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WAS JUSTICE SERVED IN CASEY ANTHONY CASE? — SEE A10

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Filling holes

Day in the life UCF alumnus styled for Vogue Japan in New York City — SEE News, A2

Rooney and Mercadante recruit to fill baseball’s holes — SEE SPORTS, A8 People

BRAZILIAN BOY IS QUITE

MAGNETIC

An 11-year-old boy in Brazil’s northeastern city of Mossoro is drawing attention with his purportedly magnet-like qualities. The Globo TV network has broadcast images of Paulo David Amorim demonstrating how forks,knives, scissors,cooking pans,cameras and other metal objects seem drawn to his body and remain stuck on his chest, stomach and back.

www.CentralFloridaFuture.com • Monday, July 11, 2011

The Student Newspaper at UCF since 1968

Sexy satire steals the stage Popular comedy comes together in weeks SALO STEINVORTZ Staff Writer

Students of the UCF Conservatory Theatre experienced the lightningfast pace of professional acting during Summer B, managing to have a worldfamous play ready for audience approval in three weeks. Love, Sex and the IRS, which was originally writ-

ten by Billy Van Zandt and Jane Milmore in the late 1970s, was performed for the first time at the university’s Black Box Theatre July 7. According to Christopher Niess, director of the UCF Conservatory Theatre, the globally recognized play has been staged more than 1,000 times worldwide. “It was quite difficult

For more photos of the show visit: www.UCFNews.com and rewarding at the same time to present this play,” Niess said. “The short summer allows us to have a more dynamic schedule, but that also means less time to practice. This is what the schedule of pro-

PLEASE SEE LOVE ON A3

KATIE DEES / CENTRAL FLORIDA FUTURE

Michael Atteo,left,and Robert Svetlik,right,play out-of-work musicians named Jon and Leslie who file tax returns as a married couple to save money.

People

BANANA MAN GOES APE ON

MASCOT

The Wireless Center in Strongsville, near Cleveland,advertises at curbside with a man in a gorilla suit. Manager Brandon Parham says he was watching last week as a kid dressed as a banana emerged from some bushes and took a flying leap at the store mascot. Parham says the attacker looked like a Spartan from the movie 300 — except he was a banana.

Breaking news on your cell Get UCF news sent to your cell phone. Just text the keyword UCFNEWS to 44636.

AROUND CAMPUS,A2

DEVELOPING TRUE COLLEGE FRIENDSHIP WITH KNIGHTS Dispute Resolution Services,part of the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities,will host a workshop on friendship on July 11,from 5 p.m.to 6 p.m.in the Hercules Programming Center.

LOCAL & STATE,A2

FL RESIDENTS DISPOSE OF 58,000 UNWANTED PILLS

Nearly 60,000 unused or expired prescription pills were turned in to authorities in Broward County as part of a prescription pill “take back”event.

Caring for the coast Students prevent shoreline erosion JORDAN SNYDER Senior Staff Writer

UCF students have been working to save historic shell mounds around Florida’s coast from erosion using natural solutions. Using a method known as “living shorelines,” or implementing the installation of oyster mats, spartina grass and mangroves to absorb the energy of the tide, their efforts have garnered national attention. “We have recently received funding from the National Park Service to begin living shoreline stabilization of five additional shell middens within Canaveral National Seashore,” Dr. Linda Walters, UCF professor of biology, said. “We will be looking for volunteers to help prepare and deploy materials over the next 12 months.” Field & Stream recently acknowledged the team as “Heroes for a Day” because of their efforts to save Turtle Mound, a historical Native American site located in New Smyrna Beach, from erosion. “Greg Harrision, who we met through the Coastal Conservation Association and who volunteers on my projects, was the magazine’s hero,” said Walters, UCF’s resident oyster expert. “Through this, we received support for our project from Field and Steam and every-

WUCF launches despite obstacles Station survives after Gov. Scott’s veto CAMILLE THOMAS Staff Writer

PHOTOS COURTESY DR.LINDA WALTERS

UCF biology professor Dr.Linda Walters and a team of students lay oyster mats,which is one of the ways to provide natural shoreline protection,at Turtle Mound in New Smyrna.

important to Native American cultures,” Walters said. “This midden dates back to the year 700 and will be one who participated that excavated later this month weekend were called Heroes by National Park Service for a Day.” archeologists.” On April 31, Walters and It took nearly two years to more than 250 volunteers put the two-day event covered more than 200 together. meters of shoreline in an “We had dozens of volunattempt to stop erosion of teer events to prepare the the largest shell midden in oyster shell mats,” Walters the state. said. “We began working A midden, according to with teachers in seven centhe American Heritage Dic- tral Florida schools in tionary of the English Lan- August to grow mangroves guage, is a mound or deposit and spartina. Then, there containing shells, animal were over 100 pages of perbones or other materials that mitting. Getting all the mateindicates the site of a human rials procured and on site, settlement. and finding and organizing Turtle Mound shows the volunteers, were all complihistory of the Timucua tribe. cated and fun jobs. It was an “It contains a lot of their amazing weekend, so it did refuse, including oyster and all come together really clam shells, fish and mam- well.” mal bones, pottery, etc., Colleen Devlin, a secondthereby giving us a glimpse year conservation biology of the amazing history of the PLEASE SEE SHORELINE ON A6 area and are extremely To comment on this story visit: www.UCFNews.com

Despite support from the Orlando community, WUCF-TV’s process to adopt PBS to its network has not gone without its share of obstacles. According to Grant Heston, assistant vice president for UCF News and Information, WUCF and WBCC had six weeks to upgrade their reception quality to high definition, reach agreements with cable companies, launch a website and begin broadcasting. “We did in six weeks what most stations have six months to do and that was create a new PBS broadcast network,” Heston said. WUCF is now in partnership with WBCC of Brevard Community College to offer public broadcasting via PBS. Heston said that funding for WUCF-TV and WBCC has been a challenge from the beginning. On the same day WUCF-TV launched, July 1, Governor Rick Scott vetoed $4.8 million in funding for public broadcasting. “The partnership lost about $50,300, and Brevard lost $300 plus. We will have to be more aggressive about getting funding and more efficient in how we

PLEASE SEE COMMUNITY ON A5 Have you watched WUCF TV lately?: www.UCFNews.com

MIAMI BOMB SCARE SUSPECT TO GET MENTAL HEALTH EVAL A mental health evaluation has been ordered for the man police say drove the hearse involved in Miami's bomb scare. Twenty-eight year-old Lee Lewis was being held at a detention center on $36,500 bond after a hearing Sunday.

