar seems like a taller replica of the Barcelona tower with a more localised facade. The project in Spain would defi nitely have served as a good warm up for Nouvel’s team. A question mark surrounds the reason why the tower was honoured in 2012. It has long been a feature on Doha’s skyline and was completed in 2010 according to several data websites, including Emporis.

Burj Qatar (left); Al Hamra Tower

Past winners of the award include Bahrain Trade Centre, Burj Khalifa and The Index by Foster + Partners, indicating a steady delivery of quality tall buildings in the region. Burj Qatar managed to tick CTBUH’s boxes to qualify for 2012, perhaps due to occupancy levels. But does the selection of an established tower suggest a lack of quality, newly completed towers? In the case of Dubai, this may be true. Several towers in Dubai Marina have been completed and handed over yet the standout building, Infi nity Tower by SOM, is still several months away from fi nishing. In January this year, Abu Dhabi’s

Does the selection of an established tower suggest a lack of quality, newly completed tall buildings?

16

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Jumeirah at Etihad Towers, by DBI, picked up an award for ‘World’s Leading New Hotel’ in the World Travel Awards. Yet the glassy fivetower project is perhaps not special enough to win the CTBUH award. A tower that should have been a contender is Capital Gate in Abu Dhabi. Like Burj Qatar, Capital Gate has been topped out for a number of years, but was only launched relatively recently. From certain angles Capital Gate is utterly beguiling, yet when the tilt is not apparent it loses much of its appeal. For me, the most exciting new tower to be completed in the Middle East is SOM’s Al Hamra Tower. The tallest stone-clad structure on earth is both elegantly sculpted and unlike any other building. Looking at London’s ‘gherkin’ and Barcelona’s Torre Agbar, the same could not be said for Burj Qatar.


HP recommends Windows® 7 Professional.

All-in-one, all inside

Introducing the new HP Z1 Workstation. Power without the tower. Bring your imagination to life with the all-in-one HP Z1 Workstation – featuring the powerful Intel® Xeon® processor E3-1200 series, genuine Windows® 7 Professional and a stunning 68.6 cm (27") high-resolution LED-backlit display.1 Get professional-grade graphics and performance in a sleek, space-saving design that makes customisation a snap – literally.

The HP Z1 Workstation snaps open for simple, tool-free customisation2

© Copyright 2012 Hewlett-Packard Development Company, L.P. The information contained herein is subject to change without notice. Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside logo, Xeon and Xeon Inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation in the U.S. and other countries. Microsoft and Windows are trademarks of the Microsoft group of companies. 1 Refers to diagonal measurement of display. 2  $OOVSHFLƭFDWLRQVUHSUHVHQWWKHW\SLFDOVSHFLƭFDWLRQVSURYLGHGE\+3oVFRPSRQHQWPDQXIDFWXUHUVDFWXDOSHUIRUPDQFHPD\YDU\HLWKHUKLJKHURUORZHU


COMMENT | GEORGINA CHAKAR

FRESH THINKING OPINION What has the industry learned in the last five years? Georgina Chakar is an Australian architect and a Master of Urban Planning. She works in Abu Dhabi.

F

ive years after the start of the economic crisis, there is one question at the centre of concern for all industries: what have we learned? It appears that many issues the construction industry was facing have been analysed during the time of the recession and treasured for the future. Let’s look at the high dynamics of construction itself that became a platform for creating other issues. The speed of construction in the UAE and in the wider region before 2007 was fostering the concept of constructing sustainable buildings, while at the same time construction was faster than the implementation of the science of the sustainability. The necessity of performing a full feasibility study is now needed more than ever, as the time when everything was feasible is far behind us.

Practicality versus luxury, due to the consumers’ uphill movement to personal and social recovery, should become priority. Accordingly, knowing your current consumers better, and the satisfaction of the end user trapped in circumstances created by the latest economic downturn, is a step forward to the success of the construction industry. The introduction of innovations not only in the multiple reusable/recyclable materials, but in technology specific for the construction industry, leading to even larger globalisation, is becoming essential. The more time and resources the consultancy/ construction companies engage in the research and innovations, the more competitive they become. We are still facing mis-coordination between departments within the same organisation. For instance,

The construction of social infrastructure, such as schools, is keeping the industry afl oat.

The use of local building materials will widen the activities in the construction industry; it will control the prices and will certainly create new jobs.”

18

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

while the design department is producing the documentation for tender in one format, the procurement is asking for another. The process of the adjustment and the agreement is long or endless. The massive import of final building materials needs to be analysed, with a push towards local production. The cheaper services still are, and have always been, available in the UAE and in the wider region. The use of local building materials will widen the activities in the construction industry; it will control the prices and will certainly create new jobs. The recent economic turmoil left a mess behind it and at the same time created a platform for learning lessons. And each recession is different, appearing in a specific time and set of circumstances. Has the most recent downturn been utilised by the construction companies to better prepare for new challenges? Are the governments helping the construction industry, including the private sector, to overcome the crises and take a strong direction? Being present in the UAE and the GCC region, we witness governments that are well focused on the recovery of their countries. The major programmes such as the construction of Emirati housing, schools, hospitals, energy supply facilities, as well as the development of infrastructure in the UAE and wider region, will keep the construction industry alive until the recession is over. When will this happen? Well, that is the million dollar question.


Our modular process makes your building a snap.

architecture.geometrica.com


SITE VISIT | UAE UNIVERSITY

CAMPUS OF COLOUR With a new male campus set to welcome students in September, Oliver Ephgrave visits the stunning UAE University in Al Ain

20

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


UAE UNIVERSITY | SITE VISIT

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

21


SITE VISIT | UAE UNIVERSITY

A

The centrepiece Crescent Building.

purpose-built university from scratch, designed and documented in a period of eight months conjures up images of drab boxy buildings lining clinical grid streets, yet UAE University’s new campus in Al Ain couldn’t be further from this. With its shaded canopies, narrow alleyways, open courtyards and water features, it somehow feels like a charming old city, albeit one with ultra-contemporary buildings. “Our design brief was to create a contemporary university that would rival the leading education infrastructure projects around the world,” says Greg Howlett, director of Australia-based Cox Architecture. Cox was behind the detailed masterplan, concept design, design development and documentation, while Woods Bagot created the initial masterplan concept. The progressive Western-style buildings are used for a very traditional form of education, with

strictly enforced gender segregation. While the female campus opened last year, along with the landmark Crescent Building, the male campus is preparing to welcome students for the new semester in September. The university’s shared facilities required sophisticated planning in order

to maintain segregation. Howlett explains: “The laboratories required a lot of planning so the buildings could operate at the same time with both male and female students, but without cross-over. “We have separate entrances for males and females, so the buildings can be separated through the middle of the buildings or level changes. There are

