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TIMEOFF

NEWS

Up close and personal

Call him the fireman

An intimate concert series debuts in Lambertville. Plus: Reviewing ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ at Kelsey Theatre.

Anthony Aprile joins the East Windsor Volunteer Fire Company No. 2. Page 3A

Vol. 51, NO. 9

Published every Friday

Friday, March 2, 2018

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East Windsor police officer is promoted By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

There were smiles all around at the East Windsor Township Council meeting last week as a veteran police officer moved up the ranks and was promoted to sergeant. Virtually every East Windsor Township police officer - from patrolman to lieutenant - lined the walls of the meeting room to support newly promoted Sgt. Paul Wille as he was sworn into his new position. Sgt. Wille joined the East Windsor Township Police Department in January 2006, after graduating from the Ocean County Police Academy. He began work as a patrol officer, has served as a field training officer for new police officers, and also earned a unit citation. He was named the Officer of the Year. “This is a great celebration for the town,” Mayor Janice Mironov said as she surveyed the meeting room and noted the police officers in attendance at the Feb. 20 meeting. The promotion to sergeant is not something that is given away, Mayor Mironov said. It is earned. Police officers work “very hard” to earn a promotion, she said. The East Windsor Township Police Department is made up of hard-working, professional and caring police officers, she said. The officers look to advance themselves through coursework. “The point is, to get to the point to be promoted, you have to perform. In the view of the Police Department, you have to show yourself worthy to be elevated to the next level,” Mayor Mironov said. Chief of Police James Geary praised Sgt. Wille. “Sgt. Wille has my complete confidence. He is the consummate professional. He puts out his best effort,” Chief Geary said.

Photos by Scott Friedman

Dollhouse delights Mini-mansions and the scaled-down furniture and accessories that furnish them were among the items on display at the 39th annual Dollhouse and Miniature Show and Sale Feb. 24 at the First Presbyterian Church of Hightstown. The event, sponsored by the Hightstown Woman's Club, featured nearly two dozen dealers from New Jersey, Pennsylvania and North Carolina. Above, Patrons enjoy "the little things in life" at the show. At right, a miniature musical display.

A super bowl event: Peddie School to host ‘Empty Bowls’ By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

215-354-3146

Fill an empty bowl and fill the food pantry at the third annual “Empty Bowls” fundraiser, set for March 24 at The Peddie School’s cafeteria on the private school’s campus at 201 S. Main Street in Hightstown Borough. The event, which will be held from 5 to 8 p.m., is the brainchild of Hightstown Cultural Arts Commission co-chairs Ann Marie Miller and Adam Welch.

Tickets for the event cost $35, and entitle participants to select a one-of-a-kind handmade bowl and fill it with soup from one of nearly a dozen eateries. Proceeds will be split between RISE, which is a community service organization that offers a food pantry, and the Hightstown Cultural Arts Commission in support of its public art programs. The idea for “Empty Bowls” came up at an arts commission meeting, Miller said, adding that she and Welch were aware of similar “empty bowl” programs that have taken place elsewhere in the United States. “Adam is a ceramic artist and we both loved the idea of the arts helping to relieve hunger,” Miller said. “We also thought it was a wonderful way to inform our community about the Cultural Arts Commission and to help the local food pantry at RISE.” The Empty Bowls fundraiser has grown since its beginnings in 2016, when Welch made 200 stoneware bowls. Last year, Welch upped the number of bowls to 300,

and included another 50 bowls made by Hightstown High School students. This year, Welch is making 300 bowls, Miller said. They will be supplemented by about 100 more bowls, created by students at Hightstown High School and The Peddie School under the guidance of Hightstown High School art teacher Heather Lisk and The Peddie School art teacher Andrew Harrison. The venue has changed from year to year, starting out at Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 5700 in Hightstown, and then moving on to the ballroom at Hightstown Engine Co. No. 1 last year. The Peddie School agreed to host the event this year, after a student suggested it to school officials. Bowls can be reserved online, or by purchasing a ticket at RISE’s Greater Goods store at 114 Rogers Avenue in Hightstown Borough. At the event, bowls will be filled with soup from restaurants that include 12 Farms, Tavern on the Lake, Byrne Cafe and Deli, Fernando’s Grille, Morgan’s Is-

File photo

The third annual "Empty Bowls" fundraiser is set for March 24 at The Peddie School's cafeteria at 201 S. Main Street in Hightstown. land Grill, Pompier Catering, the Americana Diner, Panera Bread and Maninno’s. “Folks can take their handmade bowls home to remind them of other empty bowls still unfilled throughout the world, and how the

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greater Hightstown community came together for a great cause,” Miller said. To sign up online for Empty Bowls, visit http://www.signupgenius.com/go/508044baaa72ba2f94 -empty.

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POLICE BLOTTER

The East Windsor Township Police Department initiated the following police reports through Wednesday, Feb. 21, 2018:

A 33-year-old East Windsor man was charged with DUI, failure to signal turn, having a suspended license, failure to surrender a suspended license, being an unlicensed driver, reckless driving and careless driving after being stopped at 8:50 p.m. Feb. 17 on Route 535. While on patrol and officer received a report from a passing motorist of an erratic driver. The officer then observed a vehicle making an illegal turn and a motor vehicle stop was conducted. An investigation revealed that the driver was suspected of operating the vehicle under the influence. The driver was given field sobriety tests, arrested and later released pending court action.

A 26-year-old Highstown woman was charged with obstructing justice, hindering apprehension, possession of marijuana, possession of drug paraphernalia and possession of a controlled dangerous substance in a moron vehicle after an incident at 5:04 p.m. Feb. 19 on Town Center Road. While on patrol an officer observed a vehicle being operated while a front-seat

passenger was not wearing a seatbelt and a motor vehicle stope was conducted. An investigation revealed that the driver was in possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia. While being interviewed, the driver obstructed the officer’s investigation and hindered her own apprehension by attempting to destroy evidence. The driver was arrested and later released pending court action. A 27-year-old East Windsor man was charged with DUI, having a suspended license, being an unlicensed driver, reckless driving, careless driving, possession of crystal methamphetamine, possession of Lorazepam, being under the influence of a controlled dangerous substance and possession of drug paraphernalia after an incident at 2:15 p.m. Feb. 20 on Milford Road. While on patrol an officer received a report of a driver sleeping behind the wheel and a motor vehicle stop was conducted. And investigation revealed that the driver was suspected of operating the vehicle under the influence, being in possession of crystal methamphetamine, Lorazepam and drug paraphernalia. The driver was given field sobriety tests, arrested and later released pending court action.

Submitted photo

East Windsor Township Officials kick-off Township Gun Safety Program for March, as police officers demonstrate proper use of gun locks. Pictured (from left to right) are Lieutenant Christopher Jackson, Mayor Janice S. Mironov, Chief of Police James Geary and Sergeant Ryan Mattek.

Free gun-safety locks available in East Windsor By Lea Kahn Staff Writer

Children and guns do not mix, and that’s why East Windsor Township is making free gun-safety locks available to township residents during March through the East Windsor Township Police Department. The cable-style gun lock fits most handguns, shotguns and rifles. It is being made available to residents at no cost through Project Child Safe, which is a na-

tionwide firearms safety education program co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Justice and the National Shooting Sports Foundation. East Windsor Township is sponsoring the pro-active safety initiative to promote improved gun safety. Properly used, the gun locks can prevent accidental deaths and injuries in the home, as well as deaths and injuries caused by intentional misuse of guns, Mayor Janice Mironov said.

“The use of gun locks is a no-brainer, which keeps guns out of the hands of children and helps prevent unnecessary tragedies,” Mayor Mironov said. “We hope that programs such as this will remind and educate lawful gun owners about their important responsibility to handle firearms safely and to store them in a secure manner,” Mayor Mironov said. Since 2003, more than 37 million firearm safety kits have been distributed in

all 50 states and five U.S. territories through partnerships with police departments. About 15,000 police departments have formed partnerships with Project Child Safe. The free gun lock safety kit, which includes the gun lock and educational material, is available by calling police Detective Brian Gorski at 609-448-5678, ext. 236. They can be picked up at the East Windsor Township Police/Court building at 80 One Mile Road.

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Passport applications to be processed on-site in East Windsor

Mercer County Clerk Paula Sollami Covello and her staff will visit the East Windsor Municipal Building to process U.S. passport applications on-site from 3 to 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 28, for the residents of East Windsor and all other parts of the county. The East Windsor Municipal Building is at 16 Lanning Boulevard. “Travelers who have not yet applied for a passport, should not hesitate, because the overall demand for passports has been rising due to changes in U.S. travel requirements, which now requires travelers to have

Anthony Aprile joins No. 2 fire company

In an age of dwindling volunteerism, East Windsor Volunteer Fire Company No. 2 Chief Mario Batista says he is delighted to announce that Anthony Aprile has joined Station 46 as a probationary firefighter. “We can never have enough volunteers,” said Chief Batista, “and having Anthony on board is certainly a welcome addition.” “I’ve wanted to be a firefighter since I was a teenager,” said Aprile. “I’m fortunate that I’m physically able to do it, and hope to be a positive role model for not only kids, but also for adults who are able as well. It’s an important and fulfilling job, and I’m looking forward to it.” Chief Batista says helping others seems to be the common thread among all his volunteer members. “There’s a lot of time involved in training and re-

passports for air, land and sea travel outside of the United States, including Caribbean islands, Canada and Mexico,” said Sollami Covello. Passport photos are also available on-site. residents are encouraged to call 609989-6473 to reserve a specific time. Walk-in applicants will be accommodated but may have to wait. To apply for a U.S. passport, residents will need: (1) Proof of U.S. citizenship in the form of a state certified birth certificate, a U.S. naturalization certificate or a previous

U.S. passport; (2) Proof of identity in the form of a current driver’s license or state issued identification card. A U.S. passport is valid for 10 years for adults and five years for minors. The rate for a passport is $110 for adults and $80 for minors plus a processing fee of $25. (Beginning April 2, 2018, the new processing rate will rise to $35.) The federal government requires a separate check for each passport application. Passport photos will be taken on-site for $15 or $10 for senior citizens and minors. The clerk’s office will accept checks or money or-

ders for payment. No cash or credit cards will be accepted. Effective April 1, 2011, the U.S. Department of State requires the full names of a passport applicant’s parents to be listed on all certified birth certificates to be considered as primary evidence of U.S. citizenship. The new requirements will apply to all U.S. passport applicants, regardless of age. Under the new federal mandate, certified birth certificates missing parental information will not be accepted as proof of U.S. citizenship. For children, federal

passport guidelines now require both parents to appear in person - or one parent in person with required documentation - when applying for a passport for a child under 16. For those who will be unable to participate in this passport event, the clerk’s office processes U.S. passport applications on a regular basis, at the County Clerk’s Office, 240 West State Street in Trenton, and is open from Monday to Friday from 8 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and Wednesdays until 6:30 p.m. In addition, one can also apply for a U.S. passport at the Mercer

County Connection at the Hamilton Square Shopping Center on Highway 33 and Paxson Avenue in Hamilton and is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., Tuesday and Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Passport photos are available at both locations. For further information on passport requirements, and needed personal documents to obtain a passport, residents should visit www.mercercounty.org and click on County Clerk or call 609-989-6473.

BETH EL NEWS

Trip reveals the Masorti movement growing in Israel By Steve Guggenheim Correspondent

The Masorti movement in Israel is growing. That is the assessment of Beth El Synagogue Rabbi Jay Kornsgold, who just returned from a trip to the Jewish state. In the United States the Conservative movement is the middle of the three main Jewish denominations, buffeted by the Orthodox and Reform. But in Israel and the rest of the world the Conservative movement is called Masorti. The purpose of the trip by the East Windsor rabbi and 16 other Jewish leaders was Submitted photo to celebrate the movement’s 40th anniversary in Israel. Probationary firefighter Anthony Aprile recently joined the ranks of East Windsor Vol. They visited a dozen synagogues all over the country Fire Co. 2. to see how they were doing. sponding and those who in- community service,” he ested in joining should stop They discovered some with by firehouse, or call 443- large numbers of congrevest that time should be said. gants but no building, and Those who are inter- 5130. commended. It’s a true

Rabbi Jay Kornsgold also saw beautiful houses of worship but few members. Much to their pleasure they discovered the number of boys having Bar Mitzvahs is skyrocketing. A Bar Mitzvah is when a Jewish boy turns 13 and becomes a man in the eyes of the religion. The growth of Masorti Bar Mitzvah is significant because in Israel religious law is governed by the UltraOrthodox. The Ultra-Orthodox hold sway in the Jewish state since without their poSee BETH EL, Page 4


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Friday, March 2, 2018

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WHAT’S GOING ON Fri., March 2

Beginners from 10 a.m. to noon at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. For adults and teens 14 and up. Get acquainted with the basic materials and techniques then dive into learning a variety of basic stitches. Your first embroidery project will be a small stitch sampler. All materials will be supplied. Registration required at www.mcl.org.

Free Tax Preparation will be held by appointment only between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Free face-toface tax preparation for individuals and families with income of less than $65,000 a year. Provided by United Way of Greater Mercer County. Call 609 448-0957 for an appointment. Baby & Toddler Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. For children ages birth to 2.5 years with a caregiver. Join us for singing and rhyming fun followed by play time with the library’s toys.

Sun., March 4 Saint David’s Episcopal Church in Cranbury will hold an “Evensong” (evening prayer) service at 3 p.m. in celebration of Saint David’s Day. In honor of Saint David being the patron saint of Wales, the service will be followed by a tea featuring traditional Welsh fare. All members of Saint David’s, as well as the community, are invited to attend. Movie: The Battle of the Sexes at 2 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join us for a screening of the popular movie. Rated PG-13, 121 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library.