INDEX Around Campus Weather Local & State Sports Opinion Classifieds Sudoku Crossword

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TODAY’S WEATHER

SCATTERED T-STORMS

91º 75º HIGH LOW

KATIE DEES / CENTRAL FLORIDA FUTURE

Since its approval and launch,WUCF TV has undergone a speedy process to adopt PBS into its network.


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www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

AROUND CAMPUS News and notices for the UCF community

Developing true college friendship with Knights

Dispute Resolution Services, part of the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities, will host a workshop on friendship on July 11, from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m. in the Hercules Programming Center. The workshop will teach students what characteristics make a person a good friend and how to deal with issues that could test a friendship. Students are encouraged to bring a friend, roommate and/or classmate. Freshmen students can earn 500 LINK points for attending. No RSVP is required, but attendance will taken. For more information on the event, visit http://www.drs.sdes.ucf. edu or contact Jennifer Wright at 407-823-4544 or jennifer.wright@ucf.edu.

LOCAL & STATE Keep local with headlines you may have missed

Fla.residents dispose of 58,000 unwanted pills

WESTON — About 58,000 unused or expired prescription pills were turned in to authorities in Broward County as part of a prescription pill “take back” event. Hundreds of people showed up Saturday at the Sheriff’s Office to turn in 58,000 prescription pills and shred 15,000 documents. Participants of the pill-take-back program, also called Operation Medicine Cabinet, are given $5 gift cards.

Miami bomb scare suspect to get mental health eval

MIAMI GARDENS — A mental health evaluation has been ordered for the man police say drove the hearse involved in Miami’s bomb scare. Twenty-eight year-old Lee Lewis was being held at a detention center on $36,500 bond after a hearing Sunday. Police found Lewis’ abandoned hearse on Friday filled with what appeared to be a cache of weapons, ammunition and rocket launchers. Authorities later said the weapons were fake replicas. The investigation closed major highways and snarled traffic for hours. According to his MySpace page, Lewis says he’s a fetish model and fireplay entertainer.

July 11, 2011 •

A DAY IN THE LIFE WARDROBE ASSISTANT

Alumnus styles in the city Appreciation for fashion turns into styling career BRANDI BROXSON UCF alumnus Jacob Glaser moved from UCF to NYC after graduating in 2009 with a degree in interdisciplinary studies with minors in marketing and history. Glaser, who works as a wardrobe assistant in New York, spends his days styling models and assisting on photo shoots. Glaser said he has always had an appreciation for playing dress-up but had no idea that he could make a career out of it. The Central Florida Future had the opportunity to interview Glaser about his time at Vogue Japan, styling celebrities and life in the Big Apple.

In the July 7 issue of the Future, we incorrectly identified the drummer of Gorillafight as Kevin Sanchez. The drummer’s name is Kevin Collado. The Future regrets the error.

The Central Florida Future is the independent, studentwritten newspaper at the University of Central Florida. Opinions in the Future are those of the individual columnist and not necessarily those of the editorial staff or the University administration. All content is property of the Central Florida Future and may not be reprinted in part or in whole without permission from the publisher.

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Central Florida Future: Tell me a bit about yourself. Jacob Glaser: I am 23 years young, I have a terrible sweet tooth and the majority of my closet was purchased at thrift stores. Not to mention the fact that I truly believe that I was separated at birth from my other half, Beyoncé.

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CFF: When did you decide you wanted to be a stylist? Glaser: When I was working at Vogue Japan, I was exposed to the profession and realized there is nothing else I’d rather do. I went on to freelance on advertising campaigns for Bergdorf Goodman, Delta Air Lines and Banana Republic. CFF: When did you move to NYC? What was that like? Glaser: I moved to New York two weeks after I graduated. I was convinced I could find a place to live and a job within a week. In actuality, it took a month to find an apartment and two months before I was employed. CFF: How did you land your first styling job? Glaser: I found my first styling job through Craigslist. It pays to constantly check job listings online. CFF: What was it like to work at Vogue? Glaser: Mind-blowing. My first day in the office I saw the entire Givenchy couture collection. The clothes were spectacular, but there is so much more that goes into the magazine than I had ever considered while flipping through them before. I was most impressed by the collaboration of so many different departments that create and see a photo shoot through to fruition. It was a really moving moment when I held the first issue I worked on, knowing the amount of hard work so many put into it. CFF: Where do you work currently? Glaser: Gilt Groupe (gilt.com) as a wardrobe assistant. CFF: Describe a day in the life of your job. Glaser: On a daily basis, I am on set, styling products for the site. If we

— ASSOCIATED PRESS

CORRECTION

July 11, 2011 Vol 43, Issue 46 • 12 Pages

News Editor

Photo Editor

Katie Dees x213 Photo.CFF@gmail.com

Senior Staff Writer Jordan Snyder

Staff Writers

Camille Thomas, Jessie Kristof, Lacy Papadeas, Jordan Swanson, Tim Freed, Salo Steinvortz, Jessica Gillespie, Steven Ryzewski, Emon Reiser PHOTOS COURTESY OF JACOB GLASER

UCF alumnus Jacob Glaser moved from UCF to New York City after graduating in 2009.Glaser works as a wardrobe assistant and spends his days styling models and assisting on photo shoots.

Got a cool job? Let us know. news.cff@gmail.com are doing a “ready-to-wear” shoot, which is clothing shot on a model, I act as an assistant to the stylist. I prep the clothes, create the shotlists and dress the models. If I am on a “stilllife” shoot, I am styling the individual shots and the editorial for the brand. CFF: What is it like to live in NYC? Glaser: It is a very different environment. I really enjoy public transportation, I am so much more productive during my commute now; I’m able to read on the train, and now that it’s summer, I bike everywhere. I love that the city gives you the freedom to be who you want to be. CFF: How did your time at UCF help you with your current job? Glaser: My degree really emphasized individuality and versatility. This has come in quite handy, especially with working in an industry I had no schooling for. UCF taught me the importance of networking and to take advantage of every opportunity given to you. CFF: Have you ever styled celebrities?