US$544 MILLION VALUE OF CAMPUS

22

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


PRODUCT

SHOWCASE YOUR IN FRONT OF 50,000 BUYERS

I]Z7^\*!B^YYaZ:VhiÉhW^\\ZhiVcYWZhiViiZcYZYWj^aY^c\VcYXdchigjXi^dch]dl! egZhZcihndji]ZWZhideedgijc^inid\gdlndjgWjh^cZhh^ci]ZgZ\^dcWnWg^c\^c\ *%!%%% egd[Zhh^dcVahY^gZXianidndjghiVcY#

Je[dgk_h[WXekj[n^_X_j_d]fb[Wi[[cW_b0

?ddelWj_edIkijW_dWX_b_jo_d9edijhkYj_ed

+Å.Del[ [cX[hh(&' '( :kX XW_MehhbZJhW WZ[9 9[djh[ lll#i]ZW^\*#VZ$VgX&

^c[d@i]ZW^\*#VZ ehYWbb .,&%))(-%(** <daYHedchdg/


SITE VISIT | UAE UNIVERSITY

The campus is filled with colourful colleges.

some fairly advanced management systems in place. “Similarly, the library is designed to have both male and female students in separate areas. The segregation system is very sophisticated and designed with subtle security, that isn’t ‘in your face’.” Thankfully, two electric vehicles were on hand to escort us around the huge 100Ha campus, a welcome alternative to walking several kilometres in the scorching heat. Cruising along, the quality of the built environment is immediately apparent. Quite remarkably, each building and courtyard has its own identity. The open spaces veer from the intimate to the open, surrounded by carefully-designed colleges with expressive facades. Howlett comments: “We didn’t want the buildings to be identical. We used common colours and materials but each building has its own character. They are quite different but they all sit comfortably together.

I think that is the great success of the overall campus.” A similarly diverse approach was adopted with the external circulation, according to Howlett. “You get very confi ned spaces opening into courtyards and different squares. Some of them are covered in their entirety, while others are more landscaped with planting. The external spaces are being used, contrary to previous predictions. We thought it was very important to utilise them.” He elaborates on the arrangement of the campus: “The user experiences the university through a series of primary axial circulation movements, landmark vista stops, framed views and places of congregation. A central connective formal spine segregates the male and female campus. “Wayfi nding was an important aspect - there are markers to make it easier to navigate around. We added some tower elements and different colour schemes. We have used quite bright colours throughout.”

Our design brief was to create a contemporary university that would rival the leading education infrastructure projects around the world.” Greg Howlett, director for Cox Architecture

24

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

The variety in design was partly due to the involvement of different offices. “We delivered different buildings out of different branches - Sydney, Melbourne, Perth. This meant that the buildings had a difference as well as a sameness.” Howlett says the time difference between the UAE and Australia actually aided the delivery of the project in the client’s tight programme schedule. “We used the time zones to our advantage. We’d have a meeting here with Mubadala in the afternoon and download to Sydney and by the next morning we would have the drawings ready.” However, he concedes the process would have been even smoother if BIM was utilised. “It would have helped, no doubt about it. To have a 3D model you can work on in real time, particularly when working in different offices on the single model, would have been great. But BIM was not really prevalent at the time we started designing.” “In terms of construction, we used a lot of precast. We did look at blockwork for the female residential - concrete


UAE UNIVERSITY | SITE VISIT

frame and blockwork infill - but we found that the contractors were very keen to use precast.” The vehicles eventually arrive at the campus’ standout centrepiece, the aptly-named Crescent Building which houses all of the university administration. Howlett describes the design of the eye-catching structure. “Some of the facade panels are for vision while others are just cladding. “The glass panels add colour to the interiors of some of the offices. If you look at the Crescent

Building in plan it is actually quite slim, but it is generous with space. The corridor tapers as you get further down the building and the volumes become smaller. “I’d say the geometry was quite demanding - it contains two different radii that converge while the cambered walls meet at a single point.

300,000M2 NET AREA OF CAMPUS

“ Imagining a hotel takes a lot of creativity and innovation, taking into consideration all the while the constraints of the standards in force ” Agneta S. Architect - Stockholm (Sweden)

Clean Maintain

Cook Serve

Welcome Relax

Conceive Design Des

Manage Connect

All the solutions for the Hotel and Catering Sector

YOUR FREE ACCESS AT www.equiphotel.com [code ITP] Contacts: International Visitor Promotion Delphine GELLY & Dalinda BOUNOUARA visiteurs.equiphotel@reedexpo.fr +33 (0)1 47 56 50 56

OFFICIAL PARTNERS:

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

Organised by

25


SITE VISIT | UAE UNIVERSITY

It’s probably my favourite part of the campus, partly because it was done out of my office in Perth.” Howlett believes one of the reasons that Cox was selected was due to its experience with the harsh Australian climate. “We are accustomed to dealing with passive

environmental design, such as shading on windows.” He continues: “It was extraordinary to do a project of this nature. Compared to other universities around the world, this is extremely substantial and we had to build it from scratch. “The programme was challenging to say the least. I must say I didn’t think it was achievable. “Essentially we used most of our resources, delivered through three different offices. We also worked with a local partner Cansult, which is part of the Aecom Group. They had

The Sharia Law faculty (right); Crescent Building (below).

8 MONTHS DESIGN AND

DOCUMENTATION TIMEFRAME

26

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

the experience dealing with the local authorities and they assisted us with the documentation.” Given the scale of the project, and its tight delivery timeframe, the fact that it retains a human quality is testament to the skilful and carefully crafted design. What’s more, it seems that the campus is appreciated by those that have to use it every day. After inadvertently eavesdropping on our conversation, the driver of one of the vehicles turns to Howlett and says: “You designed the campus sir? Wow, amazing work.”


