Issuu on Google+

An ITP Business Publication

MARCH 2013 / VOLUME 07 / ISSUE 03

NEWS, DATA, ANALYSIS AND STRATEGIC INSIGHTS FOR ARCHITECTS IN THE GCC ANALYSIS

Assessing the state of the Abu Dhabi market before Cityscape /p14

p2// FRONT Architects appointed to work on Saudi’s Kingdom City

p4// PEOPLE Veteran Steven Miller joins global construction firm

p22// INTERVIEW NGS’s Nabil Sherif reveals the secret to setting up in Dubai

SUSPENDED ANIMATION CASE STUDY BAHRAIN NATIONAL THEATRE IN MANAMA CASE STUDY KEO’S KUWAIT UNIVERSITY PROJECT

Sharjah Art Foundation prepares to launch its stunning array of galleries with spectacular lighting and inspiring vistas, designed by GAJ


So many dreams. Bring them all to life with Danube Buildmart.

s

elier

d Chan

rniture

Outdoor Fu

ens

Luxury Bathtub

iles

Cu

Ceramic T

UAE:

Abu Dhabi, Dalma Mall +971 2 5506610 Abu Dhabi, Mushrif Mall +971 2 4470966 Al-Ain, Bawadi Mall +971 3 7840318 Al-Ain, Al-Ain Mall +971 3 7376905 Fujairah +971 9 2249848 Fujairah, Dibba +971 9 2431859

TOLL FREE: 800-3131

d

ize

m sto

h Kitc

Dubai Festival City +971 4 2325220 Dubai, Bur Dubai +971 4 3862465 Dubai, IBN Battuta Mall +971 4 4404920 Dubai Bath Solution +971 4 2977020 Ras Al Khaimah +971 7 2355761

BAHRAIN:

Bahrain Mall +973 1 7382480 Hamad Town +973 1 7610809 Salmabad +973 1 7879931

SAUDI:

Jeddah +966 2 6590172

OMAN:

INDIA:

Honda Road +968 2 4834414 Ahmedabad +91 7966625831 Pune +91 2030552500 Salalah +968 2 3213005

QATAR:

Doha +974 44116604


MARCH | CONTENTS

MARCH 2013 VOLUME 7 ISSUE 03 2

FRONT

Top stories in the world of architecture, such as the latest on KSA’s Kingdom City

6

4

PEOPLE Key regional appointments, famous architect news and top quotes

PROJECTS A round up of the latest project news from MENA and the rest of the world

20

14

THE BIG PICTURE The stunning lighting design of a metro station in Hamburg, Germany

ANALYSIS

What is the state of the capital’s real estate market in the lead up to Cityscape?

32

22

INTERVIEW

MEA speaks to Nabil Sherif of NGS Architects about setting up a fi rm in Dubai

SITE VISIT

Exploring the galleries in GAJ’s recently completed Sharjah Art Foundation

56

40

CASE STUDIES Bahrain National Theatre, KEO’s Kuwait university and Dewan’s Basra project

THE WORK

A detailed reference section covering all the best projects in the world

64

60

CULTURE A snapshot of funky furniture, books and other accessories in the market

LAST WORD Stephen Embley, Aukett Fitzoy Robinson, reveals his favourite things

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

1


FRONT | MARCH

32

Age of Nabil Sherif, founder of NGS (page 22)

Kindom Tower forms the centerpiece of the project. Image: AS+GG.

UAE FIRM TO WORK ON KINGDOM CITY PLANS

GAJ to support US-based Calthorpe Associates on Saudi’s $20bn mega project TOP STORY

Kingdom Holdings announced the appointment of two architecture firms to carry out masterplanning for its $20bn Kingdom City project in Jeddah: UAE-based GAJ as urban architect and US firm Calthorpe Associates as lead masterplanner. The 5.3 million m2 Kingdom City development will surround the world’s tallest tower, the 1km-high EXPECTED HEIGHT Kingdom Tower. OF KINGDOM The value of the TOWER contracts to the firms is $1.6m (SR:6m), according to a statement issued to the Saudi stock exchange. Kingdom Holding Co, which is chaired by HRH Prince Alwaleed Bin Talal Bin Abdulaziz Alsaud, agreed a deal last year with contractor Saudi Binladin Group which will see the contractor invest SR: 1.5bn in building the project in return for a 16.93% stake in the company developing it, Jeddah Economic Company (JEC). Kingdom Holdings retains a 33.35% stake in JEC,

1KM

2

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

while Abraar International also holds 33.35% and Jeddah businessman Abdulrahman Hassan Sharbatly has a stake of 16.67%. At a recent meeting of investors, Prince Alwaleed said the tower is on “a solid strategic path”. The tower will cost around $1.22bn (SR: 4.6bn) to build, according to Kingdom Holdings. Architects for the tower project, USbased Adrian Smith & Gordon Gill Architecture (AS + GG), were appointed back in 2011 and a construction licence was granted to build the tower in February 2012. Saudi Bauer Group won a $40.8m contract to carry out piling work for the tower in November. Eng. Talal Al Maiman, chairman and CEO of Kingdom Real Estate Development Company (KRED), said: “The careful strategic planning has paid off and the execution of the greatest, tallest building project in the world for the next years to come has started in our beloved country Saudi Arabia. Our country deserves no less than such a project.”


MARCH | FRONT

1,100

50

Units in Foster + Partners’ Latin scheme, The Aleph (page 52)

• Doha’s Al Shaqab stadium picks up global awards • Andy Warhol uncovered • 25 essential iPad apps for interior design students • Construction begins on China’s $4bn skyscraper by Terry Farrell

WEIRD PROJECT OF THE MONTH

DATASTREAM CITIES WITH MOST SKYSCRAPERS Data: Emporis

HONG KONG 1,224

Danish fi rms Tredje Natur and PK3 have designed a series of artificial islands entitled ‘Blue Plan’ which would transform Copenhagen’s harbour into a recreational area.

NEW YORK 573

entire structures. Our team investigated if it could similarly be employed to build a lunar habitat.” Addressing the challenges of transporting materials to the moon, the study investigates the use of lunar soil, known as regolith, as building matter.

• CID’s Hot List: 1-10

SINGAPORE 141

Foster + Partners is part of a consortium set up by the European Space Agency (ESA) to explore the possibilities of building on the moon, with the aid of 3D printing technology. The practice designed a lunar base to house four people, which can offer protection from meteorites, gamma radiation and high temperature fluctuations. The base’s design was guided by the properties of 3D-printed lunar soil, with a 1.5 tonne building block produced as a demonstration. ESA’s head of the project Laurent Pambaguian, said: “Terrestrial 3D printing technology has produced

• Aecom designs eco villa for Qatar

TOKYO 347

Foster + Partners designs building for the moon

home of Middle East Architect

CHICAGO 283

Corbin, Abu-Sukheila and Hickey.

During the event, Tareq AbuSukheila, managing director for Gensler Abu Dhabi, commented: “Although this fantastic office space is new, Gensler has been delivering architecture, design and planning consultancy services in the Middle East for nearly 20 years.” He continued: “It’s an exciting time to be in the Middle East and our firm is thrilled to be operating from this vibrant city, Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s capital. There’s a strong undercurrent in this market, and contrary to the financial challenges felt elsewhere, herein lies opportunities untapped.”

This month’s top stories from the online

DUBAI 240

Global architecture giant Gensler last week opened its Abu Dhabi office in Etihad Towers, inaugurated by the United States’ ambassador for the UAE, Michael Corbin. To mark the occasion, all five Etihad Towers were outlined in the Gensler’s red brand colour.

DESIGNMENA.COM

SHANGHAI 229

Gensler opens offi ffice in Etihad Towers

TORONTO 162

Capacity of auditorium in Bahrain National Theatre (page 40)

Foster + Partners is working for ESA.

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

3


FRONT | MARCH

PEOPLE

Van Berkel becomes AIA Honorary Fellow

Architect Miller hired by construction firm.

Steven Miller joins Shapoorji Pallonji Engineering and construction fi rm Shapoorji Pallonji has appointed architect Steven Miller as vice president business development. The move forms part of the fi rm’s growth plans for the MENA region. Miller has over 49 years of experience in design management and construction administration for building and infrastructure, recognised as a specialist in urban design, hotel planning and residential design. Before taking up his position at Shapoorji Pallonji, Miller served as regional and managing director for international architectural fi rms like Kohn Pederson Fox, Perkins Eastman and FX Fowle, as well as for Dubai-based Emaar. “His innate ability to leverage a deep understanding of the issues that drive development, and the elements that make it successful, make him the perfect point man when liaising with clients from established and emerging markets,” commented Mohan Dass Saini, MD and CEO, Shapoorji Pallonji.