Sat., March 3

The Statewide Parent Advocacy Network (SPAN) is bringing one of its mini-conferences, “Inclusion with The End in Mind,” to Hightstown from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at at St. Anthony of Padua Church. The conference will focus on how to best support and accommodate students with disabilities, both in the classroom and in the community. This can be especially helpful for parents, grandparents, caretakers, professionals and educators of all students. Certificates for professional development hours will be provided. To register or for more information, call SPAN at 973-642-8100 ext. 123 or e-mail start@spannj.org. Hand Embroidery for

Mon., March 5 Music Mondays at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Play instruments, learn about rhythm, and sing songs with friends. Ages 2 to 5.Make It! Monday from 10:30 to 11:30

a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2 to 6 with a caregiver can drop in during the program to make this week’s craft and stay to play with the library’s toys. Lunch Time Guided Meditation from 12:30 to 1 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Join us for guided mediation during your lunch hour. Help yourself regain the peace lost through busy mornings and smoothly get through the rest of the day. Facilitated by library staff member Leena, a 10-year practitioner of Rajyoga meditation. Adult English Learner Writing Class from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Improve your writing skills for school and work. Taught by an experienced volunteer from Literacy NJ (formerly Literacy Volunteers). K-6th Grade Tutoring from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children in grades K-6 will get homework help. Registration required in person or by phone at 609-448-1474.

is 1½ hours. Bring a yoga mat or large towel. Call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Story Time at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Stories, songs, and a craft for ages 2 through 5. DIY Vanilla Sugar Coconut Body Scrub presentation at 6 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Use household ingredients to learn to make a luxurious in-shower body scrub to pamper yourself with. Ages 15 and up. Preregistration required. Story Time with Miss Liz from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2 to 6 will enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and a craft. Siblings welcome. Beginning Spanish class from 5 to 6 p.m., Citizenship Exam Review from 6 to 7 p.m. and Learning English with Victor from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Register in person or by calling (609) 448-1474. for any of these 3 classes.

Wed., March 7

Tues., March 6 Beginner Yoga will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Instructor Mira Desai has 30 years of experience in yoga. Join her for an introduction to basic yoga and meditation. Class

Back to Basics: Google Docs at 1 p.m. at the Cranbury Public Library, 23 N. Main St., Cranbury. Learn how to use Google Docs to create and save a letter or document, and how to share it through email. Enroll online or at the library. Paper Crafts with Lonie will be held at 11:30 a.m. at the Hickory Corner

N O TIC E

Legal Notices Cranbury Township School District Board of Education 23 North Main Street ‡ Cranbury, NJ 08512 Business Office: Phone: (609) 395-1700 ‡ Fax: (609) 395-7561

Pl ea se sen d a l l Leg a l s a d c o py t o :

RESCHEDULED DATE FOR March 2018 BOARD MEETING Change Meeting CANCELLED

Date

Day

March 13 , 2018

RESCHEDULED Meeting March 27, 2018

Time

Purpose

Location

Tuesday

7:00 PM

Regular Board Meeting

Large Group Room

Wednesday

7:00 PM

Regular Board Meeting

Large Group Room

Email: legalnotices @centraljersey .com

CP, 1x, 3/2/18 Fee: $27.90

Legal Notices

If questions, or to confirm, call:

609-924-3244 ext. 2150

Legal Notices BOROUGH OF JAMESBURG NOTICE OF FINAL ADOPTION

The ordinance published by title herewith have been finally adopted at the meeting of the Mayor and Borough Council of the Borough of Jamesburg, held on February 21, 2018. Susan Boulogne Acting Municipal Clerk Borough of Jamesburg

NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANTS Docket No. F-002773-18 Superior Court of New Jersey Chancery Division Middlesex County (L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO: Jayachander Tandava Lakshmi N. Baalay

ORDINANCE #01-18 2018 ORDINANCE TO EXCEED THE MUNICIPAL BUDGET APPROPRIATION LIMITS AND TO ESTABLISH A CAP BANK CP, 1x, 3/2/18 Fee: $14.88

BOROUGH OF JAMESBURG NOTICE OF PENDING ORDINANCES The ordinances published by title herewith were introduced and passed upon first reading at a meeting of the Governing Body of the Borough of Jamesburg, County of Middlesex, State of New Jersey, held on February 21, 2018. This will be further considered for final passage, after public hearing thereon, at a meeting of the Governing Body to be held in the Borough Hall, 131 Perrineville Road, Jamesburg, on March 21, 2018 at 7:00PM, and during the week prior to and up to and including the date of such meeting, copies of said ordinances will be made available at the Municipal Clerk’s office, in the Borough Hall, to the members of the general public who shall request same. ORDINANCE #02-18 TRAFFIC CONTROL SIGNAL: INSTERSECTION OF BUCKELEW AVENUE, EAST RAILROAD AVENUE, WEST RAILROAD AVENUE AND FORSGATE DRIVE ORDINANCE #03-18 AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR IMPROVEMENTS OF THE SANITARY SEWER SYSTEM AND APPROPRIATING THE SUM OF $33,073 THEREFORE, AUTHORIZING IN AND BY THE BOROUGH OF JAMESBURG, IN THE COUNTY OF MIDDLESEX, NEW JERSEY CP, 1x, 3/2/18 Fee: $23.25

NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANTS

YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND REQUIRED to serve upon McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, counsel for the plaintiff, with an address of 99 Wood Avenue South, Suite 803, Iselin, NJ 08830, with a telephone number of 732-902-5399, an Answer to the Complaint filed in a civil action where THE BANK OF NEW YORK MELLON F/K/A THE BANK OF NEW YORK, AS TRUSTEE FOR HARBORVIEW MORTGAGE LOAN TRUST 2006-CB1 MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-CB1 is the plaintiff and Jayachander Tandava , et al. is the defendant. The action is pending in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division, Middlesex County, and bears Docket No. F-002773-18. Your Answer must be filed within thirty-five (35) days of March 2, 2018, excluding that date, or if this publication runs after March 2, 2018, within thirty-five (35) days after the actual date of publication, excluding that date. If you fail to file an Answer, judgment by default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. You shall file your Answer and Proof of Service in duplicate with the Clerk of the Superior Court, Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, NJ 08625, with a copy to McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, in accordance with the NJ Rules of Court. This action has been instituted for the purpose of (1) foreclosing a mortgage dated September 28, 2005 made by Jayachander Tandava, a married man and Lakshmi N. Baalay as Mortgagors to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Assured Lending Corporation, its successors and assigns, recorded in the Middlesex County Clerk's Office on January 5, 2006 in Book 11236, page 0129, which mortgage was assigned to the above named Plaintiff, which has the right to enforce the note secured by the mortgage; and (2) to recover possession of the land and premises commonly known as 78 Wood Avenue, Township of Woodbridge, Iselin, NJ 08830 and is further described as Lot 11.02 (formerly Lot 11.B), Block 435.03 (formerly Block 435.C). If you are unable to obtain an attorney, you may communicate with the New Jersey Bar Association by calling 732-249-5000. You may also contact the Lawyer Referral Service of the County of venue by calling (732) 828-0053. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may contact the Legal Services office of the County of venue by calling (732) 2497600. YOU, Jayachander Tandava, are made a party defendant to this foreclosure action because you executed the note and mortgage and may be liable for any deficiency, are a record owner of the subject property, and for any right, title and interest you may have in, to or against the subject property. YOU, Lakshmi N. Baalay, are made a party defendant to this foreclosure action because you executed the note and mortgage and may be liable for any deficiency, are a record owner of the subject property, and for any right, title and interest you may have in, to or against the subject property.

the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join librarian Mary Elizabeth Allen to learn how to improve your English language speaking skills, pronunciation, vocabulary, grammar and fluency. Must have some basic knowledge of English. Call the library to register at (609) 4480957. Drawing From Your Imagination art class will be held from 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Three-part series of lessons. Learn to draw your own picture using felt-tip pens with the guidance of local artist Marge Rosen. All materials provided. Call the library to register at (609) 448-0957. Microsoft Word Basics from 10:30 a.m. to noon at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Learn the basics of creating and formatting documents in Word. Mouse and keyboard skills are essential. Preregistration required. Story Time at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Stories, songs and a craft for ages 2 through 5. Friends of the Twin Rivers Library meeting at 7:30 p.m.at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. New members welcome. Brown Bag Book Club from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in See CALENDAR, Page 5

Beth El Continued from Page 3 litical support the coalition government would collapse. The boys having the Bar Mitzvahs are not coming from that movement but are secular Israelis and the Beth El rabbi says this shows they are looking for something religious and finding it in the growing movement. During the trip the group met with members of the Knesset, Israel’s parliament, to push for religious pluralism. They don’t like that the Chief Rabbinate has such control over religious life. The American leaders were pleased with comments from a number of legislators, but stunned with those from the speaker. Yuli Edelstein told the group they need to talk about Israel in their communities. They said they do that. One rabbi then said

young American Jews love Israel, but believe because of the religious control by the Ultra-Orthodox, in which they don’t even recognize some Americans as Jews, they don’t feel loved by Israelis With that comment, instead of opening dialogue, the speaker shut the door on it saying we have nothing to talk about, took two more questions and left the meeting. Rabbi Kornsgold and the group came away from their trip believing the Masorti movement is definitely growing but realizing more work needs to be done. The Beth El rabbi also said they see more cooperation by the Ultra-Orthodox on the local level, but not yet on the national level.

Michelle M. Smith Clerk of Superior Court of New Jersey

Docket No. F-002468-18 Superior Court of New Jersey Chancery Division Middlesex County

CP, 1x, 3/2/18 Fee: $50.22 Affidavit: $15.00

(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO: Joan A. Schriber, her heirs, devisees and personal representatives and her, their or any of their successors in right, title and interest YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND REQUIRED to serve upon McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, counsel for the plaintiff, with an address of 99 Wood Avenue South, Suite 803, Iselin, NJ 08830, with a telephone number of 732-902-5399, an Answer to the Complaint filed in a civil action where JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association is the plaintiff and Joan A. Schriber, her heirs, devisees and personal representatives and her, their or any of their successors in right, title and interest, et al. is the defendant. The action is pending in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division, Middlesex County, and bears Docket No. F-002468-18. Your Answer must be filed within thirty-five (35) days of March 2, 2018, excluding that date, or if this publication runs after March 2, 2018, within thirty-five (35) days after the actual date of publication, excluding that date. If you fail to file an Answer, judgment by default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. You shall file your Answer and Proof of Service in duplicate with the Clerk of the Superior Court, Hughes Justice Complex - CN 971, Trenton, NJ 08625, with a copy to McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, in accordance with the NJ Rules of Court. This action has been instituted for the purpose of (1) foreclosing a mortgage dated May 1, 2004 made by Joan A. Leal and Joan A. Schriber, as Mortgagors, to Washington Mutual Bank, FA, recorded in the Middlesex County Clerk's Office on November 23, 2004 in Book 10199, page 0055, which mortgage was assigned to the above named Plaintiff, which has the right to enforce the note secured by the mortgage; JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association is also the holder and owner of a second mortgage dated September 26, 2007, given by Joan A. Leal and Joan A. Schriber to Washington Mutual Bank, FA, and recorded on September 23, 2009 in the Middlesex County Clerk's Office in Book 13587, Page 0458 securing the sum of $67,000.00. This mortgage was assigned from The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, a Corporation Organized and Existing Under An Act of Congress (FDIC), and Acting in its Receivership Capacity as Receiver of Washington Mutual Bank f/k/a Washington Mutual Bank, FA to JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association by Assignment of Mortgage dated September 27, 2016 and recorded in the Middlesex County Clerk's Office on December 8, 2016, in Book 01196, Page 0649. Plaintiff desires to include the second lien in the instant action so as to extinguish its equity of redemption but will NOT include the amount due the second mortgage in its final judgment in foreclosure and (2) to recover possession of the land and premises commonly known as 72 North Washington Avenue, Township of Woodbridge, Colonia, NJ 07067 and is further described as Lot 1 (formerly known as Lots 1, 2 and 3A), Block 393.01 (formerly known as Block 393.A). Former Block 393.A is also known as 393A. If you are unable to obtain an attorney, you may communicate with the New Jersey Bar Association by calling 732-249-5000. You may also contact the Lawyer Referral Service of the County of venue by calling (732) 828-0053. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may contact the Legal Services office of the County of venue by calling (732) 249-7600. YOU, Joan A. Schriber, her heirs, devisees and personal representatives and her, their or any of their successors in right, title and interest, are made a party defendant to this foreclosure action because Joan A. Schriber executed the note and mortgage. You, unknown heirs, may be liable for any deficiency, and for any right, title and interest you may have in, to or against the subject property.

CP, 1x , 3/2/18 Fee: $54.87 Affidavit: $15.00

Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join us for a paper crafting workshop to create a spring flower greeting card. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. Please call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Socrates Café will be held at 7 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Socrates Café is a gathering where participants pose questions, listen to others, raise challenges and consider alternative answers. Background in philosophy not required; no preparation necessary. Wii Sports at 5 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Dr., East Windsor. Take turns playing the sport of your choice on our Nintendo Wii. Ages 7 12. Story Time with Miss Liz from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2-6 will enjoy stories, songs, rhymes & a craft. Siblings welcome. Evening Guided Meditation from 8 to 8:30 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Come join us for guided meditation at the end of your day. Leave feeling relaxed and rejuvenated. Facilitated by library staff member Leena, a 10- year practitioner of Rajyoga meditation.Thurs., March 8 Conversational English as a Second Language from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at

Michelle M. Smith Clerk of Superior Court of New Jersey

NOTICE TO ABSENT DEFENDANTS Docket No. F-023642-14 Superior Court of New Jersey Chancery Division Middlesex County

www.windsorheightsherald.com www.cranburypress.com Bernard Kilgore, Group Publisher 1955-1967 Mary Louise Kilgore Beilman, Board Chairman 1967-2005 James B. Kilgore, Publisher, 1980-2016

(L.S.) STATE OF NEW JERSEY TO: Edward Driscoll Paola A. Driscoll YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED AND REQUIRED to serve upon McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, counsel for the plaintiff, with an address of 99 Wood Avenue South, Suite 803, Iselin, NJ 08830, with a telephone number of 732-902-5399, an Answer to the Complaint filed in a civil action where JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association is the plaintiff and Edward Driscoll, et al. is the defendant. The action is pending in the Superior Court of New Jersey, Chancery Division, Middlesex County, and bears Docket No. F-023642-14. Your Answer must be filed within thirty-five (35) days of March 2, 2018, excluding that date, or if this publication runs after March 2, 2018, within thirty-five (35) days after the actual date of publication, excluding that date. If you fail to file an Answer, judgment by default may be entered against you for the relief demanded in the Complaint. You shall file your Answer and Proof of Service in duplicate with the Clerk of the Superior Court, Hughes Justice Complex – CN 971, Trenton, NJ 08625, with a copy to McCalla Raymer Leibert Pierce, LLC, in accordance with the NJ Rules of Court. This action has been instituted for the purpose of (1) foreclosing a mortgage dated August 17, 2009 made by Edward Driscoll and Paola A. Driscoll, husband and wife, as Mortgagors, to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Sullivan Financial Services, Inc., its successors and assigns, recorded in the Middlesex County Clerk's Office on September 8, 2009 in Book 13562, page 0544, and as Instrument No. MG 2009 024812, which mortgage was assigned to the above named Plaintiff, which has the right to enforce the note secured by the mortgage; and (2) to recover possession of the land and premises commonly known as 292-A Alpine Way, Woodbridge, NJ 07095 and is further described as Lot 1.01, (formerly Lot 292.A), Qualifier C2921, Block 408. If you are unable to obtain an attorney, you may communicate with the New Jersey Bar Association by calling 732-249-5000. You may also contact the Lawyer Referral Service of the County of venue by calling (732) 828-0053. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may contact the Legal Services office of the County of venue by calling (732) 249-7600. YOU, Edward Driscoll, are made a party defendant to this foreclosure action because you executed the note and mortgage and may be liable for any deficiency, are a record owner of the subject property, and for any right, title and interest you may have in, to or against the subject property. YOU, Paola A. Driscoll, are made a party defendant to this foreclosure action because you executed the note and mortgage and may be liable for any deficiency, are a record owner of the subject property, and for any right, title and interest you may have in, to or against the subject property. Michelle M. Smith Clerk of Superior Court of New Jersey CP, 1x, 3/2/18 Fee: $47.43 Affidavit: $15.00

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Calendar Continued from Page 4

Hightstown. Join our lunch time book discussion group! This month’s title is “A Week in Winter” by Maeve Binchy. Bring your lunch. Beverages and a light dessert will be provided.

