Page 13

By Any Means Necessary

13

Imperialism and Black Migration at the Border of the U.S. Empire Maria Fernandez

The forced movement of Black bodies across borders and geographies has been a fundamental strategy of the global white supremacist project. From the kidnapping and enslavement of over 13 million Africans through the trans-Atlantic slave trade, to the wars, military interventions and destabilization of Black nationstates, the U.S. Empire and its allies have created the immigration crisis at its southern door. The mainstream narrative of those migrating to the U.S./Mexican border, who are fleeing violence and war, who are seeking asylum, and who are being targeted, arrested and detained in inhumane private detention facilities has once again erased Black people from the diaspora. This erasure of forced Black migration is dangerous – it absolves the U.S. (and its allies) of all the ways neoliberal foreign polices and military backed coup d’Êtats manipulate Black people's economic, social, and political movement – both metaphorical and literal. No other Black nation is more of a testament to the devastation of U.S. imperialism than Haiti. After the Hai-tian Revolution, the United States and France ensured the first free Black Nation would never have the eco-nomic and political stability to thrive and lead the Caribbean against colonization, imperialism, and racial capitalism. Under the 19-year military occupation from 1915-1934, the U.S. took control over Haitian financ-es, customs, police, public works, and medical services – backing violent corrupt regime after violent corrupt regime. The U.S. Empire secured its interests and the interest of multinational corporations – the exploitation of the Haitian people and their resources. This has created massive political and economic turmoil, civil unrest and uprisings, a militarized police, which for decades forced hundreds of thousands of Haitians to migrate. Through Central America and up to the U.S./Mexican border is the newest route for Haitian immigrants. According to a report by the Black Alliance for Just Immigration entitled “Black Lives at the Border,â€? a total of 19,000 migrants arrived to Mexico in 2016 from Africa and Haiti. Approximately 7,000 Haitian immigrants are now residing in several border towns in Mexico.1 Just last year, 3000 Haitian migrants made the journey to Tijuana, Mexico. This past June, footage of a Haitian mother trapped in a makeshift detention center in Tapachula (in southern Mexico) went viral. In the video she's pleading for food for her starving children.2 She was one of hundreds of Haitian and African immigrants who rioted demanding food, water, medical attention and stream-lined immigration processes. It is no surprise that the same violent, racist, inhumane conditions deployed onto Central and South American migrants, which are protested in the U.S., are deployed by the Mexican state against Haitian and African migrants. America’s tentacles and anti-Black racism have no borders. Similarly, in 2018, Mexican officials saw 3,000 African migrants from Cameroon, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Angola seeking entry into the United States.3 According to the United Nations’ Refugee Agency, Congolese make up the third largest new refugee population in the world. We would be foolish to not recognize the linkages between the current socio-economic conditions in the Congo and the CIA backed and Belgian government orchestrated assassination of the Pan-African revolutionary nationalist leader Patrice Lumumba. Once again, the U.S. Empire secured its interests – to control Central Africa from communism during the Cold War. After Lumumba’s assassination, the U.S. supported Mobutu Sese Seko’s (Jospeph Mobutu) rise to military dictatorship, reigning over 30 years of violence, corruption, and human rights abuses. After Mobutu’s exile and assassination, wars and conflicts forced over 600,000 Congolese to migrate to escape hunger and violence.  %ODFN$OOLDQFHIRU-XVW,PPLJUDWLRQÂł%ODFN/LYHVDWWKH%RUGHU´KWWSVWDWHRIEODFNLPPLJUDQWVFRPZSFRQWHQWXSORDGV  0LUURU8.KWWSVZZZEODFNOLYHVDWWKHERUGHUILQDOSGIPLUURUFRXNQHZVZRUOGQHZVPLJUDQWPXPEHJVKHOSSOHDVH  $WODQWD%ODFN6WDUKWWSVDWODQWDEODFNVWDUFRPZK\QRRQHLVGLVFXVVLQJWKHULVHLQDIULFDQVPLJUDQWVSLOHGDWXVPH[LFRERUGHU

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By Any Means Necessary, Volume 1, Issue 3  

Black August Edition

By Any Means Necessary, Volume 1, Issue 3  

Black August Edition

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