Everyone knows that concrete will crack - it’s a fundamental law of civil engineering.” BARRY JACKSON, technical director of concrete repair firm Tradeways

4

The Jury of the American Institute of Architecture elected Ben van Berkel of Dutch-based UN Studio as Honorary Fellow in Denver, USA. Developed as an international counterpart to the Fellowship programme, the Honorary fellowship is awarded to architects of esteemed character with distinguished achievements who are not U.S. citizens or residents. Van Berkel has also been recently awarded the Kenzo Tange Visiting Professor’s Chair at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, where he is currently leading a series of studios. As co-founder of UN Studio, van Berkel has completed a number of projects in the U.S. including the New Amsterdam Plein & Pavillion in Battery Park, the Collectors Loft in New York City and the Villa NM in Upstate New York. UN Studio also received 2nd place in the competition for the New Business School for Columbia University and is a fi nalist for LA Union Station.

60 SECOND INTERVIEW PHIL MCCOWEN, GENERAL MANAGER, TYCO FIRE PROTECTION PRODUCTS MIDDLE EAST What are the common mistakes in the region when it comes to fire protection? Poor design and installation of systems as well as the use of equipment that carries no international approvals. We have come across several examples that would fail to adequately protect a building and its occupants in an emergency situation. Are there certain building materials or designs that should be avoided? Flammable building materials is a topic high on the agenda in the Middle East. Put simply, there should be a ban on the use of these materials due to the significant fire risk they pose to occupants.

Van Berkel is behind Dutch firm UNStudio.

A couple of years ago there was a mindset: if it’s worn, rip it down. Now everybody’s starting to repair.” CHRIS HILL, division manager of Structural

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

BIM...BIM...BIM. Is it going to happen in the Middle East, or are we going to keep asking the same questions like ‘How much is it going to cost?’” DR OZAN KOSEOGLU, School of the Built Environment, Heriot-Watt University, Dubai


Sound Insulation... Protect your homes and offices from discomforting sound and noise, giving you peace of mind whilst maintaining a quiet and serene environment with TECHNAL®’s world-class aluminium façades, skylights, sunshades, windows, doors and office partition systems. TECHNAL® sets the standard for quality and innovative engineering solutions with a range of complete applications that meets all your architectural aluminium needs in both residential and commercial buildings.

TECHNAL C MIDDLE DD EAST - P. O. Box: 21848, Manama, Bahrain - T: +973 1722 5777 - F: +973 1721 7799 - E: technal@technal.com.bh - W: www.technal-me.com


FRONT | MARCH

1 2

3

MENA PROJECT SNAPSHOT 1 SAUDI ARABIA

2 QATAR

3 DUBAI

Aecom lands Jeddah city planning contract

Doha’s North Gate mall wins design award

Damac launches Fendibranded towers

Aecom has been awarded a US$10m contract for city-planning services in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The contract involves updating the Jeddah strategic plan and preparing subregional, structural and local plans for the area. The Jeddah Municipality, representing the Ministry of Municipal & Rural Affairs of Saudi Arabia, awarded Aecom the contract for multiple levels of city-planning services that will reshape Jeddah.

The $290m North Gate shopping mall project in Doha, currently under construction on Al Shamal North Road, and represented by Qatari company Equinox SPC, has won the ‘Best Retail Architecture 2012 in Arabia’ award at the Arabian Property Awards 2012. North Gate, located on a 200,000m2 plot, offers close to 100,000m2 of leasable space for retail and a further 45,000m2 of office space.

Dubai-based developer Damac launched two projects in Dubai and Riyadh, worth over $550m, in partnership with luxury brand Fendi. The company will build a 150m-high tower opposite the Kingdom Tower in Riyadh branded as Damac Esclusiva Luxury Serviced Apartments as well as taking the top 42 floors of a tower in Dubai Marina branded as Damac Residenze (pictured). Both are set to complete in 2016.

6

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


,i`iw˜ˆ˜}Ê̅iʘiÝÌÊ }i˜iÀ>̈œ˜ÊœvÊii}>˜Ì]Ê ÃÕÃÌ>ˆ˜>LiÊyœœÀˆ˜}

/…iÊyœœÀˆ˜}Ê܈̅ʘœÊˆ“ˆÌð Û>˜ÌʈÃÊ̅iʘiÜÊvÕÌÕÀiʜvÊVœ“«œÃˆÌiÊyœœÀˆ˜}Ê«>˜iÃ°Ê,iÃi>ÀV…i`Ê>˜`Ê`iÛiœ«i`Ê ÕȘ}Ê>`Û>˜Vi`ÊiÀ“>˜ÊÌiV…˜œœ}Þ]Ê̅iÊ£ää¯ÊÜ>ÌiÀ«ÀœœvÊyœœÀˆ˜}ʈÃÊÓ>ÀÌÊ>˜`Ê “>ˆ˜Ì>ˆ˜i˜Vi‡vÀii°Ê ->˜`ˆ˜}]Ê Û>À˜ˆÃ…ˆ˜}Ê >˜`Ê «œˆÃ…ˆ˜}Ê >ÀiÊ Ì…ˆ˜}ÃÊ œvÊ Ì…iÊ «>ÃÌ°Ê œÊÃVÀ>ÌV…iÃ]ÊÃÌ>ˆ˜Ã]ÊV…ˆ«Ã]Ê`ˆÃVœœÀˆ˜}]ʓœÕ`ʜÀÊÌiÀ“ˆÌiðÊ-…iiÀÊLi>ÕÌÞÊ>˜`Ê œ˜}iۈÌÞÊ ÜˆÌ…Ê Ì…iÊ i>ÃÌÊ ivvœÀÌ°Ê œÀÊ …œÌiÃ]Ê …œÃ«ˆÌ>Ã]Ê Ã…œÜÀœœ“Ã]Ê …œ“iÃ]Ê L>̅Àœœ“Ã]ÊÃ՘Ê`iVŽÃÊ>˜`ʓœÀi°Ê-iiʈÌÊ̜ÊLiˆiÛiʈ̰

In step with style È>ÊUʈ``iÊ >ÃÌÊUÊ ÕÀœ«iÊUÊ œÀ̅Ê“iÀˆV> ‡“>ˆ\ʈ˜vœJ>Û>˜ÌyœœÀˆ˜}°Vœ“ ÜÜÜ°>Û>˜ÌyœœÀˆ˜}°Vœ“

,"" ÊÊ | ÊÊ  ÊÊ | ÊÊ*  ÊÊ | ÊÊ"", 

Antiabrasion AC5

Certified

Guarantee

£ää¯Ê7/ ,*,""ÊÊUÊÊ, Ê, --/ /ÊÊUÊÊ ,9Ê-6 ÊÊUÊÊ -9Ê -//"

Follow us on


FRONT | MARCH

1 DUBAI

2 SAUDI ARABIA

3 UNNAMED LOCATION

Nakheel to start work on $900m Palm projects

N.Designers completes KSA conference centre

Flying saucer museum proposed for Arabia

Developer Nakheel is to start work on $900m worth of projects on its Palm Jumeirah development: a $680.7m shopping mall and $217.8m entertainment complex The Point. The projects were announced following a visit to the company’s headquarters by Dubai ruler HH Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum to review the firm’s investment projects and approve the two new schemes for immediate launch.

Lebanon-based N.Designers has completed the 7,000m2 Alkhozama Banqueting & Conference Centre in Riyahdh, using high-end European fittings. The banqueting and conference centre comprises three floors and two underground levels: an office block, and a huge 4,000m2 open space ballroom which forms the project’s centerpiece. A guest block includes suites, a spa, salons and related services.

Mexican architect Fernando Romero has unveiled his firm’s proposal for a space-age 3,800m2 cultural institution set in an unnamed Arabian desert location, which will showcase photography and photographic equipment. The structure of the PH museum functions as a large canopy that is used to shade the outdoor areas, complemented by water features and vegetation. It is inspired by the mechanics of a camera.

1

2

3

8

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


Concepts Products Service

Metro Dubai - Red Line

Changing Perspectives by Discovering Innovations. Lindner is your partner of choice when it comes to „Building New Solutions“ in all areas of interior finishes. Our strength is to combine aesthetically appealing materials with superior quality and functionality. We are looking forward to supporting you by offering products tailored to your needs: Raised Floors - Demountable Partitions - Suspended Metal Ceilings - Lightings - Chilled Ceilings

Lindner Middle East LLC One Business Bay Tower, Office 2702 Dubai, United Arab Emirates middleeast@Lindner-Group.com www.Lindner-Group.com


FRONT | MARCH

1

2

3

GLOBAL PROJECT SNAPSHOT 1 FINLAND

2 CHINA

3 UK

‘Ripped book’ library unveiled for Helsinki

Atkins and Buro Happold to work on Xiqu Centre

The Shard officially named Europe’s tallest

California-based firm Dinkoff Architects has revealed its design for the central library in Helsinki, Finland. Horizontal stripes, exposed on the facades, evoke running text that updates the viewer on current ‘intellectual’ events. The entrances to the building are on the east and west sides where an imaginary ‘binding’ allows the ‘pages’ to be flipped. The upper pages on the north side are ‘ripped’ along their lines of text.