Glaser: I’ve assisted on quite a few shoots with celebrities. I worked with Scarlett Johansson once, and she gave me really great advice on where to go shoe shopping in the city, although her recommendations were slightly out of my price range (like thousands out of my price range). CFF: What do you like most about your job? Glaser: There is never a dull moment. Every day presents new sets of challenges that stress the importance of teamwork, and we work together to overcome and inspire our customers with each photo shoot we create. CFF: Any predictions for fall fashion this year? Glaser: This fall, it looks like a lot several designers were inspired by Orlando’s very own Minnie Mouse, as polka dots covered many looks making their way down the runway. CFF: Do you have any advice for people thinking about working in the fashion industry? Glaser: My advice to those looking to get into the fashion industry is to start early. I wish I wouldn’t have waited to intern until my junior year of college. A degree is essential, but experience distinguishes you.

LOCAL WEATHER

High: 91º Low: 75º

Chance of rain 50 percent. Tonight: Isolated showers and thunderstorms.

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TODAY IN DETAIL Today Today: Scattered showers SCATTERED and thunderstorms. SSW T-STORMS winds around 7 mph.

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If you’re interested in writing for the Central Florida Future or have a story idea you would like to share, send an email to one of our staff editors.


www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

• July 11, 2011

A3

‘Love, Sex and the IRS’ cast moves at frenzied pace FROM A1 fessional actors is like.” The comedy tells the story of two unemployed male musicians living in New York City who have been filing tax returns as a married couple in order to save money, until an agent of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) goes to investigate the marriage. According to Niess, Love, Sex and the IRS is a farce, which is a comedy that uses crude and sometimes vulgar humor, containing a theme of mistaken identities and other ridiculous plot twists. It also moves at a frenzied pace toward a climax and requires an actor’s full attention and a great deal of physical stamina. The time constraint also meant less time to assemble a production and design team, which was responsible for organizing play components such as lighting, costumes, and sound. This sort of play could have proven difficult for the cast in the short amount of time they had to practice, and some of the eight UCF student actors involved had never acted in one before. “Farces are one of the most difficult plays to learn because they are so fast paced,” Niess said. “You can’t do a farce and slow down all of the reactions, slow down all of the motivations of the actors, or else the audience gets bored.” To freshman criminal justice major and play attendee, Danielle Barnes, the actors performed their roles with no signs of inexperience. “The acting was flawless,” Barnes said. “It seemed as if they weren’t even actors but rather people that happened to be themselves on stage.” This was Barnes’ first time watching a UCF play, and what captivated her attention the most was the acting, she said. The cast included professional actor Jason Nettle, an acting graduate student at UCF and member of the Actors Equity

PHOTOS BY KATIE DEES / CENTRAL FLORIDA FUTURE

Above left:Trevin Cooper plays IRS agent Floyd Spinner and Allison Walter plays Connie in the UCF Conservatory Theatre’s play Love,Sex and the IRS.Above right:Kelly Kilgore,who portrays Vivian Trachtman,readies herself to wake the slumbering Spinner during a scene of the fast-moving comedy performed in the UCF Black Box Theatre.

Association, who returned from New York City for this production. According to Nettle, one of the most difficult aspects of the play was working with actors not familiar with the pace of farces. He also cited the challenge as

one of his favorite parts of the experience. “Having people on a stage having to figure out the intensity of movement and organized chaos is not easy, but the process is fun and rewarding in the end,” Nettle said.

Nettle said that, as a professional actor, playing his role reminded him how acting is a constant learning process in how to become more comfortable with complex characters. Love, Sex and the IRS will run from July 7-17 on Thursdays-Sun-

days. The shows will begin at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday, and at 2 p.m. on Sundays. To purchase tickets or for ticket information, call the box office at (407) 823-1500 or visit the website at http://theatre.ucf.edu.


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www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

July 11, 2011 •

Final space connection: Atlantis docks at station MARCIA DUNN Associated Press

CAPE CANAVERAL — In a flight full of passion, Atlantis made the final docking in shuttle history Sunday, pulling up at the International Space Station with a year’s worth of supplies. The station’s naval bell chimed a salute as Atlantis docked 240 miles above the Pacific. “Atlantis arriving,” called out space station astronaut Ronald Garan Jr. “Welcome to the International Space Station for the last time.” “And it’s great to be here,” replied shuttle commander Christopher Ferguson. It’s the final docking to a space station ever by a NASA shuttle. Atlantis is being retired after this flight, the last of the 30year shuttle program. Excitement grew throughout the morning — in orbit and at Mission Control — as the miles melted between the two spacecraft with every circling of Earth. Every landmark, or rather spacemark, of this final two-week shuttle mission is being savored. Mission Control’s lead flight director, Kwatsi Alibaruho, declared “this is it” as he gave the OK for the historic linkup. This was the 46th docking by a space shuttle to a space station. Nine of those were to Russia’s Mir station back in the mid-1990s, with Atlantis making the very first. The U.S. and Russia built on that sometimes precarious experience to create, along with a dozen other nations, the world’s largest spacecraft ever: the permanently inhabited, finally completed, 12-yearold International Space Station. This time, Atlantis is delivering more than 4 tons of food, clothes and other space station provisions — an entire year’s worth, in fact, to keep the complex going in the looming post-shuttle era. Ferguson was at the controls as Atlantis drew closer, leading the smallest astronaut crew in decades. Only four are flying aboard Atlantis, as NASA kept the crew to a minimum in case of an emergency. In the unlikely event that Atlantis was seriously damaged, the shuttle astronauts would need to move into the space station for months and rely on Russian Soyuz capsules to get

back home. A shuttle always was on standby before for a possible rescue, but that’s no longer feasible with Discovery and Endeavour officially retired now. Two days into this historic voyage — the 135th in 30 years of shuttle flight — Atlantis was said by NASA to be sailing smoothly, free of damage. Sunday’s docking proved to be as flawless as Friday’s liftoff. As a safeguard, Atlantis performed the usual backflip for the space station cameras, before the linkup. The station astronauts used powerful zoom lenses to photograph all sides of the shuttle. Experts on the ground will scrutinize the digital images for any signs of damage that might have come from fuel-tank foam, ice or other launch debris. NASA, meanwhile, continued to bask in the afterglow of Friday’s liftoff. As part of Sunday morning’s mail to Atlantis, Mission Control sent up a 4-inch image of a shuttle made entirely of exclamation points. Flight controllers joked that the city of Philadelphia — Ferguson’s hometown — is arranging for Lincoln Financial Field to cut its turf in the shape of the crew’s mission patch. “The mayor was quoted as saying, ‘As long as the NFL lockout is still ongo-