Fri., March 9

Laugh Yoga will be held 1:30 to 3 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Laugh yoga has many health benefits. The yoga breathing, in combination with laughter exercises, brings more oxygen to the body and makes you feel energetic and stay healthy. Presented by Atrium Health and Senior Living. Call the library to register at (609) 448-0957. Baby & Toddler Time from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. For children ages birth to 2.5 years and a caregiver. Join us for singing and rhyming fun followed by play time with the library’s toys.

Sat., March 10

Writers’ Group at 2 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Please bring five pages of a work in progress to discuss with other writers. VITA Super Tax Day from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. IRS-certified volunteers provide free basic income tax return preparation to people with lower incomes, persons with disabilities and limited English speaking taxpayers who need assistance in preparing

their own tax returns. Schedule a time in person or by calling (609) 448-1474.

Sun., March 11 The village of Cranbury will host its 21st Annual Cranbury Craft Show from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and again on Sunday, March 11, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Browse the offerings of 120 juried crafters and artisans showcasing a wide variety of goods. Coffee, snacks and lunch available on site at the Craft Show Garden Cafe. There will be raffles and a kids craft corner. Sponsored by the Cranbury Education Foundation as a yearly fundraiser. Cranbury School, 23 North Main St., Cranbury. Movie: Marshall at 2 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join us for a screening of the popular movie. Rated PG-13, 119 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library.

Mon., March 12 Art of Living Yoga & Meditation will be held at 7 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Discover how to relax and recharge your mind and unlock your full potential through gentle stretches, breathing and guided meditation. Call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Baby Time at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Stories, music, and play for tiny tots ages 6 months through 2 years.

Photo by Scott Jacobs

‘The Role of Cotton in Slavery’

Cranbury resident Frank Marlowe presented “The Role of Cotton in Slavery” Feb. 17 at the Cranbury Public Library as part of Black History Month. This discussion explained slavery’s role in introducing the United States to industrial capitalism with its enormous wealth and disturbing inequalities that are with us today. Sci-Fi Movie Night: Escape from New York (1981), 6 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. In 1997, a major war between the United States and the Soviet Union is concluding, and the entire island of Manhattan has been converted into a giant maximum security prison. When Air Force One is hijacked and crashes into the island, the president is taken hostage by a group of inmates. Rated R; 106 minutes. Preregistration preferred. This program was made possible by generous funding from the Friends of the Twin Rivers Branch. Make It! Monday from 10:30-11:30 am at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2-6

with a caregiver can drop in during the program to make this week’s craft & stay to play with the library’s toys. Lunch Time Guided Meditation from 12:30-1 pm at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Join us for some guided mediation during your lunch hour. Help yourself regain the peace lost through busy mornings and smoothly get through the rest of the day. Facilitated by library staff member Leena, a 10 year practitioner of Rajyoga meditation. Adult English Learner Writing Class from 2 to 3 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Improve your writing skills for school and work. Taught by an experienced volunteer

from Literacy NJ (formerly Literacy Volunteers). K-6th Grade Tutoring from 4:30 to 6 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children in grades K-6 will get homework help. Registration required in person or by phone at 609-448-1474. Craft Circle from 7 to 8:30 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Adults and teens 14 and up. Crafters of all skill levels are invited to join the library’s crafting group. Bring your knitting, crochet, embroidery, quilting, paper or other project and work on it with other crafters. Drop in anytime during this monthly meeting to work on a project, share what you’ve made and chat

over light refreshments.

Tues., March 13

Beginner Yoga will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Instructor Mira Desai has 30 years of experience in yoga. Join her for an introduction to basic yoga and meditation. Class is 1½ hours. Bring a yoga mat or large towel. Call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Understanding Your Social Security Benefits will be held at 3 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. As See CALENDAR, Page 6


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Friday, March 2, 2018

Calendar Continued from Page 5 you approach retirement, it is more important than ever to understand the role that Social Security benefits can and should play in your retirement plans. This informative seminar will show you how and when to apply for Medicare, Social Security and other topics. Call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Story Time at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Stories, songs, and a craft for ages 2 through 5. PowerPoint Basics from 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Learn to create basic presentations, format text, and insert images. Mouse and keyboard skills are essential. Registration required. Upcycling: Scrap Fabric Rag Doll at 6 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Use leftover scraps of fabric to make a cute rag doll for someone in your life. Ages 15 and up. Preregistration required. Story Time with Miss Liz from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2 to 6 will enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and a craft. Siblings welcome. Beginning Spanish class from 5 to 6 p.m., Citizenship Exam Review from 6 to 7 p.m. and Learning English with Victor from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Register in person or by calling (609) 448-1474. for any of these three classes. Monthly Drop-in Blood Pressure Checks from 6 to

7 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Drop in for a blood pressure check from our local public health nurse. There will also be health information and activities for children.

Wed., March 14 Women’s History Month Program: Eleanor Roosevelt will be held at 7 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Eleanor Roosevelt was an inspiration to people all over the world. Actor and narrator Linda Kenyon is back with her one woman show about this historic figure. Sponsored by Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. Call the Reference Desk to register at (609) 448-0957. Adult Movie: Marshall (2017), 2 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Biopic of Thurgood Marshall. Rated PG-13. Running time: 118 minutes. Preregistration preferred. This program was made possible by generous funding from the Friends of the Twin Rivers Branch. Story Time with Miss Liz from 10:30 to 11:15 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Children ages 2 to 6 will enjoy stories, songs, rhymes and a craft. Siblings welcome. Evening Guided Meditation from 8 to 8:30 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Come join us for guided meditation at the end of your day. Leave feeling relaxed and rejuvenated. Facilitated by library staff member Leena, a 10- year

Photo by Scott Friedman

Minature madness

Patrons enjoy the 39th Annual Dollhouse and Miniature Show and Sale, sponsored by the Hightstown Woman's Club, Feb. 24 at the First Presbyterian Church of Hightstown, on Feb. 24. practitioner of Rajyoga med- System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. itation. Join librarian Mary ElizaThurs., March 15 beth Allen to learn how to improve your English lanThe Beth El Synagogue guage speaking skills, proof East Windsor Seniors nunciation, vocabulary, group will have its annual grammar and fluency. Must Model Seder at noon. Light have some basic knowledge refreshments and ceremonial of English. Please call the lifoods will be served. Mem- brary to register at (609) bers are $18 and non-mem- 448-0957. bers are $20. RSVP is Drawing From Your required no later than March Imagination art class will 9, and checks must be re- be held from 1:30 to 3:00 ceived no later than March pm at the Hickory Corner 12. Beth El Synagogue is at Branch of the Mercer 50 Maple Stream Road, East County Library System, 138 Windsor, NJ, 08520; 609- Hickory Corner Road, East 443-4454; www.bethel.net. Windsor. Three-part series Conversational English of lessons. Learn to draw as a Second Language from your own picture using felt10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the tip pens with the guidance Hickory Corner Branch of of local artist Marge Rosen. the Mercer County Library All materials provided. Call the library to register at (609) 448-0957. Story Time at 11 a.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Stories, songs, and a craft for ages 2 through 5.

Fri., March 16 Movie: American Made at 2 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join us for a screening of the popular

Join Us, It’s Free To Attend! Go to: www.nmg.ticketleap.com/homeandmore

Would You Like To Showcase Your Business At This Event? Contact Michele Nesbihal at 609-874-2147 or mnesbihal@centraljersey.com

movie. Rated R; 115 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library. St. Patrick’s Day Craft from 2 to 4 p.m. at the Twin Rivers Library, 276 Abbington Drive, East Windsor. Join us to make a craft for St. Patty’s Day. Ages 5 - 12. Open Play for Babies & Toddlers from 10:30 to 11 a.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Library, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. For children ages birth to 2.5 years and a caregiver. Play with the library’s toys & socialize.

Sat., March 17 Free Tax Preparation will be held by appointment only between 9:30 a.m. and 3:30 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Free face-to-face tax preparation for individuals and families with income of less than $65,000 a year. Provided by United Way of Greater Mercer County. Call 609 448-0957 for an appointment. Yoga for Beginners from 2:30 to 4 p.m. at the Hightstown Memorial Li-

brary, 114 Franklin St. in Hightstown. Learn simple and powerful yoga postures to improve stability and balance. No physical agility or prior yoga experience needed. Bring a mat or large towel. Instruction in English by a trained Isha facilitator. Please register at www.mcl.org.

Sun., March 18

The Beth El Synagogue of East Windsor, Mercer County Genealogy Society will present “Finding Uncle Harry!” at 7:30 p.m. Learn about Jack Feinstein’s quest to identify descendants of his great uncle Harry Feinstein. His presentation will describe what he found, how he found it and lessons learned. Beth El Synagogue is at 50 Maple Stream Road, East Windsor, NJ, 08520; 6 0 9 - 4 4 3 - 4 4 5 4 ; www.bethel.net. Movie: Dunkirk at 2 p.m. at the Hickory Corner Branch of the Mercer County Library System, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor. Join us for a screening of the popular movie. Rated PG, 120 minutes. A small snack will be provided. Sponsored by the Friends of the Hickory Corner Library.


Friday, March 2, 2018

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SPORTS

Princeton’s Bobchin wins Region 5 wrestling title By Bob Nuse Sports Editor

Alec Bobchin of Princeton High got caught up in the moment as he grew closer to his first Region 5 wrestling championship. “I remember looking up at clock before we started the last couple of seconds,” Bobchin recalled of his championship match on Feb. 24. “I saw eight seconds left and I was on top for the start and I started feeling butterflies in my stomach. I was getting excited and when the clock ran down I was so happy. When it was over I pointed to my dad. I wouldn’t be where I wanted to be now without him.” Bobchin, the No. 1 seed in the 138-pound weight class, defeated Raritan’s AJ Erven, 5-0, to capture his first region championship and advance to the state tournament in Atlantic City this weekend. A week earlier, Bobchin had won the 138-pound title at the District 19 tournament. Montgomery senior Emmanuel Perera will also be making the trip to Atlantic City after he advanced by finishing fourth in the 126pound weight class at the Region 5 tournament that was wrestled at Hunterdon Central in Flemington. The top four finishers in each weight class from each of the eight regions that ended on Feb. 24 qualified for the state tournament that will begin today and run through Sunday at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City. The state tournament gets underway today with the Round of 32 matches scheduled to begin at 2:30 p.m., with the Round of 16 matches, the pre-quarterfinals, to follow. The Saturday session will include wrestlebacks beginning at 9 a.m. and the quarterfinals at noon. The semifinals and wrestlebacks will be held at 6 p.m. On Sunday morning at 10, the final round of

wrestlebacks will be held and then consolation bouts for places third through eighth will be wrestled. The state championship round is scheduled to start at 3 p.m. “Going in I treat it the same as any other tournament,” said Bobchin, a junior who will take a 33-4 record to Atlantic City. “Once you start thinking about it too much something different gets into your head. I just stayed calm and kept my composure and tried to treat it like any other match.” Bobchin had a bye in the opening round of Region 5 before defeating Shane Demeter of Manville in the quarterfinals by technical fall, 20-5. In the semifinals he got past fifth-seeded Andrew Lombard of Monroe, 7-2. “At this point everyone you face is tough,” Bobchin said. “The was no one specific I was looking out for before it started. I just went in wrestling my hardest. I usually I treat everyone the same and wrestle every match the same. I am always going to wrestle my hardest.” Bobchin is the No. 12 seed in the 138-pounds bracket. He will open against Dante Stefanelli of Delbarton, who is 13-6 and the No. 21 seed. For Bobchin this will be a second trip to the state tournament, which should help him ease his way onto the mat. He did not place in the 2017 state tournament. “Going to the state tournament once already I have the oohs and aahs out of the way,” he said. “Last year was a little overwhelming. This year I am coming in full on. I want to place in the top eight and get on the podium. “I am definitely ready. The amount of work I have put in during the offseason is going to show. I think going back second time and having been in the setting will help. It is breathtaking

Photo by Scott Friedman

Alec Bobchin of Princeton ties up his opponent AJ Erven of Raritan in the finals of the 138-pound weight class at the 2018 NJSIAA Region V Wrestling Tournament Feb. 24 at Hunterdon Central High School. and I know what it will look like.” This will be the first trip to the state tournament for Perera, who reached the semifinals at 126 before falling to top-seeded AJ DeRosa of Delaware Valley by fall at 3:47. Perera lost to Max Brignola of RumsonFair Haven, 10-0, in the third-place match. “He was very excited,” Montgomery coach Kurt Franey said. “He was seeded fourth, so he wrestled up to his seed. Winning (District 18) was pivotal to him getting out. He had a rematch Friday (with Jaleel Gopaul of Keyport) and won, 1-0.” Perera, who is now 30-6, had beaten Gopaul to win the district title. It was his performance at a tournament at East Brunswick in December that showed Franey that Perera had what it took to get this far. “As soon as he got to the finals of that tournament I saw he had jumped a level from last year,” Franey said. “I knew he had put in the work.”