FEATURE | ACOUSTIC DESIGN

iq u e a n d te c h n s d n e r t t s h e late lo o k s at t e v a r g h p O live r E d e sig n l a co u s tic a n io g e r in

30

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

s


ACOUSTIC DESIGN | FEATURE

I

t’s fair to say that the acoustics of a building will probably not be the first thing on the agenda for most clients and architects. But how important is the way a building deals with sound? According to Mark Scaife, associate for acoustics, WSP Environment and Energy, the acoustic performance of a space goes hand-in-hand with the perceived quality. He opines: “If a building looks stunning, but you can hear what the neighbours are saying, people will very soon tire of the appearance. That said, it is vital that the design is both architecturally and acoustically pleasing.” Andrew Jackson, director at metal ceiling supplier SAS International, believes acoustics are becoming more integral in commercial environments. “Occupant comfort, particularly acoustics, is becoming more important in the design and performance of offices. Productivity of staff is directly affected if this issue is not considered at an early design stage,” he says. Jason Hird, technical manager for wall and ceiling supplier SaintGobain Gyproc, offers advice on how to improve a building’s acoustic performance. “Both internal and external sound transmission should be considered and the requirements for each individual space taken into account when planning the building design,” he remarks. “Sensible measures, such as separating quiet and noisy activities and the careful specification of doors, windows and ductCOST PER UNIT work systems, will OF ACOUSTIC help to reduce the RETROFIT demands on sound insulation. Continuing partitions to the underside of the structural soffit and the use of plasterboard suspended ceilings to both sides of the partition will reduce flanking transmission.”

US$11,000

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

31


Mark Scaife, associate for acoustics, WSP Environment and Energy (right).

Hird continues: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Air tightness is essential, and while most junctions will be sealed using standard jointing techniques, any gaps or other small air paths should be sealed using a proprietary sealant.â&#x20AC;? When asked about the most challenging type of building to deal with acoustically, Scaife highlights hotels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are problematic because they often contain conďŹ&#x201A;icting uses in close proximity such as nightclubs and ďŹ ne dining. It is then necessary to provide separating elements (wall and ďŹ&#x201A;oors) with very high levels of sound insulation which can affect the structural loads and space planning.â&#x20AC;?

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s often the case that acousticians are employed too late or not for the entire design and construction, so that they are prevented from adding their true value.â&#x20AC;? Mark Scaife, WSP Environment and Energy

70#PROTECSPRIMEVALFORESTS/URFIRST OBJECTIVEWASTODEVELOPTHETECHNOLOGYTO CREATEACOMPOSITEWOODSUPERIORTONATURAL WOODINORDERTOCOMBATTHETHOUGHTLESS LUMBERINGOFFORESTTREES

32

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Scaife also states that schools are a big challenge in terms of acoustics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Studies have shown that schools located in areas of high noise levels have students that suffer long term learning impairment. Therefore without proper consideration to acoustics, we could be impacting future generations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is also important to consider that the majority of research into speech intelligibility which the acoustic criteria for schools is based on teacher and student sharing a common ďŹ rst language. Certainly in the multicultural societies in Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Doha, this is often not the case and designers should consider improving the performances. This is certainly an area requiring further research.â&#x20AC;? UAE-based Dewan Architects and Engineers was behind the design of the huge Al Bateen Secondary School in Abu Dhabi, a project which posed many acoustic challenges. Nidaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;a Al Gailani, senior projects manager, ex-


ACOUSTIC DESIGN | FEATURE

plains: “Rooms or spaces of different functions require different acoustical treatments, such as classrooms, lecture rooms, music rooms and performance halls.” She continues: “A high degree of speech intelligibility in learning spaces needs to be achieved. With good classroom acoustics, learning is easier and less fatiguing for students and teachers.” According to Al Gailani, the correct amount of reverberation is crucial for classrooms. She continues: “The larger the room, CAPACITY OF the longer it will take for AL BATEEN reflected sound to die away quickly. Excessive SCHOOL reverberation can reduce the understanding of spoken words. Conversely, too much soundabsorbing treatment, especially in dedicated lecture rooms, can reduce beneficial early sound reflections causing speech levels from a talker to fall off rapidly with distance.” Lecture halls and seminar rooms also required a considered sound absorption solution. “In teaching spaces with ceiling heights greater than three metres, an increased amount of sound-absorbing material was Parallel surfaces were avoided to needed to achieve the recommended prevent the sound from slamming level,” says Al Gailani. back and forth. “This annoying condi“The acoustical mineral ceiling tion is referred to as standing wave or was distributed uniformly to enhance flutter echo,” she explains. reflections to and from the back of the Meanwhile, the rear and back stage room, as well as back and forth, thus walls were treated with an absorptive promoting good speech communicamaterial to control reflections. “If tion,” she adds. these reflections are not prevented, Other acoustic tricks included the the sound will reflect off the back wall use of carpets to muffle impact sound. and return to the people on stage, In rooms without carpet, Neoprene which would be very distracting for chair leg tips were used to help reduce the audience and the presenters,” shuffling noises. states Al Gailani. Al Gailani points to the multiWhen it comes to the common mispurpose hall as the main acoustic takes made in acoustic design in the challenge, due to its various funcMiddle East, WSP’s Scaife remarks: tions. The result was a “comfortable “It’s often the case that acousticians balance between sound absorption are employed too late or not for the and reflection providing a favourable entire design and construction, so noise distribution pattern”. that they are prevented from adding

1,500

Al Bateen Secondary School in Abu Dhabi provided several acoustic challenges for Dewan Architects & Engineers.

their true value. Misunderstanding the difference between common acoustic ratings for materials is also common and this can lead to expensive mistakes.” He explains that the confusion surrounds ratings such as Rw, the Weighted Sound Reduction Index which is measured in an acoustic laboratory, and DnTw , the equivalent value measured on-site. Scaife warns that retrofitting acoustic design is extremely costly. He comments: “A study in the UK found that improving sound insulation in residential dwellings cost, on average, almost US$11,000 per dwelling if inappropriate materials are specified.” “If you multiply that by the number of apartments in a typical tower

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

33


FEATURE | ACOUSTIC DESIGN

Jason Hird, technical manager, Gyproc (far left); performance hall at Al Bateen Secondary School.

AED150M VALUE OF PROJECT

block or rooms in a hotel, the costs can soon mount up. Employing an acoustician early will add value to the project, while employing an acoustician late will add cost.” Gyproc’s Hird also points to the expense of retrofitting acoustics. “Once a building has been completed it can be very expensive and incon-

venient to address sound insulation problems, and it is therefore prudent to ensure that appropriate sound insulation measures and detailing are incorporated at the design stage.” Although acoustics may have been neglected by many Middle East developers in the past, Scaife believes the situation is changing.

“Acoustics is becoming more important to developers in the Middle East and this is being picked up in the numerous Green Building codes around the Gulf. Estidama (Abu Dhabi), QSAS (Qatar) and DEWA Green Building Regulations (Dubai) have all seen fit to include acoustic performance as a measure of building and community quality.”

ADVERTORIAL

ASI Group earns architects’ trust

T

he ASI Group offers a single-source solution for washroom accessories, toilet partitions, lockers and other storage products. These products, used in many highprofile projects around the world including Doha Rugby Football Centre in Qatar and Seagas (Damietta) Natural Gas Complex in Egypt, have earned the trust of architects, designers, building owners, facility managers and construction professionals. With headquarters in Yonkers, N.Y. and manufacturing facilities across the U.S., the company’s representatives are strategically located around the globe to best serve customers’ needs.