Atkins is to develop the belowground elements for a Chinese opera facility designed for the preservation and development of this traditional art form in Hong Kong. The firm is working as sub-consultant to structural engineer Buro Happold, which will carry out the remainder of the engineering, and Bing Thom Architects and Ronald Lu & Partners. The Xiqu Centre is a gateway building for a planned cultural district.

London’s The Shard officially acquired the title of Europe’s tallest building with the opening of the viewing platform on February 1. Designed by Italian Pritzker Prize-winner Renzo Piano, the building now satisfies the criteria for a completed building, as per the guidelines from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat. Standing at 310m, The Shard was inaugurated in July after the completion of its exterior.

10

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


FRONT | MARCH

THE BIG PICTURE

GOING UNDERGROUND Captured by photographer Markus Tollhopf, the stunning subway station HafenCity University in Hamburg was designed by Munichbased Raupach Architects. The station contains 12 LED lights ‘Light Containers’ hovering above the platform, by pfarré lighting design and D-Light Vision. HafenCity Hamburg is one of the largest inner-city development projects in Europe, covering a total area of 157 ha.

12

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


MARCH | FRONT

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

13


NEWS ANALYSIS | CITYSCAPE ABU DHABI Sowwah Square is a major commercial delivery.

CAPITAL GAIN Will the Abu Dhabi market be in a healthy state at the time of its most important real estate show? MEA looks at the latest market reports and project launches while the emirate prepares for the Cityscape Abu Dhabi exhibition

D

ANALYSIS

uring the lead up to Cityscape Abu Dhabi, the UAE capital has been overshadowed by its flashier neighbour in terms of major project launches. These include the multi-billion dollar Mohammed Bin Rashid City containing 100 hotels and the world’s largest mall, and Meraas’ $1.6bn Bluewaters islands, set to contain the world’s largest ferris wheel. However, the capital is by no means devoid of headline grabbing launches. The most high profile example is TDIC’s The District on Saadiyat Island, a vast retail scheme linking the flagship museum projects. Another leisure scheme that is in the spotlight is Fairmont Abu Dhabi, a 39-storey 563-room resort designed by Dewan and awarded to contractor Arabtec in February. Abu Dhabi developers will surely be unveiling more projects at the upcoming Cityscape Abu Dhabi, taking place from 16-18 April at the Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre. Exhibiting architecture firms will also showcase their latest projects while networking with prospective clients. For developers and architects, a key topic will be the state of the Abu Dhabi market.

14

According to Alan Robertson, CEO of Jones Lang LaSalle MENA, Abu Dhabi is still lagging behind Dubai in terms of recovery. He commented: “Abu Dhabi remains 18 to 24 months behind Dubai and the market is not expected to experience an upturn in 2013. The foundations are however being laid for a recovery from 2014, with a number of major infrastructure projects scheduled to start later this year.” In its report, 2013 Top Trends for UAE Real Estate, Jones Lang LaSalle pointed out that Abu Dhabi is leading the UAE’s sustainability agenda. “With continued progress in 2012, sustainability is expected to move into even greater focus in 2013. With Masdar and Estidama regulations, Abu Dhabi will continue to take the lead,” the report added. It continued: “Most sustainability initiatives in 2013 are likely to be micro and small scale as there is a general reluctance among owners to accept green leases. Evidence from overseas suggests sustainability is unlikely to be fully embraced until either government regulations force change or there is shift in local market perceptions about the financial viability of green buildings.” Recent examples of green buildings include the Siemens’ Abu Dhabi

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Headquarters in Masdar City, which is nearing completion. Designed by Sheppard Robson and set for LEED Platinum status, the scheme won two MEA awards (Best Sustainable and Best Commercial project). Another high profile ‘green’ building that has taken shape in Abu Dhabi is Al Bahar Towers. The Aedas-designed project won the inaugural Innovation Award from the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat for its computer-controlled mashrabiya which responds to the sun and limits solar gain. A number of office schemes have been recently completed or unveiled, many of which are located on Al Maryah Island, the capital’s new CBD. Last year saw significant delivery on Sowwah Square by Goettsch Partners, which was highly commended as MEA’s Best Overall Project. Launches on the island include Gensler’s 31-storey National Bank of Abu Dhabi and Goettsch Partners’ Al Hilal Bank tower. However, a report from CBRE warned that the market is in danger of oversupply. It stated: “Abu Dhabi’s office inventory continues to rise unabated, although demand for office space remains largely passive. “Over the next three years, as much as 1.5 million m2 of new office


CITYSCAPE ABU DHABI | NEWS ANALYSIS

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

15


NEWS ANALYSIS | CITYSCAPE ABU DHABI

space could be delivered to the market. Given current demand levels, this is expected to result in rising vacancy rates. “Both prime and secondary locations are suffering from a reduced number of tenant requirements, resulting in an increasingly competitive environment for the capital’s landlords,” it added. CBRE also noted that the government will be a “major player” in influencing the real estate market throughout the UAE in 2013. The report added: “Initiatives such as the UAE Central Bank mortgage cap, approval of the Dubai Urban Planning Framework and consolidation of real estate players in Abu Dhabi will better regulate or tighten control on market conditions. It continued: “While initiatives such as regulation on housing allowances for Abu Dhabi government employees, the announcement of major government backed projects

and AED330bn stimulus package Siemens’ Masdar City HQ won in Abu Dhabi will stimulate demand praise for its sustainabilty. and market performance.” The Abu Dhabi Department of Economic Development has reported GDP growth of around 3.9% during 2012, and an average forecast of OFFICE SPACE 5.7% for the period DELIVERY BY 2016 2013 – 2016. Oil-related revenues remain the key contributor to the emirate’s economy, although the non-oil sector is expected to see stronger growth in the medium term, rising by an average of 6.5% annually over the next four years, according to CBRE. Meanwhile government expenditure in physical and social infrastructure will continue to fuel economic activity and ultimately help to drive short to medium term growth in the capital.

1.5M METRES2

Gensler released images of a 31-storey tower on Al Maryah island.

The District was recently revealed by TDIC.

16

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CITYSCAPE ABU DHABI | NEWS ANALYSIS

“The foundations are however being laid for a recovery from 2014, with a number of major infrastructure projects scheduled to start later this year.

/ŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞ&ƵƌŶŝƚƵƌĞŽŵƉŽŶĞŶƚƐ ZĞƋƵŝƌĞ/ŶŶŽǀĂƟǀĞDĂƚĞƌŝĂůƐ

Alan Robertson, CEO, Jones Lang LaSalle MENA

<ŝƚĐŚĞŶŽŽƌ&ƌŽŶƚƐŝŶWŽůLJŵĂƩ

This economic growth may have contributed to an increase in premium class residential developments, yet this also reflects the “limited availability of quality residential properties in the Abu Dhabi market” according to CBRE. The report continued: “Recent rental growth at selected prime developments appears to indicate a current gap in the market for top quality, well managed properties. “The imminent entry of numerous apartment schemes in established and newly emerging masterplanned communities will see a highly fragmented marketplace develop over the next 12 months. Location and project specific attributes are already serving to create a distinct two-tier marketplace that will see further disparities arise in the coming quarters.” It remains to be seen whether the projects unveiled at next month’s Cityscape Abu Dhabi will assuage or accentuate this disparity.

Chest of Drawers in Acrylux

ƵďĂŝKĸĐĞͻƵƐŝŶĞƐƐsŝůůĂŐĞͻ KĸĐĞϳϭϱͻWŽƌƚ^ĂĞĞĚĞŝƌĂ ƵďĂŝͻh͘͘͘ͻW͘K͘ŽdžϭϭϯϬϴϱ ͻdнϵϳϭϱϱϲϱϳϴϯϳϯ ŽŚĂKĸĐĞͻ'ĂƚĞϭϴϱͻ ^ƚƌĞĞƚϯͻ/ŶĚƵƐƚƌŝĂůƌĞĂͻŽŚĂͻYĂƚĂƌ W͘K͘ŽdžϱϭϴϳͻнϵϳϰϰϰϲϬϰϭϬϰ

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

17


COMMENT | EDITOR’S LETTER

TRAIL BLAZER EDITOR’S LETTER

How the Sharjah Art Foundation is a standard bearer for urban renewal

GOT A COMMENT? If you have any comments to make on this month’s issue, please e-mail oliver. ephgrave @itp.com

T

his month I visited Sharjah for only the second time in my five years in the UAE. Like many western experts it seems, I have not journeyed to the conservative emirate for leisure purposes, despite it having more museums and cultural attractions than other areas. The emirate’s collection has now been augmented by the recently completed Sharjah Art Foundation, the subject of this month’s cover story. Designed by GAJ, the complex will take centre stage from March 13, with the emirate’s Biennial taking place in its grounds. Although the complex was a little hard to fi nd, tucked away in

unmarked alleyways behind the Corniche, it was certainly a delight to explore. There’s a lot of talk about the correct approach for integrating heritage projects and I feel that this complex sets the benchmark for the Gulf region. It’s sympathetic to the history of the area, yet brave in its approach. The shells of historic buildings are reused in combination with new structures which are harmonious in terms of scale and materials. By studying old maps and plans, with irregular courtyards and alleyways, the team created an authentic feel rather than a Disney-esque aesthetic that is sometime found in the region. The Sharjah Art Foundation offers glimpses into the emirate’s heritage.