Perera follows Dylan D’Amore as a Montgomery wrestler to get to the state tournament. D‘Amore reached the state tournament each of the last two years. D’Amore placed third in the state tournament at heavyweight during his senior season in 2017. Perera was one of five Cougars to qualify for Region 5 this winter. “To get five there was a good accomplishment,” Franey said. “We had a rough Wednesday night

with the other four guys losing. But it was good to get five out of eight wrestlers out of districts. That was a great experience. “To get a wrestler there for the third year in a row is a nice accomplishment. Emmanuel is pretty close to Dylan. That helps that he was there and saw what Dylan went through. I am sure it is overwhelming when you first step out on the match. He’ll have a tough first round match. But now with full wrestlebacks he can get a few

matches in and have some fun. That is really his overall goal.” Perera is seeded 30th at 126 pounds and will open against third-seeded Michael Kelly of St. Peter’s, Prep who is 32-4 and was second at the Region 4 tournament, losing 2-1 in the final to Joe Heilmann of South Plainfield. Heilmann is 40-0 and the No. 2 seed at the state tournament. In the 2017 state tournament at 120 pounds, Heilmann placed third and Kelly finished eighth.

Obituaries

Dietrich (Dee) Fredric Wahlers, Jr., 81

Dietrich (Dee) Fredric Wahlers, Jr., 81, of Cranbury, New Jersey, passed away on February 20, 2018 after a long stay at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania. Born in Maplewood, New Jersey in 1936, he was the son of Dietrich Fredric Wahlers and Anna C. Wendel Wahlers. He graduated from Columbia Highschool in 1955 and Gettysburg College, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania in 1959.

Dee was married to Barbara Sue Wahlers on October 16, 1959 in Chicago, Il. After three years of service in the United States Army (Fort Benning, Fort Meade, and The Pentagon) Dee moved to Short Hills, NJ. His professional career began with Ciba Geigy and he took evening classes to earn his MBA from Fairleigh Dickinson University. He spent the next forty years employed at Johnson & Johnson and Becton Dickinson. Dee was very involved with his son’s activities which included Boy Scouts (being an Eagle Scout himself), sports, and helping his sons on their paper routes. Due to the size of the Sunday Trenton Times, Dee would drive his son’s around Cranbury to insure prompt delivery! One of Dee’s many passions was the preservation of the Village of Cranbury. He contributed to this effort with his many hours of service while on the township committee, planning board, and environmental commission. Dee always considered Cranbury a special place and a town worth preserving for future generations. Dee was affectionately referred to by his grandsons and granddaughter as Grand D. He enjoyed relaying stories about his childhood, college days, and life on an army base! Always a life learner, Grand D intertwined personal anecdotes along with “real world” pearls of wisdom to his grandchildren. Dee is survived by his two sons and a daughter-in-law; Robert and wife Linda Harrigan Wahlers, grandson Declan; and son Peter and grandsons Ryan, Mason, and granddaughter Lauren, along with his sister Stephanie W. Krom of Holland, Michigan and many nieces and nephews.

Photo by Scott Jacobs

Hightstown High School's Johnny Andre, left, zones in against Northern Burlington's Tommy Hill in the consolation round of 182-pound weight class at the 2018 NJSIAA Region 6 Wrestling Tournament Feb. 24 at Brick Memorial High School.

NEWS

Officials create reward fund to combat vandalism By Philip Sean Curran Staff Writer

Mayor Glenn R. Johnson and two other officials agreed Monday to create a $300 reward from their own money for information leading to the conviction of whoever was responsible for two acts of vandalism in town.

Mayor Johnson said the first incident happened on Halloween night when a light fixture, on top of the water fountain that sits on the bridge on Brainerd Lake, was bent over. The second occurred sometime last week, he said, when two electrical outlets, on the section of the bridge projecting over the spillway, “were

kicked to pieces.” “When vandals do what they do, they steal from all of us,” he said. The mayor initially offered a $200 reward, with Township Committeeman Daniel P. Mulligan III and Vice Mayor James Taylor offering to increase that amount, by $50 each, to bring the total to $300.

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Interment service will be private for the family at Dietrich’s request. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made in Dietrich F. Wahlers’ memory to: The Cranbury Historical and Preservation Society Endowment Fund (CHPS Endowment Fund) History Center, 6 South Main Street, Cranbury, NJ 08512, or to a charity of your choice. A memorial gathering will be held on Saturday March 3rd at The Cranbury Inn, 6-8pm. Obituaries

Dorothy K. Thomson, 100

Dorothy K. Thomson who just celebrated her 100th birthday as a lifelong resident of New Jersey went home to be with her Lord on February 24, 2018. She attended college at NYU receiving a Master’s Degree in Secretarial Studies and worked many years with top executives in New York City. She later married the love of her life, Robert Thomson (deceased), and eventually moved to the Rossmoor Community in Monroe Twp. later in life. She loved golf, singing in the Rossmoor Choir, playing the piano or playing cards. She leaves behind many nieces and nephews along with a host of friends. The funeral will begin at 9 a.m. Monday March 5th at the Lester Memorial Home 16 W. Church St., Jamesburgfollowed with her burial at Brainerd Cemetery, Cranbury. A Memorial service will be held 11 a.m.Monday at the Rossmoor Community Church. Memorial donations in the name of Mrs. Thomson may be made to the charity of your choice. For directions to the funeral home or to send condolences to the family visit www. LesterMemorialHome.com


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Friday, March 2, 2018


Art of Sound in Lambertville is presenting a series of intimate concerts By Anthony Stoeckert

Frank Bell’s March 9 concert will open a series of intimate music performances at Art of Sound in Lambertville.

rank Bell’s career as a musician finds him performing in many venues that are not traditional theaters. Working with a company called Sofar Sounds, he plays his music in homes, lofts, warehouses and cathedrals. “As long as there are people to listen, anything can be a stage,” Bell says. “I think it’s cool to step out of conventional listening spaces as well because it creates more of a shared experience between the performer and the audience.” That makes Bell the perfect musician to open “The Art of Sound Unplugged,” a springtime acoustic series presented by The Art of Sound in Lambertville. Art of Sound is a showroom devoted to creating intimate music experiences. It was opened by John Nirmaier, who worked as a sound engineer, and his wife, Patti Giro. Art of Sound creates sound systems using high-end, stylish equipment. The show room in Lambertville features a listening room, designed for the ultimate music experience. The unplugged series will open March 8 with the concert by Bell. Next will be a tribute to Sarah Vaughan, April 12, and a program titled “Poetry, Prose & Potions,” May 10. Closing the series will be a tribute to Dave Brubeck with the Eric Mintel Jazz Trio, June 7. “The space is just really, really cool,” Bell says. “That building, it’s an old paper mill, and the way they have it set up, there’s exposed brick and wood vaulted planks and things. It’s a really cool environment, and it made sense.” Bell’s career in music started with training as a classical cellist before he started playing other instruments. “I eventually started writing my own music, kind of interpreting life’s experiences in my own words and notes,” Bell says.“It became something people seem to enjoy and something I enjoy.” He released a five-song EP, “On Passion and Reason” in 2010, followed by an album, “Everything Falls Into Place,” released in 2011. His concert will feature just him and a guitar, playing his original songs. In between tunes, he’ll share stories about his life and music. And these days, acoustic concerts are fitting his interests. “I prefer the intimacy,” he says. “And when it’s just me, it’s easier to catch a vibe, or not necessarily catch a vibe, but a different kind of vibe.” The concert will feature songs from throughout his career. “It’s a hodgepodge,” he says. “I very rarely make a set list or plan for these things in advance as far as what I’m going to play. But there’ll be a little bit of old, a little bit of new. Don’t get me wrong, there’s definitely merit to playing with a band, communicating and kind of having a family on stage. But sometimes, depending on the kind of mood I’m in and the size of the room, it makes more sense to just play solo and I can bring a lot to the table.”

Art of Sound in Lambertville will host an "Unplugged" series of concerts at its listening room this spring.

He writes songs about his life, what he observes about other people around him, and also about our shared experiences as human beings. Although he hasn’t released an album in nearly seven years, Bell says he’s done some recording and is figuring out the best way to release that music. “I’m not in a hurry to come out with a new record, but the last record I released, I was believe was in 2011, so obviously I’m always writing and recording a bit,” Bell says. There’s a lot going on in the world, of course, and he says like anybody else, all of that affects his

music, directly or indirectly. “It definitely influences my writing,” Bell says. “I try to be aware of where we are and where we’re potentially headed. One thing that’s always been consistent is the power of art, the power of music. I have a social responsibility, more or less, to create.”

Frank Bell will perform at The Art of Sound, 201 S. Main St., Lambertville, March 8, 7 p.m. Reservations are required and can be made by calling 609-483-5000. For more information, go to theartofsoundllc.com.

Also Inside: Reviewing ‘Moon Over Buffalo’ at Kelsey • Spring classical music preview


2B TIMEOFF

March 2, 2018

IN CONCERT

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By Anthony Stoeckert

Music for the Season Spring is offering a variety of classical concerts

It’s time to get out of hibernation and hear the music play. The next few weeks will see a bevy of classical concerts and performances from regional ensembles and concert series performed throughout the area. These concerts promise performances of great music, performed in beautiful settings by both professional and amateur groups. And affordable tickets for many of these shows make this the perfect time to log out of Netflix and get out of the house for some culture and entertainment. The Princeton Singers will perform a concert titled “In a Celestial Garden,” March 3 at Princeton University Art Museum. Conducted by Steven Sametz, the program will offer sacred music by Gregorio Allegri, Arvo Part and ! DAY William Byrd. Sign up TO ! s p There will two performances, beginning at 5:30 p.m. and m a c mer MUSIC m u S d n 8 p.m. at the museum’s medieval gallery. There will be a rea g Sprin ception between concerts. Tickets cost $15. For more inMontgomery Shopping Center 609-924-8282 formation, go to www.princetonsingers.org. West Windsor 609-897-0032 (lessons only) The Dryden Ensemble will present harpsichordist farringtonsmusic.com Adam Pearl in a performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations, March 4, beginning at 3 p.m. at Miller Chapel. Pearl, a laureate of the 2001 Jurow and 2004 Bruges international harpsichord competitions, will perform Bach’s Goldberg Variations, a monumental work for harpsichord with two manuals consisting of an aria followed by 30 variations. Dr. Pearl, a member of the Early Music faculty at Peabody Conservatory, has performed throughout the United States as well as in Europe, South America and Asia. He has been principal harpsichordist for Philadelphia’s Baroque orchestra, Tempesta di Mare since 2005. He has recorded on the Chandos, Dorian and Plectra labels. His recording of virtuosic works from the late French baroque will be released in 2018. The concert is part of the Dryden Ensemble’s seasonlong celebration of Bach, which will continue April with “Organic Bach,” an all-Bach organ recital featuring Eric Plutz, and “Bach & Beyond,” a chamber concert featuring music by J. S. Bach, Janitsch, Telemann, and J. C. Bach. Miller Chapel is on the campus of Princeton Theological Seminary, 64 Mercer St., Princeton. Tickets cost $25, free for students with ID. For more information, go to www.drydenensemble.org. Parents can share the joys of classical music with the children during Princeton University Concerts’ “Baby Got Bach: String ‘Stravaganza” with Orli Shaham and the Rolston String Quartet, March 17, beginning at 1 p.m. at Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall on the Princeton University Campus.  Classifieds Classifieds

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Harpsichordist Adam Pearl will join the Dryden Ensemble for a performance of Bach’s Goldberg Variations.

Shaham is a pianist and will act as a host for the concert, which introduced preschool kids to classical music. She will be joined by the Rolston String Quartet for a concert of chamber music with string and piano. Tickets cost $10, $5 children and are available at princetonuniversityconcerts.org or by calling 609-258-9220. La Fiocco will perform a concert titled “Vivaldi & Company; Sparkling Instrumental Works in the Italian Style,” March 17, beginning at 7:30 p.m. at All Saints Church in Princeton. Music on the program will include Baroque concertos and sonatas for oboe and strings, including the Oboe

See CONCERTS, Page 9B


March 2, 2018

TIMEOFF 3B

ART By Anthony Stoeckert

The Historic

Jean Négulesco’s “Still Life” from 1926 is on view in “The Artist Sees Differently” at Princeton University Art Museum.

Artistic Visions

Works by renowned artists are on view at Princeton University Art Museum

P

aul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, Georgia O’Keeffe, Georges Braque, Juan Gris, those are just some of the artists featured in “The Artist Sees Differently: Modern Still Lifes from The Phillips Collection,” on view at PUAM through April. 29. The 38 paintings in the exhibit are from the collection of Duncan Phillips and the artist Marjorie Acker Phillips. Duncan Phillips was an artist and collector, and a major figure in showcasing modern art in America. The exhibit displays several important still lifes of fruit, including Pierre Bonnard’s 1920 work, “Bowl of Cherries.” Wall text explains that the artist was more interested in how objects interact with each other to “create a harmonious construct of color, light, and shadow,” than in rending the object itself. In this painting, the cherries rest in a glass bowl

on a wooden table, with white pieces of china behind the bowl. Cezanne’s “Ginger Pot with Pomegranate and Pears” (1893) shows the fruits strewn about a wooden table. A table cloth is bunched together, and a plate holding a piece of fruit is half on the cloth, half on the table. To the left is another table with books and behind the table is a gray curtain. Harold Weston’s 1929 work “Melon” is an example of his colorful works depicting everyday life, according to wall text. In the work, melon slices are spread out on a plate, in a star-like shape. The plate sits on a table, covered by a light green-blue checkered cloth. A decanter and a glass also are on the table, which is pushed into the corner. To the left, a sliver of red floor can be seen. See ARTIST, Page 9B

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4B TIMEOFF

March 2, 2018

STAGE REVIEW By Anthony Stoeckert

‘Moon Over Buffalo’ at Kelsey M&M Productions gets big laughs with Ken Ludwig’s farce about life in the theater

O

pening and shutting doors may not seem like a special talent, but the cast of “Moon Over Buffalo” at Kelsey Theatre makes it an art form. During one of the highlights of Ken Kudwig’s backstage farce, all of the play’s characters are looking for one another, and they’re frantically entering and exiting the green room of a theater. A door opens, a panicky character enters the room, sees no one there, and exits in haste. Just as that door closes, another opens, with another character continuing the bit. It’s a classic farce move, one that always works when in the right hands, and the folks with M&M Productions, who are staging “Moon Over Buffalo’ at Kelsey through March 4, have very capable hands when it comes to comedy. In addition to the business with the doors, the actors in this production get laughs with their timing, physical antics and facial expressions. As is typical with farces, there’s a lot going on with the plot. The scene is Buffalo, 1953. George and Charlotte Hay (John Pinto and Maureen Hackett) are a married theatrical couple. They’ve had some success, but a few flops have led to them touring “Cyrano de Bergerac” and Noel Coward’s “Private Lives” in repertory. In case you don’t know, “Cyrano” is about a swordsman with a big nose who’s in love with Roxane. “Private Lives” is a sophisticated Noel Coward comedy about a divorced couple who both remarried and are honeymooning in the same hotel. They’re very different plays, and that’s important. Anyway, Charlotte dreams of Hollywood stardom, but George loves the theater and sees it as more noble than movies. Charlotte’s deaf mother Ethel (Linda Cunningham) doesn’t agree with her son-inlaw on much, but she’s on his side in this debate. Without theater, Ethel says, “We’d all be republican.” Charlotte and George have a daughter, Rosalind (Angela Fasanella). She used to be engaged to the stage manager Paul (Tim

Photo by John Maurer

From left: Tim Moran, John Pinto and Angela Fasanella in “Moon Over Buffalo” at Kelsey Theatre.