34

In 2010, the ASI Group teamed up with the Sanipex Group, a market leading supplier of quality bathrooms, tiles and plumbing materials headquartered in Dubai, United Arab Emirates that conducts business in over 20 countries across three continents, expanding its presence in the Middle East. Our mission at ASI Group is to make our customers successful by providing value that exceeds price and an excellent service experience. We do this by providing superior design, the broadest range

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

For more information, visit www. asigroup.us or contact the Sanipex Group at +971 4 330 7771.

of quality products in the industry, and state-of-the-art manufacturing to ensure that we have whatever our customers need, whenever they need it.


ACOUSTIC DESIGN | PRODUCTS

NOISE BUSTING MEA picks a selection of acoustic products

SILENT-DB 20, GEBERIT The Geberit Silent-db20 drainage system comes with sound insulation already installed. Mineral-filled plastic increases the weight of the pipes and fittings and reduces natural vibrations. Additional sound insulation ribs in the impact zones help reduce noise development. System pipe brackets for wall fastening decouple the system acoustically from the wall or ceiling and prevent sound transmission. It was used in the five-star St. Regis Hotel Saadiyat Island Abu Dhabi.

PERFORATED METAL CEILING, SAS INTERNATIONAL SAS International’s perforated metal ceilings offer a high level of acoustic performance and a lifespan in excess of 25 years, with only very basic maintenance. The system incorporates perforations in the surface area with the inclusion of acoustic pads, which alleviates reverberation time in the space. It was used in a number of buildings at King Saud University, Riyadh.

PARTITION SYSTEM, GYPROC SAINT-GOBAIN As a supplier of gypsum-based lightweight partition and lining systems, Gyroc provides a wide choice of performance levels, from the ‘GypWall CLASSIC’ internal partition systems, ideal for residential and office developments, up to the highest performing ‘GypWall AUDIO’ partitions offering up to Rw 80dB performance for multiscreen cinemas and exceptionally sensitive acoustic environments.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

35


SETTING THE BENCHMARK FOR THE REGIONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ARCHITECTURE INDUSTRY

TUESDAY 23RD OCTOBER, 2012 THE WESTIN, DUBAI

For sponsorship enquiries please contact:

The 5th annual Middle East Architect Awards are an opportunity for the industry to come together for one night to toast exceptional performance in architecture, engineering & design.

Yazan Rahman Sales Director, Construction Group Tel: +971 4 444 3351 Email: yazan.rahman@itp.com

NOMINATION DEADLINE: THURSDAY 23rd AUGUST 2012

Platinum Sponsor

Gold Sponsor

Andrew Parkes Advertising Director, Construction Group Tel: +971 4 444 3570 Email: andrew.parkes@itp.com For nomination enquiries please contact: Oliver Ephgrave Editor Tel: +971 4 444 3303 Email: oliver.ephgrave@itp.com For table bookings and further information please contact: Michelle Meyrick Events Manager Tel: +971 4 444 3328 Email: michelle.meyrick@itp.com

Category Sponsor

To submit your nominations, or for more information, please visit:

www.constructionweekonline.com/meaa


DOHA TWINSECTION) TOWERS | CASE STUDY AL HITMI COMPLEX (RESIDENTIAL

THE PROJECT Completed in April 2012, the new residential section is the final piece of the jigsaw for Doha’s distinctive Al Hitmi complex, designed by Norr Group Consultants. With a built up area of 27,743m 2 , the 15-storey tower accommodates a total of 84 units and sits behind the older seven-storey office section, completed in 2010. By arranging six units on each level, Norr was able to design apartments ranging between two and three bedrooms, with en-suite bathrooms. The optimised glazing design provides the living rooms and bedrooms with ample natural light and views over the Corniche.

AL HITMI RESIDENTIAL Location: Doha, Qatar Architect: Norr Group Consultants

15

CASE STUDY

STOREYS IN RESIDENTIAL SECTION

THE SITE Located on a prime waterfront site along the Doha Corniche, the Al Hitmi complex overlooks IM Pei’s Museum of Modern Art. With its striking, futuristic form, the complex has long been a landmark for central Doha. The sculptural design is composed of solid granite masses sliced by a dramatic sky-lit glazed atrium that faces towards the water. The atrium dissects the office building and folds vertically up through the residential tower. This internal space, suggestive of a ravine or gorge between massive rock forms, is clad in high performance glass that allows natural light into the buildings while reflecting the sun’s heat.

38/46 38

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.desi www.designmena.com

39

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

50/53 18M

HEIGHT OF SPACES LOBBY SPACE ES

THE GALLERIES TH AArchitect: Burt Hill Location: Downtown Jebel Ali, Dubai

PROJECT UPDATE

PARK HYATT ABU DHABI

306

NUMBER OF ROOMS AND SUITES

Architect: Perkins Eastman Location: Abu Dhabi

WATER DISCUS HOTEL Designer: Deep Ocean Technology Location: Various, including Dubai

TITANIC BELFAST

3,000

ALUMINIUM SHARDS IN THE FACADE

50

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Lead consultant: Todd Architects Location: Belfast, Northern Ireland

THE VERTICAL OASIS

The first hotel project completed on Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island, as well as the first Park Hyatt-branded property in the UAE capital, the Park Hyatt Abu Dhabi Hotel & Villas opened its doors in November 2011. Designed by Perkins Eastman, the 306-key 45,000m2 resort is oriented towards the sea, with private villas that line a boardwalk and private beach. The energy-efficient design meets LEED Certified standards.

Architect: Aaron Marriott and Clarissa Wenborn, University of Nottingham Location: Abu Dhabi

AZERENERJI HQ

This daring concept for an underwater hotel was conceived by Polish company Deep Ocean Technology (DOT). Drydocks World, the shipbuilding arm of Dubai World, signed a deal to become the exclusive main contractor for the hotel concept in the Middle East. Named Water Discus Hotel, the design envisages an ‘ultimate leisure facility’ with a structure that is partly above water and the rest submerged underneath.

NUMBER OF

This $140m cultural scheme is a strikingly modern homage to the Titanic, located on the site where the ill-fated ship was designed and built. It is the world’s largest ever Titanicthemed visitor attraction and Northern Ireland’s largest tourism project. The building contains nine galleries documenting the Titanic, as well as the maritime history of the city, and a 1,000-seat banqueting suite.