By studying old maps and plans, with irregular courtyards and alleyways, the team created an authentic feel rather than a Disney-esque aesthetic that is sometime found in the region.”

18

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Additionally, and crucially, it serves a purpose. It is not a static showpiece; SAF is a functioning area that will hopefully attract visitors who have a passionate interest in art, as well as serving the needs of local artists and artisans. I would compare the layout and scale of the project to Bastikiya in Dubai, but would argue that Sharjah’s project is even more intriguing as an urban renewal project. Dubai’s historic district is undoubtedly beautiful, but it is often lacking in activity and remains for me, under-exploited. Sharjah’s approach of building a top rate gallery seems to be a masterstroke. The facilities are there; it’s success will ultimately come down to the quality of the art work on show and the willingness of people to make the trip. Perhaps one issue, architecturally, will be navigation through the spaces - the network of alleys and absence of clear landmarks may result in a few lost visitors, especially when the Biennial gets in full swing. As the client told me, signage will be key both inside the site and from the Corniche. I have to admit that I struggled to find the site, although my navigational skills are questionable. Nevertheless, the existence of such a project in the UAE is refreshing to see. The client, architect and the emirate’s rulers should be applauded for conceiving and delivering the scheme. It’s certainly a good reason to make the trip to the overlooked emirate of Sharjah.


*HEHULW0RQROLWK

8UEDQ GHVLJQ

*HEHULW0RQROLWKVDQLWDU\PRGXOHVLQVSLUHDWƬUVWVLJKWDQGEHFDXVHRIKLJKTXDOLW\ PDWHULDOVVWDQGXSWRFORVHUVFUXWLQ\DVZHOO7KH\RƪHUDJUHDWGHDORIIUHHGRP WRDFFRPPRGDWHLQGLYLGXDOSUHIHUHQFHVLQWKHFKRLFHRIZDVKEDVLQV:& ELGHW FHUDPLFDSSOLDQFHV$YDLODEOHLQPDQ\GLƪHUHQWJODVVFRORXUV*HEHULW0RQROLWK SURYLGHV\RXZLWKORWVRIIUHHGRPRIFKRLFH


COMMENT | SIMON GATHERCOLE

CITY SPEAK OPINION

What are the fundamentals for creating an effective urban masterplan?

Simon Gathercole is a director for Allies and Morrison Architects

M

any Middle East cities are now at an interesting point where the paradigm for development is shifting from expansion to renewal. This needs to be accompanied by a more inclusive definition of context, capturing not only the historically important but also that which is pre-existing. The absence of contextual relationships in many rapidly developed districts provokes us to imagine how straight-forward urban values, such as a walkable public realm and a sense of place, can be retro-fitted. There is still so much latent potential. Old and new is stitched together in Beirut’s Solidere, Dubai Creek continues to thrive on its

frenetic energy and Msheireb Downtown Doha looks to craft its own contextual response in an historic area. The creation of a masterplan remains one of the most important tools for regeneration and for defining the terms of relationships between old and new. Firstly, a masterplan should exploit the potential of the pre-existing. The history and topography of a site are important, not only because they help explain the nature of its past but, because they can inform the shape of its future. Crucially, in a masterplan the focus must be as much on the space between buildings as it is on the buildings themselves. Msheireb Downtown Doha.

Too many contemporary masterplans are self-absorbed in their vision for the interiors of their sites that they fail to address the often much more significant issues pertaining to their edges.”

20

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Masterplans must also provide a clear hierarchy. Cities are easier to use when a hierarchy defines and discloses the relative significance of their parts. Furthermore, the making – or re-making – of connections is essential to establishing a continuum between the existing city and the new. If a masterplan is to be realised it must propose buildings that people want to build today. Structures that are inappropriate or contrived will deter investment rather than attract it. In the absence of an established context, a masterplan offers a virtual setting within which individual buildings can be designed and against which they can be judged. Cities are not static and buildings change over time. A masterplan which ignores this may not only become an obstacle to change but may, at some stage, become an agent of decline. The masterplan needs to create complex spaces with simple buildings. It is much easier to achieve complexity and richness within a masterplan by manipulating the relationships between buildings than by forcing the shape and configuration of the buildings themselves. Too many contemporary masterplans are self-absorbed in their vision for the interiors of their sites that they fail to address the often much more significant issues pertaining to their edges. Lastly, a masterplan is not a rigid proposition. It must be expected to evolve as it is implemented.


+RWHO 5HVRUWV

0L[HGXVH 0DVWHUSODQQLQJ

(GXFDWLRQ &XOWXUDO

&RPPHUFLDO 5HWDLO6SDFHV

6SRUWV /HLVXUH

5HVLGHQWLDO

,QWHULRU'HVLJQ

&HOHEUDWLQJ\HDUVRI'XEDL&UHHN*ROI <DFKW&OXE

'XEDL$EX'KDEL6KDUMDK2PDQ4DWDU.LQJGRPRI6DXGL$UDELD8QLWHG.LQJGRP 7HO)D[

ZZZJDMXDHDH PDLO#JDMXDHDH


INTERVIEW | NABIL SHERIF

SMART START INTERVIEW

Oliver Ephgrave meets Nabil Sherif, founder of NGS Architects, to discover the realities of setting up an architectural practice in Dubai

M

any people aspire to set up their own business and Nabil Sherif is someone that is living the dream, having created UAEbased NGS Architects in 2009 at the sprightly age of 28. After welcoming MEA into his office in Jumeirah Lakes Towers, the now 32-year-old Sherif speaks frankly about the joys and woes of being the boss of a fledgling design company. “Overall, what we have achieved has happened at a slow pace. It’s hard work,” he remarks. “It’s something I have created from nothing. I haven’t been injected by fi nance — there are no bank loans. There are times when it’s hard and there are times when you are happy. It’s an up and down thing.” Born to an Egyptian father and a Portuguese mother, Sherif’s adolescence was spent in the UK and Egypt, before he opted to study architecture and design in the University of Westminster, London. Before attaining part three in the UK architecture programme, he worked for a number of fi rms including Sheppard Robson, HOK Sports, Portfurious and Foster + Partners. Commenting on his stint at the latter fi rm he said: “At Foster + Partners I worked on some very interesting projects, such as a yacht design scheme and a skyscraper in Dubai. The building never went ahead, but it was the fi rst time I got linked to this region. I was there for around six months, until I did part three.” Sherif subsequently joined RHWL and stayed for a number of years, primarily working on commercial and hospitality schemes in London. Like most fi rms around the world, the fi nancial crisis forced redundancies in Sherif’s team, prompting him to come up with an ambitious plan. He continues: “I went to Egypt and sat down with my family and said I’m thinking of doing my own thing. I read somewhere that companies set up during a recession

22

because things are cheaper, but you go up with the wave when things get better. “People were saying, ‘Nabil, give it more time’. I thought I knew 60-70% of the experiences in architecture. The rest I’d have to learn the hard way. I just thought of doing it. So I sold my car and used the money to come out here.” After arriving in the UAE, Sherif bought a trade licence from Ras Al Khaimah as it was “the cheapest option at the time” and set up an office in his living room. “It’s something I wouldn’t wish on anyone,” he adds. “After a year, I found a way to set up in JLT, Dubai. “I fi nd Dubai to be a good mix between the Middle East and the UK. In the UK and Egypt I felt like a foreigner — I had an identity crisis. In Dubai we are all in the same boat — we are all trying to settle and fi nd a life. “I thought it was going to be like another city you can break into. But it had a culture, with people that have been here for 2030 years who had relationships. You weren’t just going to come from outside and get lots of business by yourself. When I had my licence I bought a brand spanking new computer. I sat down and then thought, ‘what do I do now?’ Thankfully I got my fi rst client two weeks later, which was an interior design project in Montreal, Canada.” He continued: “We have reached a stage now where we are in talks with a few high-profi le clients from abroad to do a couple of villas on the Palm, and we’re doing several creative office spaces for marketing companies. We have labelled ourselves as the ‘creative’ architectural practice. It is this ‘creative’ element that is fundamental to Sherif. He elaborates: “If I’m paid to design a square block, and I ask the client ‘is there any design element, where can I put my stamp on it?’