Moran), and is now engaged to Howard (Christopher “Lars” Schmalbach), a weatherman, and big fan of Rosalind’s parents. Rosalind is nervous about introducing Howard to her family, but he can’t wait. Howard even bought an old general’s costume George wore in a show. Meanwhile, George has had a fling with Eileen (Jennifer Litzinger), an actress in the show, and it turns out Eileen is pregnant. Meanwhile, Richard, “the accountant to the stars” (played by Matthew Cassidy) is in love with Charlotte and promises her a luxuri-

ous life if she leaves her husband for him. There’s more, including a huge fight between Charlotte and George over that bun in the oven. Then George finds out Frank Capra is coming to see the company perform because he‘s directing “Twilight of the Scarlet Pimpernel” and star Ronald Colman has broken both his legs. Capra needs a replacement, opening the door for Charlotte and George, and George is elated to tell his wife the news. “The most wonderful thing in the world has happened, Ronald Coleman is crippled,” he says with joy. But Charlotte thinks it’s a ruse to keep

her in Buffalo, making her even madder at her husband. She storms out, George gets drunk, and all seems lost. Pinto and Hackett have terrific comic timing and very funny facial expressions in playing this bickering couple, who deep down are quite fond of each other. Cunningham gets lots of laughs with her digs at George, who she blames for ruining her daughter’s Broadway career. George is such a ham, she says, “They should stick cloves in him and serve him with pineapple. As the daughter, Rosalind, Angela is playing the most normal character in the show, and gets plenty of laughs, particularly her jab about Buffalo being “like Scranton but without the charm.” Cassidy brings desperation, energy and heart to Richard (he also has a fun moment interacting with audience members). Schmalbach is funny breaking into weatherman mode; Litzinger plays the wronged young lover spot-on; and Moran gets big laughs as the stage manager, trying to woo his ex while holding the company together. M. Kitty Getlik directed the show. Getlik is the artistic director at Kelsey, and does lighting design for most productions there. She doesn’t get to direct often (the last time she did was in 2009), and she has a sure hand and keeps the pace face — the first act flew by. It culminates with a wonderful scene where the company performs “Private Lives” — or is is “Cyreno?” One of the characters gets it wrong, and thank goodness for that. We can all use a few good laughs right about now, and “Moon Over Buffalo” has plenty of them. Ï“Moon Over Buffalo” continues at Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor, through March 4. Performances: Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Tickets cost $18, $16 seniors, $14 students/children; www.kelseytheatre.net; 609-570-3333.


March 2, 2018

TIMEOFF 5B

THINGS TO DO

STAGE

“Moon Over Buffalo,” Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. M&M Stage Productions presents Ken Ludwig’s farce about a theater couple with a last chance at stardom, through March 4. Tickets cost $18, $16 seniors, $14 students/children; www.kelseytheatre.net; 609-5703333. “Red Velvet,” ActorsNET of Bucks County, Heritage Center, 635 N. Delmorr Ave., Morrisville, Pennsylvania. In the early 1800s, a black American Shakespearean actor finds he is not welcome on the London stage, but triumphs in Europe, March 2-8. Performances: Fri.-Sat. 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20, $17 seniors 62 and up, $10 children 12 and under; www.actorsnetbucks.org; 215-295-3694. “A Chorus Line,” Music Mountain Theatre, Route 1483 Route 179, Lambertville. Classic musical about 17 dancers vying for a spot in the chorus line of a Broadway musical. Songs include “One,” “What I Did For Love,” and “I Can Do That,” March 2-18. Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 3 p.m., 8 p.m., Sun. 3 p.m. Relaxed performance, Feb. 11, 3 p.m. Tickets cost $22; www.musicmountaintheatre.org; 609-397-3337. “California Suite,” Somerset Valley Players, 689 Amwell Road, Hillsborough. Neil Simon’s comedy about four different stories that take place in the same hotel room, March 2-18; www.svptheatre.org. “Trying,” George Street Playhouse, 103 College Farm Road, New Brunswick. Play about Francis Biddle, Chief Judge of the Nuremberg trials, and attorney general under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, March 13 through April 8; www.georgestreetplayhouse.org; 732-246-7717. “Fiddler on the Roof,” Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Maurer Productions OnStage presents musical classic set in a small village in Imperial Russia circa 1905. The plot focuses on Tevye, a poor dairyman struggling to hold onto his religion, his Russian-Jewish traditions, and his five daughters. Songs include “Tradition,” “Matchmaker, Matchmaker, and “Sunrise, Sunset,” March 16-25. Performances: Fri. 8 p.m., Sat. 2 p.m., 8 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20, $18 seniors, $16 students/children; www.kelseytheatre.net; 609-570-3333.

CHILDREN’S THEATRE “Goldilocks and the 3 Bears,” Kelsey Theatre on the campus of Mercer County Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West Windsor. Kaleidoscope Theatre presents the fairy tale musical about a little girl with the golden curls who encounters a family of bears who live peacefully in the woods. With the helpful participation of the audience, Goldilocks’s three furry friends teach her important lessons in kindness and acceptance, March 3, 2 p.m., 4 p.m. Tickets cost $12, $10 seniors/children; www.kelseytheatre.net; 609-570-3333. “Annie Jr.,” Music Mountain Theatre, Route 1483 Route 179, Lambertville. Shortened version of classic musical designed to be performed by kids. The show follows

the adventures of a depression-era orphan who gets to spend the holidays with the wealthy Daddy Warbucks, March 10-31. Performances are Saturdays at 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. $8; www.musicmountaintheatre.org.

MUSIC

A Jazzy Night at the Philharmonic Soprano Gianine Campbell will join the Capital Philharmonic of New Jersey during its “The Jazz Age” concert at the War Memorial George Washington Ballroom, 1 Memorial Drive, Trenton, March 10 at 7:30 p.m. Campbell will sing songs from Kurt Weill’s “Three Penny Opera.” Also on the program is Igor Stravinsky’s “Ragtime,” Darius Milhaud’s “Creation of the World” and “Jazz Symphony” by Trenton-born composer George Antheil. Tickets cost $30-$65; www.capitalphil-harmonic.org; 215893-1999.

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CLASSICAL MUSIC The Princeton Singers, Princeton University Art Museum on the Princeton University campus. Concert titled “In a Celestial Garden” featuring sacred music of Allegri, Pärt, and William Byrd’s Mass for 5 voices in the Medieval Gallery of the Princeton University Art Museum, March 3, 5:30 p.m., 8 p.m. (There will be a reception between concerts.) Admission costs $15; www.princetonsingers.org. Princeton University Concerts’ “Beyond the Music” series. Following a collaboration with the Brentano String Quartet, pianist Jonathan Biss returns March 7 for two free events as part of PUC’s “Beyond the Music” programming. Biss will present this season’s final Live Music Meditation at 12:30 p.m. in Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall on the Princeton University campus. The program offers an opportunity for the community to experience a half-hour meditation, guided by Associate Dean Matthew Weiner of the Office of Religious Life, to live music performed by Biss. At 4 p.m. Biss will teach Princeton University piano students in a Performers as Teachers workshop in the Lee Music Performance and Rehearsal Room in the Lewis Arts complex. For more information, go to princetonuniversityconcerts.org. “Baby Got Bach: String ‘Stravaganza,” Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, Princeton University campus. Princeton University Concerts’ family concert for kids ages 3 to 6. Hosted by pianist Orli Shaham, pre-school-aged kids are introduced to the joy of live classical music, joined by special guest artists the Rolston String Quartet, March 17, 1 p.m. Tickets cost $10, $5; princetonuniversityconcerts.org; 609-258-9220. La Fiocco, All Saints Church, 16 All Saints Road, Princeton. Program titled “Vivaldi & Company: Sparkling Instrumental Works in the Italian Style,” featuring Baroque concertos and sonatas for oboe and strings by Vivaldi, Al-

See THINGS TO DO, Page 6B


6B TIMEOFF

March 2, 2018

CROSSWORD PUZZLE “ISLAND HOPPING” By JOHN GUZZETTA ACROSS Clues with a dash are intentionally blank. 1 Pond organism 5 Traffic sound 9 Spin, for one 14 Niger neighbor 18 Slight mitigation? 20 One dressed for dinner? 22 “I didn’t mean that” 23 Defense opponent, briefly 24 Preliminary negotiations 25 27 Bivouac structure 28 Sportage automaker 29 Olympic skater Ito 31 Mag. edition 33 Obliterate 37 Blow bubbles into 40 Canberra school 41 Benjamin of “Private Practice” 43 Italian peaks 44 “Seriously?” 46 Teachers’ org. 48 Former Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale component 50 51 Fluorescent bulb element 52 53 Functions 55 Ring holders 56 Fish eggs 58 Toffee candy bar 60 Alloys, e.g. 61 Corner office execs 62 Word spoken con affetto 63 Fine-grained wood 64 Sleep it off 66 “Shame!” 67 “On the Good Ship Lollipop” performer 69 71 Tach figure 72 Youth support group 74 Antique 76 Storage facility sometimes found underground 77 New Mexico’s __ Ski Valley 78 “What __”: “Ho-hum” 79 Scoop

80 81 82 84 86 88 89 90 91 92 94 96 98 102 104 105 107 108 110 112 115 119 121 122 123 124 125 126 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Part of TNT Show some teeth Washington soccer team Lesser clergy member Confirmed Balaam’s mount Vade __: handbook Old Vatican bread Port of __: Trinidad and Tobago’s capital Fashion initials Hundreds, slangily Plane wing parts Driver’s lic. figure Lacking what it takes Mauna __ Blood prefix Check out a wreck, perhaps Babysitters’ woes Romcom, perhaps Piton user How titles may be written Sludge Wonder Woman’s __ of Truth Chinese: Pref. From Denver to Topeka DOWN Golfer Sorenstam Canadian coin Had success Picked hairdo Classic “Star Trek” order China’s Zhou __ Night school subj. Manning in Nationwide ads Amontillado holder Base reply? “__: Miami” Final part of a task Art Deco artist Watchword PC space bar neighbor Bloke

17 Early civil rights activist __ B. Wells 19 Pro, country-style 20 Colombian city 21 Clear-minded 26 “Single Ladies (Put __ on It)”: Beyoncé hit 30 Pair 32 Relish 34 ATV part 35 Watches secretly 36 Legal titles: Abbr. 38 Actor Lew 39 Some action figures 41 Successful shot 42 Vocal effect 45 Subway line with a Yankee Stadium stop 47 “Whoa!” 49 Payoff 51 “Laughing” Australian bird 52 “SNL” alum Kevin 54 Paul Bunyan tool 55 Chicago Museum of Science and Industry showpiece 57 Bobby on the ice 59 Has a loan from 61 Windy City transp. org. 62 Frito-Lay product with a spokes-feline named Chester 64 Put together, as film 65 U.K. heads 67 __ A: Italian soccer league

68 “The Simpsons Theme” composer Danny 70 105-Down launch 73 Slew 75 “... the worst thing you can __ nothing”: Teddy Roosevelt 77 Clobber 79 Attaché attachment 81 African bovines 82 Two-baggers: Abbr. 83 High 85 Timberlake’s former band

87 91 93 95 97 99 100 101 103 105 106 109

Approve Commissioner’s Trophy org. Welding fuel “And So __”: Billy Joel song Riyadh residents Kid-lit pig Elixirs Like the best wisdom Paving stone 70-Down launcher Classic language Dinner, for one

111 113 114 115 116 117 118 120

It has a Double Stuf variety The Beatles’ “__ Loser” Burrowing rodent Aetna offering Tic-tac-toe win Spanish light ER workers Young Skywalker’s nickname

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

THINGS TO DO Continued from Page 5B

binoni, A. Scarlatti, Stradella, Lotti, and Brehy, March 17, 7:30 p.m. The concert also will be performed at Trinity Episcopal Church, 6587 Upper York Road, Solebury, Pennsylvania, March 18, 3 p.m. Tickets cost $25, $10 students; lafiocco.org. Baroque to romantic organ recital, St. Paul Church, 216 Nassau St., Princeton. Members of the American Guild of Organists will perform a program on St. Paul Church’s four-manual, 65- rank organ, March 18, 2:30 p.m. For more information, go to www.agohq.org/chapters/centralnewjersey or call 609 921 7458. Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Richardson Auditorium, Alexander Hall, on the campus of Princeton University. Cellist and composer Joshua Roman performs his 2015 work “Awakening” under the baton of guest conductor Teddy Abrams. Joan Tower’s “Made in America” is also on the program, performed as part of the Princeton Migrations project. Ludwig van Beethoven’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major, Op. 68 “Pastoral” concludes the concert, March 18, 4 p.m. $35-$85; princetonsymphony.org; 609 497-0020.