5,193M2

28

STOREYS IN THE TOWER

Location: Baku, Azerbaijan Architect: P&T Architects and Engineers

XEROX EMIRATES HQ

GROSS FLOOR AREA

Architects: AK Design/ Adel Almojil Consulting Engineers Location: Dubai

As the flagship project for UAE developer Limitless, the Galleries is a mixed-use scheme in Downtown Jebel Ali containing Grade-A office space, housing and retail space. Since last month, all four towers in the Galleries Offices Buildings are now open, with 70% of the 800,000m2 space already leased. Certified LEED Silver, it consists of two groups of four buildings, separated by a landscaped plaza.

This eco tower for Abu Dhabi was designed as part of a master’s course at the University of Nottingham’s architecture department. The project, called the Vertical Oasis, was created by students Aaron Marriott and Clarissa Wenborn. As suggested by the name, the project aimed to recreate the oasis in the sky, for a site on the Abu Dhabi Corniche, adjacent to the ADIA Tower. It features a series of stacked villages shaded by an outer perforated facade.

This tower complex is the headquarters for AzerEnerji, the state provider of power for the whole of Azerbaijan. P&T was tasked with producing a building that is highly secure and functional, which also the advanced technology used in Azerbaijan’s new infrastructure grid. The 28-storey tower is capped with a triple-high lounge space for the company president, with views across Baku and the Caspian Sea.

Designed by UAE-based AK Design and Adel Almojil Consulting Engineers, this clean-lined complex serves as a showcase for the Xerox brand in the Middle East. It contains a customer showroom, offices, workshops, support centres and training facilities. Large, open-plan areas encourage interaction between departments. The building was completed in late 2011.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

51

LIKE WANT NEED | CULTURE

LIKE WANT NEED

CULTURE | LIKE WANT NEED

THE WORK

THE WORK

THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

CASE STUDIES

ACCESSORIES VIPER Hans Sandgren Jakobsen A flexible screen wall designed by Hans Sandgren Jakobsen and manufactured by Fritz Hansen, the Viper is 300cms long and can be extended. The oval tubes are individually hinged, and the screen wall has black-grey synthetic end plugs in both ends. It is pivotally connected by dropped turnable stainless steel hinges which are mounted and dismantled manually. Conveniently, Viper can be rolled up into a compact cylinder if a more open space is suddenly required by the user.

CULTURE

WALLCOVERINGS DOT WALL TILES Studio/Nakisci

Designed by Studio/Nakisci (Tamer Nakisci), these wall tiles draw attention to their digitalised and individual composition. The ceramic tiles, in various graphic designs, can be combined in several different ways to create a different environment. The tiles are both simple and striking and resemble a drop falling into water. A handy interactive online programme also allows end users to design their own walls.

FURNISHING LOVE ME LOVE ME NOT John Vogel

54/55 54

John Vogel’s inspiration comes from the natural world and the exploration of organic forms. He designed the Love Me Love Me Not table in collaboration with Justin Plunkett, and these delicate side tables are available individually or as a set of eight making up a full flower. The sculpted form of the base unfurls to reveal a surface like a floating leaf or petal.

ACCESSORIES DITTO 3form

APP ARCHITIZER Architizer LLC

3form has launched Ditto, a decorative and modular space system for any room. The design uses crossshaped pieces to create 3D effects for partitions, wall claddings or simply as an art piece. It’s easy to put together, and is a do-it-yourself kit that allows users to click together into the desired shapes. Ditto is made from 3form Varia Ecoresin with 40% preconsumer recycled content, and comes in a box.

The iPad app for Architizer, the online source for new architecture, showcases tens of thousands of buildings with huge pictures, all in a constantly updated stream. Every week, hundreds of new buildings are added to the website by the architects who design them, which are then reflected in the app. Its features include a matrix of the best projects on Architizer, updated in real time. It can also display projects based on categories selected by the user.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.co www.designmena.com

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

55

CULTURE

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

37


DOHA TWINSECTION) TOWERS | CASE STUDY AL HITMI COMPLEX (RESIDENTIAL

AL HITMI RESIDENTIAL Location: Doha, Qatar Architect: Norr Group Consultants CASE STUDY

38

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | AL-ABDULKARIM TOWER

THE PROJECT Completed in April 2012, the new residential section is the fi nal piece of the jigsaw for Doha’s distinctive Al Hitmi complex, designed by Norr Group Consultants. With a built up area of 27,743m 2 , the 15-storey tower accommodates a total of 84 units and sits behind the older seven-storey office section, completed in 2010. By arranging six units on each level, Norr was able to design apartments ranging between two and three bedrooms, with en-suite bathrooms. The optimised glazing design provides the living rooms and bedrooms with ample natural light and views over the Corniche.

15

STOREYS IN RESIDENTIAL SECTION

THE SITE Located on a prime waterfront site along the Doha Corniche, the Al Hitmi complex overlooks IM Pei’s Museum of Modern Art. With its striking, futuristic form, the complex has long been a landmark for central Doha. The sculptural design is composed of solid granite masses sliced by a dramatic sky-lit glazed atrium that faces towards the water. The atrium dissects the office building and folds vertically up through the residential tower. This internal space, suggestive of a ravine or gorge between massive rock forms, is clad in high performance glass that allows natural light into the buildings while reflecting the sun’s heat.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

39


DOHA TWINSECTION) TOWERS | CASE STUDY AL HITMI COMPLEX (RESIDENTIAL

THE CONCEPT The Yahya Jan, Norr’s design director and vice president, said that the building is intended to be abstract, despite its residential and commercial nature. “We felt that this unique development along the water should be monumental and abstract rather than typically building like.” He continued: “We went to great lengths to create a sculptural massing and façade texture evocative of natural geological forms.” As a result, the buildings are clad in a skin of polished and honed black granite interspersed with grey-tinted glazing that creates a monumental and scale-less exterior for the project.

THE DETAILS A distinctive characteristic of the residential section is the three landscape atrium levels, each four storeys high, offering enclosed passive gardens for the residents. In addition, a roof garden has been de-

signed as a passive leisure space with the atrium spaces and of the Doha water features integrated harbour beyond. Facilities in the within hard and soft residential tower also include landscape areas. a roof top fitness centre, an Three panopen pool terrace and two oramic elevators levels of basement parking provide views of for 107 cars. NUMBER OF

84

RESIDENTIAL UNITS

40

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


DOHA TWIN TOWERS AL-ABDULKARIM TOWER | CASE STUDY

AL-ABDULKARIM TOWER Architect: Dewan Architects & Engineers Location: Dammam, Saudi Arabia CASE STUDY

42

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | AL-ABDULKARIM TOWER

THE PROJECT UAE-based Dewan Architects & Engineers has been awarded a contract to design and supervise the construction of a 150m-tall tower in Dammam, Saudi Arabia, for building material supplier AlAbdulkarim Holding. Ammar Al Assam, executive director, Dewan, said: “The client liked the simple volumes based on straight lines and transparency. One component is tilted, and this creates great spaces internally.”