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


NABIL SHERIF | INTERVIEW

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

23


INTERVIEW | NABIL SHERIF

My architecture would be Islamic with old and new — showing historic Islamic architecture with a contemporary touch. I like to work with straight lines and squares. I’m not too much of a roundy person.”

and he says ‘no, it is restricted,’ I’m not inclined to work with that client. I’m more inclined to work with someone that appreciates creativity and wants me to create the brief.” He concedes that it’s sometime hard for an architect to think as a businessman. “When you are an architect you are behind a computer — you aren’t meeting the client, or knowing what the charges are — you aren’t a business man. Still today I don’t think I’m a business man, but I am trying to get there. “When you are a businessman opening up an architectural practice, you employ architects. But an architect setting up a practice is more inclined to be emotionally attached to projects and not to charge the full fees, as he may feel that the project would benefit his portfolio. That is more valuable than money. That is the creative mind. These are the things you are trying to come to terms with.” Describing his own personal style, Sherif comments: “I am Arab. I like Islamic architecture and I like the calligraphy and the art — all of these combined. My architecture, if I had it my way, would be Islamic with old and new — showing historic Islamic

Sherif first set up NGS Architects in 2009 in Ras Al Khaimah.

24

architecture with a contemporary touch. I like to work with straight lines and squares. I’m not too much of a roundy person. Everything is clean and square, even to my logo. I like things that are striking, things that make you think, things that tell a story. “I’m not the best; I consider myself above average but I enjoy what I do. I’m still fi nding myself in architecture in terms of skill and design. At the end of the day, it’s important to be paid for something you enjoy doing. We’re looking for that middle ground where we can create something but get paid for it.” He reiterates that the company has struggled at times. “To be honest, the beginning of 2012 was a bit disastrous — projects were put on hold, or cancelled because the client couldn’t agree contracts or terms. When I approached my fi rst client, I didn’t have anything. They said what have you done for NGS? “I didn’t have a portfolio but I knew myself I could do it. They said, ‘Nabil you look young, I don’t want to risk my two million dirhams with you’. If I put myself in their situation, I wouldn’t do it. If I had some kid that has a bit of confidence I would say, ‘hope it works out with you, but not with me’. Sherif continues: “When you run your own business, your name and relationships are gold. Word spreads. You have to change your personality for the better and adapt to it. If you’re a hothead then you won’t be able to speak to clients or get business. But you learn how to be diplomatic and not take things to heart. “When you are negotiating contracts it’s an art — there’s a lot of psychology. Anothing thing that keeps you going is that a lot of architects, in the UK or elsewhere, have failed in business but their architecture is amazing. A lot of businesses buy out architectural practices.” Yet throughout the conversation, it is clear that Sherif has high ambitions for NGS. He adds: “The idea is to be a major player in the Middle East region. Those are the things that keep me going. I think I’ve been here for a few years and I’m not where I want to be. But then you hear stories. There are many architects that set up their own practice and their fi rst project came four or five years later. Tadao Ando was a boxer before he became an architect. It can happen to you at any time.”

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


NABIL SHERIF | INTERVIEW

PORTFOLIO: NGS Architects SLICE BUILDING, DUBAI In this commercial scheme, horizontal planes act both as a means to reduce sun glare in the office space and give the building a streamline effect. The office comprises a double height entrance lobby with a connecting bridge to both parts of the dissected building, using Islamic geometry. ISLAMIC HOUSE, DUBAI This unbuilt project for a private client in Dubai combines Islamic art and architecture to create a luxurious living space. Tranquil water features, geometric patterns and mosaics are all used to give a modern twist on Islamic design.

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

25


INTERVIEW | NABIL SHERIF

FRED PERRY STORE, DUBAI Fred Perry wanted to achieve a look that was in keeping with their English Heritage and brand image. In its role a design/sustainable consultant, NGS provided reclaimed Barnstock bricktiles to provide a rustic look that aligns with the Fred Perry brand. PIZZA EXPRESS, JLT, DUBAI For the flagship Pizza Express in the Mövenpick Hotel in Jumeirah Lakes Towers, NGS Architects, along with partners Reclaimed Brick UK, supplied the yellow London brick-tiles to achieve an aesthetic which brought the design together.

26

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


One of the many tranquil courtyard spaces outside the galleries.

28


SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION | SITE VISIT

HIDDEN

GEM

Oliver Ephgrave explores the alleyways and courtyards of the Sharjah Art Foundation, a GAJ-designed project which is preparing for its grand launch at the Sharjah Biennial

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

29


SITE VISIT | SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION

The complex is linked at roof level by a network of bridges.

ucked away in the historic Corniche area is the newly completed complex for Sharjah Art Foundation, a collection of gallery spaces that will host the emirate's Biennial from March 13 2013. With its maze of alleyways and courtyards, the area feels similar to Bastakiya in Dubai, but with a contemporary edge thanks to the white rendered walls and slit windows. “We are working on proper signage so people like you don't get lost. This is always the problem here,” says Mona El Mousfy, senior architect and client representative for Sharjah Art Foundation (SAF). She explains that the warren-

like layout was strictly informed by old maps. “All the footprints are from aerial maps and urban plans - we kept the alleyways and courtyards. There was a lot of porosity and we tried to keep that. We worked more with the architectural expression. “This alley existed like this, that's why is it's not straight. It's at least accurate to one layer of history. Many of these buildings were ruins but we kept about six enclosures as traces of the past. Artists love them for site specific installations. However, they are made from coral, which is fragile, and are not suitable for exhibitions or habitation. She continues: “We chose GAJ to do the architectural design , without them this would not have

been possible. But we [Sharjah Arts Foundation] were key in the conceptual and schematic design. It was a close relationship.” El Mousfy adds that the SAF team also included Hassan Ali Al Jidah, operations manager and technical client representative, as well as Sharmeen Syed, architect and researcher. Around 30 sub-contractors worked on various packages of the construction, with MEP and structural design provided by URS/Scott Wilson. The historic structures are augmented by new construction, with simple whiteplastered walls, and a network of bridges connecting the buildings at roof level. The building heights were initially a bone of contention according to

Not everyone was happy with the idea, but when they saw it they were convinced. They feel it is their heritage but it has been given a new life. The new life has come from a new need.” Mona El Mousfy, Sharjah Art Foundation

30

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


Hotel, Abu Dhabi, UAE

Residential Towers, Dubai, UAE

Shapoorji Pallonji International FZE Dubai Airport Free Zone (DAFZA)

Shapoorji Pallonji Qatar WLL

PO Box 54449, Dubai, United Arab Emirates

C-Ring Road, Doha, Qatar


SITE VISIT

Paul Crawford, senior architect for GAJ. “There was a bit of reluctance that some of the buildings are a little bit higher than the existing fabric, but due to the setbacks from the ground to the double volume spaces it's worked out OK - it's not really noticeable,” he remarks. El Mousfy leads the tour into the entrance area, or “social hub” as she calls it. The large courtyard has a slidable canopy for shading, while the glass facade can also be retracted. “We can transform it into an outdoor social space - the gallery will spill into the courtyard so we can have events,” she comments. The internal space contains a “memory wall” made from coral stone which breaks up the plain white areas. “It's the only interior space that has this type of wall - the stones were taken from old stock from the site. We tried to establish a relationship without destroying the introverted nature of the architecture,” adds El Mousfy. Other coral walls can be found in the external areas. Crawford says: “We did so many mock ups for the coral walls. We looked at four or five different orientations, different materials - herringbone or brick layout - and the closeness and size of the blocks. It's really the addition of the niches that adds the modern twists.” El Mousfy adds that these niches, complete with sockets for laptops, are designed for visitors to sit on and take a break. She points out that each alleyway culminates in a slit window into one of the gallery spaces. “These give visitors a hint of the outside. You orientate yourself with the urban fabric coming into the interiors. Every line outside is carried inside.” Walking around the various gallery spaces is certainly an experience. MEA is guided through spaces that reach 6m in height, for large hanging installations, while other volumes are far more intimate.

32

A suspended ceiling in one gallery creates a diff used light effect.

Natural light is kept to the perimeters.

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION | SITE VISIT

“We have to have a variety. For visitors it is an experience and for artists it becomes a wider palette to choose from. I've been working with Sharjah Art Foundation since 2005 so I know the needs of the artists.” A particularly dramatic gallery contains a skylight partially concealed by a suspended ceiling, which produces an ethereal diff used lighting effect. “This is a colder, softer light - it works well for art works that are very delicate,” remarks El Mousfy. Crawford adds: “The skylights were an alternative to patching the elevations full of windows. Aside from the skylights, the natural lighting was kept to the perimeter. Light studies were done at an early stage to assure the client that there wouldn't be direct exposure.” He continues: “The fi re system was quite complicated - we went

One gallery features a 6m-high atrium.

^

THE ASI GROUP...

BIM Your Single Source Solution

Partitions

Accessories

High Speed Hand Dryers

Stainless steel, solid plastic, powder coated steel, phenolic, color-thru phenolic and plastic laminate partitions.

Superior design and the most extensive range of products in the industry — hallmarks of our washroom accessories.

The best designed GREEN hand dryers in the industry.