JAZZ, CABARET, ROCK, FOLK, ETC. Le Cabaret Francais, The Mansion Inn, 9 So. Main St., New Hope, Pennsylvania. Cabaret hosted by Barry Peterson, with lyric books, sing-along and special performing guests, first Wednesday of each month, 7:45-10 p.m. $10 drink minimum; 215-740-7153. Princeton University Glee Club, Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall, Princeton. Featuring the United States premiere of John Tavener’s “Total Eclipse.” The program also includes George Frideric Handel’s Dixit Dominus, as well as a new work by Princeton University senior Shruthi Rajasekar, March 3, 7:30 p.m. Tickets cost $15; music.princeton.edu; 609-258-9220. “The Magic of Disney Love Songs,” Bordentown Regional Middle School, 50 Dunn’s Mill Road, Bordentown. Alexis Cole will sing songs including “When You Wish Upon A Star” from “Pinocchio” and “So This is Love” from “Cinderella.” Cole will be joined by music director Scott Archangel and backed by a jazz ensemble, string quartet and the Bordentown Regional Middle School Chorus, March 11, 3 p.m. $20, $5 students; 609-298-5465. Princeton Society of Musical Amateurs, Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Princeton, Route 206 at Cherry Hill Road, Princeton. Choral Reading of Haydn, “Paukenmesse” and Brahms, “Nanie.” Choral singers welcome. No auditions, no rehearsal, just the joy of song, March 11, 4 p.m. Members and students sing for free. Admission for guests costs $10. For more information, email musical.amateurs@gmail.com. Little Steven and The Disciples of Soul, State Theatre, 15 Livingston Ave., New Brunswick. Concert featuring Steven Van Zandt, guitarist for Bruce Springsteen’s E Street Band and producer who used the “soul horns-meet-rock ‘n’ roll guitars” approach he first pioneered on Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes’ classic first three albums, April 29, 8 p.m. Tickets cost $55-$125; www.stnj.org; 732246-7469

MUSEUMS

Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie Mansion, Cadwalader Park, Parkside Avenue, Trenton. “Going for the Gold: Trenton and the Olympics.” There have been 14 Olympic athletes associated with Trenton, from the 1928 Amsterdam Summer Games through the 1996 Atlanta Summer Games. Only two win medals: a gold and bronze. Discover who these Olympians are. Olympic posters from 12 Olympics attended by TMS trustee Karl Flesch are on display along with other Olympic memorabilia, through April 29. “The Bigger Picture,” an exhibition of paintings and sculpture by four recognized local artists that have combined forces to make a statement that supports the relationship between larger paintings, sculpture and the timely celebration of cultural differences, March 3 through April 29. Opening reception, March 3, 7-8 p.m. Reception and

Scenes of the City “Trenton Coliseum” is among the paintings by Suzanne Dinger featured in the exhibit “Outside/Inside,” at Rider University Art Gallery in the Bart Luedeke Center on the Rider campus, 2083 Lawrenceville Road, through April 15. Hours: Tues.-Thurs. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sun. noon to 4 p.m. For more information, go to www.rider.edu/arts. conversations with the artists, March 25, 2-4 p.m. Hours: Wed.-Sat. noon to 4 p.m. Sun. 1-4 p.m. www.ellarslie.org; 609-989-3632. Princeton University Art Museum, on the campus of Princeton University, Princeton. “The Artist Sees Differently: Modern Still Lifes from The Phillips Collection. Exhibit of 38 paintings from The Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C., offers an analysis of the modernist still life, including rarely seen works by European and American masters such as Paul Cézanne, Georges Braque, Pablo Picasso, Marsden Hartley, Milton Avery, and Georgia O’Keeffe, through April 29. Hours: Tues.-Wed., Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., Thurs. 10 a.m.-10 p.m., Sun. 1-5 p.m. Admission is free; artmuseum.princeton.edu; 609-258-3788. Morven Museum & Garden, 55 Stockton St., Princeton. “A Gentleman’s Pursuit: The Commodore’s Greenhouse” Exhibit reveals the findings at Morven from Hunter Research’s excavation of one of New Jersey’s earliest greenhouses, through June 3. Hours: Wed.-Sun. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $10, $8 seniors/students; morven.org; 609-924-8144.

Gallery. “Aldo Rossi: The Architecture and Art of the Analogous City.” Second retrospective of Aldo Rossi (19311997) in the United States since 1979 offers a new assessment of his multifaceted achievements as architect, designer, and theorist of architecture and the city, through March 30; soa.princeton.edu/aldorossi. Millstone River Gallery at Merwick Care & Rehabilitation Center, 100 Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro. “Art for a Wintry Season,” mixed media exhibit featuring works by Lauren Curtis, Mary M. Michaels, Debra Pisacreta, and Mickie Rosen, through April 20. For more information, go to princetonphotoclub.org. Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, 65 Olden Street, Princeton University campus. “Learning to Fight, Fighting to Learn: Education in Times of War,” exhibition at World War I and its effect on education, drawing from the university srchives and the public policy papers of Princeton University Library, through June 2018. Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 4:45 p.m. during the academic year; library.princeton.edu. Anne Reid ’72 Art Gallery at Princeton Day School, 650 Great Road, Princeton. “adaptation: an exploration of scale” featuring works by Lindsay Feuer, Carrie Norin, and Madelaine Shellaby, through March 8. Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. when school is in session. For more information, go to www.pds.org or call 609-924-6700, ext. 1772. The Rider University Art Gallery, Bart Luedeke Center on the Rider campus, 2083 Lawrenceville Road, Lawrenceville. “Outside/Inside,” an exhibit of works by alumna Suzanne Dinger featuring local infrastructures, as well as natural settings, through April 15. Artist’s talk, March 8, 7 p.m. Hours: Tues.-Thurs. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Sun. noon to 4 p.m. For more information, go to www.rider.edu/arts.

COMEDY

Stress Factory, 90 Church St., New Brunswick. Francis Ellis from Barstool Sports, March 3, 7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m., March 4, 7 p.m., $20; Dom Irrera, March 9-10, 7:30 p.m., 9:45 p.m., $22; www.stressfactory.com; 732-545-4242. Princeton Catch a Rising Star, 102 Carnegie Center, West Windsor. Tommy Savitt, March 2-3; James Goff, March 9-10; catcharisingstar.com; 609-987-8018.

DANCE

SUBMISSIONS Ellarslie Open 35 Annual Juried Show. The Trenton Museum Society announces Ellarslie Open 35 Call for Art. Every May and June, the Trenton City Museum at Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park in Trenton has hosted an open, juried show, “The Ellarslie Open, the most popular exhibit in its roster. Originally conceived to encourage local artists to submit their work for judging and display, the Ellarslie Open has grown to be one of the region’s most prestigious shows. Submissions are limited to six entries: March 1618, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Trenton City Museum Ellarslie in Cadwalader Park. For more information, go to ellarslie.org.

Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson Center, 1 Monument Drive, Princeton. Weekly Wednesday Contra Dance, March 7, 8-10:30 p.m. (Instruction at 7:30 p.m.), $10; Second Saturday English Country Dance, March 10, 8-11 p.m. www.princetoncountrydancers.org. M R Square Dance Club, Saint Luke’s (Episcopal) Church, 1620 Prospect St. Ewing. Weekly progressive dances. No prior experience is needed. Please be prompt. Tuesdays 7:30 p.m. $10 suggested donation; richd1squarerounddancer@msn.com; 609-844-1140.

GALLERIES

FILM

The Gallery at Mercer County Community College, Communications Building on MCCC’s West Windsor campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. “Passing the Palette: Arts Educators and Students,” showcasing the talents of high school art teachers and their students, through March 8. Hours: Mon., Tues., Thurs. 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., Wed. 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. www.mccc.edu/gallery. Arts Council of Princeton’s Taplin Gallery, Paul Robeson Center for the Arts,102 Witherspoon St., Princeton. Heroes of Comic Art, featuring original published artworks by Jack Kirby, Gil Kane, Carmine Infantino, Joe Kubert, Curt Swan, John Buscema, Jack Davis, Steve Ditko and other great artists that created many of the comic heroes that we enjoy in today’s books and films, through March 10. For more information, go to artscouncilofprinceton.org or call 609-924-8777. Princeton University School of Architecture North

Not-So-Silent Cinema: Charlie Chaplin, Bucks County Playhouse, 70 S. Main St., New Hope, Pennsylvania. Program featuring short films Chaplin made in 1916 and 1917 accompanied by original scores by Brendan Cooney, March 2, 8 p.m. $25; http://bcptheater.org; 215862-2121.

MISCELLANY

“Brexit, Ireland and the Rise of English Nationalism,” East Pyne Room 010 on the Princeton University campus. Fund for Irish Studies at Princeton University presents lecture by Irish Scholar and theater critic Fintan O’Toole. O’Toole’s writing on Brexit, the prospective withdrawal of the United Kingdom from the European Union, has won the European Press Prize and the George Orwell Prize for Journalism in 2017, March 2, 4:30 p.m. Free; fis.princeton.edu.


LIFESTYLE 7B

Friday, March 2, 2018

A Packet Publication

PACKET PICKS

LOOSE ENDS

Pam Hersh

March 4 Radio play at Princeton Library Raconteur Radio will present a staged radio play of “Sunset Boulevard,” beginning at 2 p.m. at Princeton Public Library. Based on the 1950 film, “Sunset Boulevard” tells the story of a forgotten silent film star and the events that led up to the murder of a struggling screenwriter found in the swimming pool of her mansion. The show features theatrical lighting, period costumes, vintage commercials, Golden Age radio equipment and sound effects. Community Room The library is located at 65 Witherspoon St., Princeton. For more information, go to www.princetonlibrary.org or call 609-924-9529.

March 7 Bernard Shaw lecture in Princeton Fintan O’Toole will present a lecture titled, “Bernard Shaw and the Uses of Celebrity,” beginning at 5 p.m. at the Friend Center, 65 Olden St., Princeton University. Daniel Mulhall, the Ambassador of Ireland to the United States, is scheduled to attend as an esteemed guest. The lecture, sponsored by the Friends of the Princeton University Library, will focus on Shaw, Nobel prizewinner and Academy Award winner, who is perhaps best known as the author of “Pygmalion” (his most popular and most frequently performed play). O’Toole’s new book, “Judging Shaw,” was recently published by the Royal Irish Academy. O’Toole is a lecturer in Irish Letters at Princeton University. He has been a drama critic for The Irish Times, New York Daily News, Sunday Tribune (Dublin), and In Dublin Magazine. Admission is free. For more information, go to library.princeton.edu.

Heifer living gift market in Skillman St. Charles Borromeo Parish will host the 2018 Heifer Living Gift Market, March 7, 6-8 p.m. Living gift markets supports the organization Heifer International, by raising awareness and revenue in order to help poor families throughout the world. Heifer International provides the animals as well as the technical training and follow-up support that recipients need to turn their animals into income that will support their families and even their surrounding community. The event will be set up like a farmers’ market. Participants can come to learn how life changing these animals can be to those who are in need. There are also many ways and price points for participants to financially support Heifer International at the event. St. Charles Borromeo Parish is at 47 Skillman Road, Skillman. For more information, email dsileo@ borromeo.org or call 609-466-0300, ext. 23.

March 8 Garden talk at Morven Marta McDowell, author of “All the Presidents’ Gardens,” will host a talk at Morven Museum & Garden, beginning at 7 p.m. Marta McDowell, New York Botanical Garden landscape historian and award-winning author, will explore the ways gardens are unwitting witnesses to history. Discussion highlights to include President Buchanan’s greenhouse, and Emily Dickinson’s, Mark Twain’s, and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s conservatories all contemporaries of Commodore Robert F. Stockton. Morven is located at 55 Stockton St., Princeton. Tickets cost $18. To register, go to morven.org.

Learning, and teaching, by doing Princeton Professor Michael Littman makes engineering accessible to students The biggest mistake I have made thus far in my role as a grandparent was showing my kids a picture of Princeton University Engineering Professor Michael Littman. He was standing with his structural creations — a pendulum clock taller me, bridges, and the Eiffel Tower — all made from Legos and Connex building blocks. Most notably, I said, he constructed these objects as part of his job. The occasion of my grandparenting miscalculation was Thomas Edison’s birthday on Feb. 11. I was trying to make a point that New Jerseyans should celebrate in February not only the legacies of Presidents Lincoln and Washington, but also New Jersey’s heritage of science and innovation, as represented by Thomas Edison. Professor Littman, a longtime acquaintance of mine, is someone who truly appreciates the importance of that heritage. The result, however, was that my grand babes wanted to adopt him as a grandparent and relegate me to the waste bin of those grandparents who simply spend a fortune on Legos, but can do nothing cool with them. A third picture of Dr. Littman, standing in front of a motorcycle that he built, threw Littman into superhero status in the minds of my kids. He told me to refrain from taking their rejection personally. With all of his cool toys and creations, he is an engineering Pied Piper to kids. One of the youngsters in his neighborhood was always requesting play dates with him, said Professor Littman, the father of grown children, but grandfather to none — yet. My grandkids announced that they first, wanted to go to work with him; and second, were convinced that they could build an Eiffel Tower, but not so sure about the motorcycle. Both comments would be structural music to the ears of educator Littman, who wants to do nothing more than enlighten and inspire people of all ages about the joys of engineering. His bio is intimidating, but for the nearly three decades that I have known him, I vouch for his completely down-to-earth demeanor and non-patronizing behavior toward engineering morons like myself. He is a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering, with a bachelor’s from Brandeis

Michael Littman uses his knowledge to make teaching engineering fun by building everythng from motorcycles to a model of the Eiffel Tower.

(Physics) and Ph.D. from MIT (Atomic Physics) and a string of publications with titles that boggle my mind. Littman’s research interests include automatic controls, tunable laser design, and bio-mimic robotics. His principal research concerns the Terrestrial Planet Finder, a project involving design and control of a high-contrast coronagraph. Most telling is the fact that in 2015 he won the Distinguished Teaching Award, the highest faculty honor conferred by Princeton’s School of Engineering and Applied Science. What he is doing now is combining his love of education with a love of laboratories and the history of science and engineering. His area of specialty for the past several years has been teaching engineering in a way that is accessible and compelling to both engineering and non-engineering students in the university. His signature course for engineering accessibility is Engineering in the Modern World, developed two decades ago with Dr. David Billington, who before his retirement taught at Princeton from 1960 through 2010. “That course got me very ex-

cited about [the] history of science of engineering and the engineering pioneers who revolutionized the world,” Littman said. “I started to dig deeper into the subject and needed to be certain that I understood the subject well enough to communicate the information effectively.” The way he learns — and the way he teaches — is by doing. “I believe that this is the most effective way to learn,” he said. “I taught myself electronics and mechanics not by just using a machine, but by actually building equipment and making it work.” This semester he is teaching his hands-on seminar and laboratory course about the engineering design of motorcycles. Students restore a vintage motorcycle — examine, disassemble, model test and rebuild a vintage motorcycle. No previous shop or laboratory experience is needed, liberal arts students as well as engineering students are welcome. “My learning-by-doing approach is analogous to what a soccer coach told me years ago. . . you can tell students something, show them, but the lesson only sinks in when you actually do it. .