ing and the Eagles aren’t playing, we might as well use the stadium for something,’” controllers wrote in the so-called news break. Atlantis and its crew will spend more than a week at the orbiting complex. The shuttle flight currently is scheduled to last 12 days, but NASA likely will add a 13th day to give the astronauts extra time

to complete all their chores. NASA is getting out of the launching-to-orbit business, giving Atlantis, Endeavour and Discovery to museums, so it can start working on human trips to asteroids and Mars. Private U.S. companies will pick up the more mundane job of space station delivery runs and, still several years out, astronaut ferry flights.

PHOTOS BY ASSOCIATED PRESS / NASA-TV

Space shuttle Atlantis performing a pitch maneuver as it closes in for one last docking at the International Space Station,Sunday,July 10.


www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

• July 11, 2011

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Community support fuels public broadcasting FROM A1 operate,” Heston said. The “Keep PBS in Orlando” campaign, an initiative to preserve public broadcasting in the area, has made a statewide effort to support WUCF-TV, Anna Eskamani, a senior political science major and co-creator of the campaign, said. Eskamani said “Keep PBS in Orlando” will help with fundraising in the fall and solicit donations as well as volunteers for WUCF-TV. “There’s always a reason to keep fighting. We’re definitely moving forward,” Eskamani said in reference to the campaign’s support of WUCF-TV. “We launched a petition with singup.org, as well as photo and video petitions, so we’ve been emailing people to sign the petition to get an override,” Eskamani said. “I’ve been able to send our promotional video to 26,000 people and have gotten good feedback.” National PBS stations that are affiliated with universities tend to be more successful than free standing stations, Heston said. Funding is expected from UCF, viewer and corporations. “Support from around the country has been great, and from the state,” Heston said. “We plan to listen to the community, hear what they want to see and what they want their channel to be. Ultimately, we want to adjust and create a channel that makes central Florida proud.” UCFTV, now a sub-channel of WUCF-TV, will likely be reinvented with a different mission and a new identity, Heston said. Heston said UCF’s existing relationship with BCC is very important, and that partnerships with the national PBS organization and Bright House Networks are incredibly helpful in WUCF-TV’s broadcast. According to Heston, their “energy, enthusiasm and knowledge have been helpful and a joy to work with.” Kate Junco, director of mar-

keting and media relations for Brevard Community College, agrees. “The best part of the past few months has been combining the strengths and talents of both institutions together to form something even greater than we could have realized on our own,” Junco said. Heston also credited President John C. Hitt and Brevard Community College for keeping up with the commitment, one which allows more families, like that of UCF alumnus Kian Shafie, to spend more time at home watching family-friendly broadcasting. “It’s nice to be able to watch Saturday evening comedy with the family. I think it’s important, especially for the kids who would watch the programs,” Shafie said. “Everyone has the opportunities to see those programs. I’m extremely happy and grateful that UCF has adopted PBS.” UCFTV and WUCF-TV are both available for students living on campus. Listings for local channels and cable providers can be found on wucftv.org.

COURTESY ANNA ESKAMANI

Anna Eskamani,senior political science major and co-creator of the “Keep PBS in Orlando”campaign,sports a pin at the UCF Board of Trustees meeting.

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www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

July 11, 2011 •

President Obama not giving up on debt deal LAURIE KELLMAN Associated Press

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama hasn’t given up on getting congressional leaders to accept a $4 trillion debt reduction deal that Republicans have rejected for its tax increases and Democrats dislike for its cuts to programs for seniors and the poor, administration officials said hours before talks resumed Sunday. “He’s not someone to walk away from a tough fight,” presidential chief of staff William Daley said. “Everyone agrees that a number around $4 trillion is the number that will ... make a serious dent in our deficit.” But House and Senate Republican leaders now say the largest of three proposals under consideration

would not pass the GOPled House because of its tax increases, an abrupt shift in negotiation over the terms of raising the nation’s debt ceiling before an Aug. 2 deadline. House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, announced late Saturday that he was rejecting that proposal. Heading into the talks at 6 p.m. EDT, the top Senate Republican, Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, suggested the deal was dead. “I think it is,” McConnell said. Raising taxes amid 9.2 percent unemployment, he added, “is a terrible idea. It’s a job killer.” The back-and-forth on the Sunday morning talk shows came hours before Obama and eight lawmakers of both parties were to convene at the White House over a plan to raise

CHRIS USHER / CBS NEWS / ASSOCIATED PRESS

U.S.Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner talks about the debt crisis on CBS’s “Face the Nation”in Washington Sunday,July 10.Geithner said Sunday that the Obama administration wants to seek “the biggest deal possible”on debt reduction.

the nation’s borrowing capacity from $14.3 trillion before next month’s deadline, when administration officials say the nation would default on its debts. Republicans have demanded that any plan to raise the borrowing limit be coupled with massive spending cuts to lighten the burden of government on the struggling economy. Higher taxes, Republicans have said from the start, are deal-killers if not offset elsewhere. But Obama has a long way to go to satisfy lawmakers in his own party, too. Many Democrats are unnerved by the president’s $4 trillion proposal because of its changes to Medicare and Medicaid. Political pain is part of the deal, too, and should be worth bearing, Daley said, adding that Obama was calling on lawmakers to “step up and be leaders.” He cast Obama as uninterested, for now, in two more modest proposals to raise the debt limit for a shorter time, in exchange for smaller spending cuts. But Daley and Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner used rhetoric that appeared to acknowledge the prospects for the $4 trillion deal could be in doubt. “We’re going to try to get the biggest deal possible,” Geithner said. He cautioned that a package about half the size of the one Obama prefers would be equally tough to negotiate because it, too, could require hundreds of billions in new tax revenue. Expectations for Sunday’s meeting took an abrupt turn after Boehner informed Obama that a package of about $2 trillion identified but not agreed to by bipartisan negotiators was more realistic.