T: +971 4 330 7771 F: +971 4 330 7177

asigroup.us

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

33


SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION | SITE VISIT

for a nitrogen based system that's waterless so it doesn't damage the contents. I believe it's one of a handful of projects in the region that uses this system.” The largest volume is a dramatic, industrial-looking space known as Building P. Crawford comments: “Building P is my favourite internally. You don't get the impression of structural steelwork from outside - it's more of a surprise. It was the odd one out. The client was a little bit hesitant at the beginning but NUMBER OF ARTISTS they've warmed to it.” TO EXHIBIT AT THE SHARJAH BIENNIAL El Mousfy adds: “I saw this is as a flexible space - you can slide the partitions in and out. We could have made the ceiling all white,

100

Sharjah's historic heart is constantly visible.

but to cover it with plaster would not really have worked with the structure.” The tour moves up to the roof level; each building's roof is accessible through a network of bridges, which El Mousfy refers to as the “grand fi nale”. She continues: “In traditional architecture, people used to use the rooftop, but in the 60s they started using AC and put the air handling units on the top, so the roofspace became unused. Here, we created a sophisticated system to release the roof from any equipment and MEP. All the MEP is underground. The roof is a now a promenade and you can walk from building to building and relate yourself to urban layers in the city. Look, you even see the water from here.”

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

35


SITE VISIT | SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION

The buildings look pretty simple, with not much to them, but the amount of MEP that's below us is huge.â&#x20AC;? Paul Crawford, senior architect for GAJ

Coral walls sit next to whitewashed facades.

36

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


SHARJAH ART FOUNDATION | SITE VISIT

GAJ produced several mockups to get the feel right for the coral walls.

The network of alleys encourages exploration.

Yet the implementation of underground MEP was no easy task. Crawford elaborates: “The biggest challenge for GAJ was the integration and coordination of the MEP. The buildings look pretty simple, with not much to them, but the amount of MEP that's below us is huge. We had to get that all concealed and accessible, and as respectful as possible to the heart of Sharjah.” El Mousfy reiterates that the project is extremely sensitive due to the integration and adaptation of heritage structures in a historic area. “We have an open leadership in Sharjah. There were a lot of discussions - this was a reinterpretation of heritage. It didn't happen overnight. “Not everyone was happy with the idea, but they were when they saw it. They feel it is their heritage but it has been given a new life. The new life has come from a new need.” She reveals that the ruler of Sharjah visited the site and expressed a dislike for the storm water drains. Thankfully, GAJ was able to come up with a solution. “The existing storm water drains were not discrete enough. We are putting hidden slot drains into the expansion joints. Hopefully it will be a neat solution,” remarks Crawford. When questioned over the important of the scheme to the emirate of Sharjah, El Mousfy replies: “Time will tell. If the access is improved then for sure we will have lots of visitors. It's the fi rst time that heritage has been interpreted in this way. The reaction in the last month has been very positive, from artists and visitors, both local and international.” At the time of MEA's visit, three weeks before the Biennial, the site was busy with workers yet no art works were on display. The quality of the work remains to be seen, but judging by the urban environment and gallery spaces, this gem of a project is certain to encourage arty types to flock to Sharjah.

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

37


16-18 APRIL 2013

eco

technology

products n a t u r a l cement

lighting

green

c l e d stone athrooms

electrical

construct

cement build

metal

s t r u c t u r e natural b a t h r o o m s l i g h t i n g

estidama

lighting glass

metal

construct eco sustainable marble

uce b u i l d

technology

equipment

ceramic

lighting

green

renewable ceramic concrete r e c y c l e d stone build

kitchens

Source sustainabilityO'eliYer Sro多tabilityO Register to attend free of charge at www.ecoConstructexpo.com

Hosted alongside

Principal Sponsor

Strategic Partner

Organised by

estidama

concrete

ceramics

cement aggregate

Cladding

l i g h t i n g renewable

waste management

natural Green

technology b u i l d

natu

construct

recycled

natural

plumbing

natural

ceramic r e n e w a b l e LEED

technology

natural

technology lighting

metal

ceramic

natural

LEED

e q u i p m e n t technology m e t a l buil light concret

reduce costs

build

renewable marble

glass structure

glass

sustainable

te metal c o n cn art ue ral

construct

renewable

ADNEC I ABU DHABI I UAE


BAHRAIN NATIONAL THEATRE | CASE STUDY

BAHRAIN NATIONAL THEATRE Architect: AS.Architecture-Studio Detailed design: Atkins Location: Manama, Bahrain CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT Bahrain’s fi rst national theatre opened on 12 November 2012 to coincide with the king’s birthday. It contains a 1,001-seat auditorium and a 150-seat flexible auditorium and exhibition area. The expansive glazing involved an innovative curtain wall system that was fully supported by glass. With overall control of the entire project, Paris-based AS. Architecture-Studio appointed Atkins in 2009 to collaborate on detailed architectural design, including the total external envelope, along with site-wide supervision. The main contractor was Cybroc, with MEP services provided by EMCO WLL.

40

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | BAHRAIN NATIONAL THEATRE

THE SITE Located adjacent to the National Museum on the Al Fateh Corniche in Manama, it will form part of a ribbon NUMBER OF SEATS of cultural buildings, IN AUDITORIUM stretching from the National Museum to the Bahrain Library and the Al Fateh Grand Mosque. The surrounding lagoon was an existing feature that was built into and topped up with water to create the front promenade. The all-glass lobby gives unobstructed views over the lagoon, while the heavier solid stone-clad ancillary facilities give the theatre a striking textural contrast.

1,001

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

41


BAHRAIN NATIONAL THEATRE | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT According to AS. ArchitectureStudio, the design reflects the serenity of the local landscape. The theatre acts as the meeting point between land and sea, with the golden shell anchored in the earth and a light canopy floating over the water. One of the most notable aspects is the roof, conceived as a “shimmering gold jewel”. To WEIGHT OF achieve this, the stainEACH GLASS FIN less steel cladding panels were sent to UK-based fi rm Rimex, which applied a special chemical treatment.

800KG

THE DETAILS A huge overarching mashrabiya brise soleil allows for untinted glazing on the curtain wall. The structure involves woven perforated sheets of aluminium attached to aluminium beams. Hidden inside each of them are fluorescent lights which create striking shadows at night. The glazing system is supported by glass, with 54mm-thick panels that structurally hold the main glass in place. The system is bonded using a special type of silicone to a small aluminium extrusion, concealed between a glass fi n and a glass panel.

42

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


THE 10TH INTERNATIONAL TRADE EXHIBITION FOR CONSTRUCTION TECHNOLOGY, BUILDING MATERIALS, EQUIPMENT AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY FOR QATAR

6 - 9 May 2013 Doha Exhibition Center

Daily from

4 -10pm

The fastest growing construction exhibition in the world's fastest growing economy

FRAME YOUR SUCCESS & BOOK YOUR SPACE NOW

DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T MISS THE OPPORTUNITY TO BE A PART OF THE 10TH ANNIVERSARY OF PROJECT QATAR

Held Concurrently with Heavy Max, Stone-Tech & Energy Qatar

Gold Sponsor

www.projectqatar.com for enquiries or more information please contact: Mr. Michel Gebrael

Organized By:

Project Director

Or Email us at: info@projectqatar.com

m: t: f: e:

Fill the electronic form at our website by scanning this code

+974 5551 7971 +974 4432 9900 +974 4443 2891 michel.gebrael@ifpqatar.com


BASRA CULTURAL PALACE | CASE STUDY

BASRA CULTURAL CENTRE Architect: Dewan Location: Basra, Iraq

CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT Last year Dewan was awarded the contract to design the new Cultural Centre by the Basra Governorate in Iraq. This comes after the recent establishment of Dewan’s Basra branch office and its recent commissions on the Basra Governorate Building and the 5-star Shatt Al Arab Hotel. The Basra Cultural Centre will contain fi ne arts exhibition areas, meeting rooms, conference halls, a heritage museum, cinema halls, theatre, a radio and television broadcasting department, public library, cafeteria and outdoor landscaping and green areas.

44

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | BASRA CULTURAL PALACE

THE SITE It will be situated on a plot of land near Shatt al-Basra with an approximate area of 15,275m2, and will form part of Basraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new administrative complex. The complex will also include the new Basra Governorate headquarters offices and will be the cultural platform of the city. It will host different cultural events and festivals 2 in a contemporary and built-for-purpose SITE AREA functional environment that will use the latest in sound, acoustics, and lighting technology.

15,275 METRES

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

45


BASRA CULTURAL PALACE | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT The design approach is translated on the building façades in randomly placed diagonal square-shaped openings, reminiscent of the “dots” in Arabic calligraphy, which are gradually reduced in size as they get closer to the main entrance void. The relatively large void which cuts through the centre of the building mass signifies the heart of the project, where social interaction takes place, in addition to its main function as the entrance for the public. It contains curvilinear gradual architectural elements that resemble an open book.