. . Building the object and getting it to work also builds confidence,“ he said. Also fascinating to him is the history part, understanding how early scientists did so much with so little. Joseph Henry, who Littman calls “the most important” scientist of the early 19th century and first secretary of the Smithsonian, was a physics professor at Princeton from 1832 to 1846. His chief scientific contributions were in the field of electromagnetism, where he discovered the phenomenon of self-inductance. Littman said students are amazed that Joseph Henry’s measuring instrument was a magnetic compass, and his voltage source was a chemical battery and wires. He was able to do these elegant studies of electricity and magnetism without any expensive equipment. “When the students recreate his experiments, they learn the principles of physics and a lesson [perhaps a life’s lesson] of how you can do a lot with very little,” Littman said. Similarly, students comprehend computer technology when they build the equivalent of the Apple 1 computer and then program it. Professor Littman often takes his learn-by-doing projects outside of the Ivory Tower. He and his students have become ambassadors in the community (at the public library and Communiversity, for example) through the program known as Engineering Projects in Community Service (EPICS). In EPICS, students earn academic credit for their participation in multidisciplinary design teams that solve technologybased problems for local, not-forprofit organizations. Littman and his EPICS team are proud of the role they played with ISLES, a Trenton-based community development organization, that a few years ago saved and redeveloped the historic Mill One on the Trenton-Hamilton border. Princeton University’s Department of Engineering led the rebuilding of the factory’s 1895-era mechanical clock and developed a course through which students worked alongside the Isles design team to explore potential sustainable design elements of the mill restoration. One can say that the students engaged in well-timed, hands-on learning.


8B A Packet Publication

HEALTH MATTERS

The Week of Friday, March 2, 2018

Dr. Satyen Govan, DO

What are hospitalists and what do they do? In the past, when patients were admitted to the hospital, their primary care physician would come to the hospital to check on them and coordinate their care if they were treated by specialists or other healthcare professionals. Today, however, many primary care doctors spend their time only seeing patients in their office, and entrust hospitalists to care for their patients during a hospital stay. A hospitalist is a doctor who provides care exclusively for patients in the hospital. Hospitalists typically do not have outpatient practices, which means they can devote the majority of their time caring for hospitalized patients. If you or someone you know is hospitalized, it is important to understand what a hospitalist does and what you can expect from their care. What is the role of a hospitalist? The role of the hospitalist is to provide direct care to patients and to coordinate and manage a patient’s care from admission to discharge. A hospitalist looks at all aspects of a patient’s care and is the leader of the care team, which typically includes specialists, nurses, social workers, case managers and primary care physicians. In other words, a hospitalist can be thought of as a quarterback, coordinating the actions of the healthcare team.

What type of training do hospitalists have? The vast majority of hospitalists are doctors trained in internal medicine. At Penn Medicine Princeton Medical Center (PMC), all hospitalists are board certified internal medicine doctors who have undergone the same training as other internists, including medical school, residency training and board certification examination. Board certification is a process over and above medical licensure that demonstrates a physician’s exceptional expertise in a particular specialty. What are the advantages of having a hospitalist? Because hospitalists are on site and lack typical office time constraints, they are typically available to provide focused, face-to-face care 24 hours a day, seven days a week, year round. Put simply, they are there when you need them. Given they work in the hospital every day, hospitalists are familiar with the hospital’s protocols and processes, and have close working relationships with nurses and other staff. Additionally, hospitalists look at the big picture. While a patient may see multiple specialists during their stay, it is the job of the hospitalist to evaluate various treatment recommendations, coordinate testing and develop a plan of care that is right for the patient. Hospitalists are available to answer questions, discuss test results and engage in family discussions. They also keep current

charged and will provide the physician with a record of the patient’s hospital stay and discharge plan. How does a hospitalist work with a patient’s specialists? Often patients in the hospital have more than one health problem — or comorbidities in medical terms. In these instances, the goal of care is to treat the primary diagnosis that led to the hospitalization, while ensuring the other conditions are stable. It is the role of the hospitalist to communicate with the specialists and coordinate care.

Dr. Satyen Govan

on the latest advances in hospital medicine. Do hospitalists communicate with primary care physicians? Yes. Normally, if a patient is admitted trough the Emergency Department, the hospitalist will inform the primary care physician. If the admission is planned, the primary care physician will request that a hospitalist provide care during the patient’s stay. When a patient is admitted, the hospitalist will request their medical history and list of current medications. The hospitalist will also let the primary care physician know when a patient is dis-

Do hospitalists change during a patient’s stay? Depending on their length of stay, a patient could see more than one hospitalist. Hospitalists work in teams so when one hospitalist is off duty, another hospitalist who is familiar with the patient’s case will provide care. When a hospitalist goes off service they provide a detailed report to the hospitalist who sees the patient for the first time the following day to ensure a smooth transition and continuity of care. Do hospitalists communicate with a patient’s family? Patients who want to give a family member access to their health and treatment information must first give their hospitalist written permission. The hospitalist will likely request one point of contact — a spouse, partner, child, sibling — who can dissem-

inate information to other family and loved ones. If the patient is unable to provide written permission at the time of hospitalization, the hospitalist will refer any advance directives the patient may have.

When do hospitalists typically make rounds? At PMC, hospitalists typically make rounds in the morning and see most patients before noon. However, hospitalists are available day or night for questions, test results and family discussions. In addition, PMC provides notebooks for patients and their family to write down questions they want to remember to ask their hospitalist and to take notes. To learn more about hospitalists, Penn Medicine Princeton Health will air a pre-recorded USTREAM video with me on March 14 at noon on its Princeton Health on Demand USTREAM channel at http://www.ustream.tv/princetonhealth. To register to watch the premier and be entered for a chance to win a gift card visit httpwww.princetonhcs.org/events. To find a physician with Princeton Health, go to www.princetonhcs.org or call 888-742-7496.

Satyen Govan, DO, is board certified in internal medicine and sports medicine. He is the medical director of Princeton Medicine Physicians Hospitalist Service and a member of the Medical Staff of Princeton Health.

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A Packet Publication 9B

The Week of Friday, March 2, 2018

HEALTH MATTERS

Lisa Steinhilber

Animal-assisted therapy boosts mental health

Throughout history, animals have served as loyal companions to humans. Dogs particularly, have long been known for their unconditional love, offered freely and without judgment. It’s no wonder they’re called “man’s best friend.� Over the past decade, an increasing body of research has shown the physical benefits of pet ownership from reducing blood pressure to improved cardiovascular fitness. In addition, studies have shown that animals can also help reduce stress and improve mental health conditions, such as anxiety and depression. At Penn Medicine Princeton House Behavioral Health, animal-assisted therapy is helping patients of all ages overcome mental illness, emotional difficulties or substance abuse.

What is animalassisted therapy? As defined by the American Counseling Association, animal-assisted therapy is the incorporation of pets as therapeutic agents into the counseling process. More specifically, animalassisted therapy is a tool used to help individuals —

Good listeners It is believed that people relate to dogs so well because dogs seem to express some of the same feelings people experience. Just like people, dogs can be scared, sad, or excited. They can read body language and communicate through their own body language. For instance, a dog that rolls over on its back for a

belly rub is allowing itself to be vulnerable and showing it trusts you. Additionally, because dogs can only listen and do not judge, they provide a sense of safety for individuals, helping people to open up about their emotions and allowing them to start processing their feelings so they can manage them in a healthy way. For children especially, dogs or other animals in a therapeutic setting can help build self-esteem and leadership skills and teach impulse control and empathy. As part of animal-assisted therapy, individuals are encouraged to think about how the therapy dog might handle a certain problem or situation. Doing so enables the individual to see the problem from a different perspective and begin to identify solutions. Moreover, dogs sense when someone is struggling or sad and their presence can be soothing and calming. The sensory aspect of petting a dog or other animal can also help reduce stress, teach people how to be present and mindful, lower cortisol (the stress hormone) and release ‘feel good’ hormones that promote happiness.

late Baroque, and Albinoni’s oboe concerto is among the period’s greatest hits. But we will also hear lesser-known composers, including Brehy, who, though based in Brussels, was a follower of the Italian style. We hope the audience will find the entire program upbeat and enjoyable.� La Fiocco will also perform the concert at Trinity Episcopal Church in Solebury, Pennsylvania, March 18 at 3 p.m. Tickets cost

$25, $10 students. Tickets are sold at the door, cash or check. For more information, go to lafiocco.org. Members of the American Guild of Organists will perform an organ recital featuring composers from Baroque to Romantic, March 18 at St. Paul Church in Princeton. The musicians will play on the church’s historic 1925 Aeolian-Skinner organ, beginning at 2:30 p.m. The church is located

children and adults, men and women — process difficult emotions. Therapy dogs (or other animals) should not be confused with service animals, which live with their owners and are trained to assist their owners with specific medical conditions such as blindness or epilepsy. Moreover, therapy dogs are different than emotional support or comfort animals, pets that provide support to a person with mental illness. To be designated an emotional support animal, the pet must be prescribed by a licensed mental health professional for a person with mental illness. At Princeton House, therapy dogs are trained and certified to participate in the mental health treatment process, directed by a mental health professional.

As noted by the Ameri- planning can Psychiatric Association, • Evidence-based treatthe mental health benefits of ment animal assisted therapy in• Group and individual clude: therapy • Expressive therapies • Decreased anxiety like art and yoga •Increased sense of com• Psychoeducation fort and safety groups, with an emphasis on • Reduced loneliness family involvement and • Enhanced self-esteem support and confidence Princeton House’s ani• Increased prosocial bemal-assisted therapy prohaviors gram is directed by a • Decreased behavioral licensed clinician and curproblems rently involves a cockapoo Customized care Princeton House offers inpatient and outpatient treatment programs that are customized to meet the needs of children, adolescents, young adults, adults and older adults, along with specialized programs for men and women. Care is provided by board certified psychiatrists and physicians, registered nurses, master’s-level social workers, therapists and addiction counselors. Inpatient and outpatient programs are designed to meet unique developmental, diagnostic, and gender-related needs. Treatment programs feature: • A comprehensive evaluation • Personalized treatment

Concerts Continued from Page 2B Concerto in D minor by Tomaso Albinoni (Op. 9 No. 2); Vivaldi’s Concerto in C Major (RV 87) for Recorder, Oboe, and Continuo; and the Sonata for Oboe, Strings, and Continuo in G minor by Petrus Brehy. “The music in this concert is marked by its buoyancy, melodiousness, and rhythmic vitality,� says Lewis R. Baratz, artistic director for La Fiocco. “Vivaldi was one of the most influential composers of the

named Sadie. For more information, go to www.princetonhouse.org or call 888-437-1610.

Lisa Steinhilber, Ed.S., L.P.C., A.C.S. is a licensed professional counselor and approved clinical supervisor. She is a senior primary therapist with Penn Medicine Princeton House Behavioral Health, a division of Penn Medicine Princeton Health.

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Artists

Continued from Page 3B

Marjorie Phillips’ 1922 work “Poppies and Cornflowers� is a stunning, deceptively simple work. Beautiful flowers of various colors are in a glass vase on a wooden table against a black background. Two books are on the table, and most fascinating is the view of the flowers through the glass vase. Another simple image is depicted in Walt Kuhn’s “Bread and Knife,� from 1934. In it a loaf of bread is nestled in a soft, white cloth, a sharp knife is placed in front of the bread. Like Phillips’ painting, the background is black.

And of course, visitors to the exhibit won’t want to miss the two works by Pablo Picasso — “Studio Corner� (1921) and “Still Life with Glass and Fruit (1939). “The Artist Sees Differently� is on view at Princeton University Art Museum on the Princeton University campus, through April 29. Hours: Tues.-Wed. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Thurs. 10 a.m. to 9 .m., Fri.-Sat. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sun. noon to 5 p.m. Closed Mondays. For more information, go to artmuseum.princeton.edu/ or call 609-258-3788.

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Mercer County Top Producers

TOP PRODUCERS MAKE THEIR MARK IN MERCER COUNTY the members of the Mercer County Top Producers Association Oversoldthemorepastthanyear,2,149 homes with over $855 million in total sales volume. The MCTPA is comprised of the best agents from many of the local real estate firms. All of them are recipients of the prestigious NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Sales Award®. Their commitment to professionalism, performance, dedication and service to the customer is top priority. Their purpose is to offer home buyers and sellers the highest level of service available. When hiring a Top Producer you are also tapping into the experience of 82 agents. Their monthly meetings give them an opportunity to share their expertise and techniques

with each other, announce new listings and listen to real estate related professionals who keep them educated on the latest laws, practices, new products, market trends and new technology. This ultimately makes their clients home buying and selling process a satisfying experience. There are many steps in the home buying and selling process. Working together, they can make this process seamless for both the buyer and seller. At monthly meetings, your agent will be telling 82 agents about your new listing sometimes before it even hits the market. This gives your home a head start by making these agents aware of the property so they can already be thinking of a buyer who might be the perfect fit for your home. At the end of each year, the Mercer County Top Producers donate money to local charities, such as Homefront, Housing Initiatives of Princeton, Toys for Tots and the Mercer Street Friends Food Bank. If you are looking to buy or sell a home, be sure to call one of these top agents in your area. The Members of the Mercer County Top Producers Association are committed to supporting the communities in which they work and are strong supporters of local charities.

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Great opportunity in Brandon Farms. Updated 2,462 SQFT model. This home features a 2-Story Foyer w/hrdwd flrs, upgraded trim package, and 9’ ceilings. First Level features a FLR & DR. Bright & sunny kit overlooks yard. Kit features Granite Counters, Double SS Sink, Range, Dishwasher, Bow Window, French Doors to Deck & Center Island. laundry Room located off Kitchen. Fam Rm w/wood-burning Frple & Built In Cabs. The Master Suite boasts (2) Walk In Closets & Bow Window that overlooks Yard. Mast bath features a corner Garden Tub & Stall Shower. 3 addt’ BRs, Full Finished W-O Bsmnt w/full size windows, Double Door to Yard, Recessed Lights, Bar Area & Wine Room. A Wonderful Place to Call Home!!