In a statement, Boehner said: “Despite good-faith efforts to find common ground, the White House will not pursue a bigger debt reduction agreement without tax hikes.” A bipartisan group of lawmakers led by Vice President Joe Biden had already identified, but not signed off on, about $2 trillion in deficit reductions, most accomplished through spending cuts. “I believe the best approach may be to focus on producing a smaller measure, based on the cuts identified in the Biden-led negotiations, that still meets our call for spending reforms and cuts greater than the amount of any debt limit increase,” Boehner said. After holding a secret

meeting with Boehner last weekend, Obama and aides said they believed an even bigger figure was attainable if both parties made politically painful, but potentially historic, choices. A Republican official familiar with the discussions said taxes and the major health and retirement entitlement programs continued to be sticking points. Obama wanted Republicans to accept closing some corporate tax loopholes and subsidies to corporations, ending a tax friendly inventory accounting system for businesses, as well as reducing the value of tax deductions for wealthy taxpayers. A senior administration

official said the discussion on taxes broke down over the administration’s desire to have the wealthy pick up a bigger share of the tax revenue load than Republicans were willing to accept. The official, speaking on the condition of anonymity because of the sensitivity of the negotiations, said the $2 trillion to $2.4 trillion in deficit reduction identified by the Biden-led negotiations remains under negotiation and will also require some new tax revenue of up to $400 billion. Daley was on ABC’s “This Week,” McConnell appeared on “Fox News Sunday” and Geithner was interviewed on NBC’s “Meet the Press” and CBS’ “Face the Nation.”

COURTESY DR.LINDA WALTERS

UCF students monitor the progress of where oyster mats have been previously secured to preserve the shoreline.

Shoreline saviors turn to Indian River FROM A1 graduate student, was one of the many student volunteers at Turtle Mound. According to Devlin, she used her independent study with Walters to volunteer with the Turtle Mound project. Devlin was driven to volunteer due to the beauty of the shoreline, a love of the outdoors and a strong interest in shoreline restoration. “I thought it was cool to be a part of something much bigger,” Devlin said. According to Walters, all of the volunteers were delighted to be recognized for their efforts to save Turtle Mound, as they knew that the work they were doing for the environment was important. Jennifer Manis, a second-year graduate student in the biology program, used the efforts to reduce erosion at Turtle Mound as part of her thesis, “Living Shorelines in

Communities.” “Our project was basically to place ecologically friendly types of shoreline restoration to try to mitigate the erosion caused by boat wakes,” Manis said. Although Turtle Mound is now safe from erosion, there are still many more shell mid-

dens that need protection from the elements. Walters and Manis have already begun testing on other areas of the Indian River. “Many shorelines in the Indian River Lagoon are rapidly eroding due to boat wakes, wind wakes and sea level rise,” Walters said.


• July 11, 2011

www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

A7


Sports The Student Newspaper at UCF since 1968

NATIONAL

SPORTS

WRAP

www.CentralFloridaFuture.com • Monday, July 11, 2011

Baseball

Loss prevention

SOCCER

U.S.BEATS BRAZIL IN WOMEN’S WC SEMIFINALS

DRESDEN, Germany — The Americans are moving on to the semifinals after one of the most exciting games ever at the Women’s World Cup — winning 5-3 on penalty kicks after a 2-2 tie. Abby Wambach scored a thrilling goal Sunday to tie it in the 122nd minute, and former St. Louis Athletica goalkeeper Hope Solo denied the Brazilians again. The U.S. made its first three penalty kicks, and Cristiane and Marta easily matched them. But then it was Daiane’s turn, the same Daiane who’d given the U.S. a 1-0 lead with an own goal in the second minute. She tried to go near post, but Solo batted it away. The U.S. still had two more to make, but Megan Rapinoe buried a blast and Ali Krieger converted hers, too, sending the Americans racing onto the field in celebration. The U.S. plays France on Wednesday in the semifinals. Game two will feature Japan versus Sweden.

GOLF CFF ARCHIVE

Recruiting is in full swing for the Rooney-led Knights,who are looking to replace key players in the infield and in the pitching bullpen.Joe Mercadante,the Knights’new recruiting coordinator,is already on the job recruiting heavily looking for replacements to UCF’s losses.

With recruiting coordinator in place, Knights can fill holes ERIKA ESOLA Sports Editor

BRITISH OPEN WITHOUT MONTGOMERIE

INVERNESS, Scotland — The British Open will be without Colin Montgomerie next week for the first time since 1989 after the veteran Scot ran out of steam at the Scottish Open on Sunday. The former Europe Ryder Cup captain needed a top-five finish at Castle Stuart to stand a chance of making next week’s tournament in Sandwich, and he briefly held a share of the lead following a birdie at the par-5 No. 6. However, a disastrous double-bogey on the short 11th — which came after he missed the green with his tee shot and then fluffed a short chip — not only cost him a shot at victory in the Highlands but also an opportunity to seal his Open place. “It was going well and then I sort of ran out of puff,” he said. “It was always too soon, too short. So there you go. A week off next week.” After bogeys at Nos. 13 and 14, Montgomerie responded by making three straight birdies but a final-round 70 wasn’t enough. He must now wait until Lytham St. Anne’s in 2012 for another chance to win the Open. The closest the eight-time European Order of Merit champion has come to winning his home major was in 2005, when he finished second to Tiger Woods by five strokes at St. Andrews. He may never get as close again, but he vowed to continue giving it a go. “We’ll have to start again, that’s all we’ve got,” he said. After finishing the second round at Castle Stuart early on Sunday at 8 under — a target he had set for himself Saturday — to lie three shots off the pace, Montgomerie gave the home fans renewed hope with an eagle on the par-5 No. 2 to close in on the leaders. His birdie at No. 6 drew him alongside five others at the top of the leaderboard but that was as close as he came, finishing with a 10-under 206. Montgomerie slipped to No. 420 in the rankings during his two-year spell as Ryder Cup captain and is attempting to get back into the top 50. He is currently No. 285.