THE DETAILS The central void contains sequential ramps, linked on different levels, connecting the two parts of the building for easier access to the inner spaces, in addition to a number of elevators and escalators inside the building. According to Dewan, this creates a sense of “dynamism” for visits. The architects introduced ornamental features such as calligraphy BUILT UP AREA and poetry to decorate the ‘pages’, and illustrate the important role of Basra throughout history.

20,868 METRES2

46

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


20 - 23 May 2013

Dubai World Trade Centre, UAE

To register for your free visit please go to: www.indexexhibition.com/visit

20 - 23 May, 2013, Dubai World Trade Centre, UAE To register for your free visit please go to:

theofďŹ ceexhibition.com/visit Organised by

Part of

Knowledge Partner

Intelligence Partner


KUWAIT INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY | CASE STUDY

KUWAIT INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Architect: KEO International Consultants Location: Kuwait CASE STUDY

THE PROJECT KEO International Consultants has designed a new University for Kuwait Institute for Science and Technology that will accommodate 1,500 students. Designed for the Company of Science & Technology, the building contains a three-storey atrium connecting the various programme elements with daylight ďŹ ltering through the sides. A series of wings house the administration, academic faculty, classrooms, academic support, laboratories as well as the graduate programme. These areas have been placed in a parallel arrangement at various nodal points along the concourse based on their functional adjacencies.

48

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | KUWAIT INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

THE SITE Located outside Kuwait City, the scheme covers a total 27,000m 2 . Design director for KEO International Consultants, Raj Patel, explained the concept. “The inspiration for the project stemmed from the site’s natural desert scape located outside the urban fabric of the city.” Patel continued: “The natural and contextual phenomenon of continuously shifting and realigning furrows in 2 the sand formed by TOTAL AREA OF the movement of wind SCHEME reflect in the striation of forms and organisation of the design.”

27,000 METRES

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

49


KUWAIT INSTITUTE FOR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT The academic wings which house the classrooms, laboratories and the graduate programmes are three-storey blocks sitting astride the central concourse. Each of the wings terminates across the concourse in a node opening on to the circulation spine. A 220-seat and a 520-seat lecture hall are both accessed from the ďŹ rst ďŹ&#x201A;oor through pre-function spaces connected to the circulation. All of the component wings are separated by open-ended landscaped courtyards, creating shaded and controlled outdoor environments.

THE DETAILS The entire campus has been coloured in sand tones emphasising a horizontal movement similar to the shifting plane of the desert landESTIMATED VALUE scape. The rectilinear bar buildings end in dynamic angled objects which have been expressed in coloured metal cladding. These linear wings resemble tensed levers arranged opposing each other with the central spine as a fulcrum, and are said to create an overall appearance of movement and balance.

$38 MILLION

50

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CASE STUDY | THE ALEPH

THE SITE The project forms part of the reinvention of the former docks of Puerto Madero as a dynamic new urban quarter. It combines new construction and refurbished historic buildings, with places to live and work alongside new civic spaces, leisure and arts venues. Puerto Madero is home to several high rises, such as an office tower by Cesar Pelli. Other landmarks include the Puente de la Mujer, Santiago Calatrava’s striking ‘Woman’s Bridge’ completed in 2001, and the Hotel Faena by Philippe Starck.

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

53


THE ALEPH | CASE STUDY

THE CONCEPT Apartments contain vaulted living spaces and deep, sheltered terraces that exploit the local climate and maximise views towards the city and Rio de la Plata. Brandon Haw, senior partner, Foster + Partners, said: “The Aleph is a building that is very much borne of its place.” Haw continued: “From the traditional Buenos Aires house, which takes advantage of the climate to combine outdoor with indoor living, to the industrial architecture legacy of the Puerto Madero District, the Aleph building creates a wonderful new living environment.”

THE DETAILS The Aleph is inspired by traditional housing in Buenos Aires, where boundaries between inside and outside living are blurred. Its design features split-level living spaces that extend into generous balconies and double-height patios. Apartments combine a warm, natural palette with elegant vaulted concrete ceilings. Moveable sun COMPLETION OF THE NEARBY screens and projecting CALATRAVA balconies provide shade BRIDGE from low and high angled sun, while ensuring privacy, allowing natural ventilation.

2001

54

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


2 8 20 205

56058 560 5

Tuesday y 5th Novemberr 2013 e Towers Jumeirah Emirates A Dubai - UAE

SETTING THE BENCHMARK FOR THE MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECTURE SECTOR THE 6TH ANNUAL MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT AWARDS BRINGS TOGETHER THE ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN AND ENGINEERING COMMUNITIES TO CELEBRATE INDUSTRY EXCELLENCE THROUGHOUT THE MIDDLE EAST.

NOMINATIONS NOW OPEN 2210 22 2 10

55 552 52

1645 5

1532.23

15432 154 32

Do not miss your chance to put ut fforward your work for o our u expert panel of judgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; consideration. n. Submit your nominations today at www.designmena.com/meaa or contact one of our team for more information. CATEGORY SPONSOR

For nomination enquiries, please contact:

For sponsorship enquiries, please contact:

For table bookings, please contact:

Oliver Ephgrave Editor Tel: +971 4 444 3303 Email: oliver.ephgrave@itp.com e

Alexander James Sales Manager, Middle East Architect Tel: +971 4 444 3393 Email: alexander.james@itp.com

Michelle Meyrick Events Manager Tel: +971 4 444 3328 Email: michelle.meyrick@itp.com

w w w . c o n s t 56 r 0u58 c t i o n w e e k o n l i n e . c o m / m e a a539 5 8 560 5


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

THE WORK PROJECT UPDATE

PARK HYATT ABU DHABI

306

NUMBER OF ROOMS AND SUITES

Architect: Perkins Eastman Location: Abu Dhabi

ABADAN APARTMENT Designers: Farshad Mehdizadeh & Raha Ashrafi Location: Abadan, Iran

QATAR PASSIVHAUS

200 METRES2 SIZE OF BOTH VILLA PROJECTS

56

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Architect: Aecom Location: Qatar

The first hotel project completed on Abu Dhabi’s Saadiyat Island, as well as the first Park Hyatt-branded property in the UAE capital, the Park Hyatt Abu Dhabi Hotel & Villas opened its doors to guests last year. Designed by Perkins Eastman, the 306-key 45,000m2 resort is oriented towards the sea, with private villas that line a boardwalk and private beach. The energy-efficient design meets LEED Certified standards.

Highly commended in the Residential category at the 2012 MEA Awards, the austere apartment block was designed by local architect Farshad Mehdizadeh and Raha Ashrafi. Mehdizadeh is also supervising the project, still under construction. It uses local architecture elements such as cantilevers, but adds new design techniques. The façade made from local materials suits the dusty conditions.

This ambitious ‘experiment’ for Qatar involves the construction and operation of a super energy-efficient house, which adopts the Germanydeveloped ‘Passivhaus’ concept. It also requires the construction of a conventional villa to serve as a tangible point of comparison, and the basis for a number of targets for the eco-villa. The scheme is a collaboration between Kahramaa, QGBC, BRE, and Aecom.


3,500 METRES2 GROSS FLOOR AREA

Architect: Henning Larsen Architects Location: Umeå, Sweden

SNIM HOTEL Architect: Draw Link Group Location: Nouakchott, Mauritania

MOP HOUSE

750 METRES2

Designer: AGi Architects Location: Kuwait City

AREA OF PLOT

SIKKAS IN THE SKY Designers: Alexandre Carrasco and Omelmominin Wadidy, University of Nottingham Location: Abu Dhabi

Designed by Henning Larsen, this impressive museum is located in the Arts Campus at Umeå University in northern Sweden. It comprises three exhibition halls placed on top of each other. The ground plan of the museum covers 500m2, while the total gross floor area amounts to 3,500m2. The new museum more than doubles the exhibition area. It contains an auditorium, children’s workshops and administration.

Sponsored by the National Industrial and Mining Company (SNIM), the five-star hotel project is intended to be an oasis of rest within the heart of Nouakchott. The main building is swathed in greenery and vegetation. Landscaped grounds link a central reception building to living and recreational areas, including a spa and pool. Part of the connecting area was designed as a public gallery.

This four-level home consists of a main residence with a garden, pool, gym, and private terrace. Originally conceived as a single-family home, MOP House can be split into two separate properties for future use. The project uses dark brown, natural sandstone and white plaster in the building’s façade to differentiate between the different levels. Bamboo is used generously in the interior, built into curved walls.