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Traditional, center hall Colonial boasts sunny Living Room with pocket door & finished, wide plank flooring, Family Room with bow window, window seat & fireplace flanked by custom built-ins, adjacent Kitchen with Viking Stove, SubZero refrigerator, custom light fixtures & granite-topped center island. Upstairs: 4 bright, corner Bedrooms, 2 updated Baths plus large walk-in attic. Sited on a lovely, 1+ acre lot with in-ground swimming pool, too! $699,000 Listed by Anne Nosnitsky of the Princeton office (609) 921-2600, cell (609) 468-0501.

5 WEST SHORE DRIVE

At first glance, you will be captivated by the impressive curb appeal of this extraordinary Colonial home located in Elm Ridge Park. This meticulously maintained home boasts a plethora of amenities. In autumn and winter months, enjoy and embrace the chilly evenings by cozying up to any one of this home’s 3 wood-burning fireplaces. Watch your favorite movie in the privacy of your own home theater. Celebrate the spring and summer months in your private back yard oasis. Enclosed gunite pool, tranquil waterfall, lush landscaping and darling tree house complete this wonderful outdoor space. Live the life you imagined at 5 W. Shore Drive. $899,000 Listed by Alison “Ally” Steffans of the Pennington Office (609) 737-9100, cell (609) 558-2555.

4 NORTH WOODS DRIVE

Tucked on a cul-de-sac, this 3 Bedroom, 3.5 bath Contemporary defines convenient, one story living. A spacious & flexible floor plan offers a variety of multi-generational living options. Sky-lit, vaulted living room with adjacent dining room & comfortable family room, the spacious kitchen with SS appliances includes a pass-through to the breakfast room & an office w/private entrance. Master suite boasts updated bath. Finished lower level w/recreation room w/wet bar, game/craft room, full bath & unfinished storage space. Enjoy the resort-style, acre plus yard, poolside or on the generous deck! $674,900 Listed by Michelle Needham cell (609) 839-6738, and Ann Nosnistsky cell (609) 468-0501 of the Princeton Office (609) 921-2600

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Magdalena Amira

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Deborah Benedetti

Harveen Bhatla

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Michelle Blane

Beatrice Bloom

Helen “Sandy” Brown

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Sales Associate Keller Williams® Princeton Realty

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Sales Associate Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s Realty

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Broker Associate Weidel Realtors® Princeton

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Broker Associate ReMAX of Princeton

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Jud Henderson

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Lori Janick

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Ingela Kostenbader

Anjie Kumar

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Sales Associate Callaway Henderson Sothebys International Realty

Sales Associate Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty

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Debbie Lang*

Lisa LeRay

Donna Lucarelli

Rachna Luthra

Eric MCroy

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Dawn Monsport

Donna Murray *

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Broker of Record Realty Mark Advantage

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Broker Associate Keller Williams® Princeton Realty

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Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Sales Associate Century 21 Abrams, Hutchinson & Associates

Anne Nosnitsky

Catherine O’Connell

Roberta Parker

Blanche Paul

Linda Pecsi

Dawn Petrozzini

Eva Petruzziello

Mary Reiling

Lynda Schrieber

Broker Associate Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

Realtor® Associate Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Princeton

Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors

Broker Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Broker Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Broker, Owner RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Broker Sales Associate Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Sales Associate Weidel Realtors

Allison “Ally” Stephans

Kimberly Storcella

Lee Yeen Tai

Sales Associate Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

Sales Associate Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

Smita Shah

Denise “Dee” Shaughnessy

Helen Sherman

Marina Shikman

James “Jim” Simmons

Valerie Smith

Broker Associate RE/MAX Greater Princeton

Sales Associate Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty

Secretary Broker Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Sales Associate Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage

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Sales Agent Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

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Carole Tosches **

Linda Twining

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William Usab, Jr.

Robin Wallack

Sales Associate Gloria Nilson & Co. Real Estate

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Broker Associate Keller Williams® Princeton Realty

Broker Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Sales Associate Weidel Real Estate

Ivy Wen Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

Sales Associate Keller Williams Princeton Realty

Amy G. Worthington Broker Associate Callaway Henderson Sotheby’s International Realty

Yael Zakut Sales Associate Berkshire Hathaway Fox & Roach Realtors®

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Week of March 2nd 2018

609-586-1400

105 FARNSWoRth AVE, BoRdENtoWN CitY Unique opportunity in Bordentown City’s Bus. District. 3 story brick building & may accommodate retail, comm. prof., residential or multi-fam. w/approvals. MLS#7056921 $395,000 609-298-3000

34 hoNEYMAN dR, RARitAN tWP. Warm & inviting Colonial w/ updated kitchen. All public utilities! 1 Year Home Warranty included! MLS #3448647

9 PAtERSoN Rd, REAdiNgtoN tWP. 4200 SF custom built Tudor style home on 3 acres of serene country living. Home warranty included! MLS#3449024

17 WiNdiNg WAY, YARdViLLE Fantastic 3 BR, 1 ½ BA move in ready split level offers LR w/hrdwd flr,formal DR, EIK, family room, home office and enclosed sun porch. MLS#7130707

$389,900

$639,900

$259,900

908-782-0100

908-782-0100

2028 SYLVAN PARK, BURLiNgtoN Lake Front Property offers 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room, upgraded kitchen, baths plus 3 car garage. Renovated & ready for its new owner. MLS#7113940 $300,000 609-298-3000

19 PERShiNg AVE, EWiNg tWP. In the Glendale area of Ewing a totally renovated multi family home. Perfect for Live in one and have the others pay your mortgage MLS#7123950 $385,000 609-737-1500

15 SCUddER Rd, EWiNg Fully renovated Custom Bi-level in desirable Scudder Falls near the Topath, Wash. Crossing State Park, and major roadways. 3 bed., and 2 full updated baths. Open Concept, fam. room w/ dry-bar, wood stove. MLS #:7123950 $380,000 609-737-1500

76 FEdERAL CitY Rd, EWiNg tWP. Sprawling and beautifully maintained 4bed,2bath, ranch style home on gorgeous hilltop lot! Full bsmt, 2 car gar, huge rear porch! MLS#0000000 $254,900 609-921-2700

115-117 REEgER AVE, hAMiLtoN Income producing Multi Family home in Hamilton Twp. Both units have 2 bedrooms, 1st expanded living space including partially finished basement.

24 ChEVERNY Ct, hAMiLtoN Spacious 2 Bedroom 2.5 Bath Two-Story Townhome in desirable Society Hill II, near Veterans Park. Entrance in rear w/ wooded views.

2 PoNd ViEW LANE, hoPEWELL tWP. Stunning 4 bed, 2.5 bath, 3800 sf home in desirable Hopewell Ridge on 1.84 acre lot. Upgrades galore! MLS#7118306

9 CLiNtoN St, LAMBERtViLLE CitY An exclusive opportunity to own one of three luxury townhomes in the heart of Lambertville with the D&R canal in your backyard. Pricing starting at $699,900. MLS#6837213

$248,000

$189,900

$779,000

4412 NottiNghAM WAY, hoPEWELL tWP. Appealing 3 BR, 1 ½ BA Split located in desirable Hamilton Square. Hardwood flooring, spacious LR, EIK, family room, 3 tier deck and central air. MLS# 7052596 $279,900 609-586-1400

83 ZioN WERtSViLLE Rd. MoNtgoMERY 2 bedroom, 1 bathroom single family home located in Montgomery Township.

WiLLiAMS tWP, CoMiNg SooN BY THE STREAM: 1820 Stone house next to the stream. Gourmet kitchen, 3 Bedrooms and Family Room, 5 FP, Vintage and Modern touches. MLS#7126242 $599,000

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27 hoNEY FLoWER dR, BoRdENtoWN 2 Bed. 2 Bath w/2 car gar. and Deck in 55+ Village Grande. Come check me out! MLS#7099885 $344,900 609-298-3000

609-298-3000

609-737-1500

609-921-2700

193 N UNioN St, LAMBERtViLLE CitY Live in one and rent out the other! Vintage townhouse with two units: upstairs/downstairs apartments have separate utilities, central AC, new furnace, built-ins, big new windows in front. Walk to all amenities! MLS#7058498 $429,000 609-397-0777

4 ViStA dR, LAWRENCEViLLE This outstanding 6,500sf home with Princeton address is situated on 1.92 professionally landscaped property. Beautifully restored w/approved new septic. MLS#6968372 $1,134,999 609-921-2700

7 WoodFiELd LANE, LAWRENCEViLLE 5 bedroom, 3 and ½ bathroom colonial style home located in Hudler Farms MLS #:7126571 609-737-1500

15 PAgodA Ct, LAWRENCEViLLE Charming 2 BR,2.5 BA townhome in desirable Society Hill neighborhood near downtown Lawrenceville. Few miles S. of Princeton, min. to I-295/95, Rt 1, and Hamilton Train Station. MLS#7124155 $235,000 609-921-2700

8 tiMKAK LANE, PENNiNgtoN 4 bedroom 5 and ½ bathroom traditional style home located in Ridings. MLS #:7127040

114 dRUMMoNd dR, PENNiNgtoN 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom ranch style home located in Princeton Farms. MLS #: 7130272

$819,000

$415,000

31 RiChEY PLACE, tRENtoN A rare opportunity to own one of Trenton’s grand old homes. 5 bedrooms, 2 full & 2 half baths. Beautifully restored and updated to maintain the charm of yesteryear with modern conveniences of today. A Must see!!! MLS# 7127251 $305,500 609-586-1400

3010 WiNdY BUSh Rd, UPPER MAKEFiELd tWP. C.1890 Windy Bush Estate is a 10 acre oasis of country farmlands and gently rolling hills. Many possibilities horses, crops etc. Original Fieldstone House features generously sized rooms. MLS#7103893 $1,350,000 215-862-9441

609-737-1500

609-737-1500

$625,000

$699,900

609-397-0777

$199,000

609-737-1500

Call the ROCCO D’ARMIENTO TEAM today!

Rocco can help you sell your home in Cranbury, NJ or the surrounding areas and move to Pennsylvania! Currently, Pennsylvania has lower taxes, lower home prices, and lower income taxes! There is no income tax on retirement! (Please refer to your accountant). In today’s demanding real estate market, you need the best and most knowledgeable real estate professional. Rocco lives and works in the NJ-PA area and has a thorough knowledge of the business demographics. As a full time residential and commercial Realtor®, Rocco D’Armiento has an expansive business footprint, from Philadelphia to Central NJ and beyond, with offices in Princeton, NJ and Yardley, PA. After college, Rocco became the owner of Cranbury Paint & Hardware in Cranbury, NJ for 20 years and has an absolute comprehension of Central NJ and commuting to PA. In 2004, inspired by his own entrepreneurial spirit, Rocco began his real estate career. Combining his knowledge from being a business owner in Cranbury with his familiarity of Bucks County, where he raised his children and lives, Rocco offers his clients a wealth data to his clients. As a top producing agent, in the top 1% of Realtors in the surrounding areas in both New Jersey and Pennsylvania, Rocco goes above and beyond for his clients, enabling them to reach their real estate goals. His strength of character, knowledge and credibility help prospective buyers or sellers make the most informed real estate decisions.

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Help Wanted

TIMESHARE FOR SALE Hilton Grand Vacation Club West 57th st.. New York. Posh area, near Central Park. 1 Bedroom Premier. Platinum Week. 12,600 annual points. $98,000. 609-933-3767

Senior Java Developer @ Bloomberg (Princeton, NJ) F/T. Dsgn & implmnt REST & XMLbased wb serv usng Java. Pos reqs MS deg or frgn equiv in Comp Engg, IN, Comp Sci, Engg or rltd & 1 yr exp in job offd or as Sftwr Dvlpr, Sr Sftwr Dvlpr, Sr Cnsltnt, VP or rltd. Alt, Emp will accpt Bach deg & 5 yrs of prgrssvly resp exp. Mst have 1 yr of exp in each skill: Relational databases; SQL development; Messaging middle-ware; Linux; and Data structures, algorithms, and object-oriented design concepts. Emp will accpt any suita combo of edu, training or exp. Send res to Bloomberg HR, 731 Lexington Avenue, NY, NY 10022. Indicate B7-2018. EOE

Condo for Rent LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ Spacious one bedroom, one bath condo. In a quite and beautiful meadow woods. Laundry room is in the building. Large eat in kitchen, bedroom has 2 large closets, spacious living room with outdoor sitting, tennis court, swimming pool, and new courtyard. Rent $1200 plus utilities. Pets are negotiable!! Please call 609-297-0203 Houses for Rent HOPEWELL TWP located on beautiful 250 acre estate. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Next to golf course. Full deck and full basement. Available immediately. $1500 mo plus utils. Contact Dave 609-841-5157

Fitness Instructors PT for adult communities. Aqua aerobics, dance, strength, tai Chi, Yoga. Experience preferred, but will train. Call 732-742-3514. PAINTER Full time , must have transportation! Pay based on experience. Call Mark 609-921-0066

YOUR DREAM JOB! A career in summer camping. Full/Part Time Position open for highly motivated and organized person with good admin skills. Great opportunity for recent college grads or people looking for a career change. You must have a college degree, good communication and customer service skills and be interested in a challenging and rewarding career working with children. send resume to jonathan@ oakcrestdaycamp.com Announcements Energetic Healings offered in Bound Brook New Jersey. Please call 732-233-4746 between the hours of 9am and 4pm Monday through Friday. Garage Sale NEWPORTVILLE. PA 19056 HUGE ESTATE SALE Thursday March 8, 4 pm - 8 pm Friday March 9, 10 am - 4 pm Saturday and Sunday March 10 & 11, 10 am - 3 pm See www.thetagladies.net or cavanscloset.com for info and times. 2700 New Falls Road

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ROCCO D’ARMIENTO REALTOR®, e-Pro, SRES Five Star REALTOR award since 2010. Selling Residential & Commercial • Licensed in NJ & PA NJ REALTORS® Circle of Excellence Award® Winner - Gold 2012

Cell: 267-980-8546 Office: 609-924-1600 ext. 7601

Rocco.DArmiento@FoxRoach.com www.roccodarmiento.foxroach.com A member of the franchise system of BHHS Affiliates, LLC.

253 Nassau Street Princeton, NJ 08540

609-924-1600

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