— ASSOCIATED PRESS

Although no games are being played, July is a crucial month for college baseball teams. It’s a last-minute scurry for recruiters seeking out unsigned, elite high school and junior college talent to fill the holes left from the MLB draft and graduation. After Knights head coach Terry Rooney picked Joe Mercadante as UCF’s new recruiting coordinator, the two immediately got to work recruiting for the Knights, attempting to fill major voids in the infield. UCF has lost starters at catcher, first base, third base and pitcher. Mercadante is currently on a recruiting trip for the Knights in Georgia, likely looking to build depth in the pitching bullpen and in the

infield. Although most of the Knights’ replacements will come from players already on the roster and will likely not see many freshmen playing as starters, UCF will have to look to add depth.

Catcher

Loss: Beau Taylor, fifth round, Oakland A’s Replacement: The Knights recruited local standout Tyler Marlette of Hagerty High School to replace Taylor. However, Marlette was drafted in the fifth round by the Seattle Mariners. If Marlette opts to sign professionally with the Mariners, the Knights will likely look to replace Taylor with Ryan Breen, who has previously seen time behind the

For more sports: www.UCFNews.com Twitter: @CFFsports plate. Mercadante is a former collegiate catcher and will work with and tutor Breen and Marlette (or any other freshman who comes in). If Marlette opts to stick with his original commitment to the Knights, he very well likely can be the lone freshman starter for the Knights on the diamond next season.

First base

Loss: Jonathan Griffin, 21st round, Arizona Diamondbacks Replacement: D.J. Hicks will likely step up and start

at first. Hicks was the designated hitter last season and has even seen time on the mound, but he will likely sharpen up at the position over the summer in the Cape Cod Summer League and replace Griffin. Playing at first base will also greatly improve Hicks’ draft stock. Despite being a Dick Howser Award finalist, he went undrafted. Mercadante will have to look to fill Hicks’ spot in the lineup at DH.

Third base

Loss: Derek Luciano, 44th round, Arizona Diamondbacks Replacement: Chris Taladay has seen time at third base before and can be a viable option for the Knights if Mercadante and Rooney are unable to scoop up a recruit. If he does not replace Luciano at third, Taladay,

PLEASE SEE PITCH-

ING ON A9


www.CentralFloridaFuture.com

• July 11, 2011

A9

Women’s World Cup shows entertainment value in sport Like any sports fanatic, ESPN is usually the channel that my TV is set to. There aren’t too many sports on TV, being that it’s July, so I’ve been watching the FIFA Women’s World Cup. Truthfully, I don’t typically watch or follow women’s sports, but one day I had nothing better to do and tuned in to a match between the United States and Colombia. Twelve minutes into the match, Heather O’Reilly ripped a gorgeous ball past the Colombian keeper into the back of the net. O’Reilly’s goal had me hooked and convinced. Fast forward to the quarterfinals. The match between Brazil and U.S., despite the awful officiating, was one of the most epic World Cup matches I’ve seen, men’s or women’s. Between Brazil’s Marta and her beautiful Brazilian play, Hope Solo’s brilliant saves and Abby Wambach’s game-tying header to bring the match into penalties, it was a game for the ages. So when the U.S.‘s Ally Krieger drilled the matchwinning penalty kick against Brazil’s keeper to advance to the semifinals of the World Cup, I realized something: soccer is the most entertaining professional women’s sport. Not golf, basketball or tennis. Why is ESPN shoving the WNBA down our throats and not WPS — Women’s Professional Soccer? I’d rather watch a game between the Western New York Flash and magicJack of Boca Raton featuring Marta, Alex Morgan and Solo over Diana Taurasi unsuccessfully attempting to dunk with a much smaller basketball than males use. Women’s soccer uses the same size net and ball

ERIKA ESOLA Sports Editor

as men’s, which, if anything, makes it more difficult for women to play. According to Grant Wahl of Sports Illustrated, shorter and smaller goal keepers in women’s soccer give an idea of what larger goals in a men’s game would look like. There is more space available vertically for goal-scorers, and goal keepers have to be able to make more acrobatic saves. I’ve also observed that women’s soccer players take significantly fewer dives than males, which calls for a more entertaining match. The talent discrepancy is obvious between the NBA and the WNBA; players in the WNBA simply aren’t as fast as NBA players, can’t jump as high or dunk. But is the talent discrepancy as obvious between the WPS and the, let’s say, MLS? I don’t think so. According to Sports Illustrated, women’s soccer is more competitive and more watched than ever, averaging record viewership of millions in the U.S. during the World Cup. For a comparison, the WNBA averages about 400,000 viewers per game. All things considered, ESPN needs to look into a television contract with the WPS. The Women’s World Cup has been extremely entertaining so far and has proven something significant to sports fans across the U.S. — women’s sports can be entertaining.

MICHAEL PROBST / ASSOCIATED PRESS

The U.S.team celebrates after United States' Heather O Reilly,2nd right,scored the opening goal during the group C match between the U.S.and Colombia at the Women’s Soccer World Cup in Sinsheim,Germany,Saturday,July 2.

PETR DAVID JOSEK / ASSOCIATED PRESS

United States goalkeeper Hope Solo jumps in celebration after the U.S.won in a penalty shootout the quarterfinal match between Brazil and the U.S.at the Women’s Soccer World Cup.

Pitching staff to look very different FROM A8 a utility player, will either see time behind the plate, in the outfield or at DH.

Pitcher

Losses: Danny Winkler, 20th round, Colorado Rockies

Chase Bradford, 35th round, New York Mets Nick Cicio, Free agent, Minnesota Twins Replacements: Along with losing Winkler, Bradford and Cicio to the pros, the Knights also lost four more pitchers to graduation. However, the

Knights will be fine at pitcher. Rooney and Mercadante will heavily recruit the position and have a valuable ace in Chris Matulis to use next year. Matulis, who sat out last year after transferring from LSU, was drafted in

the 29th round by the St. Louis Cardinals despite not having played a game. Matulis will likely start on Friday nights. The Knights pitching staff will look very different next season, but will be headlined by new faces with pro-potential.