THE DETAILS Dewan’s design features doubleheight glass cladding to demarcate the client’s 27 office floors from the remaining lower offices which are to be leased to other fi rms. Completion is scheduled for 2014. Al Assam, added: “Every office floor will have its own feel due to the tilt. We are 90% through the HEIGHT OF design and THE TOWER we are due to start on site in four months.”

150M www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

43


DONGDAEMUNDESIGN DESIGNPLAZA PLAZAAND ANDPARK PARK | CASE STUDY DONGDAEMUN

DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA AND PARK

Location: Seoul, South Korea Architect: Zaha Hadid Architects and Samoo Architects & Engineers CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT Dongdaemun Design Plaza project (DDPP) is a major cultural facility under construction in the heart of Seoul. The main client is the Seoul Metropolitan Government, which chose a team with Zaha Hadid Architects and local ďŹ rm Samoo Architects & Engineers. The 85,000m2 TOTAL BUDGET scheme will create a learnFOR DDPP ing resource for designers and the public, with a design museum, library and educational facilities, while the 30,000m2 Design Park offers an oasis within the dense urban setting.

$33M

44

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA AND PARK

THE SITE The project is under construction at the site of the former Dongdaemun Stadium, which had to be demolished. The form revolves around the ancient city wall, which is the central element of the design, creating a continuous landscape that physically links the park and plaza together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A fundamental aim of the scheme is to bring delight and inspiration to the people of Seoul by establishing a cultural hub in the centre of one of the busiest and most historic districts of the city,â&#x20AC;? said Hadid at the project launch.

www.designmena.com | 06.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

45


DONGDAEMUN DESIGN PLAZA AND PARK | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT According to Hadid, the amorphous language of the design acts as a catalyst by promoting fluid thinking and interaction across all the design disciplines, while also encouraging the greatest degree of

interaction between the activities of the plaza and the public. The design integrates the park and plaza seamlessly as one landscape element. The park

reinterprets elements of traditional Korean garden design with reflecting pools, lotus ponds, pebble beds and bamboo groves, and no single feature dominating the perspective.

50,000 DOUBLE-CURVED EXTERIOR PANELS

THE DETAILS BIM was used extensively from the planning stage, which proved crucial in dealing with the exterior’s 50,000 double-curved aluminium panels varying in colour, perforations and light location. The panels cover 38% of the exterior skin, or 10,900m2. Titanium, chosen as the fi nishing material for the surface of the structure, had to be changed to aluminium due to budgetary constraints. The size of the aluminium panels to be used was also perceived as a problem, due to the concern that the 50cm x 80cm-sized surfaces would be difficult to be smoothly expressed into curved surfaces.

46

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


www.constructionweekonline.com/conferences

ABU DHABI 5TH NOVEMBER 2012 THE WESTIN, ABU DHABI

This one day forum brings the whole spectrum of the construction, real estate and FM sectors together for an open discussion alongside government representatives to promote sustainability initiatives in the Middle East

MEDIA PARTNERS

GOLD SPONSORS

HOSTED BY:

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT: CARLO MENEZES SPONSORSHIP SALES MANAGER, CARLO.MENEZES@ITP.COM DIRECT: +971 4 444 3306

YAZAN RAHMAN SALES DIRECTOR YAZAN.RAHMAN@ITP.COM DIRECT: +971 4 444 3351


Case study Vialia High-Speed Train Station

Vialia high-speed train station in Albacete Investor: Adif Architect: Metrica Tip Arquitectura Location: Albacete, Spain Building type:


High Speed Rail Train Station goes Qbiss One The new train station Vialia, with a total budget of 48 million Euros, has been built with a high level of demand in terms of quality and safety and therefore presented as a major challenge for the Spanish railway engineering.

On Track

“Because of the use, size and location of Vialia Albacete Station, located in the

Having already been involved in the regeneration and

heart of the city of Albacete, we needed

development of the city of Albecete, Trimo, was excited

an industrialized façade system that

to be a part of this important high speed rail station

did not project an industrial image. The

as its features will become a benchmark in terms of

Qbiss One modular façade elements

architectural and high-speed rail infrastructure in

provide technical quality with an image

Europe. Project architect Roberto Robuffo, from

of simplicity and elegance that makes

Metric Tip Architecture specified Qbiss One for

it an ideal material even for prestige

the building’s facade with more than 5000 m2 of

buildings.”

vertical and horizontal modular elements used and integrated with decorative aluminium profiles to

Robuffo Roberto, The Architect

project dynamism and colour to the main facade.

The new AVE station in Albacete is more than a train station; it is a building that attracts the attention of visitors for its elegant facade and unique combination of bold colours and colour profiles, while providing the perfect solution in building efficiency and architecture. The simple construction of the Qbiss One element addresses the building envelope in an instant and optimizes the execution time on site. “The important thing is what can’t be seen. Its design is clearly visible, but if people knew about the thermal insulation, acoustics, fire resistance and easy assembly everybody would want it. This project has been one of the most important in Spain during 2010 and Trimo’s Qbiss One system has been the perfect “shop-window” where all the travellers would meet. Trimo has had the privilege to coat this large and prestigious project in the city with an incredible beauty and elegance.” Javier Jiménez Navarrete, Director Trimo Ibérica Trimo UK Ltd, UAE Branch office | Level 19, Monarch Office Tower | Office 1907 | One Sheikh Zayed Road | P.O Box 333840 | Dubai, UAE t: +971 4 7050401 | m: +971 505093153 | dubai@trimo.org.uk | www.qbiss.eu | www.trimo.org.uk


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

THE WORK PROJECT UPDATE

PARK HYATT ABU DHABI

306

NUMBER OF ROOMS AND SUITES

Architect: Perkins Eastman Location: Abu Dhabi

WATER DISCUS HOTEL Designer: Deep Ocean Technology Location: Various, including Dubai

TITANIC BELFAST

3,000

ALUMINIUM SHARDS IN THE FACADE

50

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Lead consultant: Todd Architects Location: Belfast, Northern Ireland

The fi rst hotel project completed on Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island, as well as the fi rst Park Hyatt-branded property in the UAE capital, the Park Hyatt Abu Dhabi Hotel & Villas opened its doors in November 2011. Designed by Perkins Eastman, the 306-key 45,000m2 resort is oriented towards the sea, with private villas that line a boardwalk and private beach. The energy-efficient design meets LEED Certified standards.