This skyscraper is inspired by sikkas, the narrow alleys between buildings in old Middle East cities. Designed by Alexandre Carrasco and Omelmominin Wadidy, Masters in Sustainable Tall Buildings Course, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, University of Nottingham, it has eight stacked communities, with a library and retail facilities at ground level, and a space for prayer at the apex.

www.designmena.com | 03.13 | MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT

57

THE WORK | PROJECT UPDATE

UMEÅ ART MUSEUM


PROJECT UPDATE | THE WORK

CIRCLE SNACK BAR Architect: Farshad Mehdizadeh Location: Isfahan, Iran

WASL SQUARE

270

TOWNHOUSES AND APARTMENTS

Architect: NAGA Architects Location: Dubai, United Arab Emirates

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING — QATAR UNIVERSITY Architect: Mimar Emirates Engineering Consultants Location: Doha, Qatar

THE CHEDI, KHOR FAKKAN

100+

NUMBER OF SUITES IN THE RESORT

58

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Architect: GAJ Location: Khor Fakkan, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates

Designed by Iranian architect Farshad Mehdizadeh, this fast food store occupies 7m2 on an Isfahan street. The project was highly commended in the Public Sector, Institutional and Cultural Project category at the MEA Awards in 2012. Judge Bart Leclercq, WSP, said: “This must be the smallest architectural project ever but the amount of diligence that went into the design is remarkable.”

This mixed-use commercial and residential project just off Al Safa Park is geared towards design savvy, middle-income residents and retailers. The multi-dwelling property is intended to socially integrate its community. The threestorey complex incorporates retail spaces on the ground floor to cater to pedestrians, and apartments on the top two floors, providing privacy from the two-storey townhouses.

Designed by Mimar Emirates Engineering Consultants, it is one of the university’s flagship colleges and will house six academic departments: Chemical, Civil, Architecture, Electrical, Mechanical, and Computer Engineering. Mimar was challenged to conceive of a facility that could handle the college’s current enrolment of 1,200, but grow over the next three years to accommodate a projected 2,200 students.

Designed by Dubai’s GAJ, this boutique hotel resort north of Khor Fakkan won the 2012 MEA Award for Hospitality & Leisure Project of the Year. The design draws inspiration from historical references in similar settings. The slope and nature of the existing mountainside have determined the massing of the hotel form. It has been sited to reduce the cutting of the natural rock as much as possible.


CULTURE CULTURE || LIKE WANT NEED

LIKE WANT NEED CULTURE

LIGHTING DUKE Delightfull The Duke suspension lamp is a 70s-inspired fi xture ideal for a contemporary living room. It offers the possibility of inclining the angle of each arm by adjusting the height of the magnetic cable at any time. The standard version is composed of three arms but it’s possible to choose any number of units. Its body comprises black matte with touches of glossy black, gold-plate and white matte.

60

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com


CULTURE | LIKE WANT NEED

FLOORING AVANT FLOORING Avant A new generation of sustainable composite flooring, Avant uses advanced German technology to make elegant and joint less flooring panels. With 100% waterproof, fi re retardant, scratch

resistant and energy saving features, the high load bearing capacity surface stand up the challenges of high footfall areas like airports, shopping malls, hospitals, shops and homes.

FURNITURE SHAKY Enzyma The ceramic vase Shaky, designed by Gianluca Sgalippa, was born as a provocative and surreal object. Its abstract presence, characterised by a clear geometry, places it outside of time and a specific space. An elongated cylindrical volume bends and, in the form of a semicircle, draws a U-turn. In this action, one of the two legs does not touch the ground. This interruption of a perfect geometry is said to generate a feeling of instability. However, the balance of the vase is introduced by a metallic weight placed on the bottom of the other leg.

62

FURNITURE BALLOON Armani/Casa The Balloon is a tubular armchair and footrest by Armani/Casa that draws inspiration from the styles of the 1930s. It is available in different elastic cover colours such as beige, black, dark green, dove, ice grey and red however

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

all covers are non-removable. The profuct is made with a black nickelplated iron base. This comfortablelooking yet chic item can be used in modern-styled interiors with its simplistic yet bold design.


LAST WORD | STEPHEN EMBLEY

Registered at Dubai Media City PO Box 500024, Dubai, UAE Tel: 00 971 4 444 3000 Fax: 00 971 4 444 3030 Web: www.itp.com Offices in Dubai & London ITP BUSINESS PUBLISHING CEO Walid Akawi Managing Director Neil Davies Managing Director ITP Business Karam Awad Deputy Managing Director Matthew Southwell Group Publishing Director Ian Stokes EDITORIAL Senior Group Editor Stuart Matthews Editor Oliver Ephgrave Tel: +971 4 444 3303 email: oliver.ephgrave@itp.com Reporter Aidan Imanova Tel: +971 4 444 3497 email: aidan.imanova@itp.com ADVERTISING

TALKING SUPERLATIVES THE LAST WORD

Stephen Embley, ME managing director, Aukett Fitzroy Robinson, on his favourite architect, building and city

Sales Manager Alexander James Tel: +971 4 444 3393 email: alexander.james@itp.com Business Development Manager, Saudi Arabia Rabih Naderi Tel: +966 1 2068697 email: rabih.naderi@itp.com STUDIO Head of Design Daniel Prescott Principal Creative Simon Cobon PHOTOGRAPHY Chief Photographer Jovana Obradovic Senior Photographers Isidora Bojovic, Efraim Evidor Staff Photographers George Dipin, Juliet Dunne, Murrindie Frew, Verko Ignjatovic, Shruti Jagdeesh, Mosh Lafuente, Ruel Pableo, Rajesh Raghav PRODUCTION & DISTRIBUTION Group Production & Distribution Director Kyle Smith Production Coordinator Nelly Pereira Distribution Executive Nada Al Alami Managing Picture Editor Patrick Littlejohn Image Editor Emmalyn Robles CIRCULATION Head of Database & Circulation Gaurav Gulati MARKETING

My favourite architect would be Jean Nouvel. His ability to interpret and capture the essence of place and spirit, especially the Arab world in a modern architectural language, is a feature of his work.

This is evident in his Ateliers work since the Arab World Institute, Paris in 1986, and more recently in The Louvre Abu Dhabi. The common thread that runs through the best works of architecture is a singleminded purpose, simplicity and the use of form, space and light.

This can create a magical and unique sense of time and place, capable of elevating the spirit. Le Corbusier’s Notre Dame du Haut chapel in Ronchamp, France, is a masterful example of this approach.

Stemming from his later years in 1954, he has created, with a minimum number of strokes and forms, a powerful yet simple building that is at the same time, on various different levels, highly complex. The use of modern architectural sculptural forms, space and light and its hill top location all come together to add a fourth dimension to the building.

It is the distillation of the essence of spirit and a timeless place of significance.

Head of Marketing Daniel Fewtrell Marketing Manager Michelle Meyrick ITP DIGITAL Digital Publishing Director Ahmad Bashour Tel: +971 4 444 3549 email: ahmad.bashour@itp.com Sales Manager, B2B Digital Riad Raad Tel: +971 4 444 3319 email: riad.raad@itp.com ITP GROUP Chairman Andrew Neil Managing Director Robert Serafin Finance Director Toby Jay Spencer-Davies Board of Directors K M Jamieson, Mike Bayman, Walid Akawi, Neil Davies, Rob Corder, Mary Serafin Circulation Customer Service Tel: +971 4 444 3000 Certain images in this issue are available for purchase. Please contact itpimages@itp.com for further details or visit www.itpimages.com Printed by United Printing Press L.L.C. Subscribe online at www.itp.com/subscriptions Audited by: BPA Worldwide Average Qualified Circulation 5,199 (July – Dec 2012) Cover image Sharjah Art Foundation, taken by Verko Ignjatovic The publishers regret that they cannot accept liability for error or omissions contained in this publication, however caused. The opinions and views contained in this publication are not necessarily those of the publishers. Readers are advised to seek specialist advice before acting on information contained in this publication which is provided for general use and may not be appropriate for the reader’s particular circumstances. The ownership of trademarks is acknowledged. No part of this publication or any part of the contents thereof may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without the permission of the publishers in writing. An exemption is hereby granted for extracts used for the purpose of fair review.

Surprisingly, my favourite city is Marrakech. Admittedly, it lacks sophistication and the variety of architectural icons but it makes up for that as a magical place.

It’s an intoxicating head-on assault on all the senses simultaneously. Not always the easiest place to love when you are there, but its legacy is only really felt once you have left.

64

MIDDLE EAST ARCHITECT | 03.13 | www.designmena.com

Published by and © 2013 ITP Business Publishing, a division of the ITP Publishing Group Ltd. Registered in the B.V.I. under Company number 1402846.


O M A N

A U R A

MZ ARCHITECTS have created yet another iconic design, a mixed used development and headquarters building in Muscat. Externally itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a breath taking complex sphere with-in a sphere . The interior makes use of the spherical design and creates a full height void with interconnections across the void focusing on the internal cour tyard below, Making the design timeless.

MZ ARCHITECTS www.mz-architects.com

Tel: + 971 2 635 0002

Fax: + 971 2 635 0008

UAE, Abu Dhabi

PO BOX 111992

infouae@mz-architects.com



Middle East Architect | March 2013