Opinions

www.CentralFloridaFuture.com • Monday, July 11, 2011

The Student Newspaper at UCF since 1968

OUR STANCE

Obesity trend needs trimming A

dult obesity is becoming a serious problem, but it’s one that we can work toward fixing. An annual report from the Trust for America’s Health and the Robert Wood Foundation finds that adult obesity rates have increased in 16 states and not declined in a single one. The report, titled “F as in Fat: How Obesity Threatens America’s Future,” shows that in 38 states, more than 25 percent of the population is obese. What makes it worse is that the problem has grown consistently over the past two decades. Twenty years ago, no state had an obesity rate higher than 15 percent, according to the Washington Post. The new figures for the 38 states show an alarming trend that we need to combat in order to keep Americans healthy. Those who suffer from obesity run a series of risks to their health. According to the National Cancer Institute, obesity increases the risk of coronary heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes. The Institute says that it also increases the risk of cancers of the breast, endometrium, colon, kidney and esophagus. The trend can be changed, but it will require a focus on education. Accord-

ing to the Post, more than 33 percent of adults who earned less than $15,000 a year were obese, compared with 24.6 percent of those who made at least $50,000 a year. Also, nearly 33 percent of adults that did not graduate from high school are obese, compared with 21.5 percent of those who graduated from college or technical college, according to the Post. These numbers clearly show that education is an important factor in fighting obesity. Higher levels of education and training mean better paying jobs, and these individuals are more likely to have time to cook food at home or invest in healthier choices. One possible reason for this is that those with less means find themselves buying inexpensive meals that are not healthy. State governments will also have to step in and make sure that government aid is not directed toward unhealthy items. One unfortunate example comes from Kentucky, which is currently the seventh-fattest state in the country, according to the Glasgow Daily Times. The state is currently being lobbied by Yum!, the parent company of Kentucky Fried Chicken, to allow residents to be able to buy fast food

with food stamps. Supporters of this idea argue that having food stamps go to fast food restaurants helps those who don’t live near grocery stores but still need to feed their families. Also, there are not restrictions on these stamps to stop people from buying unhealthy food at grocery stores. State governments will have to address this issue, as well as provide nutritional training to families so that they know the healthier options available to them. Education and nutritional training alone won’t do the trick though. We all will have to take it upon ourselves to be more physically active. The National Cancer Institute finds that the chief causes of obesity are a sedentary lifestyle and the excess consumption of high-calorie foods. In order to turn obesity rates around, people will have to make these changes on their own, but there is much that we can do as a country to move this process along. Fighting obesity will improve the health of our citizens. It is vitally important that we make this a national priority if we are to get serious about bending the cost curve on health care in America.

Keep space alive in the Sunshine State When President John tinued the shuttle proF. Kennedy chose to go to gram for 39 years, and in the moon in 1961, the that time we have sucSunshine State instantly ceeded in doing almost became the place for nothing. Two crews have space. Within that been lost in fatal accidecade, Florida experidents, and an Internationenced population growth, al Space Station (ISS) has a technological boom and been built, but it circles a major landscape the planet in low-Earth change. Indeed, the citrus orbit — a distance lacking ANNA ESKAMANI groves, sandbars and ambition to be blunt. It Guest Columnist swamps of Melbourne should also be noted that were quickly transformed ISS is scheduled to be deinto major launch sites — ones that orbited in 2020. Back in 2003, the would propel humans and their shuttle program had been deemed rockets past the Earth’s atmosphere, “old, unsafe and costly” by The Econonto the moon and toward the stars. omist. It was Florida’s Space Coast that I have no intention of discrediting fueled the American dream of doing the space program’s crews or engibig things — not because they were neers. Nor do I intend to ignore the easy, but because they were hard. jobs that will be lost in Florida with But now, as the retirement of the the program’s ending. By contrast, I space shuttle program is before us, feel that space exploration is we are forced to ask — what’s next extremely important and necessary for human space exploration? for a strong nation and economy. Before we look into the future, we I actually grew up right here in need to look back into the past. In Orlando. My dad, a UCF graduate, 1958, President Dwight D. Eisenhow- was once employed near the Space er and the U.S. Congress passed the Coast. Watching the shuttle launches National Aeronautics and Space Act. from my bedroom window was a It was the Soviet Union’s successful family tradition, and hearing the launch of the world’s first man-made sonic boom when the shuttle landed satellite, Sputnik, that enticed the was even better. Going to space is U.S. government to do so. The Space the American way, and if you ask felAct authorized the creation of the low Americans, they would agree National Aeronautics and Space with me — in fact, the majorities in Administration, more commonly nearly all demographic groups say it known as NASA. is essential that the U.S. continue to As we already know, former U.S. be at the vanguard of space exploastronaut Neil Armstrong took one ration. giant leap for mankind in 1969, Exploring the depths of space has becoming the first man to walk on both scientific and symbolic importhe moon. With its moon mission tance, and if we are to keep moving now accomplished, NASA needed a forward in the space industry, then new project. And with a lack of we need to consider privatizing direction came budget cuts, forcing NASA, at least to a point. Undenithe Administration to conjure some ably, history has shown that Conidea for human space exploration, gress is not going to pay for innovasoon to be known as the space shuttion or entrepreneurship — but tle. companies like SpaceX and Virgin A spacecraft without a real misGalactic will. sion, the shuttle program was an We cannot deny that the space unpopular one from the start. shuttle’s retirement is going to have Designed to be a reusable truck that terrible short-term impacts on an would make the business of putting already depressed economy and people into orbit on a regular basis, unemployment rate. However, in the many felt that the shuttle program long term, the Sunshine State will would only produce a broader, remain the place for space. It won’t vaguer — and in many ways — be easy, but then again, we’re known more difficult mode of space flight. for doing things because they’re Despite the doubts, NASA conhard.