This daring concept for an underwater hotel was conceived by Polish company Deep Ocean Technology (DOT). Drydocks World, the shipbuilding arm of Dubai World, signed a deal to become the exclusive main contractor for the hotel concept in the Middle East. Named Water Discus Hotel, the design envisages an ‘ultimate leisure facility’ with a structure that is partly above water and the rest submerged underneath.

This $140m cultural scheme is a strikingly modern homage to the Titanic, located on the site where the ill-fated ship was designed and built. It is the world’s largest ever Titanicthemed visitor attraction and Northern Ireland’s largest tourism project. The building contains nine galleries documenting the Titanic, as well as the maritime history of the city, and a 1,000-seat banqueting suite.


18M

HEIGHT OF LOBBY SPACES

Architect: Burt Hill Location: Downtown Jebel Ali, Dubai

THE VERTICAL OASIS Architect: Aaron Marriott and Clarissa Wenborn, University of Nottingham Location: Abu Dhabi

AZERENERJI HQ

28

NUMBER OF STOREYS IN THE TOWER

Location: Baku, Azerbaijan Architect: P&T Architects and Engineers

XEROX EMIRATES HQ

5,193M2 GROSS FLOOR AREA

Architects: AK Design/ Adel Almojil Consulting Engineers Location: Dubai

As the flagship project for UAE developer Limitless, the Galleries is a mixed-use scheme in Downtown Jebel Ali containing Grade-A office space, housing and retail space. Since last month, all four towers in the Galleries Offices Buildings are now open, with 70% of the 800,000m2 space already leased. Certified LEED Silver, it consists of two groups of four buildings, separated by a landscaped plaza.

This eco tower for Abu Dhabi was designed as part of a master’s course at the University of Nottingham’s architecture department. The project, called the Vertical Oasis, was created by students Aaron Marriott and Clarissa Wenborn. As suggested by the name, the project aimed to recreate the oasis in the sky, for a site on the Abu Dhabi Corniche, adjacent to the ADIA Tower. It features a series of stacked villages shaded by an outer perforated facade.

This tower complex is the headquarters for AzerEnerji, the state provider of power for the whole of Azerbaijan. P&T was tasked with producing a building that is highly secure and functional, which also the advanced technology used in Azerbaijan’s new infrastructure grid. The 28-storey tower is capped with a triple-high lounge space for the company president, with views across Baku and the Caspian Sea.

Designed by UAE-based AK Design and Adel Almojil Consulting Engineers, this clean-lined complex serves as a showcase for the Xerox brand in the Middle East. It contains a customer showroom, offices, workshops, support centres and training facilities. Large, open-plan areas encourage interaction between departments. The building was completed in late 2011.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

51

THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

THE GALLERIES


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

MARINA MALL Architect: HOK Location: Lusail, Qatar

KUWAIT CULTURAL CENTRE

2,500

ESTIMATED POPULATION OF SABAH AL-AHMAD CITY

Architect: BDP Location: Sabah Al-Ahmad City, Kuwait

ETIHAD TOWERS

US$1BN TOTAL VALUE OF PROJECT

Architect: Design by Innovation (DBI) Location: Abu Dhabi

AMAF HEADQUARTER BUILDING Architect: Lacasa Location: Dubai

52

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Designed by HOK, this futuristic retail complex for Qatar’s mammoth Lusail development contains five interconnected retail ‘islands’ with water running through the centre. Smaller outlying pods will house additional retail, exhibition and entertainment space, such as a skate park and children’s play area. It is aiming for the top ranking in Qatar’s green building index and was recently granted planning permission.

BDP has been appointed by the Public Authority of Housing Welfare to design a landmark cultural centre in Sabah Al Ahmad, a new city for 2,500 people in the Kuwaiti desert. According to the architect, the centre will offer an “inspirational home for a wide range of cultural activities” and includes a gallery, museum, theatre, screening room, conference centre and children’s theatre. The forms are inspired by the Arabian dhow.

Completed in November 2011, this mixed-use project in Abu Dhabi comprises five towers, plus an interconnecting podium, developed by Sheikh Suroor Projects Department (SSPD). It includes the 585-key Jumeirah Etihad Towers Hotel. The project contains three residential buildings, housing 885 apartments, a commercial office tower, a shopping mall, restaurants and cafes and the UAE’s largest banqueting hall.

Lacasa won fi rst prize in a competition design for the headquarters of Islamic foundation, Awqaf & Minority Affairs Foundation (AMAF). Accordingly the design language of the, so far, unrealised project uses Islamic patterns and motifs. Symbolism was used in the materials and their relation to the masses to reflect the entity. The building is designed to provide flexible spaces that can be divided as per the tenant’s request.


2

33,000M

TOTAL GROSS AREA

Architect: Foster + Partners Location: Vancouver, Canada

AL HAMRA TOWER

412M

TOTAL HEIGHT OF THE TOWER

Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Location: Kuwait City, Kuwait

SARAYA BANDAR JISSAH Architect: GAJ Location: Oman

SIDRA VILLAGE

1,165

NUMBER OF FLATS IN THE VILLAGE

Architect: Allies & Morrison Location: Doha, Qatar

Jameson House is a new 35-storey mixed-use tower in the Canadian city of Vancouver and includes the fi rst residential development to be completed by Foster + Partners in North America. Finished at the end of last year, the building is already almost fully occupied, according to the architect. The mixed-use development comprises 11 storeys of offices and shops, topped by 23 storeys of apartments.

Designed by US giant SOM, Al Hamra Tower is a sculpted concrete skyscraper in Kuwait, valued at US$950m. The commercial complex contains offices, a health club, rooftop restaurant and a high-end shopping mall with an IMAX cinema complex and food court. Standing at 412m, it claims numerous heightbased records such as tallest building in Kuwait, tallest ‘sculptural’ tower and tallest stone-clad structure.

Designed by GAJ, Saraya Bandar Jissah is a luxury resort and community nestled within a sheltered bay where mountains meet the Gulf of Oman. Residential units and recreational facilities are located within the valleys while two luxury hotels sit adjacent to the beach. With views of a lagoon system, wadis and mountains, the housing units are oriented to follow the contours and minimise impact on the landscape.