ED SHENEMAN / TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICE

Was justice served in Casey Anthony case? Shock and awe sumher daughter Caylee, she marized the sentiments did not “pay the penalty” of my co-workers, half of for her actions. Since this whom were stuffed into view is so common, one room, as they lismany readers at this tened to the verdict in point might say, “There! the Casey Anthony trial. Question answered. I I too could feel anger and should be pissed about disappointment welling Casey’s situation.” up inside of me because But wait, is lex talionis of the decision. really a good idea? Do we KEVIN DUPREE Eventually, however, really think that if, for Guest Columnist this anger turned into a example, a criminal rapes question that, on the face someone, that the crimiof it, is absurd, but upon further nal should be raped? Should a torreflection, is immensely interesting turer be tortured? American Uniand important: was Anthony’s versity professor of philosophy acquittal necessarily unjust? Jeffrey Reiman, by the way, made This question is interesting even this point in “Justice, Civilization if we assume that Anthony was and the Death Penalty.” It’s unlikely guilty. The answer hinges on what that we actually think that these we mean when we say “unjust.” punishments are good ideas, so perThis, of course, raises a timeless haps justice isn’t as simple as we question: what is justice? This “sim- thought. This point certainly does ple” question has perplexed not spell doom for any (modified) philosophers for ages, and being a retributive theory, but it may make student of philosophy, I’m naturally us wonder if there is another way of interested in such questions. looking at justice. This question is not just for The gist of the rehabilitationist those who have their heads stuck in view is this: exercising justice is the clouds. It is a question for legal about making us just individuals. and medical experts and for entre- Sometimes it’s necessary that we preneurs and their employees, all of punish individuals in order for whom must determine what is just them to become just. Think, for from their own unique perspective. example, about a parent disciplinIt is also a question for citizens of a ing a child. A child may be placed in nation that fought for its independ- time-out if he or she takes a toy ence because its motherland was from another child. This act is “deaf to the voice of justice,” and for intended to teach the child not to human beings everywhere who rec- unjustly take from others. In the ognize their dignity. This is a ques- rehabilitationist view, then, punishtion for you and me. ing criminals out of justice works So, let’s ask: what is justice? To the same way as punishing a child attempt to settle this question in to teach them proper behavior. this brief opinion piece would kind I am not sure which of these of be like trying to find parking in views is correct, but now I am finalGarage B at noon during the first ly in a position to say what I’ve week of UCF’s fall semester, but we wanted to say all along: If the rehacan at least examine two answers to bilitationist view of justice is corthe question. One view is often rect, and if Anthony has become a called the “retributive view” of jus- just person through her experitice. Another view is often referred ences in jail and in court, then perto as the “rehabilitationist view.” I haps we can find justice in her suspect that if the second view is acquittal. It is tempting to think she correct, then it is possible that is an egotistical moral monster, and Anthony’s acquittal could be just, there is no chance that these events but I am getting ahead of myself. had any influence on her. Let’s unpack what these views But I am almost certain that we entail first. do not know this for certain. We do We have all heard this before: an not have eyes that can peer with eye for an eye, and a tooth for a perfect perspicacity into a person’s tooth. This is basically the retribu- psyche. Only time will tell, but I, for tive view of justice. In this view, jus- one, would much rather hope that tice is about satisfying lex talionis, justice has been served, and Antho“the law of retaliation.” If you kill a ny has been transformed into a betmember of society, society kills you. ter human being than to let those On this view, Anthony’s acquittal initial feelings of anger and disapwasn’t just because, if she did kill pointment prevail.

ON UCFNEWS.COM

WHAT YOU ARE SAYING

passed or not means nothing, the debt issue and immigration have nothing to do with symbolic bills, they have to do with a voting block Whats the deal with all the frat that doesn’t educate itself so all they demand is “lower taxes” or “don’t guys looking condescendingly at the camera instead of smiling? Are take away my medicare!” without ever thinking about the issue. The they just trying to be a parody of politicians that are in there are the themselves? ones we elect, if you don’t like it — ANONYMOUS vote for people that get stuff done.

Greek GPA hits all-time high

— BRYAN Nice girls finish last; ‘queen bees’ get paid Nursing student rocks Maybe it’s because women are hard with Gorillafight

emotional and prone to irrational outbreaks?

AAAWWWEESSOOMMEE!!! MICHAEL YOU”RE AMAZING — ANONYMOUS AND THE COOL THING IS WE’VE ALWAYS KNOWN THIS :)

Symbolic bills impede progress Whether or not these bills are

— HALA KHALAF

Just awesome! — JOSHUA CHAMPION


Classifieds

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2

3 9 7

6

4 9

8 2 5 8 3 4 3 7 2 5 9 8 3 1 7 5 9 2 7 3 4 6

Fill in the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains the digits 1 through 9 with no repeats. Monday puzzle: Easy level Thursday puzzle: Hard level

Solution, tips and computer program at www.sudoku.com

CROSSWORD ACROSS 1 Cookie quantity 6 Partner of a mani, salon-wise 10 “Dancing Queen” group 14 Hawaiian hi 15 Neural conductor 16 Area outside the city, briefly 17 Rhetorical question on a sultry day 20 Appear to be 21 Illness suffix 22 Blood lines 23 Enjoy a chaise longue, say 25 Subtlety 26 Shellfish order 31 Striped cat 32 __ polloi 33 Deck swabbers 37 Cavity fillers’ org. 38 Pitcher’s malady 42 Tennis do-over 43 “Sexual Healing” singer Marvin 45 Meaning of a wd. 46 Shrek’s love 48 Off one’s rocker 52 Boutonniere spots 55 Striped fish 56 Earthy tone 57 Lion’s den 59 West Point, e.g.: Abbr. 63 What you’re solving (in more ways than one, based on the starts of 17-, 26-, 38- and 48Across) 66 Lottery-like game 67 Look at leeringly 68 Italian white wine 69 Original sin site 70 Carpenter’s supply 71 U.S.-Canada defense acronym DOWN 1 Scroogean outbursts 2 Natural balm 3 Shopping bag 4 Class with flasks and beakers 5 Solo in “Star Wars” 6 Stopped briefly

By Ed Sessa

7 Vet 8 Homer Simpson outbursts 9 Having one flat, musically 10 How lovers walk 11 Poker tournament entrance fee 12 Rodeo bucker 13 Nasty treatment 18 Slimy stuff 19 Latin egg 24 Writers Lowell and Tan 25 Neet rival 26 Party without women 27 Exclamation with a flourish 28 Cybermarketplace 29 Master slicers and dicers 30 Hawaii’s Mauna __ 34 Scads 35 Russo of “Get Shorty” 36 Marquee luminary 39 Las Vegas numbers 40 “The Crying Game” actor Stephen

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41 Advanced degs. for writers 44 “Nature” author 47 “What craziness!” 49 Brewpub pints 50 Tolerated 51 Heavenly music maker 52 “Social contract” philosopher John 53 Like a big landowner

7/11/11

54 Call up 57 Nike’s Swoosh, e.g. 58 Folk singer Guthrie 60 Drug kingpin 61 Edison’s middle name 62 Ownership document 64 “Golly!” 65 Mil. branch with ships

Solution and new puzzles in next issue’s Classifieds


A12

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July 11, 2011 •


CFF, 7.11.11