This walled community on the outskirts of Doha will provide 1,165 flats for the nursing staff of the new Sidra hospital, as part of the Education City development. The scheme will contain a small mosque, community and leisure facilities, restaurants and cafes. Developed by Mazaya for end-user Qatar Foundation, Sidra Village is integrated within the existing street pattern. It is orientated to minimise the impact of the sun.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

53

THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

JAMESON HOUSE


CULTURE | LIKE WANT NEED

LIKE WANT NEED

CULTURE

WALLCOVERINGS DOT WALL TILES Studio/Nakisci

Designed by Studio/Nakisci (Tamer Nakisci), these wall tiles draw attention to their digitalised and individual composition. The ceramic tiles, in various graphic designs, can be combined in several different ways to create a different environment. The tiles are both simple and striking and resemble a drop falling into water. A handy interactive online programme also allows end users to design their own walls.

FURNISHING LOVE ME LOVE ME NOT John Vogel John Vogel’s inspiration comes from the natural world and the exploration of organic forms. He designed the Love Me Love Me Not table in collaboration with Justin Plunkett, and these delicate side tables are available individually or as a set of eight making up a full flower. The sculpted form of the base unfurls to reveal a surface like a floating leaf or petal.

54

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com


LIKE WANT NEED | CULTURE

ACCESSORIES VIPER Hans Sandgren Jakobsen A ďŹ&#x201A;exible screen wall designed by Hans Sandgren Jakobsen and manufactured by Fritz Hansen, the Viper is 300cms long and can be extended. The oval tubes are individually hinged, and the screen wall has black-grey synthetic end plugs in both ends. It is pivotally connected by dropped turnable stainless steel hinges which are mounted and dismantled manually. Conveniently, Viper can be rolled up into a compact cylinder if a more open space is suddenly required by the user.

ACCESSORIES DITTO 3form

APP ARCHITIZER Architizer LLC

3form has launched Ditto, a decorative and modular space system for any room. The design uses crossshaped pieces to create 3D effects for partitions, wall claddings or simply as an art piece. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to put together, and is a do-it-yourself kit that allows users to click together into the desired shapes. Ditto is made from 3form Varia Ecoresin with 40% preconsumer recycled content, and comes in a box.

The iPad app for Architizer, the online source for new architecture, showcases tens of thousands of buildings with huge pictures, all in a constantly updated stream. Every week, hundreds of new buildings are added to the website by the architects who design them, which are then reflected in the app. Its features include a matrix of the best projects on Architizer, updated in real time. It can also display projects based on categories selected by the user.

www.designmena.com | 07.12 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

55


LAST WORD | RASHID BUKHASH

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 444 3000 Fax: 00 971 4 444 3030 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP BUSINESS PUBLISHING CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Managing Director ITP Business Karam Awad Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Editorial Director David Ingham EDITORIAL Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Editor Oliver Ephgrave Tel: +971 4 444 3303 email: oliver.ephgrave@itp.com Reporter Devina Divecha Tel: +971 4 444 3502 email: devina.divecha@itp.com ADVERTISING Sales Director, Construction Group Yazan Rahman Tel: +971 4 444 3351 email: yazan.rahman@itp.com Business Development Manager, Saudi Arabia Rabih Naderi Tel: +966 1 2068697 email: rabih.naderi@itp.com STUDIO Group Art Editor Daniel Prescott Designer Wasim Akande PHOTOGRAPHY

TURN BACK TIME THE LAST WORD

Rashad Bukhash, director of Dubai’s Architecture Heritage Department, on the emirate’s buildings

Chief Photographer Jovana Obradovic Senior Photographers Isidora Bojovic, Efraim Evidor Staff Photographers Lester Ali, George Dipin, Juliet Dunne, Murrindie Frew, Lyubov Galushko, Verko Ignjatovic, Shruti Jagdeesh, Stanislav Kuzmin, Mosh Lafuente, Ruel Pableo, Rajesh Raghav PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION Group Production & Distribution Director Kyle Smith Deputy Production Manager Matthew Grant Production Coordinator Nelly Pereira Distribution Executive Nada Al Alami CIRCULATION Head of Database & Circulation Gaurav Gulati MARKETING Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Marketing Manager Michelle Meyrick

Today’s architects should learn the direction of the winds and the direction of the sun.

Architects and masons before memorised it by heart. Nowadays architects don’t know where north is. In Dubai there is a mix of architects coming from different parts of the world.

Many don’t know anything about the culture of the area or the climate - they just bring some architecture from their own countries and try to do it here. Architecture should reflect the identity of the place itself. If you go to Sheikh Zayed Road, you don’t know whether you’re in New York, London or Tokyo.

Most of these towers are designed in a way that you can’t even open the windows. In Shindagha and Bastakiya it’s difficult to bring the local people to live in these houses.

That’s why we made these two areas cultural, historical and touristic areas with museums, restaurants, boutique hotels, galleries, some office buildings and nonprofit organisations.

ITP DIGITAL Director Peter Conmy Internet Applications Manager Mohammed Affan Web Designer Meghna Rao ITP GROUP Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K M Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel: +971 4 444 3000 Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com Printed by Atlas Printing Press L.L.C. Dubai Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions Audited by: BPA Worldwide Average Qualified Circulation 5,132 (July – Dec 2011) Cover image UAE University, Al Ain The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

We are trying to increase awareness so that Dubai will have an identity.

So when people look at Madinat Jumeirah they will know that this is the architecture of the region and of the city.

56

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 07.12 | www.designmena.com

Published by and © 2012 ITP Business Publishing, a division of the ITP Publishing Group Ltd. Registered in the B.V.I. under Company number 1402846.


HIGH AESTHETIC TOTAL WALL SOLUTION.

Qbiss One on McLaren Production Centre, GB | Architect: Foster + Partners

Qbiss One,

Qbiss One Facade System

Aluminium Rainscreens

The cost-effective solution for your facades an ideal alternative to Aluminium rainscreens. Combining total functionality and aesthetics it is the natural choice for all architectural building applications.

Qbiss One the full through wall solution, offering excellent insulation values, the highest levels of airtightness and exceptional levels of flatness. The true alternative to Aluminium Rainscreens.

Qbiss One the Full facade solution including curved radius panels.

Prefabricated rounded corners - no cuts, folds or welds. Giving the highest levels of aesthetics.

Trimo UK Ltd, UAE Branch office Level 19, Monarch Office Tower | Office 1907 | One Sheikh Zayed Road | P.O Box 333840 | Dubai, UAE t: +971 4 7050401 | m: +971 505093153 | dubai@trimo.org.uk | www.qbiss.eu | www.trimo.org.uk


Broadway Malyan Ltd,

All Ban A and da ar - Ab ar Abu Dh Abu Dhab bi, i, UAE AE

Al Mamoura Building Intersection of 4th & 15th Street Block A, Al Muroor District, PO Box 53670 Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates T: +971 (0) 2 4999100 F: +971 (0) 2 4999101 E: UAE@BroadwayMalyan.com


Middle East Architect | July 2012